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Dictionary of American 
Naval Aviation Squadrons 

Volume I 

The History of VA, VAH, VAK, VAL, VAP 

and VFA Squadrons 



Roy A. Grossnick 




Naval Historical Center 
Department of the Navy 
Washington, D.C., 1995 



Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data 

Grossnick, Roy A. 

Dictionary of American Naval Aviation Squadrons / by Roy A. 
Grossnick. 
p. cm. 

Contents: v. 1. The history of VA, VAH, VAK, VAL, VAP, and 
VFA squadrons 

ISBN 0-945274-29-7 (v. 1) 

1. United States. Navy— Aviation— History. 2. Airplanes, 
Military— United States— History. I. Naval Historical Center 
(U.S.) II. Title. III. Title: American naval aviation 
squadrons. 
VG93.G76 1995 

359.9'434'0973-dc20 94-35647 



Secretary of the Navy's 
Advisory Committee on Naval History 



William D. Wilkinson, Chairman 
CAPT Edward L Beach, USN (Retired) 
David R. Bender 
John C. Dann 
RADM Russell W. Gorman, USNR (Retired) 

Richard L. Joutras 
VADM William P. Lawrence, USN (Retired) 
Vera D. Mann 
Ambassador J. William Middendorf II 
VADM Gerald E. Miller, USN (Retired) 
Clark G. Reynolds 
Betty M. Unterberger 



About the Author 



Rc 



kOY A. GROSSNICK is currently a historian 
and head of the Naval Aviation History Office, a 
branch of the Naval Historical Center. He gradu- 
ated from Wisconsin State University, Stevens 
Point, where he earned a Bachelor of Science in 
history in 1970. In 1972, Mr. Grossnick complet- 
ed a Master of Arts in history at the University 
of Wisconsin, Madison. He served in the Navy 
on active duty for ten years. Following his sepa- 
ration from military service, Mr. Grossnick 
worked at the Smithsonian's National Air and 
Space Museum. In 1980, he assumed the histori- 
an position in the Naval Aviation History Office. 
He has written numerous articles for Naval 
Aviation News magazine and was the author of 

the monograph Kite Balloons to Airships ... the Navy's Lighter-than-Air Experience, 
Volume 4 in a commemorative collection published in 1986 to mark the 75th anniversary 
of naval aviation. 

Mr. Grossnick resides in Chevy Chase, Maryland, with his wife, Mary, and daughter Maki. 




Mr. Grossnick resides in Chevy Chase, Maryland, 
with his wife, Mary, and daughter Maki. 



v 



Contents 



Foreword / ix 
Preface / xi 
Acknowledgments / xiii 

Chapter 1 

The Evolution of Aircraft Class and Squadron 
Designation Systems / 1 

Chapter 2 

Attack Squadron Histories (VA) / 17 

VA-lEtoVA-873 
Chapter 3 

Heavy Attack Squadron Histories (VAH) / 295 

VAH-8toVAH-123 
Chapter 4 

Tactical Aerial Refueling Squadron Histories (VAK) / 303 

VAK-208 to VAK-308 
Chapter 5 

Light Attack Squadron H istory (VAL) / 307 

VAL-4 

Chapter 6 

Heavy Photographic Squadron Histories (VAP) / 309 

VAP-61 to VAP-62 

Chapter 7 

Strike Fighter Squadron Histories (VFA) / 317 

VFA-15 to VFA-305 



vii 



Title Page 

Appendix 1 Aircraft Data— Technical Information and Drawings 443 

Appendix 2 Aircraft Carrier Listing for CV, CVB, CVA, CVAN, 517 

CVN, CVL, and CVE Designations 

Appendix 3 Carrier Deployments by Year 521 

Appendix 4 U.S. Navy Squadron Designations and Abbreviations 537 

Appendix 5 How to Trace Squadron Lineage 541 

Appendix 6 Lineage Listing for VA, VA(AW), VAH, VA(HM), VAK, 543 

VAL, VAP, and VFA Designated Squadrons 

Appendix 7 Types of Aircraft Listed in Squadron Histories 551 

Glossary of Abbreviations and Terms 553 

Bibliography 557 

Index of Squadron Histories and Aircraft Data 561 



viii 



Foreword 



^3 REAT CREDIT IS DUE TO ROY GROSSNICK and 
his expert staff in the Naval Historical Center's 
Aviation History Branch for initiating a new publica- 
tion series entitled the Dictionary of American Naval 
Aviation Squadrons. The first volume of that series, 
which we are now publishing, includes approximately 
140 histories and other data covering every squadron 
in the attack (VA) and strike fighter (VFA) communities 
from the time the first of these commands (VA-35) was 
established in 1934. This publication may be com- 
pared to the Dictionary of American Naval Fighting 
Ships, a nine-volume compilation of individual ship 
histories published by the Naval Historical Center 
between 1959 and 1991. Now, at long last, a basic ref- 
erence work is under preparation that provides similar 
data for aviation commands. 

Subsequent volumes in this series will cover other 
components of naval aviation. At the present time, the 
Aviation History Branch is preparing a follow-on vol- 
ume containing histories of all patrol squadrons of the 
U.S. Navy. This task is in addition to the many other 
duties that office handles, including the writing of arti- 



cles for Naval Aviation News and responding to an 
increasingly heavy load of official and unofficial 
requests for information on all aspects of aviation his- 
tory. 

History is a useful subject for the Navy for several 
reasons. Insofar as it represents the sum total of the 
Navy's experience, it is an essential subject for study 
by naval professionals. History also is a means of giv- 
ing an account to the American people of the activities 
of their Navy. Finally, since history allows naval per- 
sonnel to learn about the origins, achievements, and 
traditions of their commands and of the Navy as a 
whole, it is a powerful means to promote naval 
morale. The Navy's historians publish the first volume 
with all of these purposes in mind. We hope this vol- 
ume with be of interest and use to the active-duty 
Navy and to many other individuals interested in this 
nation's rich naval heritage. 



Dean C. Allard 

Director of Naval History 



ix 



Preface 



^ThE DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION 
SQUADRONS, the first of a multivolume series, pro- 
vides a brief history, by community, of every squadron 
the Navy has established since the evolution of the 
squadron concept in the post-World War I era. The 
information and format selected to tell the story of 
each squadron was developed from a pattern of com- 
mon reference questions. The nature of the squadron 
data lends itself to a variety of formats for most entries 
in the squadron histories instead of a straight narrative 
style. The dictionary, written primarily for use as a ref- 
erence work, states concise facts about each squadron 
that provide a better understanding of the contribu- 
tions made by naval aviation squadrons in service to 
their country. 

Naval aviation is primarily a twentieth century devel- 
opment and has become an important element of U.S. 
sea power. It is part of the technological revolution that 
has been the hallmark of the twentieth century. The air- 
craft, weapons systems and associated technical equip- 
ment, combined with the men and women assigned to 
the squadrons, are instrumental to its success. 

Each squadron history begins with a lineage section 
that starts with the date of establishment. It also 
includes any redesignations and disestablishment date 
if applicable. The squadron's establishment date may 
be equated to a ship's commissioning and the history 
for a squadron or ship begins on that date. When a 
squadron is redesignated, there is no break in the his- 
tory of that squadron. The history of a squadron cov- 
ers the period from its establishment to its disestablish- 
ment, regardless of how many redesignations it 
undergoes. Redesignations can cause confusion when 
tracing the lineage of a squadron. For more informa- 
tion on how to trace squadron lineages, please refer to 
Appendix 5. 

A short description and photograph for all officially 
approved insignia used by a squadron follows the lin- 
eage section. The chronology narrates the squadron's 
important operational events and developments. The 



remaining six sections pertain to the evolutionary his- 
tory of the squadron and includes listings of home 
port assignments, commanding officers, aircraft assign- 
ments, overseas deployments, air wing assignments 
and major unit awards. 

This first volume covers the attack and strike fighter 
communities and includes VA (attack squadron), VAH 
(heavy attack squadron), VAK (tactical aerial refueling 
squadron), VAL (light attack squadron), VAP (heavy 
photographic squadron) and VFA (strike fighter 
squadron). Although VAK and VAP did not have a pri- 
mary mission of offensive and defensive air-to-surface 
operations, they are included here because these 
squadrons operated attack-designated planes, such as 
the AJ-2 and the A-3 and its derivatives. The squadron 
histories in this volume cover only those squadrons 
that are currently designated VA or VFA or those that 
had the VA, VAH, VAK, VAL, VAP and VFA designations 
when they were disestablished. Any attack squadron 
redesignated VF, VS, RVAH, VAQ or VAW that did not 
revert back to VA is not in this volume. The lineage 
listing in Appendix 6 provides a cross reference list for 
all squadrons that may have had the VA, VA(AW), VAH, 
VA(HM), VAK, VAL, VAP and VFA designation. 

Reserve squadron histories begin in 1970 following 
the reorganization of the Naval Air Reserve Force. 
Prior to that time reserve air squadrons were not per- 
manently assigned aircraft. During weekend drills they 
used aircraft from their local naval air station. This pre- 
1970 organizational system, combined with the fact 
that these squadrons provided no permanent historical 
records, makes it difficult to trace its activities. Hence, 
histories on reserve squadrons prior to 1970 cover 
only those squadrons called to active duty and 
assigned their own aircraft. 

Histories for active squadrons cover the period from 
establishment up through 1990, an arbitrary cutoff 
date. If a squadron was redesignated or disestablished 
after 1990, its history is updated to its redesignation or 
disestablishment date. 



xi 



Most illustrations used in the book are official U.S. 
Navy photographs unless otherwise identified. If avail- 
able, a photograph is included for each major type of 
aircraft operated by a squadron. 

Extensive appendices not only provide additional 
statistical material but also help to clarify or explain 
the Navy's unique organization and use of acronyms 
or designations. 

When drafting a reference work with such an exten- 
sive range of data, it is almost impossible to prevent 
errors. An exhaustive effort was made to check the 



compilation of material presented in this book. When 
different sets of records or sources provided conflict- 
ing dates, I attempted to select the most accurate one 
based on my research. In some cases only a specific 
year could be determined. As the writer and major 
compiler of the data for this volume, I accept full 
responsibility for any mistakes or errors of fact or mis- 
interpretations that may have occurred in the book, 
and I welcome any corrections. 

Roy A. Grossnick 



xii 



Acknow ledgments 



I CONCEIVED THIS BOOK AFTER eight years of 
working in the Naval Aviation History Office. A com- 
mon request received by the office was for a complete 
history of a particular squadron. Realizing the need for 
a history of all naval aviation squadrons prompted the 
development of a format that would meet the require- 
ments posed by the Navy and most people requesting 
information on a squadron. Using the Dictionary of 
American Fighting Ships as an example of an excellent 
primary reference source, I patterned my approach 
along lines similar to that series. 

I am very grateful for the guidance and support pro- 
vided by many individuals and organizations that were 
instrumental in making this book possible. The initial 
support I received from Captain Steven U. Ramsdell, USN 
(Ret.), former Director, Naval Aviation History and 
Publications Division, in getting this project off the 
ground was one of the keys to the successful completion 
of the book. He provided valuable comments in his 
reviews of the draft histories. His successors, Commander 
Stephen R. Silverio, USN (Ret.) and Commander Michael 
S. Lipari, continued in his footsteps, providing review 
recommendations as well as support for the project. 

The personnel in the Naval Aviation History Office, 
Ms. Gwen Rich, Ms. Judith Walters and Mr. Steven Hill, 
were my prime supporters in writing the book. Special 
thanks go to Mr. John M. Elliott, retired historian from the 
office, for his recommendations, and providing the air- 
craft line drawings for Appendix 1, as well as other assis- 
tance in getting the book ready for publication. The staff 
from the Naval Aviation News Branch, filled the editorial 
role. The manuscript was reviewed several times by Mrs. 
Sandy Russell and Ms. Joan A. Frasher. Mr. Charles C. 
Cooney provided design support for the squadron for- 
mat, as well as extensive photographic support. 

I would also like to recognize Naval Historical Center 
offices that made their records available. First, and fore- 
most, was the Operational Archives Branch. Mrs. 
Kathleen M. Lloyd and members of her Research and 
Reference Section, as well as Mrs. Judith W. Short, were 
always willing to make that extra effort to find the doc- 
uments I needed for the book. Mr. John C. Reilly and 



the Ships' Histories Branch was always there to provide 
documentation regarding a particular carrier. The staff 
of the Navy Department Library was particularly helpful 
when I reviewed their collection of cruise books. The 
Photographic Section of the Curator Branch, particularly 
Mr. Edwin C. Finney, Jr., was always responsive to my 
needs for particular aircraft photographs. The services 
provided by Ms. Sandra J. Doyle, the Naval Historical 
Center's senior editor, are also appreciated. 

The advice, information and comments offered by 
personnel outside the Naval Historical Center warrant 
special attention. Mr. Harold Andrews, Captain Rosario 
(Zip) Rausa, USN (Ret.), and Captain Kenneth L. 
Coskey, USN (Ret), reviewed sections of the manu- 
script and provided valuable recommendations. A very 
special thank you goes to Vice Admiral William P. 
Lawrence, USN (Ret), a member of the Secretary of 
the Navy's Advisory Committee on Naval History, for 
reviewing the complete manuscript. Mr. Robert 
Lawson, past editor of The Hook magazine, has lent 
encouragement over the past six years and provided 
many photographs from his collection. Mr. Duane 
Kasulka, as well as many other individuals, also con- 
tributed photographs from their collections. 

Dr. William J. Armstrong, historian for the Naval Air 
Systems Command, compiled and drafted the manu- 
script on aircraft data for Appendix 1. When writing 
the history of naval aviation, it is imperative that the 
technical aspects are included with the operational his- 
tory. His contributions in Appendix 1 will help to 
amplify and clarify information regarding the specific 
aircraft operated by the Navy's aviation squadrons. 

I would like to express my thanks to my wife, Mary, 
and daughter, Maki, for helping to assemble the book 
during its last stages before publication. I owe a debt of 
gratitude to Mr. John Grier, a design and typesetting spe- 
cialist from the Government Printing Office, for his 
efforts in getting the book ready for the printer. For 
those I have not mentioned by name, let me say that 
your contributions are appreciated and are not forgotten. 

Roy A. Grossnick 



xiii 



CHAPTER 1 



The Evolution of Aircraft Class and 
Squadron Designation Systems 



MavAL AVIATION HAS BECOME the forward ele- 
ment of America's ability to project its influence, at 
short notice, any place in the world. It is a product of 
the 20th century and reflects the massive technological 
developments and changes that have characterized 
this century. One reason for naval aviation's success 
has been its ability to change with the times and keep 
pace with innovations in technology. This, in turn, has 
made aviation squadrons a flexible tool that can adapt 
quickly to new missions or requirements. 

This chapter will provide the background necessary 
to help understand the history and evolution of naval 
aviation squadron designations. The Navy has used 
over one hundred different squadron designations 
since the inception of the squadron concept. This fig- 
ure does not include Marine Corps squadron designa- 
tions. To further complicate the Navy's squadron desig- 
nation system, many of the squadron abbreviations, 
such as VT, have had different mission functions dur- 
ing different time frames. As an example, the VT desig- 
nation was used as an abbreviation for a Torpedo 
Squadron from the early 1920s and lasting until 15 
November 1946 when the designation VT (Torpedo 
Squadron) was abolished. Then, on 1 May 1960, the 
use of the VT designation was reinstituted. However, 
this time the meaning and mission for VT was assigned 
as training and stood for Training Squadron (VT). This 
is just one example of the many changes that have 
occurred in the squadron designation system. 

In order to more fully understand squadron designa- 
tions, it is important to know the factors that played a 
role in developing the different missions that 
squadrons have been called upon to perform. 
Technological changes affecting aircraft capabilities 
have resulted in corresponding changes in the opera- 
tional capabilities and techniques used by aviation 
squadrons. In the early period of naval aviation a sys- 
tem was developed to designate an aircraft's mission. 
Different aircraft class designations evolved for the 
various types of missions performed by naval aircraft. 
This became known as the Aircraft Class Designation 
System. The Squadron Designation System and the 
Aircraft Class Designation System are separate systems. 



Yet, there is an inherent parallel relationship between 
the two systems whereby changes in the Aircraft Class 
Designation System have an effect on the Squadron 
Designation System. Both systems reflect the techno- 
logical changes and mission developments in aircraft. 
Numerous changes have been made to both systems 
since the inception of naval aviation in 1911. 

With the evolution of the squadron concept, a 
Squadron Designation System was developed to identi- 
fy the specialized missions of various aviation 
squadrons using different types of aircraft. Since a spe- 
cific class of aircraft identifies the type of mission per- 
formed by the squadron operating a particular aircraft 
class, an inherent parallel relationship occurrs between 
the Aircraft Class Designation System and the Squadron 
Designation System. As an example, an aircraft 
designed and built primarily with a mission of dropping 
torpedoes, such as the World War II TBF Avenger, 
would normally be assigned to a squadron with a simi- 
larly designated mission, such as a Torpedo Squadron 
(VT). The TBF Avenger aircraft would fall under the VT 
class in the Aircraft Class Designation System. 

The evolution of squadron designations may be 
seen by tracing the development of the Aircraft Class 
Designation System and the parallel changes in the 
Squadron Designation System. While tracing the evo- 
lution of the two designation systems in this introduc- 
tory chapter, the primary emphasis will be placed on 
those designations related to carrier aviation. While 
reading this chapter various references will be made 
to the Aircraft Class Designation System, Designation 
of Aircraft, Model Designation of Naval Aircraft, 
Aircraft Designation System, and Model Designation of 
Military Aircraft. All of these references refer to the 
same system involved in designating aircraft classes. 
This system is then used to develop the specific desig- 
nations assigned to each type of aircraft operated by 
the Navy. The F3F-4, TBF-1, AD-3, PBY-5A, A-4, A-6E, 
and F/A-18C are all examples of specific types of 
naval aircraft designations which were developed from 
the Aircraft Class Designation System. 

In order to make it easier to understand the evolu- 
tion and development of the Aircraft Class Designation 



1 



2 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



System and the Squadron Designation System, each sys- 
tem will be discussed separately in a chronological for- 
mat. This will help to make comparisons and connections 
between the two systems and enable the reader to grasp 
the significant interplay between the two programs. 

The Aircraft Class Designation System was devel- 
oped first. Squadrons and the Squadron Designation 
System did not come into existence until the post- 
World War I period. The evolution of the Aircraft Class 
Designation System is as follows: 

Aircraft Class Designation System 

Early Period of Naval Aviation up to 1920 

The UNCERTAINTIES DURING the early period of 
naval aviation were reflected by the problems encoun- 
tered in settling on a functional system for designating 
naval aircraft. Prior to 1920 1 two different Aircraft Class 
Designation Systems were used. From 1911 up to 
1914, naval aircraft were identified by a single letter 
indicating the general type and manufacturer, followed 
by a number to indicate the individual plane of that 
type-manufacturer. Under this system: 

"A" was used for Curtiss hydroaeroplanes 

"B" for Wright hydroaeroplanes 

"C" for Curtiss flying boats 

"D" for Burgess flying boats 

"E" for Curtiss amphibian flying boats 

This system had been established in 1911 by 
Captain Washington I. Chambers, Director of Naval 
Aviation. The following is a list of the types of aircraft 
and their designations in existence from 1911-1914: 

Aircraft Designation System, 1911-1914 

A-l Curtiss hydroaeroplane (originally an amphibian, 

and the Navy's first airplane) 

A-2 Curtiss landplane (rebuilt as a hydroaeroplane) 

A-3 Curtiss hydroaeroplane 

A-4 Curtiss hydroaeroplane 

B-l Wright landplane (converted to hydroaeroplane) 

B-2 Wright type hydroaeroplane 

B-3 Wright type hydroaeroplane 

C-l Curtiss flying boat 

C-2 Curtiss flying boat 

C-3 Curtiss flying boat 

C-4 Curtiss flying boat 

C-5 Curtiss flying boat 

D-l Burgess Co. and Curtiss flying boat 

D-2 Burgess Co. and Curtiss flying boat 



E-l OWL (over water and land) (a Curtiss hydroaero- 
plane rebuilt as a short-hulled flying boat for flying 
over water or land and fitted with wheels for use as 
an amphibian) 

A new Aircraft Class Designation System was estab- 
lished by Captain Mark L. Bristol, the second Director 
of Naval Aviation. He assumed the Director's position 
from Captain Chambers in December 1913. The new 
system was issued on 27 March 1914 as General Order 
88, "Designation of Air Craft." This system changed the 
original designation of the aircraft to two letters and a 
number, of which the first letter denoted class; the sec- 
ond, type within a class; and the number for the order 
in which aircraft within the class were acquired. The 
four classes set up on 27 March 1914 are as follows: 

Aircraft Designation System, 1914-1920 
Aircraft Classes 

"A" for heavier-than-air craft. Within the "A" class: 
L stood for land machines 
H stood for hydroaeroplanes 
B stood for flying boats 

X stood for combination land and water machines 
(amphibians) 

C stood for convertibles (could be equipped as 
either land or water machines) 
"D" for airships or dirigibles 
"B" for balloons 
"K" for kites 

Under this new system the A-l aircraft (the Navy's 
first airplane) was redesignated AH-1, with the "A" 
identifying the plane as a heavier-than-air craft and the 
"H" standing for hydroaeroplane. General Order No. 
88 also provided a corresponding link between the 
old aircraft designations and the new system: "The 
aeroplanes now in the service are hereby designated 
as follows: 

A-l became the AH-1 
A-2 became the AH-2 
A-3 became the AH-3 
B-l became the AH-4 
B-2 became the AH-5 
B-3 became the AH-6 
C-l became the AB-1 
C-2 became the AB-2 
C-3 became theAB-3 
C-4 became the AB-4 
C-5 became theAB-5 
D-l became the AB-6 
D-2 became the AB-7 
E-l became the AX-1" 2 



1 Administrative Histories, Office of the Deputy Chief of Naval 
Operations (Air), Vol. Ill, Part 1, History of Naval Aviation 
(1898-1917), p. 120-121. 



2 United States Naval Aviation 1910-1980, NAVAIR publication 
00-80P-1, 1981, p. 432. 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS- Volume I 3 



Despite the phrase, "now in the service," the A-l, B-l 
and B-2 and probably the D-l had ceased to exist 
before the order was issued. 

The Early 1920s 

In General Order 541, issued in 1920, two overall 
types of aircraft were identified and assigned perma- 
nent letters which have remained in effect since 1920. 
Lighter-than-air types were identified by the letter Z 
and heavier-than-air types were assigned the letter V. 
Within these two categories, various class letters were 
assigned to further differentiate the aircraft's operation 
or construction. Class letters assigned to the Z types 
were R for rigid, N for nonrigid, and K for kite. By 
combining the type and class designation, the different 
airships in the Navy's inventory could be categorized. 
As an example: 

ZR referred to rigid dirigibles (airships) 
ZN stood for nonrigid airships 
ZK for kite balloons 

The class letters assigned to the heavier-than-air 
vehicles covered a wider range and generally reflected 
the mission responsibilities of the aircraft classes. Class 
letters assigned to the V types were: 

F for fighting 
0 for observation 
S for scouting 
P for patrol 
T for torpedo 
G for fleet (utility) 

By combining the V designation for heavier-than-air 
vehicles with the class letters, the following aircraft 
class definitions were assigned in 1920: 

VF for fighting plane 

VO for observation plane 

VS for scouting plane 

VP for patrol plane 

VT for torpedo and bombing plane 

VG for fleet plane (most likely a general utility aircraft) 

This class designation system for aircraft has contin- 
ued to remain a functional system and is still used 
today. There have been many additions, deletions, and 
major changes to the system over the years but the 
concept has remained intact. The current naval aircraft 
inventory still lists VF, VS, VP, VG, VO, and VT aircraft 
classes. Three of these, VF, VP, and VO, still have the 
same definitions they were assigned in 1920. The VS, 
VG, and VT aircraft class designations now refer to 
antisubmarine (VS), in-flight refueling (VG), and train- 
ing aircraft (VT). 

The aircraft designation system established in July 
1920 by General Order 541 was modified on 29 March 
1922 by Bureau of Aeronautics Technical Note 213. It 
added the identity of the manufacturer to the aircraft 



model designation. The aircraft class designations 
remained the same as those issued by General Order 
541 (G.O. 541); however, besides the six aircraft class- 
es listed in G.O. 541 (VF, VO, VS, VP, VT, and VG), an 
additional two classes were added to the aircraft class 
list. The two new aircraft classes were VA for Training 
Aircraft and VM for Marine Expeditionary Plane. 3 

The mid to late 1920s 

Between 1922 and 1933, there were only a few 
modifications to the Aircraft Class Designation System. 
The Bureau of Aeronautics was established in July 
1921 and, thereafter, made changes to the Aircraft 
Class Designation System. In response to a Secretary 
of Navy letter dated 13 February 1923, the Bureau of 
Aeronautics issued a Technical Note on 10 March 1923 
that changed the VA designation for training aircraft to 
VN, dropped the VG designation, and added the VJ 
designation for Transport Plane. 4 This was followed by 
the addition, in 1925, of the VX designation for experi- 
mental aircraft. 5 The VX designation was dropped 
from the Aircraft Class Designation list in January 
1927. 6 In July 1928, the VM designation was dropped 
and the VJ designation was changed from 
Transportation Plane to General Utility. Two new des- 
ignations were also instituted, VB for bombing and VH 
for ambulance. 7 A new aircraft class was added in July 
1930 and designated VR for transport aircraft. 8 This VR 
designation has remained in effect for transport aircraft 
since 1930. 

The 1930s 

Similar changes took place in the Aircraft Class 
Designation System during the early 1930s. By July 
1933, there were ten aircraft class designations. This 
list did not vary much from those aircraft classes iden- 
tified in the previous ten years. The aircraft class des- 
ignations in July 1933 were as follows: 

VB for bombing 
VF for fighting 
VH for ambulance 
VJ for general utility 
VN for training 
VO for observation 



3 Bureau of Aeronautics Technical Note 213, Type, Class and 
Model Designation of Airplanes, March 29, 1922. 

4 Bureau of Aeronautics Technical Note No. 235, Type, Class and 
Model Designation of Airplanes, March 10, 1923. 

5 Bureau of Aeronautics, Model Designation of Naval Aircraft SH- 
3, 1 January 1925. 

6 Bureau of Aeronautics, Model Designation of Naval Airplanes 
SH-3C, 1 January 1927. 

7 Bureau of Aeronautics, Model Designation of Naval Airplanes 
SH-3D, Aer-M-157-CRP, A9-11, July 1928. 

8 Bureau of Aeronautics, Model Designation of Naval Airplanes, 
SH-3H, Aer-D-157, A 9-11, ljuly 1930. 



4 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



VP for patrol 
VR for transport 
VS for scouting 
VT for torpedo. 9 

A major change was instituted to the Aircraft 
Designation System on 2 January 1934. 10 Prior to 1934, 
aircraft classes had been established according to the 
primary mission the aircraft was to perform. The fact 
that many aircraft were capable of performing more 
than one mission was recognized in the revised sys- 
tem by assigning an additional letter to the previous 
two-letter aircraft class designation. In the new three- 
letter aircraft class designation, the first letter identified 
the type of vehicle, such as V for heavier-than-air 
(fixed wing) and Z for lighter-than-air. For heavier- 
than-air, the second letter identified the primary mis- 
sion of the aircraft, using the same 10 letter designa- 
tions listed in the above paragraph. The third letter 
indicated the secondary mission of the aircraft class, 
such as: 

F for fighting 
0 for observation 
B for bombing 
T for torpedo 
S for scouting 

By assigning these five secondary mission letters to 
the primary aircraft letter designations, seven new air- 
craft class designations were established: 

VBF for bombing-fighting 
VOS for observation-scouting 
VPB for patrol-bombing 
VPT for patrol -torpedo 
VSB for scouting-bombing 
VSO for scout-observation 
VTB for torpedo-bombing 

On the eve of World War II, the Model Designation 
of Airplanes for 1 July 1939 was very similar to what 
had been identified in 1934. There were eleven pri- 
mary aircraft class designations and six designations 
that included a secondary mission letter in its class 
designation. The 1 July 1939 Model Designation of 
Airplanes included the following Aircraft Class 
Designations: 

Bombing (VB) 
Fighting (VF) 
Miscellaneous (VM) 
Observation (VO) 
Patrol (VP) 
Scouting (VS) 



9 Bureau of Aeronautics, Model Designation of Naval Airplanes 
SH-3N, Aer-D-157, A9-11, 1 July 1933. 

10 Model Designation of Naval Airplanes, SH-30, Aer-D-157, A9-11 
dated 2 January 1934, p. 1. 



Torpedo (VT) 
Training (VN) 

Transport (multi-engine) (VR) 
Transport (single-engine) (VG) 
Utility (VJ) 

Observation-Scouting (VOS) 
Patrol-Bombing (VPB) 
Scouting-Bombing (VSB) 
Scouting-Observation (VSO) 
Torpedo-Bombing (VTB) 
Utility-Transport (VJR) 

World Warll 

The designation changes for the aircraft classes and 
squadron system during World War II and the immedi- 
ate postwar period are identified in the Model Desig- 
nation of Naval Aircraft, the Aviation Circular Letters, 
and in the Navy Department Bulletins. 

By mid-1943, many new aircraft class designations 
had been added to the Model Designation of Naval 
Aircraft. 11 The additions included: 

VA for ambulance 

VBT for bombing-torpedo 

VSN for scout-training 

VL for gliders 

VLN for training-gliders 

VLR for transport-gliders 

VH for helicopters 

VHO for observation-helicopters 

VD for drones 

VTD for torpedo-drones and/or target drones 
ZN for nonrigid airships 
ZNN for nonrigid-training and/or utility airships 
ZNP for nonrigid patrol and/or scouting airships 

As the war progressed, more changes were made to 
the Model Designation of Naval Aircraft. In July 1944, 
a major change was instituted for the Aircraft Class 
Designation System. Naval aircraft were divided into 
three main types identified by a letter: 

V for fixed wing vehicles (airplanes, gliders and 
drones) 

H for rotary wing vehicles (helicopters) 
Z for lighter-than-air vehicles (airships) 

The three main types were then each subdivided 
into classes. The classes under the heavier-than-air 
fixed wing type (V) included: 

VF fighters 

VF(M) fighters (medium or 2 engine) 

VSB scout bombers 

VTB torpedo bombers 

VO/VS observation scout 



11 Model Designation of Naval Aircraft, SH-3AK, Bureau of 
Aeronautics, July 1943, p. 1-2. 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS- Volume I 5 



VPB(HL) patrol bombers (heavy or 4 engine landplane) 
VPB(ML) patrol bombers (medium or 2 engine landplane) 
VPB(HS) patrol bombers (heavy or 4 engine seaplane) 



VPB(MS) patrol bombers (medium or 2 engine seaplane) 


VR(HL) 


transport (heavy or 4 engine landplane) 


VR(ML) 


transport (medium or 2 engine landplane) 


VR(HS) 


transport (heavy or 4 engine seaplane) 


VR(MS) 


transport (medium or 2 engine seaplane) 


VJ(M) 


utility (medium or 2 engine) 


VJ 


utility 


VSN(M) 


training 


VSN 


training 


VN 


training 


VK 


drones 


VKN 


drones (target training) 


VL 


gliders 


VLN 


gliders (training) 


VLR 


gliders (transport) 


The helicopter type (H) had the following classes: 


HO 


helicopters (observation) 


HN 


helicopters (training) 


HR 


helicopters (transport) 


The lighter-than-air type (Z) had the following classes: 


ZN 


nonrigid airships 


ZNN 


nonrigid airships (training) 


ZNP 


nonrigid airships (patrol and escort) 


This July 1944 change to the Model Designation of 



Naval Aircraft was still in effect at the close of World 
War II and only a couple of additions had been made. 
They included: 

VKC for assault drones 
HJ for utility helicopters 

Post World War II and the late 1940s 

On 11 March 1946, a major revision was issued to the 
Class Designation of Naval Aircraft. Aviation Circular 
Letter Number 43-46 divided naval aircraft into four 
types and assigned a letter designation. They were: 

V for heavier-than-air (fixed wing) 
K for pilotless aircraft 
H for heavier-than-air (rotary wing) 
Z for lighter-than-air 

Within the class designation for V type aircraft, the 
primary mission and class designation were as follows: 

Primary Mission Class Designation 

Fighter (destroy enemy aircraft in the air) VF 

Attack (destroy enemy surface or ground targets) VA 

Patrol (search for enemy) VP 
Observation (observe and direct ship and shore 

gun fire) VO 

Transport purposes VR 



Utility purposes VU 

Training purposes VT 

Gliders VG 

Within the class designation for H type (rotary 
wing), the primary mission and class designation were 
as follows: 

Air-sea rescue HH 

Observation HO 

Training HT 

Transport HR 

Utility HU 

Within the class designation for K type (pilotless air- 
craft), the primary mission and class designation were 
as follows: 

For attack on aircraft targets KA 

For attack on ship targets KS 

For attack on ground targets KG 

For use as target aircraft KD 

For utility purposes KU 

Within the class designation for Z type (lighter-than- 
air), the primary mission and class designation were as 
follows: 

Patrol and escort ZP 

Air-sea rescue ZH 

Training ZT 

Utility ZU 



This order provided that "no changes ... be made in 
the model designation of aircraft already produced or 
in production, except that the mission letter of all BT 
class aircraft shall be changed to A." 12 Thus, the SB2C 
and TBF/TBM aircraft remained in use until they were 
removed from the inventory, while the BT2D and BTM 
aircraft were redesignated as AD and AM. These air- 
craft were assigned to the new attack squadrons estab- 
lished in the latter part of 1946. 

In 1947 a modification was made to CNO's Aviation 
Circular Letter No. 43-46 of 11 March 1946 whereby a 
fifth class designation was added to the naval aircraft 
types. The new class designation was the M type for 
Guided Missiles and the primary mission and class des- 
ignation were as follows: 



Air-to-air AAM 

Air-to-surface ASM 

Air-to-underwater AUM 

Surface-to-air SAM 

Surface-to-surface SSM 

Surface-to-underwater SUM 

Underwater-to-air UAM 

Underwater-to-surface USM 

Test Vehicle TV 



12 Aviation Circular Letter No. 43-46 of 11 March 1946, 
OP-517-Bl-EPA-dml, serial 63P517, paragraph 10. 



6 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



Since this volume of the Dictionary of American 
Naval Aviation Squadrons is dealing primarily with the 
attack community, the remaining discussion on the 
Aircraft Class Designation System will deal only with 
the V (heavier-than-air fixed wing) type and its sub- 
classes. In 1949 the V type was composed of the fol- 
lowing classes: 

Air defense and escort 
Surface and ground attack 
ASW reconnaissance and attack 
Gunfire and artillery spotting 
Air logistic support 
Fleet utility support 
Basic and fleet training 



VS Antisubmarine Submarine search and attack 



VF Fighter 
VA Attack 
VP Patrol 
VO Observation 
VR Transport 
VU Utility 
VT Training 
VG Glider 



The 1950s, 1960s, 1970s and 1980s 

During the early 1950s several changes were made 
to the V (heavier-than-air fixed wing) type. The VG 
glider class was dropped and the following classes 
were added: 

VS Search Submarine search and attack (carrier) 
VW Warning Airborne early warning 

In 1953 the nine classes of the V type were further 
divided into sub-classes. The V type classes and sub- 



classes were as follows: 


VA Attack 


Surface and ground attack 


VA (Int'd) 


Interdiction 


VA (GS) 


Ground Support 


VA (AW) 


All Weather and ASW 


VA (W) 


Air Early Warning and ASW 


VA (H) 


Heavy 


VF Fighter 


Air defense and escort 


VF (Int) 


Interceptor 


VF (Day) 


Day, jet 


VF (Day)(Prop) Day, reciprocating 


VF (AW) 


All weather, jet 


VF (AW)(Prop) 


All weather, reciprocating 


VF (P) 


Photographic, jet 


VF (P)(Prop) 


Photographic, reciprocating 


VF (D) 


Drone control 



VO Observation 
VP Patrol 

VP (L) 
VP (S) 
VP (MIN) 
VP (WEA) 
VP (Q) 
VR Transport 
VR (H) 
VR (M) 
VR (S) 
VR (C) 



Gunfire and artillery spotting 
ASW reconnaissance, mining and 

weather 
Landplane 
Seaplane 
Mining 
Weather 
Countermeasure 
Air logistic support 
Heavy landplane 
Medium landplane 
Heavy seaplane 
Carrier 



VS 


Search and attack 


VS(S) 


Attack 


VS (W) 


Search 


VT Training 


Basic, fleet and primary training 


VT (jet) 


jet 


VT (ME) 


Two-engine, reciprocating 


VT (SE) 


One-engine, reciprocating 


VT(E) 


Electronic 


VT (Nav) 


Navigation 


VU Utility 


Fleet utility support 


VU (Gen) 


General 


VU (SAR) 


Search and rescue 


VU (Tow) 


Tow 


VW Warning 


Airborne Early Warning 


VW 


Air early warning 



Between 1953 and 1960 there was only one change 
in the V class and a few modifications in the sub-classes. 
The VG class, for in-flight refueling tanker, was added 
in 1958. In 1960 the type letter for the heavier-than-air 
fixed wing class was still identified as "V", however, it 
was omitted from the acronym for the class designation. 
The class designations for the heavier-than-air fixed 
wing type and their basic mission were as follows: 

A Attack 

F Fighter 

G In-flight refueling tanker 

0 Observation 

P Patrol 

R Transport 

S Antisubmarine (for carrier-based aircraft) 

T Training 

U Utility 

W Airborne Early Warning 

In 1962 a major changed occurred in the model des- 
ignation for naval aircraft. The Department of Defense 
consolidated the aircraft designation systems of the 
Navy, Army, and Air Force. A new DOD (Department 
of Defense) Directive was established that designated, 
redesignated, and named military aircraft. Under the 
new system the V for heavier-than-air fixed wing types 
was dropped completely and a single letter was used 
to identify the basic mission of the vehicle. The basic 
mission and associated type symbols were as follows: 

A Attack Aircraft designed to search out, 

attack and destroy enemy land or 
sea targets using conventional or 
special weapons. Also used for 
interdiction and close air support 
missions. 

Aircraft designed for bombing 
enemy targets. 

Aircraft designed for carrying 
cargo and/or passengers. 



B Bomber 



C Cargo/transport 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS- Volume I 7 



E Special Electronic Aircraft possessing ECM capability 
or installation having electronic 
devices to permit employment as 
an early warning radar station. 



F Fighter 
H Helicopter 

K Tanker 

0 Observation 



P Patrol 



S Antisubmarine 



T Trainer 



U Utility 



V VTOL and STOL 



X Research 



Z Airship 



Aircraft designed to intercept and 
destroy other aircraft and/or mis- 
siles. 

A rotary wing aircraft designed 
with the capability of flight in any 
plane; e.g., horizontal, vertical, or 
diagonal. 

Aircraft designed for in-flight re- 
fueling of other aircraft. 

Aircraft designed to observe 
(through visual/other means) and 
report tactical information con- 
cerning composition and disposi- 
tion of enemy forces, troops, and 
supplies in an active combat area. 

Long-range, all-weather, multi- 
engine aircraft operating from 
land and/or water bases, 
designed for independent accom- 
plishment of the following func- 
tions: antisubmarine warfare, mar- 
itime reconnaissance, and mining. 

Aircraft designed to search out, 
detect, identify, attack and 
destroy enemy submarines. 

Aircraft designed for training per- 
sonnel in the operation of aircraft 
and/or related equipment, and 
having provisions for instructor 
personnel. 

Aircraft used for miscellaneous 
missions, such as carrying cargo 
and/or passengers, towing targets, 
etc. These aircraft will include 
those having a small payload. 

Aircraft designed for vertical take- 
off or landing with no take-off or 
landing roll, or aircraft capable of 
take-off and landing in a mini- 
mum prescribed distance. 

Aircraft designed for testing con- 
figurations of a radical nature. 
These aircraft are not normally 
intended for use as tactical air- 
craft. 

A self-propelled lighter-than-air 
aircraft. 



The only type symbol not in use by the Navy from 
the above listing was the B for bomber aircraft. The 0 
for observation aircraft was in the naval inventory but 
was used primarily by the Marine Corps. 

Between 1962 and 1990 there were only two modifi- 
cations to the listing of basic mission and aircraft type 
symbols in DOD's Model Designation of Military 
Aircraft, Rockets and Guided Missiles. These changes 
involved the addition of the letter "R" for 
Reconnaissance and the deletion of the Z type for 
Airships. The basic mission for the R type was an air- 
craft designed to perform reconnaissance missions. 

Even though a consolidated DOD directive was 
issued on aircraft designations for the Navy, Air Force, 
and Army in 1962, the Navy continued to publish a 
listing of naval aircraft classes and sub-classes that dif- 
fered slightly from the DOD directive. However, the 
Navy did follow the new procedures for designating 
its aircraft, as an example, the AD-5 Skyraider aircraft 
designation was changed to A-1E. The December 1962 
issue of the Allowances and Location of Naval Aircraft 
lists the following classes and sub-classes for fixed 
wing aircraft (note the continued use of "V" as part of 
the class designation and the failure to change the VG 
class designation for air refueler to K, as listed by the 
DOD instruction): 

VF Fighter 



VF FB 


Fighter-bomber 


VF P 


Photo Reconnaissance 


VA Attack 




VA L 


Light Attack 


VA LP 


Light Attack (Prop) 


VA M 


Medium Attack 


VA H 


H eavy Attack 


VA P 


Photo Reconnaissance (long range) 


VA Q 


ECM Reconnaissance (long range) 


VA QM 


Tactical ECM 


VA QMP 


Tactical ECM (Prop) 


VSASW (Carrier based) 


VP ASW Patrol 




VP L 


ASW Patrol (shore based) 


VP S 


ASW Patrol (sea based) 


VW Airborne early warning 


VW M 


AEW Medium (carrier based) 


VW H 


AEW Heavy (shore based) 


VR Transport 




VR H 


Heavy transport 


VR M 


Medium transport 


VR C 


Carrier transport 


VG Air refueler, heavy 


VT Trainer 




VT AJ 


Advanced jet trainer 


VT BJ 


Basic jet trainer 



8 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



VT SJ 
VT AP 
VT BP 
VT PP 
VT SP 

VK Drone 
VK D 



Special jet trainer 
Advanced prop trainer 
Basic prop trainer 
Primary prop trainer 
Special Prop trainer 

Drone control 



VS Antisubmarine 



The only change to this listing occurred in 1965 
with the addition of the VO class for observation. 
Between 1965 and 1988 there was no change to the 
aircraft class listing in the Allowances and Location of 
Naval Aircraft. However, there were numerous 
changes in the listing for the sub-classes. The final 
publication of the Allowances and Location of Naval 
Aircraft was March 1988. 

On 2 May 1975, the Navy selected a derivative of 
the YF-17 as the winner of the Navy's VFAX competi- 
tion for a new multimission fighter attack aircraft. The 
VFAX aircraft was designed to replace two aircraft in 
the Navy's inventory, the F-4 Phantom II and the A-7 
Corsair II. This program was reinstituting an old Navy 
policy, whereby, multimission requirements for attack 
and fighter, be incorporated into a single aircraft. 
Fighter and light attack missions had previously been 
assigned to various types of aircraft, particularly in the 
period prior to World War II and also in the 1950s. The 
Navy was now reverting to an old policy and designing 
a plane with a dual capacity as a fighter and an attack 
aircraft to meet new multimission requirements. 

The VFAX aircraft was initially assigned the F-18A 
designation. A new model designation F/A (strike 
fighter) was established and assigned to the aircraft in 
the late 1970s. The Navy accepted its first F/A-18 
Hornet on 16 January 1979. The F/A designation was 
identified as a sub-class and listed under the VF class 
in the Navy's Allowances and Location of Naval 
Aircraft. Under the DOD model designation the F/A- 
18 designation is listed under both the A and F symbol 
designations as A-18 and F-18. 

The 1990s 

The following is a list of the Naval Aircraft Class and 
Sub-classes used in the 1990s: 



VF Fighter 
VF FA 
VF FB 
VF P 

VA Attack 
VA L 
VA M 
VA H 
VA P 
VA Q 
VA QM 



Striker Fighter 

Fighter 

Fighter 

Attack 
Attack 
Attack 
Attack 
Attack 
Attack 



VP Patrol 
v r r a u kj \ 




VP 1 
v r i_ 


Patrnl 
r a u u I 


VW Warning 




VP M 


Warning 


VP H 


Warning 


VR Transport 




VR H 


Transport 


VR M 


Transport 


VR C 


Transport 


VR LJ 


Transport 


VG In-flight Refueling 


VO Observation 


VO L 


Observation 


VU Utility 




VU L 


Utility 


VU S 


Utility 


VT Training 




VT AJ 


Training Jet 


VT SJ 


Training Jet 


VT PP 


Training Prop 


VT SP 


Training Prop 


VT SG 


Training Jet 


H Rotary Wing 


H F 


Rotary Wing 


H A 


Rotary Wing 


H G 


Rotary Wing 


H S 


Rotary Wing 


H H 


Rotary Wing 


H M 


Rotary Wing 


H L 


Rotary Wing 


H T 


Rotary Wing 


H R 


Rotary Wing 


VK Drones 




VK D 


Drones 


VK K 


Drones Jet 



This ends the chronological section on the evolution 
of the Aircraft Designation System. 



Squadron Designation System 

The SQUADRON DESIGNATION SYSTEM did not 
develop until after World War I. During the prewar 
and World War I period naval aviation and naval air- 
craft (excluding Marine Corps aircraft) were primarily 
aligned with shore-based commands. The majority of 
the operations were conducted by water-based aircraft 
assigned to naval air stations. Their primary mission 
was patrol. By the close of World War I the value of 
naval aviation as a military weapon had been demon- 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS- Volume I 9 



strated on land and at sea. In the postwar period, to 
more fully utilize aviation's potential, it was necessary 
to extend its capabilities to operate with the fleet. 

On 3 February 1919, Captain G. W. Steel, Jr., 
assumed command of Fleet Air Detachment, Atlantic 
Fleet. This marked the beginning of an aviation com- 
mand within the fleet organization. 13 From this begin- 
ning, the concept of aviation squadrons evolved into a 
permanent part of the fleet. In July 1920, the Secretary 
of the Navy issued two General Orders that played an 
important role in solidifying a position for naval avia- 
tion in the fleet and a role in its future operations. 
General Order Number 533 (series 1913) of 12 July 
1920 "provided for the organization of naval forces 
afloat into the Atlantic, Pacific and Asiatic Fleets and 
for the formation of type forces with each fleet, desig- 
nated as Battleship, Cruiser Destroyer, Submarine, 
Mine, Air, and Train." 14 Aviation was now a distinct 
part of the fleet organization. General Order Number 
541, issued 17 July 1920 and mentioned earlier in the 
discussion on the evolution of the Aircraft Class 
Designations, established the standard nomenclature 
for the designation of aircraft types and classes (the 
Aircraft Class Designation System), as well as other 
naval vessels. The following is a discussion on the 
evolution of the Squadron Designation System. 

Early Period of Naval Aviation up to 1920 

As mentioned earlier, squadrons and the Squadron 
Designation System did not exist during the early peri- 
od of naval aviation. 

The Early 1920s 

Squadron designations were not immediately identi- 
fied in the fleet organization after General Order 533 
was issued in July 1920. The first known reference to a 
squadron-like organization in the fleet appears in 
September 1920 when Airboat Divisions 1 and 2 of Air 
Force, Atlantic Fleet are identified during their visit to 
Annapolis. 15 In August 1921, reference was made to 
Torpedo Plane Squadron 5. 16 This is the first known 
reference to an aviation squadron with a designation 
similar to those assigned to the aircraft classes in 
General Order 541. The "Annual Report of the Chief of 
the Bureau of Aeronautics for Fiscal Year 1922" 
emphasized the reorganization of the aviation forces in 
the fleet. During this reorganization, Air Force, Atlantic 
Fleet and Air Force, Pacific Fleet were redesignated Air 
Squadrons, Atlantic Fleet and Air Squadrons, Pacific 



Fleet, respectively. 17 The basis for the structure of avia- 
tion in the fleet became the aircraft squadron. The first 
evidence of these changes are found in the fleet orga- 
nizational structure listed in the Navy Directory dated 
1 January 1922. The different types of squadrons listed 
as being attached to the Atlantic and Pacific fleets are 
as follows: 

Air Squadrons, Atlantic Fleet 
Scouting Squadrons 1 and 2 (combined in 

December 1921 to form one squadron) 
Torpedo Plane Squadron 1 
Kite Balloon Squadron 1 

Air Squadrons, Pacific Fleet 

Spotting Squadrons 4, 3, and L-l 

Combat Squadrons 4, 3, and L-l (Spotting Squadron 
L-l and Combat Squadron L-l were not estab- 
lished during FY-22 due to lack of personnel) 

Patrol Squadron 1 

This is the first instance in which the entire fleet 
organization of aircraft squadrons is identified and, 
more or less, corresponds to similar aircraft classes list- 
ed in General Order 541. From this point on, there is a 
natural basis for the parallel association between the 
Squadron Designation System and the Aircraft Class 
Designation System. 

The Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) issued the 
"Naval Aviation Organization for Fiscal Year 1923" on 
17 June 1922. This document ordered the redesigna- 
tion of Air Squadrons, Atlantic Fleet and Air 
Squadrons, Pacific Fleet to Aircraft Squadrons, 
Scouting Fleet and Aircraft Squadrons, Battle Fleet, 
respectively. The numbering of aircraft squadrons 
according to the ship squadron numbers was 
changed to a system of numbering all air squadrons 
serially in each class according to the order authoriz- 
ing them to organize. 18 The use of letter abbrevia- 
tions to indicate the squadron mission and designa- 
tion were listed in the "Naval Aeronautic 
Organization for Fiscal Year 1923." This is the first 
known record associating the abbreviated Aircraft 
Class Designations with the abbreviated squadron 
designations. The squadrons assigned to each fleet 
under this organization were as follows: 

Aircraft Squadrons, Scouting Fleet 

Scouting Plane Squadron 1 (VS Squadron 1) 

Torpedo and Bombing Plane Squadron 1 (VT Squadron 1) 

Kite Balloon Squadron 1 (ZK Squadron 1) 



"COMINCH U.S. Fleet letter of 7 February 1919. 

14 United States Naval Aviation 1910-1980, NAVAIR publication 
00-80P-1, 1981, p. 48-49. 

15 CNO Daily Aviation News Bulletin, Op-15H-CCT of September 
24, 1920. 

16 U.S. Naval Aviation Operations Report for October 8, 1921, p. 7. 



17 Annual Report of the Chief of the Bureau of Aeronautics for the 
Fiscal Year 1922, Washington Government Printing Office, 1922, p. 5. 

18 Naval Aeronautic Organization for Fiscal Year 1923 issued by 
CNO ser 26983 of 17 June 1922. 



10 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS- Volume I 



Aircraft Squadrons, Battle Fleet 

Torpedo and Bombing Plane Squadron 2 (VT Squadron 2) 
Observation Plane Squadron 1 (VO Squadron 1) 
Observation Plane Squadron 2 (VO Squadron 2) 
Observation Plane Squadron 3 (VO Squadron 3) 
Fighting Plane Squadron 1 (VF Squadron 1) 
Fighting Plane Squadron 2 (VF Squadron 2) 
Fighting Plane Squadron 3 (VF Squadron 3) 

The mid to late 1920s 

With the introduction of new types of planes in ser- 
vice and the formation of new squadrons, the Navy 
made modifications to its system of squadron designa- 
tions. These changes continued to be issued as 
General Orders by the Secretary of the Navy, while the 
changes to the Aircraft Class Designation System were 
issued by the Bureau of Aeronautics as Technical 
Notes or later as Model Designation of Naval 
Airplanes. On 1 July 1927, a new system for designat- 
ing aircraft squadrons was placed in effect. 19 Under 
General Order 161, the designation system for 
squadrons used three categories to identify the 
squadron: class designations, squadron identification 
numbers, and assignment letters. 

The first part of the squadron designation for heav- 
ier-than-air units used the following class designations: 

VO for observation 
VF for fighting 

VT for torpedo and bombing 

VS for scouting 

VP for patrol 

VJ for utility 

VN for training 

VX for experimental 

The second part of the squadron designation used 
squadron identification numbers within each class of 
squadrons. The numbers began with one and contin- 
ued in numerical series for each class of squadrons. 

The final part of the squadron designation used 
assignment letters to indicate what organization the 
squadron operated under. Assignment letters were as 
follows: 

B for Battle Fleet 
S for Scouting Fleet 
A for Asiatic Fleet 
F for Fleet Base Force 
C for Control Force 

D for Naval District (to be followed by district number) 
M for United States Marine Corps 
R for United States Naval Reserve 
U for United States Fleet 



19 General Order 161 (series 1921) dated March 5, 1927, System 
for Designation Aircraft Squadrons. 



By combining the class designation, squadron identi- 
fication number, and assignment letter, the squadron 
designation would be obtained. For example: 

VO-1B stood for Observation Squadron 1 in the Battle 
Fleet 

VF-3S stood for Fighting Squadron 3 in the Scouting 
Fleet 

VT-5D14 stood for Torpedo and Bombing Squadron 5 
assigned to the Fourteenth Naval District 

The lighter-than-air squadron designations were as 
follows: 

Nonrigid Airship Squadrons: ZNO, ZNS, ZNP, and ZNN 
Rigid Airship Squadrons: ZRS, ZRP, and ZRN 
Kite Balloon Squadrons: ZKO and ZKN 

None of the lighter-than-air squadron designations 
listed above were ever used by the Navy. 

This change to the Squadron Designation System, as 
directed by General Order 161, may be seen in the 
listing of aviation squadrons published in the 1 April 
1928 Navy Directory 20 . The new squadron designations 
were as follows: 

Fighting Plane Squadrons (VF-1B, 2B, 3B, 5B and 6B) 
Observation Plane Squadrons (VO-1B, 2B and 4B) 
Torpedo and Bombing Plane Squadrons (VT-1B and 

VT-2B) 
Utility Squadron (VJ-1B) 

Observation Plane Squadrons (VO-3S and VO-5S) 

Torpedo and Bombing Plane Squadron (VT-9S) 

Utility Squadron (VJ-2S) 

West Indian Aerial Survey (VJ-3S) 

Observation Plane Squadron (VO-11A) 

Torpedo and Bombing Plane Squadron (VT-5A) 

Experimental Squadron (VX-1D5) 

Training Squadrons (VN-6D5, VN-1D8, VN-3D8, VN- 

5D8, and VN-7D11) 
Utility Squadrons (VJ-4D5 and VJ-5D11) 
Torpedo and Bombing Plane Squadrons (VT-6D14, 

VT-7D14, and VT-8D15) 
Patrol Squadrons (VP-1D14 and VP-2D15) 

A modification was made to General Order 161 on 
28 September 1928. 21 This amendment added B for 
bombing and VB in the class designation category. 
The aviation squadrons listed for the January 1929 
fleet organization 22 include two new squadron desig- 
nations not identified in the 1928 fleet organization. 



20 Navy Director, Officers of the United States Navy and Marine 
Corps, April 1, 1928, published by Bureau of Navigation, U.S. 
Government Printing Office, Washington 1928, p. 128-133. 

21 General Order 179 (series 1921) of September 28, 1928 
(Amendment to General Order 161). 

22 Navy Director, Officers of the United States Navy and Marine 
Corps, January 1, 1929, published by Bureau of Navigation, U.S. 
Government Printing Office, Washington, 1929. 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS- Volume I 11 



This listing included the scouting squadrons (VS) and 
bombing squadrons (VB). The new squadrons listed in 
January 1929 were: 

Scouting Plane Squadrons (VS-1B, 2B, 3B, and 4B) 
Bombing Plane Squadrons (VB-1B and VB-2B) 
Scouting Plane Squadron (VS-5S) 

The January 1929 fleet organization listing also 
removed some of the old squadrons that had been in 
the previous fleet organization listings. This was most 
likely the result of the redesignation of some 
squadrons and the disestablishment of others. VB-1B 
and VB-2B were most likely redesignated from VFs 
(Fighting Squadrons). 

The squadron designations listed in the Navy's orga- 
nization for 1928 and early 1929 correspond to almost 
all the aircraft class designations listed in the Model 
Designation of Naval Airplanes for January 1929. 23 Out 
of the nine aircraft classes listed there is only one air- 
craft class designation that does not have a corre- 
sponding squadron designation. The Navy did not 
have a squadron with the designation VH until 15 
April 1944. VH-1 was the first squadron established as 
an Air- Sea Rescue Squadron. The use of the same 
functional designation for aircraft class abbreviations 
and squadron abbreviations demonstrated the close 
association between the two designation systems in 
the late 1920s. 

The 1930s 

On 15 May 1930, an update to the system for 
squadron designations was issued as General Order 
202. It canceled General Orders 161 and 179 and 
became effective 1 July 1930. General Order 202 was 
almost identical to the previous two general orders. 
The only change was the removal of bombing from 
the torpedo and bombing class designation and 
assigning only torpedo as the functional designation 
forVT. 

General Order 202 remained in effect until 13 May 
1935 when another revision was made to the Aircraft 
Squadron Designation System. 24 General Order 33, 
effective 13 May 1935, made only one change to 
General Order 202. The C for Control Force as an 
assignment letter was deleted. There were no changes 
to the class designation or squadron identification 
numbering categories. Essentially, General Order 33 
reaffirmed the Aircraft Squadron Designating System 
that had been instituted by General Order 161, modi- 
fied by General Order 179 and consolidated by 
General Order 202. 



23 Bureau of Aeronautics, Model Designation of Naval Airplanes 
SH-3E, Aer-D-157-CRP, January 1929. 

24 General Order No. 33 of May 13, 1935. 



After ten years of adhering to the same policy for 
squadron designations, the Navy canceled General 
Order 33 on 1 July 1937 25 and instituted a new System 
for Naming Aircraft Squadrons. 26 The new system 
issued 9 March 1937 and effective ljuly 1937, simply 
stated "Aircraft squadrons shall be named in accor- 
dance with their primary missions and differentiated as 
necessary by numbers and organization adjective." The 
functional designation of squadrons was assigned in 
accordance with the primary mission. The squadron 
designations promulgated by this CNO letter of 9 
March 1937 were the same as those issued by General 
Order 33, plus the addition of transport as a new func- 
tional designation. The functional designations for 
squadrons issued by the 9 March 1937 letter were: 

bombing (VB) 
fighting (VF) 
observation (VO) 
patrol (VP) 
scouting (VS) 
torpedo (VT) 
training (VN) 
utility (VJ) 
experimental (VX) 
transport (VR) 

Under this new System for Naming Aircraft 
Squadrons, the squadron letter designation remained 
the same as the previous system; however, the suffix 
lettering (assignment lettering) was dropped and a 
major change was instituted for the numbering of air- 
craft carrier squadrons. The numbering system was 
revised to provide for: 

1. numbering each carrier squadron according to the 
hull number of its carrier, 

2. each battleship and cruiser squadron was to be 
assigned the same number as its ship division, 

3. patrol squadrons were numbered serially without 
regard to their assignment. 

The primary designations listed for the aircraft classes 
in July 1937 27 included all of the same designations 
listed by the CNO's letter of 9 March 1937 for 
squadron designations except for experimental (VX). 
Out of the ten designations for squadrons, nine were 
assigned to active units in the Navy as of September 
1937. 28 The Bureau of Aeronautics' "Monthly Report, 
Status of Naval Aircraft" for July 1937 identified the fol- 
lowing squadrons as being in existence (this list does 
not include Marine Corps or Reserve squadrons): 



25 General Order No. 94 of March 8, 1937. 
* CNO letter OP-38-E-EMR VZ1/F40-1(370309) of 9 March 1937, 
System for Naming Aircraft Squadrons. 

27 Bureau of Aeronautics, Model Designation of Naval Airplanes 
SH-3V, 1 July 1937. 

28 Navy Directory, Officers of the United States Navy and Marine 
Corps, September 1, 1937, issued by Bureau of Navigation, U.S. 
Government Printing Office, Washington, 1937. 



12 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS- Volume I 



VB-2 


VF-2 


VB-3 


VF-3 


VF-5 


VF-6 


VF-4 


VB-5 


VS-5 


VT-5 


VS-42 


VB-6 


VS-6 


VS-2 


VS-3 


VS-41 


VB-4 


VT-2 


VT-6 


VT-3 


Vj-1 


VP-16 


VP-17 


VP-14 


VP-3 


VP-6 


VP-8 


VP-9 


VP-11 


VP-12 


VP-5 


VP-10 


VP-4 


VP-7 


VP-15 


VJ-2 


VO-1 


VO-2 


VO-3 


VO-4 


VCS-2 


VCS3 


VCS-4 


VCS-5 


VCS-6 


VCS-7 


VP-2 


VP-1 



VX-2D1 VX-3D4 VX-4D4 VX-4D5 VX-5D5 VN-8D5 
VJ-4D5 VN-1D8 VN-2D8 VN-3D8 VN-4D8 VN-5D8 
VJ-5D11 



The only designation not in use for squadrons at 
this time was the one for transport (VR). However, 
none of the three-letter Aircraft Class Designations 
(such as VBF, VOS, VPB, VPT, VSB, VSO or VTB) were 
used in the squadron designation system at this time. 
The separate but parallel relationship that exists 
between the system of naming aircraft squadrons and 
the designations assigned to aircraft classes is appar- 
ent. They serve separate purposes, yet, are so closely 
related in their requirements that they must be regard- 
ed as mutually supporting systems. 

It is important to note paragraph 7 of the Chief of 
Naval Operation's letter of 9 March 1937; it states 
"Model designations of aircraft, published by the 
Bureau of Aeronautics, employ the same functional 
designations and corresponding letters (or combina- 
tions thereof to indicate secondary as well as primary 
functions) as are listed herein. These model designa- 
tions, however, are distinct from and not to be con- 
fused with squadron names and abbreviations covered 
in the Order." The parallel relationship between the 
two systems is quite evident from this statement, as 
well as the confusion that develops when it is neces- 
sary to show the interdependence of the two systems 
(Aircraft Class Designation System and the Aircraft 
Squadron Designation System). 

The 1 July 1937 change to the aircraft carrier 
squadron numbering proved to be a disaster during 
the massive World War II expansion of naval aviation. 
With the large increase in the number of aircraft carri- 
ers and air groups (with their assigned carrier 
squadrons), combined with the movement of air 
groups from one carrier to another, it became impossi- 
ble to associate the air group's squadron numbers with 
the hull number of the carrier it was operating from 
during the war. The counterpart to this, the prolifera- 
tion of aircraft class designations, with its many primary 
and secondary missions, subsequently led to many 
squadron designation changes during World War II 
and the postwar period. By reviewing the "U.S. Navy 
Squadron Designation and Abbreviations" listing in 
Appendix 4, the reader will be able to identify all the 
changes that occurred in squadron designations 
between 1942 and 1948 or at any other time frame in 
naval aviation. 



The Squadron Designation System underwent 
changes similar to those previously mentioned in the 
Aircraft Class Designation System. A review of the 
changes in the Squadron Designation System will 
show the parallel developments between the two sys- 
tems. In July 1939, a modification was made to the 
Squadron Designation System that was set up in July 
1937. The modification standardized the numbering of 
patrol squadrons in reference to wings so that the first 
digit of a patrol squadron designation number became 
the same as the wing to which it was assigned. The 
Squadron Designation System that was set up in 1937, 
which numbered squadrons according to the hull 
number of its ship or division, became totally impracti- 
cal during World War II. In early 1941 the squadron 
designations in use included the following: 

VF for Fighting Squadrons 

VB for Bombing Squadrons 

VT for Torpedo Squadrons 

VS for Scouting Squadrons 

VJ for Utility Squadrons 

VX for Experimental Squadrons 

VP for Patrol Squadrons 

VN for Training Squadrons 

VO for Observation Squadrons 

VCS for Cruiser Scouting Squadrons 

World Warll 

During the early part of World War II many new 
squadron designations were established. The following 
new squadron designations became effective in 1942: 

ZP for Blimp Squadrons 
VGS for Escort Scouting Squadrons 
VGF for Escort Fighting Squadrons 
VR for Transport Squadrons 

In late 1942 the Squadron Designation System setup 
in 1937, and modified in 1939, was discontinued. A 
new system was issued in January 1943 and became 
effective 1 March 1943. 29 According to this Navy 
Department Bulletin, all squadrons were numbered 
serially without regard to which carrier, battleship, 
cruiser, or shore station the squadron was assigned. 
The carrier squadrons that had VSB and VTB aircraft 
classes assigned were designated in this directive as 
VB and VT, respectively. Carrier-based dive bombing 
squadrons (VB) were numbered serially from 1 to 99 
and torpedo squadrons (VT) from 1 to 65. There were 
no changes in the designations for these two types of 
squadrons under this new directive; however, as the 
war progressed, the VT squadron numbers increased 



29 SecNav Confidential Itr (SC) A3-1/VV Serial 0104540 of January 
2, 1943, Naval Aircraft Squadrons, Designation and Renumbering of, 
issued as Navy Department Bulletin C-19 of January 15, 1943, effec- 
tive 1 March 1943. 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS- Volume I 13 



from 65 and continued into the three-digit series. 

Other squadron designation changes, effective 1 
March 1943, included: 

inshore patrol squadrons redesignated VS (scouting 
squadrons), 

escort fighting squadrons (VGF) became fighting 
squadrons (VF), 

escort scouting squadrons (VGS) redesignated com- 
posite squadrons (VC), 

patrol squadrons operating land-based aircraft became 
bombing squadrons (VB) with three-digit numbers. 
This separated them from the bombing squadrons 
(VB) that were carrier-based and had two-digit 
numbers. 

Squadron designations in existence in March 1943 



were as follows: 


VF 


Fighting Squadrons 


VB 


Bombing Squadrons (carrier-based) 


VB 


Bombing Squadrons (Patrol Squadrons flying 




land-based aircraft) 


VT 


Torpedo Squadrons 


VC 


Composite Squadrons 


VP 


Patrol Squadrons 


VS 


Scouting Squadrons (included carrier and 




land-based) 


ZP 


Blimp Squadrons 


VJ 


Utility Squadrons 


VR 


Transport Squadrons 


VD 


Photographic Squadrons 


VO 


Observation Squadrons 


VCS 


Cruiser Scouting Squadrons 



Numerous modifications were made to this 
Squadron Designation System during the remainder of 
the war. On 1 October 1944, patrol squadrons (VP) 
and multiengine land-based bombing squadrons (VB) 
were redesignate patrol bombing squadrons (VPB). 
Additional new squadron designations in the Squadron 
Designation System during the latter part of World War 
II included: 

VBF Bombing Fighting Squadrons 

VFN Night Fighter Squadrons 

VTN Night Torpedo Squadrons 

VOF Observation Fighter Squadrons 

VOC Composite Spotting Squadrons 

VE Evacuation Squadrons 

VH Rescue Squadrons 

VK Special Air Task Force Squadrons 

ZJ Blimp Utility Squadron 

VRE Air Transport Evacuation Squadron 

VRJ Utility Transport Squadron 

VRF Ferry Transport Squadrons 

VRS Service Transport Squadron 

VOS Air Spotting Squadrons 



Post World War II and the late 1940s 

In 1946, to complement the change in the Aircraft 
Class Designation System (or Class Designation of 
Naval Aircraft) instituted by Aviation Circular Letter 
Number 43-46, the Navy issued a major revision to its 
method of designating naval aircraft squadrons. On 22 
July 1946, a Secretary of Navy letter established a new 
System of Squadron Designations to be effective 1 
September 1946. 30 The Secretary of Navy letter was 
issued as Navy Department Bulletin 46-1543 of 31 July 
1946; however, an All Navy Bulletin (ALNAV) 482-46 
postponed the effective date of the Secretary of Navy 
letter. The redesignation of naval aircraft squadrons 
issued by the Secretary of Navy letter became effective 
on 15 November 1946 in accordance with Navy 
Department Bulletin 46-2123. 31 The carrier squadron 
designations VB and VT were replaced by the designa- 
tion VA for attack squadrons. This was the first use of 
the designation VA for attack squadrons. Squadron 
designations in existence as a result of the 15 
November 1946 change were as follows: 



VF 


Fighting Squadrons 


VA 


Attack Squadrons 


VCN 


Night Composite Squadrons 


VP-HL 


Heavy Patrol Squadrons (landplane) 


VP-ML 


Medium Patrol Squadrons (landplane) 


VP-MS 


Medium Patrol Squadrons (seaplane) 


VP-AM 


Amphibian Patrol Squadrons 


VPM 


Meteorological Squadrons 


ZP 


Blimp Squadrons 


VR 


Transport Squadrons 


VRU 


Transport Utility Squadrons 


VRF 


Transport Ferry and Service Squadrons 


VX 


Experimental and Development Squadrons 


VO 


Observation Squadrons 


VU 


Utility Squadrons 


VPP 


Photographic Squadrons 


VN 


Training Squadrons 



With the establishment of attack squadrons, many of 
the old VT and VB squadrons were redesignated VA 
squadrons. The following is a list of VT and VB 
squadrons redesignated as attack squadrons on 15 
November 1946: 32 

VB-4 redesignated VA-1A 
VB-74 redesignated VA-1B 
VT-41 redesignated VA-1E 
VT-58 redesignated VA-1L 



30 SecNav Itr Serial 203P517, OP-517-B16-EPA:ls of 22 July 1946. 

31 Navy Department Bulletin 46-2123, Redesignation and 
Renumbering of Fleet Air Groups and Squadrons, Op-55-C-KB, 
Serial 3P55C of 31 October 1946. 

32 CNO Itr Naval-Marine Aviation Unit Designations, History of, 
rest, serial 4184P33, A12-1 of 15 December 1947. 



14 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS- Volume I 



VT-4 redesignated VA-2A 
VT-74 redesignated VA-2B 
VT-42 redesignated VA-2E 
VB-3 redesignated VA-3A 
VB-75 redesignated VA-3B 
VT-3 redesignated VA-4A 
VT-75 redesignated VA-4B 
VB-5 redesignated VA-5A 
VB-17 redesignated VA-5B 
VT-5 redesignated VA-6A 
VT-17 redesignated VA-6B 
VB-18 redesignated VA-7A 
VT-18 redesignated VA-8A 
VB-20 redesignated VA-9A 
VT-20 redesignated VA-10A 
VB-11 redesignated VA-11A 
VT-11 redesignated VA-12A 
VB-81 redesignated VA-13A 
VT-81 redesignated VA-14A 
VB-153 redesignated VA-15A 
VT-153 redesignated VA-16A 
VB-82 redesignated VA-17A 
VT-82 redesignated VA-18A 
VB-19 redesignated VA-19A 
VT-19 redesignated VA-20A 
VB-98 redesignated VA-21A 
VT-98 redesignated VA-22A 

The suffix letters attached to the above designations 
identifies the squadron's assignment to a particular 
type of carrier air group and its assignment to a Battle 
Carrier or Attack Carrier. The "A" suffix was for Attack 
Carrier assignments and the "B" was for Battle Carriers. 

On 6 December 1946, VA-19A became the first fleet 
operational squadron to have an attack-designated air- 
craft assigned. The development of a single-seat air- 
plane to execute the missions and functions of the 
VSB and VTB aircraft classes and the consolidation of 
these missions into attack squadrons, vice VT and VB 
squadrons, had finally evolved. 

The last major overall change to the Squadron 
Designation System occurred on 1 September 1948. 
The VF and VA carrier squadrons were assigned two 
or three digit numbers. The first digit number was the 
same as the parent air group number. The suffix letters 
under the old system were dropped, as an example, 
VA-22A would have dropped the "A" letter at the end 
of the designation. Patrol squadrons reverted to the 
simple VP designation, instead of using the four sepa- 
rate designations of VP-HL, VP-ML, VP-MS, and VP- 
AM. Special designations for transport squadrons, such 
as VRF and VRU, became VR. Some VC squadrons 
became VAW to reflect their air warning mission. As a 
result of the 1 September 1948 change to the 
Squadron Designation System, the following squadron 
designations were in existence: 



VF 


Fighter Squadrons 


VA 


Attack Squadrons 


VC 


Composite Squadrons 


VP 


Patrol Squadrons 


ZP 


Blimp Squadrons 


VU 


Utility Squadrons 


VR 


Transport Squadrons 


VX 


Experimental and Development Squadrons 


VO 


Observation Squadrons 


HU 


Helicopter Squadrons 


VAW 


Carrier Air Early Warning Squadrons 



Numerous modifications have been made to the 
Squadron Designation System issued in September 
1948, however, these changes have been made on a 
case by case basis. The Navy has not issued a major 
directive to change the Squadron Designation System 
since 1948. 

The 1950s, 1960s, 1970s and 1980s 

Since this volume of the Dictionary of American 
Naval Aviation Squadrons is dealing primarily with 
VA designations and its derivatives, the remaining dis- 
cussion will deal only with those designations. 
Various modifications to the VA squadron designation 
occurred between 1946 and the present. Modifications 
to VA squadron designations included the establish- 
ment of VA(AW), VAH, and VAL squadron designa- 
tions. The VAH designation was established in the 
mid-1950s to identify heavy attack squadrons which 
also had been VC (Composite) squadrons. Their pri- 
mary mission was the delivery of nuclear weapons 
from carriers. The VA(AW) designation was also estab- 
lished in the mid-1950s to identify squadrons that 
were all-weather capable. The VAL (light attack 
squadron) designation was established during the 
Vietnam conflict and only one VAL squadron was 
established. Its mission was to provide surveillance 
and offensive operations in support of the river patrol 
forces based in South Vietnam, as well as air support 
for SEALs (Sea-Air-Land team) and combined U.S. 
Army, Navy, and South Vietnamese operations. 

Numerous other derivatives of the VA squadron des- 
ignation were established, including VAP, VAQ, VAW, 
VAK, and VA(HM); however, the primary mission of 
these squadrons did not involve an attack role. The 
most likely reason for the use of the VA in these 
squadron designations may have been because the ini- 
tial aircraft used by or assigned to the squadrons was 
a modified attack aircraft. 

The most recent modification to the VA squadron 
designation is the VFA designation. The evolution of 
the VFA (fighter attack and later strike fighter) 
squadron designation involved several traditional fac- 
tors that have influenced aircraft and squadron desig- 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS- Volume I 15 



nations in the past, as well as the addition of certain 
economic and political aspects. The following are 
some of the factors that played a role in the creation 
of the VFA designation: 

• increased cost factors surrounding the acquisition of 
F-14 Tomcats 

• Congressional emphasis on achieving greater com- 
monality between Navy and Air Force aircraft (par- 
ticularly with regard to adopting a derivative of the 
Air Force's Air Combat Fighter, which involved a 
competitive flyoff between the YF-17 and YF-16 in 
the early 1970s) 

• the Navy's need for aircraft with new performance, 
electronics, and weaponry technology to counter the 
progressively more sophisticated Soviet aircraft 

• the Navy's need for an aircraft to replace overage 
and outdated tactical aircraft and maintain approved 
tactical force levels 

• a need to provide a multipurpose aircraft capable of 
performing fighter, attack, and support roles, thereby, 
reducing the different types of aircraft required to be 
supported by the Navy, especially for those assigned 
to the carriers 

On 13 November 1980, the Navy's first fighter 
attack squadron, using the VFA designation, was 
established as VFA-125. The squadron was established 
with the mission of training fighter and attack pilots 
to fly the F/A-18 Hornet. On 25 March 1983, VFA-des- 
ignated squadrons were changed from fighter attack 
to strike fighter squadrons, but the VFA acronym 
remained the same. 

The similarities between the Squadron Designation 
System and the Naval Aircraft Class System may be 
seen by making a final comparison between the two 
systems as they currently exist. The following is a list- 
ing of the current squadron designations: 

VF Fighter Squadron 

VA Attack Squadron 

VFA Strike Fighter Squadron 

VAW Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron 

VS Sea Control Squadron 

HS Carrier Helicopter Antisubmarine Squadron 

HC Helicopter Combat Support Squadron 

HSL Helicopter Antisubmarine Squadron Light 

HM Helicopter Mine Countermeasures Squadron 

VP Patrol Squadron 

VR Fleet Logistic Squadron 

VRC Fleet Logistic Support Squadron 

VC Fleet Composite Squadron 

VQ Fleet Air Reconnaissance Squadron 

VX Air Test and Evaluation Squadron 

VXE Antarctic Development Squadron 

VXN Oceanographic Development Squadron 

VAQ Tactical Electronic Warfare Squadron 

VPU Patrol Squadron Special Projects Unit 



VFC Fighter Squadron Composite 

VT Training Squadron 

HT Helicopter Training Squadron 

HCS Helicopter Combat Support Special Squadron 

The basic mission symbols for military aircraft class- 
es listed in the DOD Model Designation of Military 
Aerospace Vehicles for 1990 were as follows: 



A 


Attack 


B 


Bomber (not used by the Navy) 


C 


Transport 


E 


Special Electronic Installation 


F 


Fighter 


0 


Observation 


P 


Patrol 


R 


Reconnaissance 


S 


Antisubmarine 


T 


Trainer 


U 


Utility 


X 


Research 



In the Navy's last publication of the Allowances and 
Location of Naval Aircraft (March 1988) the aircraft 
class listing was as follows: 



VF 


Fighter 


VA 


Attack 


VS 


Antisubmarine 


VP 


Patrol 


VW 


Early Warning 


VR 


Transport 


VG 


In-flight refueling 


VO 


Observation 


VU 


Utility 


VT 


Trainer 


VK 


Drones 


H 


Rotary Wing 



The interplay between the two systems is evident 
from the comparisons presented. The "Naval 
Aeronautic Organization for Fiscal Year 1923" estab- 
lished the precedent for the corresponding relation- 
ship between Aircraft Class Designations and the 
abbreviated designations used for aircraft squadrons 
and their missions. From this point on, a parallel asso- 
ciation can be drawn between the Squadron 
Designation System and the Aircraft Class Designation 
System. This concept has remained a viable union for 
naval aviation since 17 June 1922, even though numer- 
ous changes have occurred within the aircraft classes 
and squadron designations since 1922. 

Modifications to these two systems were, and are, 
constantly being made to keep pace with the advances 
in aircraft capabilities and changes in mission require- 
ments and tactical approaches utilized by the 
squadrons. Needless to say, there have always been 
exceptions to the rule in this association between the 
two systems. Special aircraft class designations have 



16 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



existed at various times without having a correspond- 
ing squadron designation and vice versa. However, on 
the whole, aircraft class designations have had corre- 
sponding, or been associated with similar, squadron 
designations since 1922. 

The use of common letter designations in the Aircraft 
Class Designation System and the Squadron Desig- 
nation System leaves no doubt about the parallel con- 
nection between the two systems. It was only logical 
that when a new type of aircraft with advanced operat- 
ing capabilities and new weapon systems was intro- 
duced there would be a corresponding development 
for a new type of squadron. The interplay of technolo- 
gy and tactics continue to be the dominating factors in 
developing aircraft class and squadron designations. 



If the trend toward consolidation of missions into 
single airframes continues, the types of fixed-wing air- 
craft operating from the deck of a carrier could be 
reduced to only four different planes or even less. The 
trend, no doubt, will continue toward the use of a 
common airframe that may be designed to perform a 
wide variety of missions by the addition of specific 
external pods or interchangeable payloads. The AD 
(A-l) Skyraider is an example of the use of a common 
airframe that was modified to perform a variety of mis- 
sions other than the primary one it had been designed 
to fulfill. The Navy's Squadron Designation System and 
Aircraft Designation System will undoubtedly continue 
to undergo other major revisions in the future to keep 
pace with changing defense requirements. 



CHAPTER 2 

Attack Squadron Histories (VA) 

VA-1E to VA-873 



VA-1E 

Lineage 

Established as Torpedo Squadron FORTY ONE (VT- 
41) on 26 March 1945. 

Redesignated Attack Squadron ONE E (VA-1E) on 15 
November 1946. 

Disestablished on 1 September 1948. The first and 
only squadron to be designated VA-1E. 

Squadron Insignia and Nickname 

VT-4l's insignia was approved by CNO on 18 July 
1945. The insignia depicted the multi-armament capa- 
bility of the squadron's 
aircraft. Colors for the 
insignia were: light blue 
background with white 
cloud outlined in black; 
yellow torpedo with 
black markings; the 
machine gun and rock- 
ets were gray with black 
markings and the bomb 
was black; the shell and 
mouth of the turtle were 
green, while the arms, 
legs, neck and upper 
face were orange; the 
flight helmet and lower shell of the turtle were brown 
and the goggles were black. The outer circle of the 
insignia was outlined in black. 

After VT-41 was redesignated VA-1E, the squadron 
apparently continued to use its original insignia. There 
is no record of approval for a VA-1E insignia. 
Nickname: unknown. 

Chronology of Significant Events 

1 Mar 1946; Commander Air Force Pacific Fleet des- 
ignated the primary mission of VA-1E as antisubmarine 
warfare (ASW). 

4 Dec 1946: Escort Carrier Air Group 1 (CVEG-1) 
was assigned to Badoeng Strait (CVE 116) with VA-1E 
as part of this Hunter-Killer ASW team. 

1947-1948: Squadron conducted Hunter-Killer ASW 
operations intermittently from Badoeng Strait (CVE 
116) in the western Pacific off the coast of California. 



Home Port Assignments 




Squadron insignia approved for 
use by VT-41. 



location 

NAS Seattle 
NAS Pasco 
NAS Seattle 
NAAS Arlington 
MCAAF Gillespie 
NAS San Diego 



Assignment Date 

26 Mar 1945 
15 Apr 1945 
04 Jul 1945 
10 Jul 1945 
01 Aug 1945 
19 Sep 1945 



LT Joseph P. Keigher (acting) 
LT Charles A. Collins 
LCDR Kent M. Cushman 
LCDR Harold A. Robinson 



Commanding Officers 

Date Assumed Command 

26 Mar 1945 
29 Apr 1945 
14 Sep 1946 
24 Nov 1947 



Type of Aircraft 



TBM-1/1C 

TBM-3 

TBF-1 

TBF-1C/P 

TBM-3E 

TBM-3S 



Aircraft Assignment 

Date Type First Received 

26 Mar 1945 
26 Mar 1945 
Apr 1945 
May 1945 
May 1945 
1948 



Air Wing Assignments 

Air Wing Tail Code 

CVEG-41/CVEG-1* BS 



Assignment Date 

26 Mar 1945 



* CVEG-41 was redesignated CVEG-1 on 15 November 1946. 




A squadron TBM-3S Avenger in flight, June 1950 (Courtesy Robert 
Lawson Collection). 



17 



1 8 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



At 



9 



VA-1L 

Lineage 

Established as Torpedo Squadron FIFTY EIGHT (VT- 
58) on 19 March 1946. 

Redesignated Attack Squadron ONE L (VA-1L) on 15 
November 1946. 

Disestablished on 20 November 1948. The Navy's 
first and only squadron to be designated VA-1L. 

Squadron Insignia and Nickname 

CNO approved an insignia for VT-58 on 1 July 1946. 

The insignia represents 
the squadron's multimis- 
sion, day-and-night car- 
rier operational capabili- 
ties. Insignia colors 
were: a red background 
outlined in black; the 
aircraft and ship were 
black with white mark- 
ings; lightning bolts 
were silver; lettering 
Insignia approved for use by VT-58. was yellow with black 

outlines; upper half of 
the day circle was light blue and lower half was dark 
blue; the sun, moon and stars were yellow; and the 
night circle was dark blue on top and black on the 
bottom. 

There is no record of approval for a VA-1L insignia. 
Nickname: unknown. 

Chronology of Significant Events 

Mar 1946: The squadron's mission, when estab- 
lished, was to work with the Operational 
Development Force United States Fleet (COMOPDEV- 
FOR). That organization's duties included the opera- 
tional test and evaluation of new weapons, equipment 
and methods for use by the fleet; reporting the results; 
and recommending required training, operating proce- 
dures and tactical doctrine. To accomplish this mis- 
sion, the squadron operated three different types of 
aircraft, the F6F-5N, SB2C-5 and TBM-3, giving them a 
day and night capability. 

13 Dec 1946: The squadron's F6F-5Ns were trans- 
ferred to VF-1L; thereafter, VA-1L operated only the 
SB2Cs and TBMs. 

4 Mar 1947: When the squadron received the TBM-3W 
aircraft, it also received qualified personnel to support 
and operate the airborne early warning (AEW) TBMs. 

4 Apr-5 May 1947: The squadron operated aboard 
Saipan (CVL 48) during her shakedown cruise in the 
Caribbean. 



Feb 1948: Squadron aircraft participated in a fly-over 
during the inauguration ceremonies in Caracas, 
Venezeula, for President-elect Romulo Gallegos. 

20 Nov 1948: When VA-1L was disestablished, ele- 
ments of this squadron, as well as elements from VE- 
IL and Light Carrier Air Group 1 (CVLG-1), were com- 
bined to form Aircraft Development Squadron 3 
CVX-3). 



Home Port Assignments 



Location 

NAAS Fentress 
NAS Atlantic City 



Assignment Date 

19 Mar 1946 
19Jun 1946 



Commanding Officers 



LT Dean S. Laird (acting) 
LCDR Samuel G. Parsons 
LCDR John W. Shong 
LCDR Laurence W. Abbott, Jr. 



Date Assumed Command 

19 Mar 1946 
29 Apr 1946 

20 Aug 1946 
13 Jun 1948 



Aircraft Assignment 



Type of Aircraft 



F6F-5N 



SB2C-5 



TBM-3/3E 

TBM-3N 

TBM-3W 



XBT2D-1 
AD-2 



Date Type First Received 

May 1946 
May 1946 
May 1946 
Dec 1946 

04 Mar 1947 
Jan 1948 

19 Oct 1948 




A squadron TBM Avenger catches the wire aboard Saipan (CVL 48) 
(Courtesy Robert Lawson Collection). 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS-Volume I 1 9 



Major Overseas Deployments 

Date of Date of Air Type of Area of 

Departure Return Wing Carrier Aircraft Operation 

07 Feb 1948 24 Feb 1948 CVLG-1 CVL 48 TBM-3N/E Carib 



Air Wing Assignments 

Air Wing Tail Code Assignment Date 

CVLG-58/CVLG-1* SA 19 Mar 1946 



* CVLG-58 was redesignated CVLG-1 on 15 November 1946. 



20 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



VA-12 

Lineage 

Established as Bomber-Fighter Squadron FOUR 
(VBF-4) on 12 May 1945. 

Redesignated Fighter Squadron TWO A (VF-2A) on 
15 November 1946. 

Redesignated Fighter Squadron TWELVE (VF-12) on 
2 August 1948. 

Redesignated Attack Squadron TWELVE (VA-12) on 
1 August 1955, the first squadron to be assigned the 
VA-12 designation. 

Disestablished on 1 October 1986. 

Squadron Insignia and Nickname 

The squadron's first insignia was approved by CNO 
on 19 December 1945. Insignia colors were as follows: 

crimson circular back- 
ground; four of spades 
on white background 
with black markings; 
black bomb with white 
eyes, mouth, arms and 
other white markings; 
brown gloves; gold 
wings; and pink fire on 
the bomb fuse. 

There are no records 
indicating VF-2A 
changed the VBF-4 
insignia following redes- 
ignation. In 1949, almost a year after VF-2A was redes- 
ignated VF-12, the squadron requested approval for a 
new insignia. CNO approved VF-12's new insignia on 
29 September 1949- The theme of the new insignia, 
"Kiss of Death," was well illustrated: black background; 
white skull and letters; red lips; and the inner circle 
and squadron designation was outlined in red. 

When VF-12 was redesignated VA-12, the squadron 
continued to use the "Kiss of Death" insignia. It 
became a well-known insignia and was used by the 
squadron until its disestablishment in 1986. 
Nickname: Ubangis, Date unknown-1982 
Clinchers, 1982-1986 

Chronology of Significant Events 

5 Oct 1945: The squadron participated in an aerial 
parade over Washington, D.C., in honor of Fleet 
Admiral Chester W. Nimitz. It also engaged in several 
other air parades and exhibition flights during the 
month of October. 

6 Oct 1945: VBF-4's commanding officer, Lieutenant 
Commander Lackey, was killed during a training flight 
in an SNJ. 

21 Aug-19 Sep and Nov-Dec 1946: The squadron 




The squadron 's first approved 
insignia used by VBF-4. 




The squadron 's second insignia, the 
"Kiss of Death " design, was ap- 
proved for squadron use in 1949. 



operated ashore at 
Kobler Field, Saipan. 
Conducted training and 
preparations for special 
fleet exercises while 
shore based. 

26 Apr 1952: The 
squadron was 
embarked in Wasp (CV 
18) en route to the 
Mediterranean when 
the carrier collided with 
the Hobson (DMS 26) 
which sank along with 
her 176 men. There were no injuries to squadron 
personnel. The squadron's F2H-2s remained aboard 
until Wasp entered dry dock at New York to repair 
her catapults which were damaged in the collision. 

19 Aug 1953: While operating from Franklin D. 
Roosevelt (CVA 42) in the Mediterranean Sea, the 
squadron's commanding officer, Lieutenant Commander 
Breen, was lost at sea. 

Feb 1955: VA-12 supported the evacuation of 
Chinese Nationalist civilians and military personnel 
from the Tachen Islands which were being bombarded 
by the People's Republic of China. 

1 Aug 1955: With the redesignation of VF-12 to VA- 
12 and the acquisition of a new type of aircraft in 
December 1955, the F7U Cutlass, the squadron's mis- 
sion changed from jet intercept to special weapons 
attack. 

14-27 Nov I960: VA-12, embarked in Shangri-La 
(CVA 38), was part of the task force ordered to the 
coast of Central America to counter the infiltration of 
Cubans into Guatemala and Nicaragua. 

21-27 Nov 1961: VA-12, embarked in Franklin D. 
Roosevelt, operated off the coast of the Dominican 
Republic to support the newly established democratic 
government. 

Apr 1962: VA-12 was selected by CNO to conduct 
"Operation Trap," a test firing of Bullpup missiles to 
evaluate their usefulness to the Navy. The test firings 
took place while the squadron was based at their 
home port of NAS Cecil Field. 

Jul- Aug 1963: A-4C detachments from the squadron 
operated aboard Essex (CVS 9) and Intrepid (CVS 11) 
as fighter support for antisubmarine exercises. These 
operations were also used to help develop and evalu- 
ate ASW tactics and doctrine. 

8-29 Aug 1964: Franklin D. Roosevelt and her air 
wing were ordered to operated in the vicinity of 
Cyprus after fighting escalated between Turkish and 
Greek forces on the island. 

Aug 1966: VA-12 flew its first combat sortie since its 
establishment 21 years earlier. The squadron complet- 
ed its Vietnam deployment in December 1966 without 
sustaining any combat damage to its aircraft. 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS — Volume I 2 1 



12 Nov 1966: VA-12's commanding officer, 
Commander Robert C. Frosio, was lost at sea during 
flight operations from Franklin D. Roosevelt. 

14 Dec 1966: Commander Barnett, commanding 
officer of VA-12, led a 42-plane strike against a heavily 
defended target in North Vietnam and for which he 
was awarded the Silver Star. 

Oct-Dec 1973: Independence (CV 62) and VA-12 
took station southeast of Crete after the outbreak of 
war between Israel, Egypt and Syria on 6 October 
1973. During this period of operations the squadron 
conducted surveillance flights against a large Soviet 
fleet that had sortied from the Black Sea. 

Aug 1974: As a result of the crisis on Cyprus, 
Independence, with VA-12 aboard, was stationed off 
the coast of Crete. Tensions increased significantly on 
19 August when the American Ambassador to Cyprus, 
Roger Davies, was killed by a Cypriot mob. The squadron 
prepared for possible assistance in the evacuation of 
American nationals. It flew surveillance of Greek, Turkish 
and Soviet naval and merchant activity in the area. 

7 Sep 1974: The squadron participated in the search 
for victims of a TWA airliner crash in the Ionian Sea. 
No survivors were located. 

15 Apr 1980: VA-12 deployed aboard Dwight D. 
Eisenhower (CVN 69) to the Indian Ocean in response 
to the Iran-American Embassy hostage situation. The 
squadron was at sea for 254 days with only one port call 
during the entire eight and one-half month deployment. 

Jun, Aug and Sep 1983: VA-12 operated from Dwight 
D. Eisenhower while on station off the coast of 
Lebanon. The squadron flew in support of the multi- 
national peacekeeping force stationed in Beirut. 

23 Oct 1983: Dwight D. Eisenhoiver and her air 
wing returned to the coast of Beirut after 241 Marines 
died in a terrorist-suicide attack there. 

1 Oct 1986: VA-12 was disestablished, bringing to a 
close the long history of the squadron and its motto 
"Kiss of Death." 



Commanding Officers 



Home Port Assignment 



Location 

NAS Alameda 
NAAS Watsonville 
NAS Wildwood 
NAAS Groton 
NAS Norfolk 

NAS San Diego (North Island) 

NAS Norfolk 

NAAS Cecil Field 

NAS Jacksonville 

NAAS Cecil Field 

NAS Jacksonville 

NAAS Cecil Field 

NAS Jacksonville 

NAS Cecil Field 



Assignment Date 

12 May 1945 
21 May 1945 

09 Jul 1945 
09 Sep 1945 
18 Jan 1946 

15 Jul 1946 
21 Feb 1949 
25 Feb 1949 

24 Mar 1950 

25 Mar 1951 
07 Oct 1951 
28 Feb 1952 
16 May 1952 

13 Oct 1952 





Date Assumed Command 


LTJG Joseph F. Simpson (acting) 


1 2 M'A\i 


1 945 


LTJG John S. Tyler (acting) 


1 5 Mav 


1945 


LLDKjonn ri. LacKey 


_l_ y ivicly 


1 94S 


lldk William L. Loniey 


06 Oct 


1945 


lldk Kiciiara ri. Lruinn 


21 Jun 


1947 


lldk w. ri. Kiigore (.acting) 


07 Mav 


1948 


lldk Konaia w. rioei 


02 Jul 


1948 


lluk AiDeri w. rNewnan, jr. 


OH Mav 


1949 


CDR Brainard T. Macomber 


29 Jun 


1 950 


LLUKjonn l. waiter 


02 Nov 


1951 


T ri )l^ Jr\hr\ A/T Rt-PPn 

LLUKjonn ivi. rjieen 


15 Dec 


1952 

iy j 


lluk riamnton ivicwnorter 


19 Aim 


1953 


LUK rreciencK Lr. rvicia 


Oct 


1954 


luk raui ri. uurana 




1955 

±y j j 


LUK Ma.rsna.JU r. Deputy } jr. 


Tan 
jail 


1957 


CDR Charles A. Pendleton, Jr. 


10 Jan 


1 QS8 


ldk William ri. rsanow 


22 Jan 


1 QS9 

±y jy 


luk Kicnarci j . Deprez 


Mar 




CDR John E. Hansen 


18 Tun 


1 0(^1 

17U J- 


LUK Kouert b. uecnsiin 


14 Tim 


1962 


luk Max b. iviaian 


14 Tim 


1963 


CDR Burton E. Bergkind 


15 Tun 


1964 


(TAP Tom^c TA AY/kirt^ 

luk j ames u . w nyie 


30 Apr 


1965 


LUK Kooeri L. riosio 


Apr 


1966 


luk Lreraici r. rsarnett 


1M Nov 

J.LJ 1 "1 W V 


1966 


LUK Austin L. D rsrien, jr. 


21 Nov 


1 967 


luk Kicnaru m. rietcner 


Nov 


1968 


luk waiter k. retersen 


30 Sen 


1969 


luk uaniei ri. l. Lrnoison 


10 Till 


1 970 

17/u 


LLUK rienry b. iNelson 


l6 Jun 


1971 

i.y 1 i. 


CDR Anthony A. Less 


30 Tun 


1972 


LUKjonn r. Lainoun 


Oct 


1 973 

±y 1 j 


CDR James M. Hickerson 




1975 

± y / j 


(TAP Pon^ AY7" A/Ion 
LDK Lrai^ W. JViau 


14 Feb 


1976 


CDR David R. Edwards 


10 May 


1977 


CDR Richard B. Curtis 


26 Jul 


1978 


CDR Robert A. Maier 


01 Nov 


1979 


CDR Audrey B. Whitten 


26 Feb 


1981 


CDR James M. Gill 


19 May 


1982 


CDR Michael W. Samuels 


01 Oct 


1983 


CDR Harry M. Conner 


21 May 


1985 



Aircraft Assignment 



Type of Aircraft 



F6F 



F4U-1/1D and FG-1/1D 
F4U-4 



F8F-1/1B 



F6F-5P 



Date Type First Received 

23 May 1945 
23 May 1945 
30 Sep 1945 
May 1947 
May 1947 



22 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 




Aircraft Assignment — Continued 



Type of Aircraft 


Date 


type birst Received 


F2H-1 




01 Sep 1950 


F2H-2 




Dec 1950 


F7U-3 




Dec 1955 


A4D-1 




Apr 1957 


A4D-2 




Jan 1958 


A4D-2N (A-4C)* 




08 Jan 1962 


A-4E 




08 Mar 1965 


A-4C 




09 Mar 1967 


A-7E 




01 Apr 1971 


•In 1962, the Navy' 


> aircraft designation system 


was changed and 


the A4D-2N was redesignated the A-4C Skyhawk. 






A flight of squadron F4U-4s deployed aboard Tarawa (CV 40) oper- 
ating from Naval Air Base Kobler, Saipan, in August 1946. 



Major Overseas Deployments 



Date of 


Date of 


Air 




Type of 


Area of 


Departure 


Return 


Wing 


Carrier 


Aircraft 


Operation 


28 Jun 1946 


15 Jul 1946 


CVG-4 


CV 40 


F4U-4 


Transit to West 
Coast via Panama 
Canal 


01 Aug 1946 


29 Apr 1947 


CVG-4/CVAG-1 


CV 40 


F4U-4 


WestPac 


01 Oct 1948 


21 Feb 1949 


CVG-1 


CV 40 


F8F-1 


World Cruise 


20 Mar 1951 


06 Oct 1951 


CVG-1 


CVB 43 


F2H-2 


Med 


24 May 1952 


11 Oct 1952 


CVG-1 


CV 18 


F2H-2 


Med/NorLant 


11 Jun 1953 


03 Dec 1953 


CVG-1 


CVA 42 


F2H-2 


Med 


27 Dec 1954 


14 Jul 1955 


CVG-1 


CVA 41 


F2H-2 


World Cruise 


02 Sep 1958 


12 Mar 1959 


CVG-10 


CVA 59 


A4D-2 


Med 


06 Sep I960 


20 Oct I960 


CVG-10 


CVA 38 


A4D-2 


NorLant 


14 Nov I960 


27 Nov I960 


CVG-10 


CVA 38 


A4D-2 


Carib 


15 Feb 1961 


28 Aug 1961 


CVG-1 


CVA 42 


A4D-2 


Med 




The squadron's F2H Banshee, second from left, in formation with other aircraft from Air Group 1. 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 23 



Major Overseas Deployments — Continued 



Date of 


Date of 


Air 




Type of 


Area of 


Departure 


Return 


Wing 


Carrier 


Aircraft 


Operation 


19 Nov 1961 


30 Nov 1961 


CVG-1 


CVA 42 


A4D-2 


Carib 


14 Sep 1962 


22 Apr 1963 


CVG-1 


CVA42 


A4D-2N 


Med 


28 Apr 1964 


22 Dec 1964 


CVW-1 


CVA 42 


A-4C 


Med 


28 Jun 1965 


17 Dec 1965 


CVW-1 


CVA 42 


A-4E 


Med 


21 Jun 1966 


21 Feb 1967 


CVW-1 


CVA 42 


A-4E 


WestPac/Vietnam 


24 Aug 1967 


19 May 1968 


CVW-1 


CVA 42 


A-4C 


Med 


07 Jan 1969 


29 Jul 1969 


CVW-8 


CVA 38 


A-4C 


Med 


05 Mar 1970 


17 Dec 1970 


CVW-8 


CVS 38 


A-4C 


WestPac/Vietnan 


16 Sep 1971 


16 Mar 1972 


CVW-7 


CVA 62 


A-7E 


NorLant/Med 


21 Jun 1973 


19 Jan 1974 


CVW-7 


CVA 62 


A-7E 


Med 


19 Jul 1974 


21 Jan 1975 


CVW-7 


CV 62 


A-7E 


Med 


15 Oct 1975 


05 May 1976 


CVW-7 


CV 62 


A-7E 


NorLant/Med 


31 Mar 1977 


21 Oct 1977 


CVW-7 


CV 62 


A-7E 


Med 


16 Jan 1979 


13 Jul 1979 


CVW-7 


CVN 69 


A-7E 


Med 


15 Apr 1980 


22 Dec 1980 


CVW-7 


CVN 69 


A-7E 


IO 


20 Aug 1981 


07 Oct 1981 


CVW-7 


CVN 69 


A-7E 


NorLant 


05 Jan 1982 


13 Jul 1982 


CVW-7 


CVN 69 


A-7E 


Med 


27 Apr 1983 


02 Dec 1983 


CVW-7 


CVN 69 


A-7E 


Med 


08 May 1984 


20 Jun 1984 


CVW-7 


CVN 69 


A-7E 


NorLant 


10 Oct 1984 


08 May 1985 


CVW-7 


CVN 69 


A-7E 


Med 




Air Wing Assignments 



Air Wing 

CVG-4/CVAG-l/CVG-l* 
CVG-10 

CVG-l/CVW-lt 

CVW-8 

CVW-7 



Tail Code 

Tt 

AK 

AB 

AJ 

AG 



Assignment Date 

12 May 1945 
20 Jan 1958 
05 Dec I960 
25 Aug 1968 
1971 



* CVG-4 was redesignated CVAG-1 on 15 November 1946 and CVG- 
1 on 1 September 1948. 

t CVG-4 assigned the tail code T when it was assigned to the carrier 
Tarawa (CV 40) in January 1946. 

% Carrier Air Groups were redesignated Carrier Air Wings on 20 
December 1963, hence, CVG-1 became CVW-1. 





A squadron F7U-3 Cutlass, circa 1956 (Courtesy Robert Lawson 
Collection). 



A couple of squadron A-4Cs with markings from their deployment 
aboard Shangri-La with Air Group 8. 



Unit Awards Received 

Unit Award Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 



NAVE 


01 Jul 1964 


30 Jun 1965 


AFEM 


06 Jun 1983 


14 Jun 1983 




27 Jul 1983 


30 Aug 1983 




01 Sep 1983 


19 Oct 1983 




27 Oct 1983 


20 Nov 1983 


MUC 


11 Apr 1970 


06 Nov 1970 


NEM 


29 Apr 1980 


16 Jul 1980 




22 Jul 1980 


08 Dec 1980 




25 May 1983 


27 May 1983 



24 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



Unit Awards Received — Continued 



Unit Awards Received — Continued 



Unit Award 
NUC 

VNSM 



Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 



Unit Award 



Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 



29 Apr 1980 
21 Jul 1983 
30 Jul 1966 
09 Aug 1966 
01 Oct 1966 

19 Oct 1966 
24 Nov 1966 

20 Jan 1967 



10 Dec 1980 
20 Nov 1983 

12 Sep 1966 
03 Oct 1966 
14 Nov 1966 
28 Dec 1966 
21 Jan 1967 



RVNGC 



10 Apr 1970 
12 May 1970 
13Jun 1970 
28 Jul 1970 
30 Aug 1970 

20 Oct 1970 

21 Oct 1966 



02 May 1970 

29 May 1970 
04 Jul 1970 

19 Aug 1970 

30 Sep 1970 
07 Nov 1970 




A flight of squadron A-7E Corsair lis in their low-visibility paint scheme. 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 2 5 




VA-15 

Lineage 

Established as Torpedo Squadron FOUR (VT-4) on 
10 January 1942. 

Redesignated Attack Squadron TWO A (VA-2A) on 
15 November 1946. 

Redesignated Attack Squadron FIFTEEN (VA-15) on 
2 August 1948. 

Disestablished on 1 June 1969- The first squadron to 
be assigned the VA-15 designation. 

Squadron Insignia and Nickname 

The squadron's insignia was approved by BuAer on 
22 April 1942. The theme of the insignia was VT-4 

sweeps the seas. The 
lion represented the 
squadron's TBD-1 
Devastator, and the six 
teeth were for the num- 
ber of Devastators 
assigned to it. Colors in 
the insignia were as fol- 
lows: circular outline in 
black; background 
white; the sea a deep 
blue with pale blue 
marks, torpedo pearl 
gray with black outline 
and marks; lion ocher 
outlined in black with black markings; white eyes out- 
lined in black with black pupils; nose black; teeth 
white, lips and mouth red; and the broom was lemon 
yellow outlined in black with red dashes on lower 
part of broom. 

There is no record of VA-2A's changing the insignia 
following its redesignation from VT-4. Three years 

after the squadron was 
redesignated, VA-15 
requested a modification 
to the old VT-4 insignia. 
On 19 September 1951, 
CNO approved the 
modification. The lion 
was retained to repre- 
sent the strong attack 
capabilities of the 
squadron and the torpe- 
do was replaced by a 
missile. The background 
color of the upper half 
of the insignia was red 
to represent the flames of past targets, and the lower 
half was blue to indicate water and the squadron's car- 
rier-based capabilities. Other insignia colors included a 



The squadron's first insignia was 
approved for VT-4 by the Bureau 
of Aeronautics . 




In 1951, a modification to the 
squadron's original lion insignia 
was approved. 



white circular border; lion in gold with brown mark- 
ings; and the missile and ripples in the water white. 
This insignia remained with VA-15 until it was dises- 
tablished in 1969. 

Nickname: Valions, mid-1950s— 1969 

Chronology of Significant Events 

10 Jan 1942: Torpedo Squadron FOUR (VT-4) was 
established aboard Ranger (CV 4) while the ship was 
in port at Grassy Bay, Bermuda. 




A squadron TBD-1 launches from Ranger (CV 4) sometime in 
early 1942. 



8 Aug 1943: Ranger, with VT-4 aboard, met the con- 
voy with the liner Queen Mary, which was bringing 
Winston Churchill to North America for the Quebec 
Conference. 

Aug-Nov 1943: VT-4, while deployed aboard 
Ranger, operated as part of the British Home Fleet. 

4 Oct 1943: The squadron participated in Operation 
Leader and struck at shipping targets around Kunna 

Head, Norway, while 
other elements of CVG-4 
struck targets at Bodo, 
Norway. The squadron's 
TBF-1 Avengers, along 
with its escort of F4F 
Wildcats, destroyed a 
German freighter and a 
^^i^fc^^ small coaster and dam- 

aged a troop transport. 

Oct 1943: VT-4, flying 
from Ranger, operated 
with the British Second 
Battle Squadron and 
patrolled the waters of 
the Norwegian Sea. 
1 May 1944: CVG-4 reformed as a spare air group 
with a composition that was designed to include 36 
fighter aircraft (F6F), 36 scout-bomber aircraft (SB2C) 
and 18 torpedo aircraft (TBF/TBM). This air group 



Squadron TBFs attack a German 
coaster off the coast of Norway in 
October 1943. 



26 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



composition was organized to operate from the large 
deck carriers of the Essex class. Squadrons in CVG-4 
included VT-4, VF-4 and VB-4. This change also 
brought an end to Air Group FOUR'S operations 
aboard Ranger. 

Jul 1944: VT-4 and CVG-4 transferred from Atlantic 
to Pacific Fleet. 

15-21 Jul 1944: VT-4 aboard Barnes (CVE 20) en 
route to Pearl Harbor from San Diego. 

21 Sep 1944: During a pre-dawn sortie involving 
simulated torpedo tactics, three of the squadron's air- 
craft collided with each other, resulting in the loss of 
nine personnel, including the squadron's commanding 
officer, Lieutenant Commander Homer H. Hutcheson. 

4-17 Nov 1944: CVG-4 and VT-4 were temporarily 
embarked on Bunker Hill (CV 17) for operations in 
support of landings at Leyte. The squadron participat- 
ed in combat strikes at Ormoc Bay, Cavite and Clark 
Field. 

Dec 1944: The squadron participated in combat 
operations in support of landings on Mindoro. 

Jan 1945: While operating from Essex (CV 9), the 
squadron struck targets on Formosa, Luzon, Hainan 
and the Ryukyu Island chain as well as in French 
Indochina (Vietnam). Operations in Vietnam were 
around Saigon and Camranh Bay. These operations 
were in support of the continued assault against the 
Japanese in the Philippines. 

16 Feb 1945: The squadron conducted its first 
strikes against the home islands of Japan, hitting 
Mawatari airfield on Honshu. Other strikes against tar- 
gets on Honshu were conducted on 17 and 25 
February. 

19-22 Feb 1945: CVG-4 provided support for land- 
ings on Iwo Jima. 

1 Mar 1945: The airfield, facilities and shipping at 
Naha, Okinawa, were hit by squadron aircraft. 

4 Mar 1945: VT-4 disembarked from Essex at Ulithi 
completing the squadron's last combat cruise during 
World War II. 

9-23 Mar 1945: CVG-4 aboard Long Island (CVE 1) 
for passage from Ulithi to Pearl Harbor. VT-4 eventual- 
ly returned to the States in April 1945 for reforming 
following its combat cruise. 

15 Feb-15 Apr 1946: VT-4 along with other 
squadrons in CVG-4, participated in Tarawa's (CV 40) 
shakedown cruise in the Caribbean Sea following the 
ship's commissioning in December 1945. 

Nov 1946: Some squadron aircraft were fitted with 
sonobuoy gear and personnel were trained in antisub- 
marine missions as well as their normal torpedo-attack 
requirements. 

22 May 1950: VA-15, along with the other squadrons 
in CVG-1, were designated as training squadrons and 
CVG-1 as a training air group. The squadron's primary 
mission was the training of fleet pilots in attack air- 
craft. VA-15's training syllabus emphasized glide 



bombing, dive-bombing, rocket firing, day-and-night 
tactics and carrier qualifications in the AD Skyraider. 

13- 23 Sep 1952: VA-15, while deployed aboard 
Wasp (CVA 18), participated in the first NATO naval 
operation, Operation Mainbrace, conducted in the 
North Atlantic. 

Feb 1955: While deployed aboard Midway (CVA 
41), the squadron supported the evacuation of 
Chinese Nationalist civilians and military personnel 
from the Tachen Islands which were being bombarded 
by the People's Republic of China. 

Nov-Dec 1956: As a result of the Suez Crisis, VA-15 
deployed aboard Forrestal (CVA 59) and operated in 
the vicinity of the Azores. 

12 Sep 1958: VA-15 was assigned the additional mis- 
sion of in-flight refueling (Buddy Stores). 

14- 28 Nov I960: VA-15, temporarily assigned to 
CVG-10, deployed aboard Shangri-La (CVA 38) to the 
Caribbean Sea to guard against possible infiltration 
into Guatemala and Nicaragua by insurgent organiza- 
tions that were believed to have ties to Cuba. 

21-27 Nov 1961: VA-15, embarked in Franklin D. 
Roosevelt (CVA 42), operated off the coast of the 
Dominican Republic to support the newly established 
democratic government. 

Mar-Apr 1962: VA-15 deployed aboard Enterprise 
(CVAN 65) to the Caribbean and participated in the 
shakedown cruise of the world's first nuclear powered 
carrier. 

Aug 1965: VA-15 began training under VA-44 for 
transition to the A-4 Skyhawk. 

4 Apr-21 Nov 1966: VA-15 deployed to Vietnam as a 
component of CVW-10 embarked on Intrepid (CVS 
11). CVW-10 was an all-attack air wing comprised of 
four attack squadrons, two squadrons flying A-4 
Skyhawks and two squadrons with A-l Skyraiders. 

15 May 1966: The squadron flew its first combat 
mission since March 1945 when it was designated VT- 
4 and a member of Carrier Air Group 4. 



Home Port Assignments 



Location 


Assignment Date 


NAS Norfolk 


Mar 1942 


NAS Quonset Point 


Apr 1942 


NAAF Ayer (Fort Devens) 


May 1944 


NAS Pearl Harbor 


Jul 1944 


NAS Hilo Field 


Aug 1944 


NAS Alameda 


Apr 1945 


NAAS Watsonville 


21 May 1945 


NAS Quonset Point 


11 Jul 1945 


NAAF Groton 


Aug 1945 


NAS Norfolk 


Apr 1946 


NAS San Diego 


15 Jul 1946 


NAAS Cecil Field 


21 Mar 1949 


NAS Jacksonville 


09 Jan 1950 


NAAS Cecil Field (NAS)* 


29 Feb 1952 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS — Volume I 27 



Home Port Assignments — Continued 



Commanding Officers — Continued 



Location 

NAS Jacksonville 
NAS Oceana 
NAS Cecil Field 



Assignment Date 

Jul 1957 
Apr 1965 
Aug 1965 



* Naval Air Auxiliary Station, Cecil Field (NAAS Cecil Field), was 
redesignated Naval Air Station, Cecil Field (NAS), on 30 June 1952. 



Commanding Officers 



LT Wallace A. Sherrill 
LCDR David W. Taylor, Jr. 
LCDR Homer H. Hutcheson 
LT P. J. Davis, Jr. 
LT John Warren (acting) 
LT Frederic Viewig, Jr. (acting) 
LCDR J. P. Barron 
LCDR John A. Camera 
CDR Charles E. Roemer 
LCDR Robert A. Newcomb (acting) 
CDR Paul C. Lovelace 
LCDR Clay A. Mitchell (acting) 
LCDR John E. Lacouture 
LCDR Roy M. Isaman 
LCDR W. R. Prescott 
CDR John B. Bain 
CDR L. B. Jennings 
LCDR William J. Gray 
CDR J. Patterson, Jr. 



Date Assumed Command 

10 Jan 1942 
Dec 1942 
Dec 1943 
Sep 1944 
12 May 1945 

23 May 1945 
26 Sep 1945 

Jul 1946 
07 Jul 1947 

29 May 1948 

30 Aug 1948 
03 Jun 1950 

12 Jul 1950 
21 Dec 1951 
05 Jan 1953 
Jan 1954 

24 Aug 1955 
10 Dec 1957 
18 Sep 1959 



CDR Ted L. Farrell 
CDR David L. Munns 
CDR Joseph L. Coleman 
CDR R. G. Bowerman 
CDR Steven D. Marvin 
CDR Jack L. Gracey 
CDR Isaac F. Jones, Jr. 
CDR William K. Carr (acting) 
CDR William K. Carr 
CDR James M. Snyder 
CDR Richard G. Daly 



Date Assumed Command 

30 Nov I960 
06 Nov 1961 

26 Nov 1962 
04 Oct 1963 
01 Apr 1964 
12 Aug 1965 

27 Sep 1966 
29 Jan 1967 
10 Feb 1967 

14 Feb 1968 

15 Feb 1969 



Aircraft Assignment 



Type of Aircraft 



TBD-1 



TBF-1 

TBF-1C/TBM-1C 

TBM-3 

TBM-3E 

TBM-3Q 



AD-4 
AD-4L 
AD-6/A-1H* 



A-4B 
A-4C 



Date Type First Received 

Jan 1942 
Aug 1942 
Jan 1944 
Jan 1945 
May 1945 
1946 
19 Aug 1949 
08 Mar 1951 
May 1954 
Dec 1965 
Dec 1966 



: AD-6 designation changed in 1962 to A-1H. 




It is believed that this photo of the squadron's AD-6 Skyraiders was taken in 1962 when they operated aboard Enterprise (CVAN 65) during its 
shakedown cruise in the Caribbean. The squadron never made an overseas deployment aboard Enterprise. 



28 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



Major Overseas Deployment 





Date nf 






Tvt>e nf 


jli 1 t £7 yjj 


Departure 


Return 


Wing 


Carrier 


Aircraft 


Operation 


10 Jan 1942 


19 Mar 1942 


Ranger 


CV 4 


TBD-1 


Bermuda 






Air Group 








02 Jun 1942 


22 Jun 1942 


Ranger 


CV 4 


TBD-1 


Newfoundland 






Air Group 








08 Jan 1943 


30 Jan 1943 




CV 4 


TBF-1 


Morocco 


13 Feb 1943 


06 Mar 1943 




CV 4 


TBF-1 


Morocco 


23 Mar 1943 


27 Jul 1943 


CVG-4 


CV 4f 


TBF-1 


Newfoundland 


05 Aug 1943 


03 Dec 1943 


CVG-4 


CV 4 


TBF-1 


NorLant/ 












Norwegian Sea 


05 Nov 1944 


17 Nov 1944 


CVG-4 


CV 17 


TBM-1C 


Philippines 


22 Nov 1944 


02 Dec 1944 


CVG-4 


CV 9 


TBM-1C 


Philippines 


11 Dec 1944 


24 Dec 1944 


CVG-4 


CV 9 


TBM-1C 


Philippines 


30 Dec 1944 


26 Jan 1945 


CVG-4 


CV 9 


TBM-1C/3 


South China Sea/ 












Philippines/ 












Formosa/ Okinawa 


10 Feb 1945 


04 Mar 1945 


CVG-4 


CV 9 


TBM-3 


Japan/Iwo Jima/ 












Okinawa 


28 Jun 1946 


15 Jul 1946 


CVG-4 


CV 40 


TBM-3E/Q 


Transit to 












West Coast via 












Panama Canal 


01 Aug 1946 


29 Apr 1947 


CVG-4/CVAG-1 


CV 40 


TBM-3E/Q 


WestPac 


01 Oct 1948 


23 Dec 1948 


CVG-13 


CV 37 


TBM-3E 


WestPac 


20 Mar 1951 


06 Oct 1951 


CVG-1 


CVB 43 


AD-4/L 


Med 


24 May 1952 


11 Oct 1952 


CVG-1 


CVA 18 


AD-4/L 


Med/NorLant 


11 Jun 1953 


03 Dec 1953 


CVG-1 


CVA 42 


AD-4/B/L 


Med 


27 Dec 1954 


14 Jul 1955 


CVG-1 


CVA 41 


AD-6 


World Cruise 


07 Nov 1956 


12 Dec 1956 


CVG-1 


CVA 59 


AD-6 


Azores 


15 Jan 1957 


22 Jul 1957 


CVG-1 


CVA 59 


AD-6 


Med 


16 Aug 1957 


21 Oct 1957 


CVG-1 


CVA 59 


AD-6 


NorLant 


13 Feb 1959 


01 Sep 1959 


CVG-1 


CVA 42 


AD-6 


Med 


28 Jan I960 


24 Aug I960 


CVG-1 


CVA 42 


AD-6 


Med 


14 Nov I960 


28 Nov I960 


CVG-10 


CVA 38 


AD-6 


Carib 


15 Feb 1961 


28 Aug 1961 


CVG-1 


CVA 42 


AD-6 


Med 


19 Nov 1961 


30 Nov 1961 


CVG-1 


CVA 42 


AD-6 


Carib 


14 Sep 1962 


22 Apr 1963 


CVG-1 


CVA 42 


AD-6 


Med 


28 Apr 1964 


22 Dec 1964 


CVW-1 


CVA 42 


A-1H 


Med 


04 Apr 1966 


21 Nov 1966 


CVW-10 


CVS 11 


A-4B 


Med/IO/WestPac/ 












Vietnam 


11 May 1967 


30 Dec 1967 


CVW-10 


CVS 11 


A-4C 


Med/IO/WestPac/ 












Vietnam 


22 Jul 1968 


29 Apr 1969 


CVW-17 


CVA 59 


A-4C 


Med 



* Half of VT-4's aircraft were aboard for this cruise which ferried Army P-40 fighters to Morocco. There were no other squadrons from Rangefs 
Air Group aboard for this cruise. 

t Ranger returned to Boston during late March for four days of repairs and then back to Newfoundland for operations. 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 29 



Air Wing Assignments 



Unit Awards Received 



Air Wing 

Ranger Air Group/ 

CVG-4/CVAG-l/CVG-l* 
CVG-13 
CVG-1/CVW-1§ 
RCVW-4/VA-44** 
CVW-10 
CVW-17 



Tail Code 
Tt 

P 

T/ABi: 

AK 
AA 



Assignment Date 

10 Jan 1942 

23 Sep 1948 
23 Feb 1949 
Aug 1965 
Jan 1966 
16 Jan 1968 



* Ranger Air Group was formed on 1 July 1938. When VT-4 was 
established on 10 January 1942, it became part of the Ranger Air 
Group. The Ranger Air Group was redesignated Carrier Air Group 
FOUR (CVG-4) on 3 August 1943. CVG-4 was redesignated Attack 
Carrier Air Group ONE (CVAG-1) on 15 November 1946. The CVAG- 
1 designation was changed to CVG-1 on 1 September 1948. 

t This tail code assignment was used beginning in 1946. 

$ Carrier Air Group l's tail code was changed from T to AB in the 
latter part of 1957. The effective date was most likely the beginning 
of FY 58 (1 July 1957). 

§ Carrier Air Groups were redesignated Carrier Air Wings on 20 
December 1963; hence, CVG-1 became CVW-1. 

** During VA-15's transition to the A-4 Skyhawk, the squadron was 
assigned to VA-44, a Fleet Readiness Training Squadron, for opera- 
tional training. VA-44 was assigned to Readiness Attack Carrier Air 
Wing FOUR (RCVW-4). 



Unit Award 


Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 


NAVE 


1953 






01 Jul I960 


30 Jun 1961 




01 Jul 1961 


30 Jun 1962 


NUC 


12 Jun 1967 


08 Dec 1967 


RVNGC 


01 May 1966 


01 Oct 1966 




21 Jun 1967 


13 Jul 1967 




29 Jul 1967 


27 Aug 1967 




14 Sep 1967 


12 Oct 1967 




31 Oct 1967 


24 Nov 1967 


VNSM 


14 May 1966 


15 Jun 1966 




08 Jul 1966 


10 Aug 1966 




01 Sep 1966 


23 Sep 1966 




02 Oct 1966 


18 Oct 1966 




21 Jun 1967 


13 Jul 1967 




29 Jul 1967 


27 Aug 1967 




14 Sep 1967 


12 Oct 1967 




31 Oct 1967 


24 Nov 1967 


PUC 


11 Nov 1944 


25 Nov 1944 




14 Dec 1944 


16 Dec 1944 




03 Jan 1945 


22 Jan 1945 




16 Feb 1945 


01 Mar 1945 


Campaign Medal 






(European) 


02 Oct 1943 


06 Oct 1943 


NEM 


20 Nov 1961 


29 Nov 1961 





A flight of squadron A-4C Skyhawks sport markings from its combat cruise to Vietnam on Intrepid. Notice the bomb silhouettes next to the 
squadron insignia identifying the number of combat sorties flown by the aircraft. The unofficial "Tonkin Gulf Yacht Club " insignia is on the tail 
of the planes. 



30 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



VA-16 

Lineage 

Established as Attack Squadron SIXTEEN (VA-16) on 
1 June 1955. 

Disestablished on 1 March 1958. The first and only 
squadron to be designated VA-16. 

Squadron Insignia and Nickname 

VA-l6's insignia was approved by CNO on 24 July 
1956. The squadron's design centered around a black 
knight symbolizing valor and dedication to duty. The 
background was divided into two fields of gold and 
gray to signify vigilance both day and night. A blue 
border surrounded the insignia. VA-l6's motto was "Per 
Aspera Ad Metam" (through adversities to the target). 
There is no copy of the insignia in the squadron's file. 

Nickname: unknown 

Chronology of Significant Events 

Jun 1955: The squadron was established with a mis- 
sion of all-weather attack, including special (nuclear) 
weapons delivery. 



Apr 1957: VA-16, while deployed to the Mediter- 
ranean aboard Lake Champlain (CVA 39), operated off 
the coast of Lebanon during the Jordanian crisis. 

18 Dec 1957: VA-16 conducted the first air-to-air refu- 
eling by an operational AD Skyraider squadron using 
the "buddy store." The refueling took place over NAS 
Oceana and the squadron's AD-6 refueled an F9F-8. 

9 Jan 1958: The squadron conducted the first carri- 
er-based AD Skyraider in-flight refueling while operat- 
ing from Ranger (CVA 61). 

Home Port Assignments 

Location Assignment Date 

NAS Oceana 01 Jun 1955 

Commanding Officers 

Date Assumed Command 



CDR Bartholomew J. Connolly III 
CDR Richard W. Willis 



Aug 1955 
Jul 1957 



Aircraft Assignment 



Type of Aircraft 



AD-6 



Date Type First Received 

Jun 1955 



Date of 
Departure 

21 Jan 1957 



Date of 
Return 

27 Jul 1957 



Major Overseas Deployments 



Air 
Wing 

ATG-182 



Carrier 



CVA 39 



Type of 
Aircraft 

AD-6 



Area of 
Operation 

Med 



Air Wing Assignments 

Air Wing Tail Code Assignment Date 

ATG-182* O/ANf 01 Jun 1955 

* Air Task Group ONE EIGHTY TWO (ATG-182). Air Task Groups 
were non-established Carrier Air Group equivalents created for the 
first time during the Korean War when the requirement for such 
units exceeded the statutory limit on their number. They were com- 
posed of squadrons withdrawn from existing air groups, which had 
been determined to operate more effectively with four instead of a 
larger number of assigned squadrons. ATG-182 was organized in 
1955 and remained in existence until 1959. 

t Air Task Group 182*s tail code was changed from O to AN in the 
latter part of 1957. The effective date was most likely the beginning 
of FY 58 (1 July 1957). 




The squadron's AD-6 Skyraiders are spotted on the flight deck aft of 
the rear centerline elevator. This photo was taken in fune 1957 when 
Lake Champlain (CVA 39) was at anchor in Cannes, France. 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS — Volume I 3 1 



VA-21A 



Home Port Assignments 



Lineage 

Established as Bombing Squadron NINETY EIGHT 
(VB-98) on 28 August 1944. 

Redesignated Attack Squadron TWENTY ONE A 
(VA-21A) on 15 November 1946. 

Disestablished on 5 August 1947. The first and only 
squadron to be designated VA-21A. 



Squadron Insignia and 
Nickname 

There is no record of 
an approved insignia for 
VB-98. In 1947, an 
insignia was approved 
for VA-21A. However, 
squadron files do not 
indicate the colors used 
in the insignia. 

Nickname: unknown 




T/je squadron 's only officially 
approved insignia. 



Chronology of Significant Events 

28 Aug 1944: VB-98 was established with the mis- 
sion of providing a pool of trained dive-bomber pilots 
and aircrewmen for assignment as replacements to 
squadrons operating in the Pacific. The training 
included carrier landing qualifications, gunnery, bomb- 
ing and night flying. When VB-98 was redesignated 
VA-21A, the mission remained the same. 



Location 

NAAS Ventura (Oxnard) 
NAAS Los Alamitos 
NAS San Diego 



Assignment Date 

28 Aug 1944 

25 Nov 1944 

26 Aug 1946 



Commanding Officers 



LCDR James D. Ramage 
LCDR Martin D. Carmody 
LCDR Louis L. Bangs 
LT Mark T. Essling (acting) 
LCDR C. T. Durgin, Jr. 



Date Assumed Command 

05 Sep 1944 
01 Jun 1946 
18 Nov 1946 
07 Jun 1947 
03 Jul 1947 



Aircraft Assignment 



Type of Aircraft 



SB2C-3 



SBD-6 



SB2C-4 



FM-2 



SBD-5 



SBW-3 

SBW-4E 

SB2C-5 



Date Type First Received 

Sep 1944 
Sep 1944 
Oct 1944 
Oct 1944 
Nov 1944 
Dec 1944 
Mar 1945 
Apr 1945 



Air Wing Assignments 

Air Wing Tail Code Assignment Date 

CVG-98/CVAG-21* RTf 28 Aug 1944 

* CVG-98 redesignated CVAG-21 on 15 November 1946. 
t Tail code assigned to CVAG-21 on 12 December 1946. 




A flight of squadron SB2C-3 
Helldivers, September 1944. 



32 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



VA-22A 

Lineage 

Established as Torpedo Squadron NINETY EIGHT 
(VT-98) on 28 August 1944. 

Redesignated Attack Squadron TWENTY TWO A 
(VA-22A) on 15 November 1946. 

Disestablished on 5 August 1947. The first and only 
squadron to be designated VA-22A. 



There is no record of an approved insignia for VA- 
22A. 

Nickname: unknown 

Chronology of Significant Events 

28 Aug 1944: VT-98 was established with the mis- 
sion of providing a pool of trained torpedo plane 
pilots and aircrewmen for assignment as replacements 
to squadrons operating in the Pacific. 




Home Port Assignments 



The timeframe for the squadron's use of this insignia is unknown. 

Squadron Insignia and Nickname 

There is no record of an approval date for VT-98's 
insignia. The motto of the squadron was "Parati — in 
Pace-Aut Bello" (Prepared — in Peace or War). Colors 
of the insignia were: dark blue background; banners 
white with red lettering; gold naval aviator wings; light 
blue crest; yellow sword; white clouds outlined in 
blue; yellow and gold torch; and black torpedo. 



Location 

NAAS Ventura (Oxnard) 
NAAS Los Alamitos 
NAS San Diego 



Assignment Date 

28 Aug 1944 
01 Dec 1944 
25 Aug 1946 



Commanding Officers 



LCDR Tom B. Bash 
LTJack C. Heishman (acting) 
LCDR Leo Meacher 
LCDR Paul N. Gray 



Date Assumed Command 

28 Aug 1944 
03 May 1945 
12 Jul 1945 
15 Jul 1947 



Aircraft Assignment 



Type of Aircraft 



TBF-1 
TBM-1C 
TBM-3 
TBM-3E 



Date Type First Received 

Aug 1944 
Aug 1944 
Oct 1944 
May 1945 



Air Wing Assignments 

Air Wing Tail Code 

CVG-98/CVAG-21* RTf 



Assignment Date 

28 Aug 1944 



* CVG-98 redesignated CVAG-21 on 15 November 1946. 
t Tail code assigned to CVAG-21 on 12 December 1946. 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 33 



VA-23 

Lineage 

Established as Reserve Fighter Squadron SIX HUN- 
DRED FIFTY THREE (VF-653) in December 1949. 

Called to active duty on 1 February 1951. 

Redesignated Fighter Squadron ONE HUNDRED 
FIFTY ONE (VF-15D on 4 February 1953. 

Redesignated Attack Squadron ONE HUNDRED 
FIFTY ONE (VA-15D on 7 February 1956. 

Redesignated Attack Squadron TWENTY THREE 
(VA-23) on 23 February 1959. 

Disestablished on 1 April 1970. The first and only 
squadron to be designated VA-23. 

Squadron Insignia and Nickname 

The squadron's first insignia was approved by CNO 
on 7 February 1951. The central figure is the dragon, 

symbolizing the terrify- 
ing qualities representa- 
tive of a fighter 
squadron, and the 
shield portraying its 
strength. Insignia colors 
were: yellow outer bor- 
der; blue background; 
red dragon with yellow 
shaded areas and black 
markings; light blue 
shield with diamond 
and checkered bar in 
yellow. 

When the squadron was redesignated VF-151, it 
adopted a new insignia sometime between 1953 and 
1955. This insignia was a shield with a knight's helmet 
at the top and a scroll at the bottom. The Latin inscrip- 
tion "In Omnia Paratus" on the scroll translated as 
"Always Prepared." Colors for this insignia were: white 
background with the outer circle in black; the helmet, 
scroll, outer section of the shield and the bar across the 
shield were black; visor of the helmet was yellow with 
black markings; the two central portions of the shield 
and the Latin lettering was yellow; the helmet plumage 



This insignia was adopted by 
the squadron sometime in the 
mid- 1950s. It was used by 
VF-151 and VA-151. When 
VF-151 was redesignated VA- 
151, the appropriate change 
in the scroll showed the VA- 
151 designation. 




The squadron 's first officially ap- 
proved insignia, used by VF-653- 





The insignia used by VF-151 
and VA-151 was adopted by 
VA-23. 



was yellow and black. 
There is no record relating 
to the use of this insignia 
following the squadron's 
redesignation to VA-151. 
However, on 29 April 
1959, CNO approved VA- 
23's request to retain the 
insignia formerly used by 
VA-151. The insignia used 
by VA-23 was the Black 
Knight insignia. 

Nickname: Black Knights, 
circa 1955-1970 



Chronology of Significant Events 

11 Dec 1951: The squadron conducted its first com- 
bat strikes. 

Feb 1955: The squadron, deployed aboard Wasp 
(CVA 18), provided air suport during the evacuation of 
Chinese Nationalists from the Tachen Islands following 
the bombardment of the islands by the People's 
Republic of China. 

Apr 1965: While operating from Midway, on Yankee 
Station, VA-23 conducted its first combat operations 
since the Korean War. 

25 Apr 1965: The squadron became the first to use 
the Shrike missile in combat. The Shrike is an antiradi- 
ation missile for use against radar sites. 

15-20 Mar 1968: VA-23, along with other squadrons 
in CVW-19, conducted flight operations from 
Ticonderoga (CVA 14) in the Sea of Japan. These oper- 
ations were part of a continuing show of American 
forces in the area, named Operation Formation Star, 
following the capture of Pueblo (AGER 2) by North 
Korea on 23 January 1968. 

Apr 1968: VA-23 flew combat strikes around Khe 
Sanh, South Vietnam, in support of the besieged 
Marine base. 

20 Mar 1970: A disestablishment ceremony was held 
by the squadron under the direction of its last com- 
manding officer, Commander Theodore L. Lloyd, Jr. 
Commander Lloyd accepted the colors of the 
squadron and brought to a close over 19 years of 
active service. The squadron was officially disestab- 
lished on 1 April 1970. 



Home Port Assignments 



Location Assignment 

NAS Akron 
NAS Alameda 
NAS Lemoore 



Date 

Dec 1949 
16 Apr 1951 
30 Sep 1961 



34 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



Commanding Officers 



Commanding Officers — Continued 



LCDR Cook Cleland 

LCDRJ. M. Rickabaugh 

LCDR Benjamin Tappan, Jr. 

CDR E. S. Parks 

LCDR Robert H. Moore, Jr. 

LCDR Bernard Sevilla 

CDR E. W. Blackburn 

CDR L. M. Cauble 

CDR S. G. Gorsline, Jr. 

LCDR Edward E. Riley (acting) 

CDR G. M. Veling 

CDR Edward E. Riley 

CDR Robert P. Smith 



Date Assumed Command 

Dec 1949 
28 Aug 1952 
Nov 1953 
Jun 1955 

* 

Jan 1957 
30 May 1958 
06 Mar 1959 
08 Apr I960 
28 Sep 1961 
06 Nov 1961 
18 Sep 1962 
20 Aug 1963 




CDR John R. Dewenter 
CDR Robert R. King, Jr. 
CDR Richard A. Mackell 
CDR Charles L. Bush 
CDR Morris A. Peelle 
CDR Theodore L. Lloyd, Jr. 



Date Assumed Command 

02 Jul 1964 
02 Jul 1965 
01 Jul 1966 

23 Jun 1967 

24 Jul 1968 
09 Jul 1969 



* Lieutenant Commander Robert H. Moore assumed command of the 
squadron sometime between late 1955 and early 1956. 



Aircraft Assignment 



Type of Aircraft 



FG-1D 

F4U-4 

1_lL_lLL 



F9F-2 
F9F-5 



F7U-3M 
F7TT-3 



F9F-8B 
F9F-8 



FJ-4B 



A4D-2 

A-4E 

A-4F 



Date Type First Received 
* 

1951t 
1951+ 
28 Aug 1952 
02 Oct 1952 
May 1955 
Jun 1955 
Dec 1956 
Jan 1957 
Jul 1957 
18 May I960 
26 Dec 1962 
13 Jul 1967 



A squadron F4U-4 Corsair, July 1951 (Courtesy Robert Lawson Collection). 



* Prior to being activated, the squadron flew the FG-lDs which were 
assigned to NAS Akron, a reserve naval air station. 

t The squadron received the F4U-4 in either April or May 1951 ■ 

% The squaron received the F4U-4B sometime between June and 
August 1951. 




Two of the squadron 's F9F-2 Panthers fly over Wasp (CVA 18) during her deployment to the western Pacific between September 1954 and April 
1955 (Courtesy Robert Lawson Collection). 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 3 5 



Major Overseas Deployment 



Date of 


Date of 


Air 




Type of 


Area of 


Departure 


Return 


Wing 


Currier 


Aircraft 


Operation 


12 Oct 1951 


03 Jul 1952 


ATG-1 


CV 45 


F4U-4/4B 


WestPac/Korea 


30 Mar 1953 


28 Nov 1953 


ATG-1 


CVA 21 


F9F-2 


WestPac/Korea 


01 Sep 1954 


11 Apr 1955 


ATG-1 


CVA 18 


F9F-2 


WestPac 


25 May 1956 


20 Dec 1956 


ATG-1 


CVA 16 


F7U-3 


WestPac 


04 Oct 1958 


16 Feb 1959 


ATG-1 


CVA 14 


FJ-4B 


WestPac 


15 Aug 1959 


25 Mar I960 


CVG-2 


CVA 41 


FJ-4B 


WestPac 


16 Feb 1961 


28 Sep 1961 


CVG-2 


CVA 41 


A4D-2 


WestPac 


06 Apr 1962 


20 Oct 1962 


CVG-2 


CVA 41 


A4D-2 


WestPac 


08 Nov 1963 


26 May 1964 


CVW-2 


CVA 41 


A-4E 


WestPac 


06 Mar 1965 


23 Nov 1965 


CVW-2 


CVA 41 


A-4E 


WestPac/Vietnam 


29 Jul 1966 


23 Feb 1967 


CVW-2 


CVA 43 


A-4E 


WestPac/Vietnam 


28 Dec 1967 


17 Aug 1968 


CVW-19 


CVA 14 


A-4F 


WestPac/Vietnam 


14 Apr 1969 


17 Nov 1969 


CVW-19 


CVA 34 


A-4F 


"WestPac/Vietnam 




A squadron F7U-3 Cutlass prepares for a launch from Lexington (CVA 16) during her deployment to the western Pacific in 1956. 



36 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 





Unit Awards Received 



An FJ-4B Fury prepares to engage a aerial refueling basket during 
the squadron's deployment aboard Ticonderoga (CVA 14) during its 
1958-1959 deployment to WestPac. 



Air Wing Assignments 



Air Wing 

CVG-15 
ATG-1 
CVG-15 
ATG-1 

CVG-2/CVW-2f 
CVW-19 



Tail Code 
H 

* 

H 

U/NA* 
NE 
NM 



Assignment Date 

05 Apr 1951 
03 Aug 1951 

03 Jul 1952 
01 Nov 1952 
24 Feb 1959 

01 Jul 1967 



• The squadron deployed with ATG-1 but used its parent air group 
tail code (H) until the tail code "U" was assigned to ATG-1 on 24 
July 1956. ATG-l's tail code was changed from U to NA in 1957. The 
effective date was most likely the beginning of FY 58 (1 July 1957). 

t Carrier Air Groups were redesignated Carrier Air Wings (CVG-2 
became CVW-2) on 20 December 1963. 



Unit Award 


Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 


KSM 


04 Dec 1951 


20 Jun 1952 




03 Apr 1953 


09 Aug 1953 




22 Aug 1953 


21 Nov 1953 


NUC 


11 Dec 1951 


11 Jun 1952 




16 Apr 1965 


04 Nov 1965 




12 Aug 1966 


01 Feb 1967 




26 Jan 1968 


23 Jul 1968 


KPUC 


07 Dec 1951 


20 Jun 1952 




30 Apr 1953 


27 Jul 1953 


UNSM 


04 Dec 1951 


20 Jun 1952 




03 Apr 1953 


09 Aug 1953 




22 Aug 1953 


21 Nov 1953 


NDSM (Korea) 


Dec 1951 


Jun 1952 


AFEM 


23 Oct 1958 


01 Jan 1959 




28 Mar 1961 


07 Apr 1961 




23 Jan 1968 


22 Mar 1968 




17 Sep 1969 






28 Sep 1969 


04 Oct 1969 


MUC 


05 May 1969 


03 Nov 1969 


VNSM 


22 Jul 1965 


26 Aug 1965 




11 Sep 1965 


09 Oct 1965 




12 Sep 1966 


19 Oct 1966 




30 Oct 1966 


04 Dec 1966 




26 Dec 1966 


01 Feb 1967 




25 Jan 1968 


04 Mar 1968 




25 Mar 1968 


08 Apr 1968 




16 Apr 1968 






24 Apr 1968 


12 May 1968 




20 May 1968 


14 Jun 1968 




25 Jun 1968 


23 Jul 1968 




05 May 1969 


04 Jun 1969 




15 Jun 1969 


01 Jul 1969 




12 Jul 1969 


30 Jul 1969 




14 Aug 1969 


12 Sep 1969 




08 Oct 1969 


31 Oct 1969 




Two of the squadron's A-4F Skyhawks fly a training mission over the Imperial Valley of southern California in 1967. 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS — Volume I 37 



SECOND VA-34 

Lineage 

Established as Fighter Squadron TWENTY (VF-20) 
on 15 October 1943- 

Redesignated Fighter Squadron NINE A (VF-9A) on 
15 November 1946. 

Redesignated Fighter Squadron NINTY ONE (VF-9D 
on 12 August 1948. 

Redesignated Fighter Squadron THIRTY FOUR (VF- 
34) on 15 February 1950. 

Redesignated Attack Squadron THIRTY FOUR (VA- 
34) on 1 July 1955. 

Disestablished on 1 June 1969- The second 
squadron to be assigned the VA-34 designation. 

Squadron Insignia and Nickname 

The first insignia used by the squadron was a 
"Joker" breaking out of a deck of cards carrying a 

machine gun. This 
insignia was selected by 
the squadron because 
the young and inexperi- 
enced pilots in the 
squadron were referred 
to as the "Jokers." It was 
approved by CNO on 15 
March 1944. Colors for 
the insignia were: the 
deck of cards was out- 
lined in black with the 
diamond marking on 
the back of the card in 
blue and white; the face 
of the card was white with black outlines and letter- 
ing; the Joker's hat and neck garment were blue; his 
right arm was yellow and the other arm white, out- 
lined in black; a black and white machine gun; facial 
features of Joker outlined in black; and the ripped 
portion of the card was in the blue and white dia- 
mond design. 

The next insignia adopted by the squadron was the 
outline of a human skull. This insignia was approved 
by CNO on 1 February 1946. Superimposed on the 
nose of a skull was a human skelton with the arms 
holding paddles that became the eyes of the skull, 
while the teeth were represented by the word 
"Fighting 20." The colors were primarily black and 
white, with the exception of the paddles (eyes) and 
the lettering which were red. On 28 February 1947 
CNO, approved a modification of this insignia which 
changed the Fighting 20 to Fighting 9A. 

On 10 June 1949, CNO approved another modifica- 
tion to the squadron insignia which embellished the 
skull design. The background became a blue diamond 




The squadron's first insignia was 
approved for use by VF-20 during 
World Warll. 





A new insignia was adopted by 
the squadron and approved in 
1946. A modification to this 
insignia was made in 1947 that 
changed the 'Fighting 20" to 
"Fighting 9A. " 



A new insignia was adopted by 
the squadron and approved in 
June 1949- This insignia is a well- 
known design that was in use 
from 1949 until the squadron 's 
disestablishment in 1969. 



outlined in black. Red stylized wings outlined in blue 
and white were added, as well as a black and white 
machine gun in the shape of a cigarette with a yellow 
ammunition belt and red bullets. The machine gun 
was held by the skelton's hand which was outlined in 
black. Fighting 9A was dropped and replaced by regu- 
lar shaped teeth. The skull remained white outlined in 
black and the LSO paddles were red and white. 
Nickname: Blue Blasters, 1957-1969 

Chronology of Significant Events 

16 Apr 1944: The squadron departed NAS Alameda 
aboard Essex (CV 9) en route to Hawaii for four 
months of operational training prior to its first combat 
tour. 

31 Aug 1944: Combat strikes were flown against the 
Bonin Islands. This was the squadron's first combat 
action. 

24-25 Oct 1944: The squadron participated in the 
Battle for Leyte Gulf, sometimes referred to as the 
Second Battle of the Philippines Sea. VF-20 aircraft 
struck elements of all three Japanese Task Forces 
which were converging on Leyte Gulf. 

Aug-Nov 1944: The squadron flew strikes against 
targets on the Bonin Islands, Yap and Palau Islands, 
Peleliu Island, Okinawa, Formosa, Luzon, and Leyte. 

14 Dec 1944: Lieutenant (jg) Douglas Baker was on 
a strike mission against Clark Field on Luzon when he 
encountered Japanese fighter opposition. During this 
engagement he destroyed four Japanese aircraft before 
being shot down by antiaircraft fire and lost in the 
action. This final action brought his air-to-air kills to 
16, making him one of the high ranking aces for the 
Navy. Only eight other Navy pilots equalled or 
exceeded this record. 

Dec 1944-Jan 1945: VF-20 engaged in another series 
of combat actions, flying missions against targets on 
and around Luzon, Formosa, French Indochina 
(Vietnam), Hong Kong, the South China Sea, and 



38 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



Okinawa. Many of these operations were in support of 
the landings at Lingayen Gulf. 

22 Jan 1945: This was the last day of combat action 
for the squadron during World War II. During the peri- 
od from 31 August 1944, the squadron compiled a 
formidable combat record. There were 8 aces (9 
counting the Commander of CVG-20 who flew the 
squadron's aircraft), 12 individuals received the Navy 
Cross and 22 individuals received the Silver Star. VF-20 
credits itself with the destruction of over 15 ships and 
407 aircraft, not counting an even greater number that 
were damaged but not destroyed. 

Feb 1945: Embarked in Kwajalein (CVE 98) at Ulithi 
and departed for the United States, arriving there in 
the latter part of the month. 

Jul-Sep 1948: In cooperation with Commander 
Operational Development Force, Atlantic Fleet, the 
squadron participated in the experimental carrier 
controlled approach program aboard Philippine Sea 
(CV 47). 

Apr 1953: The squadron embarked on Antietam 
(CVA 36) with its F2H-2s to conduct evaluation tests 
on the Navy's first angled deck carrier. 

26 May 1954: The squadron was aboard Bennington 
(CVA 20), en route to the Mediterranean Sea, when an 
explosion aboard ship resulted in the death of 7 
squadron personnel. The ship returned to the States 
and the squadron disembarked. 

31 Oct 1954: Ensign Duane L. Varner completed a 
1,900 mile nonstop, non-refueling, transcontinental 
flight from Los Alamitos, California, to NAS Cecil Field, 
Florida, in a squadron F2H-2 Banshee. His flight took 
3 hours and 58 minutes and set a new long distance 
record for the Banshee. 

4 Mar 1958: During cross-deck operations the 
squadron landed its A4D-1 Skyhawks aboard HMS Ark 
Royal. 

Jul 1958: VA-34 flew support missions during the 
amphibious landings in Beirut, Lebanon, by U.S. 
Marines. 

Jun 1959: Operating from NAAS Mayport, the 
squadron conducted the first operational firing of the 
Bull Pup air-to-ground missile in the Atlantic Fleet. 

Apr 1961 : VA-34's A4D-2 Skyhawks operated from 
Essex (CVS 9) in the Caribbean Sea during the Bay of 
Pigs invasion. This operation involved the first use of 
jet attack aircraft as part of an ASW Air Group, CVSG- 
60, operating aboard an ASW designated carrier. 

26 Oct- 18 Nov 1962: During the Cuban missile cri- 
sis the entire squadron flew aboard Enterprise (CVAN 
65) on 26 October to augment the assigned air wing. 
Enterprise had departed for the Caribbean on 19 
October. VA-34 flew numerous missions in support of 
Cuban quarantine. 

18-26 Nov 1962: On 18 November the squadron 
transferred from Enterprise to Independence (CVA 62) 
during the quarantine operations. VA-34 continued to 



fly quarantine missions aboard Independence until her 
return to the States on 26 November. 

3-21 Dec 1962: The squadron was aboard Saratoga 
(CVA 60) for carrier refresher training in the Caribbean 
and continued operations relating to the Cuban missile 
crisis. 

Dec 1963 andJan-Feb 1964: The squadron provided 
detachments of A-4C Skyhawks aboard Intrepid (CVS 
11) and Randolph (CVS 15). The aircraft were used for 
Combat Air Patrol to provide a fighter capability for 
the ASW carriers. 

May-Dec 1967: VA-34 deployed to Vietnam as a 
component of an Attack Carrier Air Wing (CVW-10) 
embarked in Intrepid (CVS-11). This was the 
squadron's first combat action since 1945. 

Home Port Assignments 

Location Assignment Date 

NAS San Diego 15 Oct 1943* 



NAS Atlantic City 


16 Apr 


1945 


NAS Edenton 


26 Jun 


1945 


NAS Elizabeth City 


02 Nov 


1945 


NAAS Charlestown 


11 Mar 


1946 


NAS Quonset Point 


01 May 


1947 


NAAS Charlestown 


26 Jun 


1948 


NAS Quonset Point 


01 Dec 


1949 


NAAS Sanford 


01 May 


1951 


NAS Jacksonville 


06 Oct 


1952 


NAS Cecil Field 


04 Feb 


1953 


* During the squadron's Pacific tour from April 1944 to February 


1945 it operated from numerous air and shore stations. 




Commanding Officers 






Date Assumed Command 


LCDR Frederick E. Bakutis 


15 Oct 


1943 


LCDR Herbert D. Remington 


17 Apr 


1945 


LCDR T. W. Ramsay 


11 Feb 


1946 


LCDR W. W. Brehm 


28 Oct 


1947 


LCDR Thomas C. Provost, III 


01 Jul 


1948 


LCDR Donald K. Olson 


12 Dec 


1949 


LCDR Robert A. Sweatt 


21 Feb 


1951 


LCDR H. B. Gibbs 


01 May 


1952 


LCDR F. H. O'Brien 


10 May 


1953 


CDR A. L. Detweiller (acting) 


05 Jul 


1955 


CDR Charles W. Pittman 


28 Oct 


1955 


CDR Ernest L. McClintock 


Jan 


1957 


CDR George C. Talley, Jr. 


07 Oct 


1958 


CDR Mitchell C. Griffin 


11 Mar 


I960 


CDR William J. Forgy 


26 May 


1961 


CDR Hector W. Davis, Jr. 


29 May 


1962 


CDR Walter T. Zebrowski 


05 May 


1963 


CDR Grant C. Young 


05 May 


1964 


CDR Rodney B. Carter 


05 May 


1965 


CDR Robert A. Zajichek 


07 May 


1966 


CDR Richard A. Wigent 


11 May 


1967 


CDR Mark E. Perrault 


04 May 


1968 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS — Volume I 39 




Aircraft Assignment 



Type of Aircraft 



F6F-3 



F8F-1 
F8F-? 



F9F-2 



F2H-2 



F7U-3 



A4D-1 
A4D-2 

A4D-2N/A-4C 



Z)fl/e Type First Received 

Oct 1943 
Jul 1944 
03 Apr 1946 
03 Dec 1948 
27 Nov 1950 
14 Feb 1952 
06 Oct 1955 
Jan 1957 
Nov 1958 
07 Jul 1962 



T/je squadron 's CO, Commander H. W. Davis, Jr., stands in front of 
the squadron 's first A4D-2N (A-4C) Sky/hawk. 



1 A4D-2N designation was changed to A-4C in 1962. 



A squadron 
F6F-5 Hellcat 
in flight, 
circa 1945 
(Courtesy 
Robert Lawson 
Collection). 




Major Overseas Deployment 



Date of 


Date of 


A ir 




Type of 


Area of 


Departure 


Return 


Wing 


Carrier 


Aircraft 


Operation 


16 Aug 1944* 


21 Nov 1944 


CVG-20 


CV6 


F6F-3 


WestPac 


11 Dec 1944* 


26 Jan 1945 


CVG-20 


CV 16 


F6F-3 


WestPac 


20 Feb 1948 


26 Jun 1948 


CVAG-9 


CV 47 


F8F-1 


Med 


03 Sep 1951 


20 Dec 1951 


CVG-3 


CV 32 


F9F-2 


Med 


28 Aug 1952 


04 Feb 1953 


CVG-3 


CVA 32 


F2H-2 


Med 


30 Nov 1954 


18 Jun 1955 


ATG-181 


CVA 15 


F2H-2 


Med 


01 Feb 1958 


01 Oct 1958 


CVG-3 


CVA 60 


A4D-1 


Med 


15 Aug 1959 


16 Feb I960 


CVG-3 


CVA 60 


A4D-2 


Med 


22 Aug I960 


25 Feb 1961 


CVG-3 


CVA 60 


A4D-2 


Med/NorLant 


28 Nov 1961 


12 May 1962 


CVG-3 


CVA 60 


A4D-2 


Med 


29 Mar 1963 


25 Oct 1963 


CVG-3 


CVA 60 


A-4C 


Med 


28 Nov 1964 


12 Jul 1965 


CVW-3 


CVA 60 


A-4C 


Med 


11 Mar 1966 


26 Oct 1966 


CVW-3 


CVA 60 


A-4C 


Med 


11 May 1967 


30 Dec 1967 


CVW-10 


CVS 11 


A-4C 


Med/IO/WestPac/ 
Vietnam 


22 Jul 1968 


29 Apr 1969 


CVW-17 


CVA 59 


A-4C 


Med 



* These deployment dates only cover the squadron's combat operations while staging out of Ulithi. 



40 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



§ CVW-3 records for 1967 list VA-46 being transferred from the air 
wing on 1 February 1967 but does not list VA-34. VA-34, as well as 
VA-46 and VA-103, were part of CVW-3 for the entire year of 1966, 
consequently, VA-34 probably was transferred from CVW-3 at the 
same time as VA-46 and VA-103, although such a transfer was not 
recorded in the air wing's history report. 



Unit Awards Received 




Squadron F8F-1 Bearcats in flight, circa 1948 (Courtesy Robert 
Lawson Collection). 



Air Wing Assignments 

Air Wing Tail Code 

CVG-20/CVAG-9/ CVG-9* PS 

CVG-3 K 
ATG-181 

CVG-3/CVW-3I K/AC| 

CVW-10 AK 

CVW-17 AA 



Assignment Date 

15 Oct 1943 
01 Dec 1949 
01 Nov 1953 

18 Jun 1955 
01 Feb 1967§ 

16 Jan 1968 



* Carrier Air Group 20 (CVG-20) was redesignated CVAG-9 on 15 
November 1946 and was assigned the tail code PS on 12 December 
1946. CVAG-9 was redesignated CVG-9 on 1 September 1948. 
t Carrier Air Groups were redesignated Carrier Air Wings on 20 
December 1963, hence, CVG-3 became CVW-3. 

i CVG-3's tail code was changed from K to AC in the latter part of 
1957. The effective date was most likely the beginning of FY 58 (1 
July 1957). 



Unit Award 


Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 


NAVE 


01 Jul 1948 


30 Jun 1949 


NUC 


31 Aug 1944 


18 Sep 1944 




10 Oct 1944 


22 Nov 1944 




12 Jun 1967 


08 Dec 1967 


PUC 


14 Dec 1944 


16 Dec 1944 




03 Jan 1945 


22 Jan 1945 


AFEM 


17 Jul 1958 


25 Jul 1958 




29 Jul 1958 


11 Aug 1958 




19 Aug 1958 


07 Sep 1958 




26 Oct 1962 


18 Nov 1962 




18 Nov 1962 


20 Nov 1962 




03 Dec 1962 


20 Dec 1962 


RVNGC 


21 Jun 1967 


13 Jul 1967 




29 Jul 1967 


27 Aug 1967 




14 Sep 1967 


12 Oct 1967 




31 Oct 1967 


24 Nov 1967 


VNSM 


21 Jun 1967 


13 Jul 1967 




29 Jul 1967 


27 Aug 1967 




14 Sep 1967 


12 Oct 1967 




31 Oct 1967 


24 Nov 1967 


NEM 


13 Apr 1961 


26 Apr 1961 




Squadron F2H-2 Banshees on the deck of Randolph ( CVA 15) during her cruise to the Med in 1954-1955. 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 41 



THIRD VA-34 

Lineage 

Established as Attack Squadron THIRTY FOUR (VA- 
34) on 1 January 1970. This is the third squadron to be 
designated VA-34. 

Squadron Insignia and 
Nickname 

When VA-34 was 
established, it adopted 
the insignia and Blue 
Blasters nickname used 
by the previous VA-34 
squadron (the second 
VA-34). Colors for the 
insignia are as follows: 
blue diamond back- 
ground outlined in 
black, red stylized 
wings outlined in blue 
and white, black and 
white machine gun in the shape of a cigarette, with a 
yellow ammunition belt and red bullets, white skull 
and skeleton with black markings and outline, red 
teeth, and red markings on the paddles (eyes). 
Nickname: Blue Blasters, 1970-present 




When the third VA-34 squadron 
was established, it adopted this 
insignia which had been used by 
the second VA-34 squadron. 



Sep 1985: While deployed aboard America to the 
North Atlantic, the squadron conducted flight opera- 
tions from the carrier while it operated within 
Vestfjord, a Norwegian fjord. 

24 Mar 1986: Libyan missiles were fired at U.S. Navy 
forces operating in the Gulf of Sidra. As a result of this 
hostile act retalitory strikes, known as Operation 
Prairie Fire, were initiated against Libya by the 
American naval forces in the area. VA-34's A-6E 
Intruders, operating from America, attacked and dam- 
aged a Libyan Combattante II G-class fast attack mis- 
sile craft with a Harpoon missile. A follow-up attack 
by VA-85 aircraft with Rockeye bombs resulted in the 
sinking of the Combattante II. The Harpoon firing was 
the first use of this missile in combat and the 
squadron's first combat action since its establishment 
in 1970. 

14 Apr 1986: Due to continued Libyan sponsorship 
of terrorist activity the United States initiated 
Operation Eldorado Canyon. VA-34 participated in this 
operation with its A-6Es, conducting a night, low level 
high speed attack against terrorists targets at the 
Benina airfield and military barracks in Banghazi, 
Libya. 

Aug 1990: The squadron flew missions in support of 
Operation Desert Shield, the build up of American and 
Allied forces to counter a threatened invasion of Saudi 
Arabia by Iraq and as part of an economic blockade of 
Iraq to force its withdrawal from Kuwait. 



Chronology of Significant Events 

17 Apr 1970: VA-34's establishment ceremony was 
conducted at NAS Oceana. 

18 Sep 1970: The squadron boarded Kennedy (CVA 
67) and departed on 14 September for final training 
and an Operational Readiness Inspection prior to its 
scheduled November deployment to the 
Mediterranean Sea. However, while en route to the 
Caribbean, the ship was ordered to deploy to the 
Mediterranean after Syria invaded Jordan. 

Sep 1972: A squadron A-6 Intruder conducted cross- 
decking operations on HMS Ark Royal while operating 
in the Norwegian Sea. 

Oct-Nov 1973: Due to the outbreak of war in the 
Middle East (Yon Kippur War), VA-34 and Kennedy 
departed the Norwegian Sea and reentered the 
Mediterranean, conducting surveillance operations 
south of Crete. 

Sep-Oct 1982: During the deployment to the North 
Atlantic, America (CV 66), with VA-34 embarked, 
received orders on 22 September to proceed to the 
Mediterranean due to the continuing crisis in Lebanon. 

Jan and May 1983: While in the Eastern 
Mediterranean the squadron conducted air operations 
from America in support of the multinational peace- 
keeping forces in Beirut, Lebanon. 



Home Port Assignments 

Location Assignment Date 

NAS Oceana 01 Jan 1970 



Commanding Officers 





Date Assumed Command 


CDR Robert W. Miles 


Feb 1970 


CDR Samuel L. Sayers 


25 Jun 1971 


CDR Philip M. Shannon 


Jul 1972 


CDR Lester T. Jackson 


28 Jul 1973 


CDR William R. Westerman 


19 Jul 1974 


CDR Gary F. Wheatley 


29 Oct 1975 


CDR Robert H. Byng 


03 Jan 1977 


CDR John M. McNabb 


21 Apr 1978 


CDR John G. Hawley 


03 Jul 1979 


CDR Brinley K. McDanel 


20 Oct 1980 


CDR Bennice L. Liner 


25 Nov 1981 


CDR Garth A. Van Sickle 


13 Feb 1983 


CDR James B. Dadson 


07 Aug 1984 


CDR Richard G. Coleman 


27 Jan 1986 


CDR Bernis H. Bailey 


05 Jun 1987 


CDR Eugene K. Nielsen 


04 Nov 1988 


CDR Ronald K. Alexander 


16 May 1990 



42 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



Aircraft Assignment 



Aircraft Assignment — Continued 



Total of Aircraft 



A-6A 
A-6B 
KA-6D 
A-6C 



Date Type First Received 

17 Apr 1970 
May 1970 
1971* 
1971t 



Total of Aircraft 



A-6E 



Date Type First Received 

Dec 1973 



* The squadron received its first KA-6D sometime between April and 
June 1971. 

t The squadron received its first A-6C sometime between July and 
September 1971. 




A squadron A-6E Intruder conducts operations off the coast of Norway in 1985. 







Major Overseas Deployment 






Date of 


Date of 


A ir 




Type of 


Area of 


Departure 


Return 


Wing 


Carrier 


Aircraft 


Operation 


14 Sep 1970 


01 Mar 1971 


CVW-1 


CVA 67 


A-6A/B 


Carib/Med/ 












NorLant 


01 Dec 1971 


06 Oct 1972 


CVW-1 


CVA 67 


A-6A/B/C 


Med/NorLant 










& KA-6D 




16 Apr 1973 


01 Dec 1973 


CVW-1 


CVA 67 


A-6A/B/C 


Med/NorLant 










& KA-6D 




28 Jun 1975 


27 Jan 1976 


CVW-1 


CV 67 


A-6E & KA-6D 


Med 


02 Sep 1976 


09 Nov 1976 


CVW-1 


CV 67 


A-6E & KA-6D 


NorLant 


15 Jan 1977 


01 Aug 1977 


CVW-1 


CV 67 


A-6E & KA-6D 


Med 


29 Jun 1978 


08 Feb 1979 


CVW-1 


CV 67 


A-6E & KA-6D 


Med 


04 Aug 1980 


28 Mar 1981 


CVW-1 


CV 67 


A-6E & KA-6D 


Med 


23 Aug 1982 


30 Oct 1982 


CVW-1 


CV 66 


A-6E & KA-6D 


NorLant/Med/ 












Carib 


08 Dec 1982 


02 Jun 1983 


CVW-1 


CV 66 


A-6E & KA-6D 


Med/IO 


24 Apr 1984 


14 Nov 1984 


CVW-1 


CV 66 


A-6E & KA-6D 


Carib/Med/IO 


24 Aug 1985 


09 Oct 1985 


CVW-1 


CV 66 


A-6E & KA-6D 


NorLant 


10 Mar 1986 


10 Sep 1986 


CVW-1 


CV 66 


A-6E & KA-6D 


Med 


29 Feb 1988 


29 Aug 1988 


CVW-7 


CVN 69 


A-6E & KA-6D 


Med 


08 Mar 1990 


12 Sep 1990 


CVW-7 


CVN 69 


A-6E & KA-6D 


Med/Red Sea 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 43 



Air Wing Assignments Unit Awards Received — Continued 



Air Wing 


Tail Code Assignment Date 


Unit Award 


Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 


CVW-1 


AR 0? Mar 1070 




01 Jan 1970 


30 Tun 1971 


CVW-7 


AG 01 Oct 1986 




01 Jan 1982 


31 Dec 1982 






NEM 


01 Jan 1983 


20 Jan 1983 




Unit Awards Received 




06 May 1983 


08 May 1983 








21 Mar 1986 


27 Jun 1986 


Unit Award 


Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 


NUC 


23 Mar 1986 


17 Apr 1986 


MUC 


29 Sep 1970 31 Oct 1970 


SLOC 


04 Aug 1980 


28 Mar 1981 




01 Dec 1977 01 Mar 1979 




23 Aug 1982 


02 Jun 1983 




29 Aug 1985 20 Sep 1985 


SASM 


08 Aug 1990 


24 Aug 1990 




A VA-34 A-6E makes a low-level strike at Vieques Island bombing range in the Caribbean in 1988. 



44 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



VA-35 

Lineage 

Established as Torpedo and Bombing Squadron 
TWO (VT-2) on 6 July 1925. 

Redesignated Torpedo and Bombing Squadron 
TWO B (VT-2B) on 1 July 1927.* 

Redesignated Torpedo Squadron THREE (VT-3) on 1 
July 1937. 

Redesignated Attack Squadron FOUR A (VA-4A) on 
15 November 1946. 

Redesignated Attack Squadron THIRTY FIVE (VA- 
35) on 7 August 1948. 

Disestablished on 7 November 1949- The first 
squadron to be assigned the VA-35 designation. 

Squadron Insignia and Nickname 

The squadron's first insignia was a winged dragon 
holding the sun in its webbed foot. Several years later 

a bomb replaced the sun 
in the dragon's foot to 
symbolize the squadron's 
^f^^^f mission. The dragon's 

color was red, and was 
H^^^ri fcfe spitting fire from its 
mouth. There are no 
records indicating an 
approval date, however, 
there are references to 
the insignia in a news- 

Tbis was the first version of the . , . , j , 

dragon insignia used by the P a P er Published by 

squadron. It dates from the mid- Saratoga (CV 3). 
1920s. A modification to the 

original insignia was 
approved sometime in 1928 or 1929. The new insignia 
depicted a dragon astride a bomb. Colors for the dragon 
were red with a green spine, yellow claws and the tip of 
the tail in yellow. The bomb was black. When the 
squadron was redesignat- 
ed in 1937 it continued 
to use this insignia. 

During World War II 
the dragon took on a 
fatter, more stylized 
shape, however, the col- 
ors remained the same. 
There are no records 
indicating the squadron 
changed its insignia fol- 
lowing its designation 
changes in the 1940s. 

Nickname: unknown 





A more detailed version of the 
dragon insignia was adopted by 
the squadron in the late 1920s. 




The final version of the dragon 
insignia was used by the squadron 
during World War II and into the 
postwar period. 



Chronology of 
Significant Events 

6 Jul 1925: VT-2 was 
established on board 
Aroostook (CM 3) at 
Pearl Harbor. Aroo- 
stook had been a 
minelayer that was 
refitted as an aircraft 
tender but continued 
to carry the CM 
minelayer designation. 

Aug 1926: The 
squadron was engaged 
in experimental work relating to the use of signal 
lights as a means of communicating between aircraft 
and ships. 

1928: With the arrival of the T3M-2 aircraft, the 
squadron began the transition from water based air- 
craft to land planes. The squadron continued its air- 
craft transition from T3M-2s, which were difficult to 
land on the carrier, to T4M-ls. Primary mission with 
the T4M-ls was bombing, although they could be 
used for torpedo work and laying smoke screens. 

Jan-Feb 1929: Fleet Problem IX was the first time 
the Navy's two large carriers, Saratoga (with VT-2B 
embarked) and Lexington (CV 2), participated in a 
major fleet exercise. 

Mar-Apr 1930: In March the squadron participated in 
Fleet Problem X which was conducted in the Caribbean 
Sea, followed by the Fleet Problem XI in April. 

May 1930: VT-2B's aircraft joined with the planes 
from 9 other squadrons, which included the Saratoga, 
Lexington, and Langley Air Groups, for a three-day 
tour of east coast cities from Norfolk, Virginia to 
Boston. The flight was commanded by Captain 
Kenneth Whiting and consisted of 36 torpedo and 
bombing planes, 57 fighting planes, 24 scouting planes, 
3 amphibian utility planes, 3 Ford trimotored transports 



* The squadron designation system was changed on 1 July 1930 by 
General Order 202 and Bombing was dropped from the designation 
Torpedo and Bombing Squadron. However, there was no change to 
the abbreviated squadron designation, it still remained VT 




A VT-2B T3M-2 with parachutists jumping from the wing, circa 1935. 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 45 



and 2 staff planes. It was the largest air parade that had 
ever been assembled on the east coast. 

1931-1934: The squadron participated in Fleet 
Problems XII through XV. 

31 May 1934: A Fleet Review for President Franklin 
D. Roosevelt was held in New York Harbor. 

1935-1938: The squadron participated in Fleet 
Problems XVI through XIX. 

May 1937: VT-2B participated in the celebration 
marking the opening of the Golden Gate Bridge. 

Apr-May 1940: The squadron participated in Fleet 
Problem XXI. This was the last major Fleet Problem con- 
ducted before America's involvement in World War II. 

May-Jun 1942: VT-3, consisting primarily of its 
pilots, flight crews and a limited number of ground 
crewmen, operated from Yorktown (CV 5) during the 
Battle of Midway. The other officers and ground crews 
remained ashore at NAS Kaneohe. Shortly after noon 
on the 4th, Lieutenant Commander Massey led a flight 
of 12 TBD-1 Devastors into the attack against the 
Japanese carriers. They were the last of the three tor- 
pedo squadrons to engage the enemy. Only two air- 
craft survived, both flown by enlisted pilots. The two 
surviving TBDs returned to the task force while 
Yorktown was under attack from Japanese carrier air- 
craft. These two TBDs were ditched and their crews 
picked up by ships in the task force. VT-3's survivors 
from Yorktown returned to the squadron at NAS 
Kaneohe. 

4 Jun 1942: Lieutenant Commander Massey was 
posthumously awarded the Navy Cross for his action 
during the battle. Eleven other squadron TBD pilots 
also were awarded the Navy Cross, they were Ensign 
Wesley F. Osmus, Ensign Carl A. Osberg, Lieutenant 
Patrick H. Hart, Enlisted Pilot Harry L. Corl, Enlisted 
Pilot Wilhelm G. Esders, Lieutenant (jg) Curtiss W. 
Howard, Ensign Leonard L. Smith, Enlisted Pilot John 
W. Haas, Ensign David J. Roche, Ensign Oswald A. 
Powers, and Lieutenant (jg) Richard W. Suesens. 

Aug 1942: Operating from Enterprise (CV 6), VT-3 
participated in the Battle of the Eastern Solomons. 

Nov 1942-Jul 1943: VT-3 operated from Saratoga, 
flying combat missions against various Japanese held 
islands in the South Pacific and providing air cover for 
American forces operating in the Eastern Solomons. 
When the squadron was not operating from Saratoga 
it was based ashore at various places, including Fiji; 
Efate and Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides; Tontouta, 
New Caledonia, and Guadalcanal, Solomons. 

May 1943: The British carrier HMS Victorious joined 
the Saratoga task force and operated with it until the 
latter part of July. 

31 Jul 1943: VT-3's TBFs were transferred to 
Tontouta on 30 July and the following day squadron 
personnel embarked on HMS Victorious for transfer to 
CONUS to reform. This ended the air group and 
squadron's association with Saratoga. 



25 Sep 1943: VT-3 and Saratoga Air Group were 
reformed at NAS Seattle. The Saratoga Air Group was 
reformed as Carrier Air Group THREE (CVG-3) with 
VT-3 as one of the three squadrons. 

Nov 1944: VT-3 conducted combat operations from 
Yorktown (CV 10) against targets in the Philippines in 
support of the Leyte invasion. 

Dec 1944: The squadron flew combat operations 
from Yorktown against targets on Luzon in preparation 
for the invasion of the island. "While retiring from the 
combat area Task Force 38, which included Yorktown 
and CVG-3, sailed through a typhoon which sank 
three destroyers and extensively damaged other ships 
in the task force. 

Jan 1945: Combat operations were conducted 
against targets in Formosa and the Philippines in sup- 
port of the Lingayen Gulf landings on Luzon in early 
January. With Yorktown leading the way, Task Force 
38 entered the South China Sea on 10 January. VT-3 
struck targets near Saigon and along the Vietnamese 
coast, Hong Kong and Canton areas, Formosa and 
Okinawa. 

9 Jan 1945: For actions against enemy targets on 
Formosa Lieutenant Frank F. Frazier was awarded the 
Silver Star. 

Feb 1945: VT-3 participated in the first carrier strikes 
against the Tokyo area, bombing the Tachikawa 
Engine Factory, 16 miles from the Imperial Palace. 
Following these strikes the squadron concentrated its 
attention on Chichi Jima and air support for the inva- 
sion of Iwo Jima. This operation was the last combat 
action for the squadron during World War II. In early 
March VT-3 transferred to Lexington (CV 16) for transit 
to the States. 

Jun-Oct 1948: During the squadron's tour of duty in 
the Mediterranean the Sixth Fleet was placed on alert 
due to the out break of war between Israel and the 
Arab countries following the establishment of the state 
of Israel. 

Nov 1948: The squadron participated in cold weath- 
er operations in the Northern Atlantic. 




This is a well-known photo of the squadron's T4M-1 making an 
approach on Saratoga (CV 3). Notice the squadron's dragon insignia 
on the fuselage just aft of the lower wing. 



46 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



Home Port Assignments 



Commanding Officers — Continued 



lAJ\sMrl HJ II I 


'X ' < *'' ' ' * J—sL 1 1 tz 


Aroostook (.LM Z) 


(JO Jul lyJo 


NAS San Diego 


Sep 1925 


roicl island UNAs Pearl riaruorj 


Jan iy^Zj 


JMAo tvaneone 


no c-.k 1 n/oi 
y)j reD ly4Zj 


brate 


A„„ 1 C\A 14- 

Aug Ly4Z$ 


Hawaii 


Sep ly4Zj 


IN AS Seattle 


Sep 1943 


JNAo wnianey island 


11 (Jet 


IN AS rasco 


\)Z reo 1V44 


MAC A 1„ . . . 1 . , 

NAS Alameda 


AC A TC\AAX 

to Apr iy44j 


NAS Puunene 


11 Apr 19441 


"N T A C T Til 

NAS Hllo 


07 Jun I944f 


NAS Kahului 


22 Jul I944f 


NAS Seattle 


Mar 1945 


NAAF Lewiston 


07 May 1945 


NAS Key West 


15 Jun 1945 


NAAS Oceana 


15 Jul 1945 


NAS Quonset Point 


11 Aug 1947 


NAAS Charlestown 


13 Oct 1947 


NAS Quonset Point 


21 Mar 1949 


* The ship was at NAS Pearl Harbor. 




t Temporily based ashore during World War II. 




% When Enterprise (CV 6) was damaged by air attacks on 24 August, 


during the Battle of the Eastern Solomons, VT-3's surviving aircraft 


were flown to Efate. These aircraft remained at Efate while the 


majority of the squadron personnel went aboard Saratoga (CV 3) 


and returned to Hawaii in September 1942. 




Commanding Officers 




Date Assumed Command 


LT A. O. Rule, Jr. 


06 July 1925 


LTJ. B. Kniep 


Sep 1925 


LCDR M. Griffin 


Oct 1925 


LCDRJ. G. Strong 


18 Jan 1926 


LCDR J. B. Kniep 


Jun 1926 


CDR Read 


Jul 1926 


LCDRJ. B. Kniep 


Sep 1926 


LT A. P. Schneider 


Aug 1927 


LCDR Harry R. Bogusch 


Feb 1928 


LCDR A. E. Montgomery 


Jul 1929 


LCDR William Masek 


Jul 1930 


LCDRJ. L. Cotton 


Mar 1931 


LT T. C. Lonnquest (acting) 


Jun 1931 


LCDRJ. J. Ballentine 


Jul 1931 


LCDR Theodore C. Lonnquest 


Dec 1932 


LCDR Harold J. Brow 


May 1933 


LCDR Herman E. Halland 


Jun 1934 


LCDR William H. Buracker 


Jun 1936 


LCDR Marion E. Crist 


Jun 1937 


LCDR Frank C. Sutton 


27 Jun 1938 


LT Austin V. Magly 


28 May 1940 


LT J. C. Clark 


27 Jun 1941 





Date Assumed Command 


LCDR John A. Collett 


Jan 


1942 


LT John N. Myers (acting) 


Jan 


1942 


LCDR Lance E. Massey 


17 Apr 


1942 


LT John N. Myers (acting) 


Jun 


1942 


LCDR Charles M. Jett 


20 Jun 


1942 


LT John N. Myers (acting) 


29 Dec 


1942 


LT Charles H. Turner (later LCDR) 


Apr 


1943 


LT Roy S. Belcher, Jr. (later LCDR) 


24 May 


1945 


LCDR Norman D. Johnson 


Jan 


1948 


LCDR Roy P. Gee 


24 Aug 


1949 




A squadron TG-2 with its dragon insignia on the fuselage, circa mid 
1930s. 



Type of Aircraft 



DT-2* 



SC-2 
SC-1 
CS-1 



T2D-1 



T^M-? 



TB-1 



T4M-1 

TG-1 

TG-2 



TBD-1 



TBF-1 

TBM-1C 

TBM-3E 

TBM-3Q 

TBM-3J 

TBM-3W 



AD-1 
AD-2 



Aircraft Assignment 

Date Type First Received 
Jul 1925 
Nov 1925 
Mar 1926 
Nov 1926 
Jun 1927 
Aug 1927 
Sep 1927 
Jul 1928 
Jun 1930 
Apr 1932 
05 Oct 1937 
Jul 1942f 
15 Mar 1944 
Jun 1945 
Jun 1946 
May 1947 
Sep 1947 
Apr 1949 
May 1949 



• The aircraft were on loan to the squadron from NAS Pearl Harbor. 

t VT-3's shore detachment received its first TBF-1 in early May 1942. 
However, the squadron continued to operate the TBD-ls aboard the 
earner until the latter part of July 1942 when it became an all TBF unit. 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 47 




A TBD-1 with VT-3 markings and the ever-present dragon insignia on the fuselage (Courtesy Harry Gann and the Douglas Collection). 



Major Overseas Deployment 



Date of 


Date of 


Air 




Type of 


Area of 


Departure 


Return 


Wing 


Carrier 


Aircraft 


Operation 


15 Jan 1929 


Mar 1929 


Saratoga 
Air Group 


CV 3 


T4M-1 


Canal Zone 
(Pac side) 


15 Feb 1930 


21 Jun 1930 


Saratoga 
Air Group 


CV 3 


T4M-1 


Canal Zone/ 
Carib 


05 Feb 1931 


15 Apr 1931 


Saratoga 
Air Group 


CV 3 


TG-1 


Canal Zone/ 
Carib 


Feb 1932 


19 Mar 1932 


Saratoga 
Air Group 


CV 2/3* 


TG-1 


Hawaii 


23 Jan 1933 


17 Feb 1933 


Saratoga 
Air Group 


CV 3 


TG-2 


Hawaii 


09 Apr 1934 


09 Nov 1934 


Saratoga 
Air Group 


CV 3/ 
CV 2f 


TG-2 


Canal Zone/ 
Carib & East 
Coast of U.S. 


May 1935 


Jun 1935 


Saratoga 
Air Group 


CV 3 


TG-2 


Hawaii/ 
NorPac 


Apr 1936 


Jun 1936 


Saratoga 
Air Group 


CV 3 


TG-2 


Canal Zone/ 
Pac 


Apr 1937 


May 1937 


Saratoga 
Air Group 


CV 3 


TG-2 


Hawaii/Pac 


15 Mar 1938 


Apr 1938 


Saratoga 
Air Group 


CV 3 


TBD-1 


Hawaii/Pac 


02 Apr 1940 


21 Jun 1940 


Saratoga 
Air Group 


CV 3 


TBD-1 


Hawaii/Pac 


08 Dec 1941 


Jan 1942 


Saratoga 
Air Group 


CV 3* 


TBD-1 


Hawaii/Pac 



48 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



Major Overseas Deployment — Continued 



Date nf 


Date nf 






Tvt>e nf 




Departure 


Return 


Wing 


Carrier 


Aircraft 


Operation 


May iy4/ 


Jun ly4z 


Yorktown 




1 DlJ-1 


Midway Island 






Air Group 








13 Jul iy4Z 


Aug 1^4z 


Enterprise Air 


0 


'in r - i 
1 Dl-1 


Pacilic ops 






Group 








10 Nov 1942 


Jul 1943 


Saratoga 


CV 3§ 


TBF-1 


Pacific ops 






Air Group 








24 Oct 1944 


27 Mar 1945 


CVG-3 


CV 10/ 


TBM-1C 


Pacific ops 








CV 16** 






07 Jun 1947 


11 Aug 1947 


CVAG-3 


CV 33 


TBM-3E/Q 


NorLant/ 










& TBM-3J 


Carib 


01 Jun 1948 


02 Oct 48 


CVG-3 


CV 33 


TBM-3E/J 


Med 



& TBM-3W 



* The squadron's cruise to Hawaii began aboard Lexington (CV 2) and prior to the beginning of Fleet Problem XXIII in late February it was 
transferred to Saratoga. 

t During the squadron's 7 month deployment in 1934 VT-2B was divided into two divisions, with division 1 aboard Saratoga and division 2 
aboard Lexington. VT-2B's division 2 operated with Lexington's Air Group. 

^ The squadron was operating from Saratoga in the Hawaiian area when the ship was hit by a torpedo from a Japanese submarine on 11 
January 1942. Saratoga departed Hawaii and returned to Bremerton, Washington for repairs and VT-3 remained in Hawaii. 

§ The squadron and air group transferred from Saratoga to HMS Victorious in July 1943 and returned to Hawaii aboard the British carrier. 
Saratoga remained in the South Pacific and continued her combat operations with a different air group embarked. 

** On 5 March 1945 VT-3 and CVG-3 were transferred from Yorktown to Lexington for its return to the States via Hawaii. Lexington departed 
Ulithi on 6 March, arriving in Hawaii on 17 March, departing on the 20th and arriving at Bremerton, Washington on 27 March. 




DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 49 



Air Wing Assignments 

Air Wing Tail Code Assignment Date 

Aircraft Squadrons, 06 Jul 1925 

Battle Fleet, 
Aroostook (CM 2) 

Saratoga Air Group* 09 Apr 1927 

Yorktown Air Groupt May 1942 

Enterprise Air Group Jul 1942 

Saratoga Air Group/ K$ Sep 1942 

CVG-3/ CVAG-3/ CVG-3§ 

* CNO's Assignment of Naval Aircraft (Naval Aeronautic 
Organization) for FY 27 (July 1927-June 1928) assigned VT-2B to 
Saratoga (CV 3) prior to the carrier's commissioning. Evolution of 
the Saratoga Air Group was as follows: Saratoga (CV 3) was com- 
missioned 16 November 1927 with squadrons previously assigned; 
the squadrons assigned to the carrier were known as the Saratoga 
Air Group. However, it was not until 1 July 1938 when the Air 
Group Commander billets were established that the air group 
became an official organization. 

t Temporily assigned to Yorktown Air Group during the Battle of 
Midway. 

| The tail code K was assigned to Kearsarge (CV 33) on 7 
November 1946. Since CVG-3 was assigned to Kearsarge its 



squadrons used the K tail code. On 12 December 1946 the tail code 
K was removed from Kearsarge and assigned to CVG-3. 

§ Saratoga Air Group redesignated Carrier Air Group THREE (CVG- 
3) on 25 September 1943. The CVG-3 designation was changed to 
CVAG-3 on 15 November 1946 to show the air wing's association 
with an attack carrier. CVAG-3 was changed back CVG-3 on 1 
September 1948 regardless of the air groups' aassignment to an 
attack or battle carrier. 



Unit Award 
PUC 



Campaign Medal 
(Asiatic-Pacific) 



Unit Awards 



Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 



11 Nov 1944 
14 Dec 1944 
03 Jan 1945 
16 Feb 1945 
23 Aug 1942 
Nov 1942 
11 Nov 1944 
14 Dec 1944 
03 Jan 1945 
16 Feb 1945 



19 Nov 1944 
16 Dec 1944 
22 Jan 1945 
25 Feb 1945 
25 Aug 1942 
08 Feb 1943 
19 Nov 1944 
16 Dec 1944 
22 Jan 1945 
25 Feb 1945 




A squadron AD-1 trapping aboard Leyte (CV 32), November 1950 (Courtesy Duane Kasulka Collection). 



50 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



SECOND VA-35 

Lineage 

Established as Bombing Squadron THREE B (VB-3B) 
on 1 July 1934. 

Redesignated Bombing Squadron FOUR (VB-4) on 1 
July 1937. 

Redesignated Bombing Squadron THREE (VB-3) on 
1 July 1939. 

Redesignated Attack Squadron THREE A (VA-3A) on 
15 November 1946. 

Redesignated Attack Squadron THIRTY FOUR (VA- 
34) on 7 August 1948. 

Redesignated Attack Squadron THIRTY FIVE (VA- 
35) on 15 February 1950. The second squadron to be 
assigned the VA-35 designation. 

Squadron Insignia and Nickname 

There is no record of 
official approval for the 
diving black panther 
insignia used by VB-3B. 
However, by mid-1935, 
the design appeared in 
Navy documents as 
Bombing THREE'S in- 
signia. The diving black 
panther design has been 
carried on through the 
various redesignations 
of the squadron and is 
the present insignia for 
VA-35. It was officially 
approved for VA-35 by 
CNO on 1 October 
1957. 

Nickname: Black 
Panthers. 

Chronology of 
Significant Events 

May 1935: Ranger 
(CV 4) and her em- 
barked air group, 
including VB-3B, partici- 
pated in Fleet Exercise 
XVI. This was the first 
time VB-3B and Ranger 
participated in a Fleet 
Exercise. 

25 Nov 1935-25 Feb 
1936: A detachment from VB-3B, including six BG-ls, 
was assigned to Ranger's Cold Weather Test Detachment 
and operated aboard Ranger in Alaskan waters. 




The original squadron diving 
panther insignia is one of the old- 
est squadron insignias in contin- 
uous use by a naval aviation 
command. 




The squadron 's insignia with the 
scroll and designation added to 
the original design. 



Apr-Jun 1936: The squadron participated in Fleet 
Problem XVII. 

Apr-May 1937: The squadron participated in Fleet 
Problem XVIII. 

28 May 1937: VB-3B participated in an aerial review 
celebrating the opening of the Golden Gate Bridge. 

Jul 1937: The squadron, embarked in Lexington (CV 
2), participated in the search for Amelia Earhart 
Putnam and Fred Noonan. 

Sep 1937: VB-4, embarked in Ranger, visited Lima, 
Peru, in conjunction with the International Aviation 
Conference being held there. 

Mar- Apr 1938: The squadron participated in Fleet 
Problem XIX. 

Apr-May 1940: The squadron participated in Fleet 
Problem XXI. This was the last major fleet problem 
conducted before America's involvement in World 
War II. 

Apr 1942: VB-3, embarked in Enterprise (CV 6), pro- 
vided escort patrols for the task force which launched 
Colonel Doolittle's B-25 raid against Tokyo. 

4 Jun 1942: At the Battle of Midway, VB-3, 
embarked in Yorktown (CV 5), engaged in its first 
combat operations. Yorktown's first strike included 17 
SBD-3's from VB-3 led by Lieutenant Commander 
Leslie. Approximately an hour after launch, VB-3's air- 
craft sighted the Japanese Fleet and commenced their 
dive-bombing attack; the primary target was the carrier 
Soryu. Lieutenant (jg) Paul A. Holmberg was the first 
to drop his 1,000 pounder on the Soryu. His hit was 
followed by two more from VB-3's SBDs. Soryu erupt- 
ed into flames and eventually sank. 

With the Soryu in flames, the other VB-3 SBDs 
directed their attack against other targets. They 
attacked a destroyer, the Isokaze, making one hit on 
her fantail and "what appeared to be a battleship," 
claiming a hit on her stern. All 17 SBDs from VB-3 
escaped the attack without a hit and returned to 
Yorktown. Prior to landing on the carrier, they were 
directed to leave the area due to incoming enemy air- 
craft. All VB-3's SBDs landed on Enterprise except for 
Lieutenant Commander Leslie and his wingman, 
Lieutenant (jg) Holmberg. These two men, low on 
fuel, ditched their aircraft along side the cruiser 
Astoria and were picked up by the ship's motor 
whaleboat. 

The battle was still not over for VB-3. In late after- 
noon, 14 of VB-3's SBDs were launched from 
Enterprise as part of a strike group ordered to attack 
the fourth Japanese carrier, Hiryu. Lieutenant 
Shumway was in charge of VB-3's formation. The 
strike force located Hiryu and again caught a Japanese 
carrier in the vulnerable position of having armed and 
fueled planes on deck. Direct hits from Shumway's 
SBD's resulted in a torched Hiryu and her eventual 
sinking. Several of VB-3's aircraft suffered heavy dam- 
age from attacking Japanese aircraft. However, all but 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 5 1 



two of VB-3's aircraft returned to Enterprise. Seventeen 
of VB-3's pilots received the Navy Cross for their 
action during the Battle of Midway, they were Ensigns 
Benson, Butler, Campbell, Cobb, Cooner, Elder, 
Hanson, Isaman, Lane, Merrill and Schoegel; 
Lieutenant (jg)s Holmberg, Sherwood and Wiseman; 
Lieutenants Bottomley and Shumway; and Lieutenant 
Commander Leslie. 

Aug 1942: While operating from Saratoga in the 
South Pacific, the squadron participated in strikes 
against Guadalcanal and other enemy installations in 
the Solomon Islands in support of the occupation of 
Guadalcanal. 

24 Aug 1942: VB-3 participated in the Battle of the 
Eastern Solomons, attacking Ryujo, a Japanese light 
carrier, and helping to sink her. 

Jan-Jul 1943: VB-3 operated in the South Pacific fly- 
ing combat sorties against various Japanese-held 
islands and providing air cover for American forces. 

July 1943: VB-3 and the Saratoga Air Group were 
relieved by Air Group 12 and boarded HMS Victorious 
for transfer to CONUS to reform, arriving at San Diego 
on 18 August. This ended the air group and VB-3's 
association with Saratoga (CV 3). 

Nov 1944: VB-3 conducted combat operations from 
Yorktown (CV 10) against various targets, including 
shipping, in support of the Leyte invasion. 

Jan 1945: Combat operations were conducted 
against targets in Formosa and the Philippines in sup- 
port of the Lingayen Gulf landings on Luzon in early 
January. With Yorktown leading the way, Task Force 
38 entered the South China Sea on 10 January. VB-3 
struck targets near Saigon and along the Vietnamese 
coast, Canton and Hong Kong areas, Formosa and 
Okinawa. 

Feb 1945: VB-3 participated in the first carrier strikes 
against the Tokyo area, bombing the Kasumiga-ura 
Airfield, an air depot 25 miles north of Tokyo, and the 
Tachikawa Aircraft Engine Plant, located 16 miles west 
of the Imperial Palace. Following these strikes, the 
squadron concentrated its attention on air support for 
the invasion of Iwo Jima. This operation was the last 
combat action for the squadron during World War II. 
On 6 March, the squadron transferred from Yorktown 
to Lexington (CV 16) for transfer to CONUS. 

11 Oct 1950: While deployed to the Korean Theater 
aboard Leyte (CV 32), the squadron launched its first 
combat mission since February 1945, striking North 
Korean targets. 

12 Dec 1950: The squadron's commanding officer, 
Lieutenant Commander Bagwell, crash-landed in North 
Korea and was taken prisoner. 

Jul-Aug 1958: VA-35, along with other squadrons 
from CVG-3, provided support for U.S. Marines land- 
ing in Lebanon. 

Oct-Nov 1962: VA-35 deployed to McCalla Field, 
Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, during the Cuban Missile 



Crisis. During December, the squadron was embarked 
in Saratoga (CVA 60). 

4 Feb 1965: The squadron's commanding officer, 
Commander Richard G. Layser, was killed in an acci- 
dent. 

15 Aug 1965: VA-35 transferred from CVW-3 in 
preparation for its transition to the A-6A Intruder. This 
brought to a close an illustrious career with CVW-3 
that began in 1939- 

26 Feb 1967: The squadron participated in the first 
combat aerial mining operations since World War II, 
when its A-6A Intruders dropped mines in the Song Ca 
and Song Giang Rivers of North Vietnam. 

1 Oct 1967: During a weapons training deployment 
to NAS Yuma, Arizona, VA-35 became the first A-6A 
squadron to fire the AIM-9 Sidewinder missile. 

Jan-Feb 1968: "While embarked in Enterprise (CVAN 
65) and en route to Yankee Station, the carrier was 
ordered to the Sea of Japan for operations following 
the seizure of the Pueblo (AGER 2) by the North 
Koreans. 

12 Mar 1968: The squadron's commanding officer, 
Commander Kollmann, was lost in an operational acci- 
dent. 

17 Sep 1972: While on a mission over North 
Vietnam the squadron's commanding officer, 
Commander Donnelly, was lost and is still listed as 
missing in action. 

3 Jan 1980: VA-35 departed Naples, Italy, embarked 
in Nimitz (CVN 68), en route to the Indian Ocean via 
the Cape of Good Hope after the U.S. Embassy staff 
was taken hostage in Tehran, Iran. This was the begin- 
ning of 144 consecutive days at sea for the squadron. 

26 May 1981: While on a training exercise aboard 
Nimitz off the coast of Charleston, S.C., an EA-6B from 
VMAQ-2 crashed into parked aircraft while attempting 
to land. VA-35 personnel provided firefighting support 
and assistance to the injured. There were no injuries 
to VA-35 personnel. Over 130 members of the 
squadron received awards for fighting fires and assist- 
ing the injured. 

Jun 1985: Nimitz and VA-35 were ordered to oper- 
ate off the coast of Lebanon due to the hijacking of 
TWA flight 847 by Arab radicals. The carrier and 
squadron remained on station until the release of the 
hostages in the latter part of June. 

Feb 1987: VA-35, embarked in Nimitz, operated off 
the coast of Lebanon after three U.S. citizens were 
taken hostage from the American University in Beirut. 

Jul 1988: VA-35 participated in a firepower demon- 
stration for the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff 
and his guest, the Marshal of the Soviet Union. 

Sep 1988: While deployed to the North Atlantic 
aboard Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71), the squadron 
conducted flight operations from the carrier while in 
the Vestfjord of Norway. 

Aug-Dec 1990: The squadron flew missions in sup- 



52 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



port of Operation Desert Shield, the build-up of 
American and Allied forces to counter a threatened 
invasion of Saudi Arabia by Iraq and part of an eco- 
nomic blockade of Iraq to force its withdrawal from 
Kuwait. 




The BM-1 was the first type of aircraft operated by the squadron. The 
vertical fin of the aircraft was most likely painted willow green, indi- 
cating it was assigned to the Ranger air group. 



Home Port Assignments 



Location 


Assignment Date 


NAS Norfolk 


01 Jul 


1934 


NAS San Diego 


14 Apr 


1935 


Ford Island (NAS Pearl Harbor)* 


Jan 


1942 


NAS Kaneohe* 


Feb 


1942 


NAS Ewa* 


Jun 


1942 


NAS Kaneohe* 


Sep 


1942 


Nandi Field, Fiji Islands* 


Nov 


1942 


Tontouta Airfield, New Caledonia* 


Dec 


1942 


NAS Sand Point 


Sep 


1943 


NAS Whidbey Island 


Oct 


1943 


NAS Pasco 


02 Feb 


1944 


NAS Alameda* 


05 Apr 


1944 


NAS Puunene* 


22 Apr 


1944 


NAS Hilo* 


07 Jun 


1944 


NAS Kahului* 


22 Jul 


1944 


NAS Seattle 


28 Mar 


1945 


NAS Wildwood 


07 May 


1945 


NAAS Oceana 


19 Jul 


1945 


NAAS Charlestown 


15 Apr 


1947 


NAS Quonset Point 


14 Aug 


1947 


NAAS Charlestown 


01 Oct 


1947 


NAS Quonset Point 


01 Feb 


1949 


NAAS Oceana* 


24 Aug 


1950 


NAS Quonset Point 


03 Feb 


1951 


NAAS Sanford 


30 Apr 


1951 


NAS Cecil Field 


Feb 


1953 


NAS Jacksonville 


01 Oct 


1958 


NAS Oceana 


Aug 


1965 



* Temporary shore base assignment during World War II. 



Commanding Officers 



Date Assumed Command 


LCDR George C. Fairlamb, Jr. 


01 Tul 


1934 


LCDR Robert H. Harrell 


10 Jun 


1935 


LCDR Paul E. Roswall 


05 Jun 


1937 


LCDR Edgar A. Cruise 


Tul 


1938 


LCDR Robert E Blick Tr 

i-iVJi-^lV lVV.y I J V^ 1 L 1 i . A—} 1 1 IV , J A , 


01 Tul 


1939 


LCDR Maxwell F. Leslie 




1942 


LCDR Dewitt W. Shumway 


15 Tun 


1942 


LT Harold S. Bottomley, Jr 


16 Apr 


1943 


LCDR John T. Lowe, Jr. 


29 Sep 


1943 


LT Raymond S. Osterhoudt (acting) 


22 Dec 


1944 


LT Raymond S. Osterhoudt 


23 Feb 


1945 


TT H N Murnhv 

JjI . XX. 11. 1V1 Lll IJLLy 


07 Mav 


1945 

A-y aJ 


LCDR Heber J. Badger 


04 Oct 


1946 


LCDR Ralph M. Bagwell 


30 Nov 


1948 


LCDR John G. Osborn 


19 Dec 


1950 


TCDR Tames W Conper 


31 Mar 


1952 


LCDR David G Adams Tr 

i-ivjj_/iv i y ci v ivi. v i . i wj-c*.iiiij « j 


10 Aug 


1953 


CDR C. W. Johnson 


Nov 


1954 


CDR Alfred E. Brown 


Sep 


1956 


CDR Harlan W Foote 

v > i / i \ x itii acaaa vv . x vyvyiw 


07 Oct 


1958 


CDR William F. Bailey 


21 Mar 


I960 


CDR F C Hastings TT 

V > 1 / 1 \ J_, . V v . X XcliJLll ItO XI 


28 Apr 


1961 


CDR W. F. Walker 


29 Mav 


1962 


CDR T R Constantine 


07 Mar 


1963 


CDR J. B. Allred 


13 Mar 


1964 


CDR Richard G. Layser 


22 Tan 


1965 


LCDR Joseph F. Frick (acting) 


04 Feb 


1965 


CDR John W. Shute 


22 Mar 


1965 


CDR Donald S. Ross 


13 Aug 


1965 


CDR Arthur H Barie 


29 Tul 

^y j ui 


1966 


CDR Glenn E. Kollmann 


14 Tul 


1967 


CDR Herman L. Turk 


15 Mar 


1968 


CDR Joseph F. Frick 


29 May 


1969 


CDR Hugh J. Campbell 


02 Jun 


1970 


CDR Kenneth B. Russell 


12 Apr 


1971 


CDR Verne G. Donnelly 


24 May 


1972 


CDR Milton D Beach (acting) 

Vj AS XV 1*111 LV/ll IS . A-J V^ CI V 1 1 V CA ^ L 1 1 lily 


17 Sep 


1972 


CDR Milton D. Beach 


26 Sep 


1972 


CDR Gerald H. Hesse 


21 Sep 


1973 


CDR Ronald P Hvde 


15 Auc 


1974 


CDR Brian K. Bryans 


10 Dec 


1975 

a. y / _J 


CDR Georee D O'Brien 


31 Mar 


1977 


CDR James D. Joyner 


23 Jun 


1978 


CDR John A. Pieno, Jr. 


19 Jul 


1979 


CDR J. M. Luecke 


05 Feb 


1981 


CDR A. H. White 


24 Jun 


1982 


CDR Stephen A. Richmond 


15 Dec 


1983 


CDR Ronald S. Pearson 


24 Jun 


1985 


CDR Louis P. Lalli 


24 Oct 


1986 


CDR James A. Bolcar 


08 Apr 


1988 


CDR James B. Andersen 


06 Sep 


1989 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS — Volume I 53 








Aircraft Assignment 



Aircraft Assignment — Continued 



Type of Aircraft 



BM-1 and BM-2 



BG-1* 



SB2U-2 
SB2U-1 



BT-1 



SBC-4 



SBD-3 
SBD-4 
SBD-3P 
SBD-5 



SB2C-1C 
SBW-3 
SB2C-4 
SB2C-5 



AD-2 

AD-2Q 

AD-1 



Date Type First Received 

Jul 1934 
Nov 1934 
Jan 1938 

Jul 1940 
Mar 1941 
Mar 1941 
Aug 1941 
Apr 1943 
Apr 1943 
Aug 1943 
Dec 1943 

Jul 1944 
Sep 1944 
Jan 1946 
24 Nov 1948 
Feb 1949 
Feb 1949 



Type of Aircraft 


Date Type First Received 


AD-4 


Oct 1950 


AD-3 


May 1950 


AD-4L 


Feb 1951 


AD-4B 


Mar 1953 


AD-4N 


Aug 1953 


AD-6/A-lHf 


Sep 1953 


AD-5 


Oct 1954 


A-6A 


15 Dec 1965 


A-6B 


Jan 1968 


KA-6D 


Dec 1970 


A-6C 


Feb 1971 


A-6E 


19 Apr 1973 



* The XBG-1 was received by the squadron in October 1934, fol- 
lowed by the BG-1 production versions in November 1934. 

t AD-6 designation changed to A-1H in 1962. 



54 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 




A formation of the squadron 's SB2U Vindicators. The squadron 's diving panther insignia is barely visible on the fuselage of the aircraft. 



Major Overseas Deployment 



Date of 


Date of 


Air 




Type of 


Area of 


Departure 


Return 


Wing 


Carrier 


Aircraft 


Operation 


28 Mar 1935 


15 Apr 1935 


Ranger 
Air Group 


CV 4 


BG-1 


Carib/Panama 

Canal/West 

Coast 


May 1935 


May 1935 


Ranger 
Air Group 


CV 4 


BG-1 


Hawaii 




* 




CV 4 


BG-1 


Alaska 


27 Apr 1936 


Jun 1936 


Lexington 
Air Group 


CV 2 


BG-1 


Central 

America/West 

Coast 


Apr 1937 


May 1937 


Lexington 
Air Group 


CV 2 


BG-1 


Hawaii 


Mar 1938 


Apr 1938 


Ranger 
Air Group 


CV 4 


BG-2 


Hawaii 


02 Apr 1940 


21 Jun 1940 


Saratoga 
Air Group 


CV 3 


SB2U-2 


Hawaii 


08 Dec 1941 


tjan 1942 


Saratoga 
Air Group 


CV 3 


SBD-3 


Hawaii 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 55 



Major Overseas Deployment — Continued 



Date of 


Date of 


Air 




Type of 


Area of 


Departure 


Return 


Wing 


Carrier 


Aircraft 


Operation 


Apr 1942 


Apr 1942 


Enterprise 


CV6 


SBD-3 


Pacific Ops 






Air Group 








30 May 1942 


Jun 1942 


Yorktown 


CV 5* 


SBD-3 


Battle of 






Air Group 






Midway 


07 Jul 1942 


21 Sep 1942 


Saratoga 


CV 3 


SBD-3 


SoPac 






Air Group 








12 Nov 1942 


26 Jul 1943 


Saratoga 


CV 3§ 


SBD-3 


SoPac 






Air Group 








24 Oct 1944 


27 Mar 1945 


CVG-3 


CV 10/ 


SB2C-4 


Pacific Ops 








CV 16** 






07 Jun 1947 


11 Aug 1947 


CVAG-3 


CV 33 


SB2C-5 


NorLant/Carib 


01 Jun 1948 


02 Oct 1948 


CVG-3 


CV 33 


SB2C-5 


Med 


02 May 1950 


24 Aug 1950 


CVG-3 


CV 32 


AD-3 


Med 


06 Sep 1950 


18 Sep 1950 


CVG-3 


CV 32 


AD-3 


Carib/Panama 












Canal/West 












Coast 


19 Sep 1950 


03 Feb 1951 


CVG-3 


CV 32 


AD-3/4 


WestPac/ 












Korea 


03 Sep 1951 


21 Dec 1951 


CVG-3 


CV 32 


AD-4/L 


Med 


29 Aug 1952 


Feb 1953 


CVG-3 


CVA 32 


AD-4 


Med 


12 Nov 1953 


Sep 1954 


CVG-3 


CVA 40 


AD-6 


World Cruise 


04 Nov 1955 


02 Aug 1956 


CVG-3 


CVA 14 


AD-6 


Med 


01 Feb 1958 


01 Oct 1958 


CVG-3 


CVA 60 


AD-6 


Med 


16 Aug 1959 


26 Feb I960 


CVG-3 


CVA 60 


AD-6 


Med 


22 Aug I960 


26 Feb 1961 


CVG-3 


CVA 60 


AD-6 


NorLant/Med 


28 Nov 1961 


11 May 1962 


CVG-3 


CVA 60 


AD-6 


Med 


29 Mar 1963 


25 Oct 1963 


CVG-3 


CVA 60 


AD-6 


Med 


28 Nov 1964 


12 Jul 1965 


CVW-3 


CVA 60 


A-1H 


Med 


19 Nov 1966 


06 Jul 1967 


CVW-9 


CVAN 65 


A-6A 


WestPac/Vietnam 


03 Jan 1968 


18 Jul 1968 


CVW-9 


CVAN 65 


A-6A/B 


WestPac/Vietnam 


23 Sep 1969 


01 Jul 1970 


CVW-15 


CVA 43 


A-6A 


WestPac/Vietnam 


06 Jul 1971 


16 Dec 1971 


CVW-8 


CVA 66 


A-6A/B/C 


Med 










& KA-6D 




05 Jun 1972 


24 Mar 1973 


CVW-8 


CVA 66 


A-6A/C & KA-6D 


WestPac/Vietnam 


03 Jan 1974 


03 Aug 1974 


CVW-8 


CVA 66 


A-6E & KA-6D 


Med 


06 Sep 1974 


12 Oct 1974 


CVW-8 


CVA 66 


A-6E & KA-6D 


NorLant 


16 Jul 1975 


24 Sep 1975 


CVW-8 


CVN 68 


A-6E & KA-6D 


Carib/NorLant 


07 Jul 1976 


07 Feb 1977 


CVW-8 


CVN 68 


A-6E & KA-6D 


Med 


01 Dec 1977 


20 Jul 1978 


CVW-8 


CVN 68 


A-6E & KA-6D 


Med/ 












NorLant 


10 Sep 1979 


26 May 1980 


CVW-8 


CVN 68 


A-6E & 


Med/SoLant/ 










KA-6D 


IO 


29 Aug 1980 


17 Oct 1980 


CVW-8 


CVN 68 


A-6E & KA-6D 


NorLant 


03 Aug 1981 


12 Feb 1982 


CVW-8 


CVN 68 


A-6E & KA-6D 


Med 


10 Nov 1982 


20 May 1983 


CVW-8 


CVN 68 


A-6E & KA-6D 


Carib/Med 



56 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



Major Overseas Deployment — Continued 



LJClie OJ 


utile oj 


Air 




lype oj 


Area of 


Departure 


Return 


Wing 


Carrier 


Aircraft 


Operation 


08 Mar 1985 


04 Oct 1985 


CVW-8 


CVN 68 


A-6E & KA-6D 


Carib/Med 


15 Aug 1986 


16 Oct 1986 


CVW-8 


CVN 68 


A-6E & KA-6D 


NorLant 


30 Dec 1986 


26 Jul 1987 


CVW-8 


CVN 68 


A-6E & KA-6D 


Med/SoLant/ 












West Coast 


25 Aug 1988 


11 Oct 1988 


CVW-8 


CVN 71 


A-6E 


NorLant 


30 Dec 1988 


30 Jun 1989 


CVW-8 


CVN 71 


A-6E 


Med 


07 Aug 1990 


28 Mar 1991 


CVW-17 


CV 60 


A-6E & KA-6D 


Med/Red Sea 



• Detachments from Aircraft Squadrons, Battle Fleet, including a detachment from VB-3B, were organizated as Rangefs Cold Weather Test 
Detachment and operated on a northern cruise to Alaska sometime between late November 1935 and 25 February 1936. 

t The squadron was operating from Saratoga in the Hawaiian area when the ship was hit by a torpedo from a Japanese submarine on 11 
January 1942. Saratoga departed Hawaii for repairs at Bremerton, Washington, and VB-3 remained in Hawaii. 

% After the squadron's first strike against the Japanese carriers, it operated from Enterprise (CV 6) for the remainder of the Midway battle. 

§ While deployed to the South Pacific, as part of the Saratoga Air Group, the squadron operated from Saratoga and various shore stations in 
New Caledonia, Fiji Islands, and Solomon Islands. 

** On 5 March 1945, VB-3 and CVG-3 were transferred from Yorktown (CV 10) to Lexington (CV 16) for its return to CONUS via Hawaii. Lexington 
departed Ulithi on 6 March, arriving in Hawaii on 17 March, departing on the 20th and arriving at Bremerton, Washington, on 27 March. 




The squadron's SBD Dauntlesses are in the foreground on the deck of Saratoga (CV 3), circa late 1941. In the background are F4F Wildcats and 
TBD Devastators from Saratoga's air group. 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 57 




SB2C-4 Hettdivers from VB-3 fly over the invasion fleet at Iwo fima 
en route to bomb targets on the island, 22 February 1945. 



Air Wing Assignments 

Air Wing Tail Code 

Ranger Air Group* 
Lexington Air Group* 
Ranger Ah Group 
Saratoga Air Group 
Yorktown Air Group 
Saratoga Air Group/ K/ACt- 

CVG-3/ CVAG-3/ 

CVG-3/CVW-3t 
CVW-4 

COMFAIRNORFOLK 

CVW-9 NG 

COMFAIRNORFOLK 

CVW-15 NL 

COMFAIRNORFOLK 

CVW-8 AJ 

CVW-17 AA 



Assignment Date 

01 Jul 1934 
Nov 1935 
01 Jul 1937 
01 Jan 1939 
May 1942 
Jun 1942 



15 Aug 1965 

16 Dec 1965 
22 Sep 1966 

Jul 1968 
31 Jul 1969 
01 Jul 1970 
01 Jan 1971 
07 Sep 1989 



* Ranger (CV 4) was commissioned on 4 June 1934 and VB-3B was 
assigned to Ranger on 1 July 1934. Squadrons assigned to the carri- 




ers prior to 1 July 1938 were part of that carrier's air group. 
However, it was not until after 1 July 1938, when Air Group 
Commander billets were established, that the air group became an 
offical organization. 

t The Saratoga Air Group was redesignated Carrier Air Group 
THREE (CVG-3) on 25 September 1943. The CVG-3 designation was 
changed to CVAG-3 on 15 November 1946 to show the air wing's 
association with an attack carrier. It was changed back to CVG-3 on 
1 September 1948 and no longer indicated the air group's associa- 
tion to a particular carrier designation, such as attack or battle carri- 
er. On 20 December 1963, all Carrier Air Groups (CVG) were redes- 
ignated Carrier Air Wings (CVW). 

£ The tail code K was assigned to Kearsarge (CV 33) on 7 
November 1946. Since CVG-3 was assigned to Kearsarge, its 
squadrons used the K tail code. On 12 December 1946, the tail code 
K was removed from Kearsarge and assigned to CVG-3. Carrier Air 
Group 3's tail code was changed from K to AC in the latter part of 
1957. The effective date was most likely the beginning of FY 58 (1 
July 1957). 



Unit Awards Received 



A squadron AD-6 (A-1H) Skyraider, circa late 1950s or early 1960s. 



Unit Award 


Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 


PUC 


11 Nov 1944 


19 Nov 1944 




14 Dec 1944 


16 Dec 1944 




03 Jan 1945 


22 Jan 1945 


NAVE 


01 Jul 1971 


31 Dec 1972 




01 Oct 1976 


30 Sep 1977 




01 Oct 1978 


30 Sep 1979 




01 Oct 1980 


31 Dec 1981 




01 Jan 1983 


31 Dec 1983 




01 Jan 1987 


31 Dec 1987 


PUC 


11 Nov 1944 


19 Nov 1944 




14 Dec 1944 


16 Dec 1944 




03 Jan 1945 


22 Jan 1945 




16 Feb 1945 


25 Feb 1945 


KPUC 


05 Oct 1950 


19 Jan 1951 


NUC 


09 Oct 1950 


19 Jan 1951 




18 Dec 1966 


20 Jun 1967 




22 Feb 1968 


26 Jun 1968 




23 Jan 1980 


01 May 1980 




17 Jan 1991 


28 Feb 1991 


MUC 


27 Oct 1969 


01 Jun 1970 




14 Jul 1972 


20 Feb 1973 




01 Dec 1977 


21 Dec 1979 




01 Jan 1981 


12 Feb 1982 


AFEM 


23 Jan 1968 


22 Mar 1968 




10 Dec 1969 


11 Dec 1969 


NEM 


18 Oct 1962 


23 Oct 1962 




14 Jan 1980 


14 May 1980 




05 Dec 1982 


31 Dec 1982 




21 Jan 1983 


13 Feb 1983 




18 Feb 1983 


24 Feb 1983 




19 Mar 1983 


21 Mar 1983 




18 Apr 1983 


22 Apr 1983 


RVNGC 


22 Feb 1968 


24 Feb 1968 




26 Feb 1968 


03 Mar 1968 




05 Mar 1968 


08 Mar 1968 




12 Mar 1968 






13 Mar 1968 





58 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



Unit Awards Received — Continued 



Unit Awards Received — Continued 



Unit Award Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 

14 Mar 1968 
16 Mar 1968 

29 Mar 1968 

01 Apr 1968 
07 Apr 1968 
12 Apr 1968 

14 Apr 1968 
16 Apr 1968 
22 Apr 1968 

02 May 1968 
01 Jun 1968 
04 Jun 1968 

15 Jun 1968 

16 Aug 1968 
VNSM 19 Dec 1966 

31 Jan 1967 

20 Mar 1967 
28 Apr 1967 28 May 1967 

04 Jun 1967 

21 Feb 1968 
26 Mar 1968 

30 Apr 1968 
30 May 1968 



Unit Award 



Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 



30 Mar 1968 
05 Apr 1968 
10 Apr 1968 



20 Apr 1968 
23 Apr 1968 

02 Jun 1968 



10 Sep 1968 

17 Jan 1967 
03 Mar 1967 

18 Apr 1967 

21 Jun 1967 
17 Mar 1968 
24 Apr 1968 
21 May 1968 
27 Jun 1968 



26 Oct 


1969 


18 Nov 


1969 


22 Dec 


1969 


19 Tan 

±y jail 


1970 


17 Feb 


1970 


09 Mar 


1970 


19 Mar 


1970 


11 Apr 


1970 


28 Apr 


1970 


01 Jun 


1970 


02 Jul 


1972 


04 Tul 


1972 


11 Tul 


1972 


24 Tul 


1972 


10 Aug 


1972 


28 Aug 


1972 


06 Sep 


1972 


07 Oct 


1972 


11 Oct 


1972 


12 Oct 


1972 


20 Oct 


1972 


01 Dec 


1972 


09 Dec 


1972 


27 Dec 


1972 


09 Jan 


1973 


02 Feb 


1973 


12 Feb 


1973 


16 Feb 


1973 


21 Feb 


1973 


25 Feb 


1973 


17 Jan 


1991 


07 Feb 


1991 


22 Aug 


1990 


21 Sep 


1990 


23 Oct 


1990 


09 Dec 


1990 


06 Jan 


1991 


11 Mar 


1991 



KLM 

SASM 



Campaign Medal 

(Asiatic-Pacific) For numerous periods during World 
War II. 




A squadron A-6 Intruder with its famous diving panther insignia on the tail. 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS — Volume I 59 




VA-36 

Lineage 

Established as Fighter Squadron ONE HUNDRED 
TWO (VF-102) on 1 May 1952. 

Redesignated Attack Squadron THIRTY SIX (VA-36) 
on 1 July 1955. 

Disestablished on 1 August 1970. The first squadron 
to be designated VA-36. 

Squadron Insignia and Nickname 

VF-102's first insignia was approved by CNO in 
October 1952. Unfortunately, the squadron's insignia 

file does not contain a 
drawing or photograph 
of the design. The 
insignia included: a blue 
circular design with a 
black winged wolf leap- 
ing diagonally from left 
to right in front of a yel- 
low moon and over a 
red lightning bolt; and a 
blue sea depicted in the 
lower part of the circle. 
The wolf, lightning bolt, 
blue sea and circular 
insignia were outlined 
in yellow. 

The squadron also 
used an insignia design 
with a roadrunner. 
However, there is no indication when it was approved 
or used by the squadron. Colors for the roadrunner 
insignia were: a green background outlined in yellow; 
and a gray roadrunner with blue wings and head 
feathers, a yellow beak, red tongue and white legs 
holding white rockets with red tips. The insignia's 
upper and lower scrolls had a blue background with 
Attack Squadron 36 in white on the upper and 
Hotrodus Supersonicus in white on the lower. Both 
scrolls were outlined in yellow. 

Nickname: Roadrunners, timeframe unknown. 

Chronology of Significant Events 

Nov 1953-Sep 1954: During the squadron's world 
cruise aboard Tarawa (CVA 40), it visited 14 different 
ports in 10 foreign countries and transited the Suez 
and Panama Canals. 

Jul- Aug 1961: While deployed on a training cruise 
aboard Saratoga in the Caribbean, the squadron was 
on an alert status due to the Bay of Pigs invasion. 

2 Dec 1965: The squadron conducted its first com- 
bat operations, flying from Enterprise (CVAN 65) on 



It is believed the squadron adopted 
the roadrunner insignia sometime 
after receiving its first A-4 Sky- 
hawks. One of the nicknames for the 
A-4 was "Heinemann s Hot Rod" 
and the logo on the insignia may he 
indicative of that nickname. 



Dixie Station in the South China Sea off the coast of 
Vietnam. This marked the first time a nuclear powered 
ship had engaged in combat. 

Dec 1965-Jun 1966: During this period of combat 
operations squadron personnel were awarded over 
170 Air Medals. 

May-Jun 1967: VA-36, embarked on America, was 
on station in the eastern Mediterranean during the 
Middle East War between Israel and Egypt and Syria. 
Units of America's air wing were launched to provide 
air cover for Liberty (AGTR 5) when it came under 
attack by Israeli forces. 



Home Port Assignments 



location 

NAAS Cecil Field 
NAS Jacksonville 
NAS Cecil Field 



Assignment Date 

01 May 1952 
Jul 1955 
Apr 1956 



Commanding Officers 







Date Assumed Command 


LCDR R. B. Dalton 


01 May 1952 


CDR R. A. Clarke 


1953 


CDR L. A. Menard, Jr. 


10 Sep 1954 


CDR Thad T. Coleman, Jr. 


31 May 1956 


CDR Hugh M. Garvey 


26 Jul 1957 


CDR A. L. Detweiler 


22 Jul 1958 


LCDR P. D. Davidson 


30 Jan I960 


CDR G. L. Ayers, Jr. 


28 Apr 1961 


CDR E. J. Carroll 


29 May 1962 


CDR H .K. Matthes 


18 May 1963 


CDR R. W. Somers 


01 May 1964 


CDR J. E. Marshall 


22 Apr 1965 


CDR T. F. Rush 




02 Apr 1966 


CDR A. R. Cunningham 


19 May 1967 


CDR E. H. Brooks 


24 May 1968 


CDR N. H. Rose 




29 May 1969 


CDR W. C. Nix 




30 Mar 1970 




Aircraft Assignment 


Type of Aircraft 




Date Type First Received 


FG-1D 




May 1952 


F9F-5 




Oct 1952 


F9F-8 & F9F-8B 




02 Nov 1956 


F9F-8T 




14 Apr 1957 


A4D-2 




11 Sep 1958 


A4D-2N/A-4C* 




21 Mar 1961 


A-4Et 




Oct 1967 



• The A4D-2N designation changed to A-4C in 1962. 

t The squadron began its transition to A-4Es in October 1967 and in 
November 1967 transitioned back to A-4Cs. 



60 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 




In the background is a squadron F9F-5 Panther and the pilots who night carrier qualified aboard Bennington (CVA 20) in September 1955 prior 
to the squadron 's WestPac deployment on the carrier. VA-36 pilots are: Bottom row, left to right: Lt. K. T. Weaver, Lt. P. M. McGucken, Cdr. L. A. 
Mendar, Jr., CO; Cdr. T. T. Coleman, Jr., XO; and LCdr. R. G. Altman. Top row, left to right: Lt. (jg) D. R. Fall, Lt. P. E.Johnson, Lt. (jg) D. A. 
Brown, Lt. (jg) A.J. Cooper, Lt. R. C. Doan, Lt. (jg)B.J. Gordon, Lt. T. W. Luckett, Ens. G. V. Smith, Lt. (jg) H. L. Brooks, Lt. H. A. Lackey LI, Lt. A.J. 
Kermes, Lt. (jg) H. W. Newhard, Lt. (jg) W. D. Baker, Lt. (jg) M. N. Guess, Ens. L. Ames (ALO), Lt. (jg) R. C. Scott, Lt. J. D. Blackwood, Lt. (jg) J. B. 
Busey and Lt. (jg) M. E. Hill. 



Major Overseas Deployment 



Date of 


Date of 


Air 




Type of 


Area of 


Departure 


Return 


Wing 


Carrier 


Aircraft 


Operation 


Nov 1953 


Sep 1954 


CVG-3 


CVA 40 


F9F-5 


World Cruise 


31 Oct 1955 


16 Apr 1956 


ATG-201 


CVA 20 


F9F-5 


WestPac 


15 Aug 1959 


26 Feb I960 


CVG-3 


CVA 60 


A4D-2 


Med 


22 Aug I960 


26 Feb 1961 


CVG-3 


CVA 60 


A4D-2 


NorLant/Med 


05 Jul 1961 


22 Aug 1961 


CVG-3 


CVA 60 


A4D-2N 


Carib 


28 Nov 1961 


11 May 1962 


CVG-3 


CVA 60 


A4D-2N 


Med 


03 Dec 1962 


21 Dec 1962 


CVG-3 


CVA 60 


A4D-2N 


Carib 


29 Mar 1963 


25 Oct 1963 


CVG-3 


CVA 60 


A-4C 


Med 


28 Nov 1964 


12 Jul 1965 


CVW-3 


CVA 60 


A-4C 


Med 


26 Oct 1965 


21 Jun 1966 


CVW-9 


CVAN 65 


A-4C 


SoLant/IO/ 












WestPac/ 












Vietnam 


10 Jan 1967 


20 Sep 1967 


CVW-6 


CVA 66 


A-4C 


Med 


04 Jun 1968 


08 Feb 1969 


CVW-10 


CVS 11 


A-4C 


SoLant/IO/ 












Pacific/Vietnam 


02 Dec 1969 


08 Jul 1970 


CVW-17 


CVA 59 


A-4C 


Med 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 6 1 



Air Wing Assignments 



Unit Awards Received— Continued 



Air Wing 

CVG-10 

CVG-3 

CVG-10 

ATG-201 

ATG-202 

CVG-17 

CVG-3/CVW-3i: 

CVW-9 

CVW-8 

CVW-6 

CVW-10 

CVW-17 



Tail Code 
P 
K 
P 

J/AP* 

AQ 

AL 

AC 

NG 

AJ 

AE 

AK 

AA 



Assignment Date 

01 May 1952 
Nov 1953 
Sep 1954 
May 1955t 

15 Jan 1958 
14 Mar 1958 
11 Oct 1958 
22 Sep 1965 

15 Jul 1966 
01 Sep 1966 

16 Oct 1967 
01 Aug 1969 



* The tail code J was assigned to ATG-201 on 24 July 1956 and 
changed to AP in the latter part of 1957. The effective date for the 
change was most likely the beginning of FY 58 (1 July 1957). 

t The specific date the squadron was assigned to Air Task Group 
201 (ATG-201) has not been verified. However, it probably was in 
May 1955, the date the squadron deployed aboard Bennington (CVA 
20) for a shakedown cruise to Guantanamo Bay. 

£ Carrier Air Groups were redesignated Carrier Air Wings on 20 
December 1963, hence, CVG-3 became CVW-3. 



Unit Award 
NAVE 

AFEM 



Unit Awards Received 



Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 



Jul 1958 
01 Jan 1967 
03 Dec 1962 



Jun 1959 
30 Jun 1968 
20 Dec 1962 



Unit Award 

NEM 

RVNGC 



VNSM 



NUC 



Inclusive Dates 

07 Jul 1961 
02 Dec 1965 
11 Dec 1965 

21 Dec 1965 
24 Dec 1965 

26 Dec 1965 

01 Jan 1966 
04 Jan 1966 
04 Feb 1966 
19 Feb 1966 
23 Feb 1966 

27 Mar 1966 
30 Mar 1966 

02 Apr 1966 
11 Apr 1966 
29 Apr 1966 

01 Oct 1968 

02 Dec 1965 
04 Feb 1966 
16 Mar 1966 

22 Apr 1966 

23 May 1966 
11 Jul 1968 
14 Jul 1968 
23 Jul 1968 

14 Oct 1968 

03 Dec 1968 
06 Jul 1968 



Covering Unit Award 
19 Aug 1961 



30 Dec 1965 
02 Jan 1966 
14 Jan 1966 



28 Mar 1966 
31 Mar 1966 



01 Nov 1968 

14 Jan 1966 
23 Feb 1966 
12 Apr 1966 
14 May 1966 
06 Jun 1966 

12 Jul 1968 

15 Jul 1968 
22 Aug 1968 
14 Nov 1968 
27 Dec 1968 

16 Jan 1969 



Squadron A-4C Skyhawks assigned to CVW-9 deployed aboard Enterprise (CYAN 65). 



62 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



SECOND VA-36 

Lineage 

Established as Attack Squadron THIRTY SIX (VA-36) 
on 6 March 1987. 

Disestablished on 1 April 1994. The second Navy 
squadron to be assigned the VA-36 designation. 

Squadron Insignia and Nickname 

The insignia adopted by VA-36 is a modification of 
the Roadrunner insignia used by the first VA-36 

squadron. The old 
insignia had been a 
Roadrunner cartoon 
character, but the modi- 
fication depicted a real 
bird with its primary 
enemy clutched in its 
talons. Colors for the 
insignia are: blue back- 
ground and scrolls; sil- 
ver and black bird with 
a red eye and tongue; 
yellow snake with 
black markings; and red 
lettering in the scrolls. 
VA-36's insignia was tentatively approved by CNO on 
6 April 1987. 

Nickname: Roadrunners, 1987-1994. 



Chronology of Significant Events 

30 Dec 1988: VA-36 deployed aboard Theodore 
Roosevelt (CVN 71) for the carrier's maiden cruise to 
the Mediterranean Sea. 

20 Jan-28 Feb 1991: The squadron participated in 
Operation Desert Storm, combat operations against 
Iraq. 

Apr-Jun 1991: The squadron participated in 
Operation Provide Comfort, a multi-national operation 
providing relief and aid for Kurdish refugees in north- 
ern Iraq. 




The squadron adopted a roadrun- 
ner insignia similar to the first VA- 
36 squadron. 



Mar-Sep 1993: The squadron, along with other units 
of CVW-8, deployed aboard Roosevelt (CVN 71) in a 
new approach to joint operations to test the Navy's 
ability to project a wide range of power and mobility 
from the sea. The composition on the carrier during 
the deployment included the regular air wing, minus 
an F-14 and S-3 squadron, and a Special Marine Air- 
Ground Task Force consisting of a Marine Corps fixed- 
wing and helo squadron and a company of Marines. 
The mix of units provided the carrier with the ability 
to project air and ground striking power ashore from a 
single deck. 

Jun 1993: The squadron, along with other units 
embarked on Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71), operated 
in the Red Sea in support of a strike on the Iraqi 
Intelligence Service headquarters building in Baghdad 
in response to Iraq's attempt on the life of former 
President Bush while on a visit to Kuwait in April. 
During this time, the squadron also participated in 
Operation Southern Watch missions, enforcing the U. 
N. no-fly zone within southern Iraq. 



Home Port Assignments 



NAS Oceana 



Location Assignment Date 

06 Mar 1987 



Commanding Officers 



CDR T. Lamar Willis 
CDR Daniel J. Franken 
CDR T. Ladson Webb, Jr. 
CDR Thomas M. Deyke 
CDR Mark T. McNally 
CDR Mark J. Himler 



Date Assumed Command 

06 Mar 1987 
01 Dec 1988 
04 May 1990 
27 Aug 1991 
03 Sep 1992 
23 Sep 1993 



Aircraft Assignment 



Type of Aircraft 



A-6E 



Date Type First Received 

May 1987 



Major Overseas Deployment 



Date of 


Date of 


Air 




Type of 


Area of 


Departure 


Return 


Wing 


Carrier 


Aircraft 


Operation 


25 Aug 1988 


11 Oct 1988 


CVW-8 


CVN 71 


A-6E 


NorLant 


30 Dec 1988 


30 Jun 1989 


CVW-8 


CVN 71 


A-6E 


Med 


28 Dec 1990 


28 Jun 1991 


CVW-8 


CVN 71 


A-6E 


Med/IO 


11 Mar 1993 


08 Sep 1993 


CVW-8 


CVN 71 


A-6E 


Med/IO 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 63 



Air Wing 

CVW-8 



Air Wing Assignments 

Tail Code 
AJ 



Assignment Date 

Sep 1987 



Unit Awards Received 

Unit Award Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 

NUC 17 Jan 1991 07 Feb 1991 

SASM 14 Jan 1991 20 Apr 1991 

JMUA 05 Apr 1991 16 Jul 1991 

MUC 01 Mar 1993 01 Aug 1993 




A squadron A-6E Intruder on a mission over the northern Arabian Gulf during Operation Desert Storm. Note the cluster bombs on the wing pylons. 



64 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



VA-38 

Lineage 

Established as Attack Squadron THIRTY EIGHT (VA- 
38) on 1 March 1967. 

Disestablished on 1 October 1968. The first and only 
squadron to be assigned the VA-38 designation. 

Chronology of Significant Events 

The establishment of VA-38 was directed by CNO. 



The squadron's administrative assignment was to 
Commander Fleet Air, Jacksonville. However, it 
appears VA-38 existed only on paper. The squadron 
was established while the A-7A Corsair II was being 
introduced to the fleet and may have been programed 
to be a new A-7A attack squadron. However, accord- 
ing to the CNO publication, Allowances and Location 
of Navy Aircraft, the squadron was not assigned air- 
craft. The only records on the squadron are the CNO 
messages establishing and disestablishing the unit. 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 65 



VA-42 

Lineage 

Established as Fighter Squadron FORTY TWO (VF- 
42) on 1 September 1950. 

Redesignated Attack Squadron FORTY TWO (VA-42) 
on 1 November 1953- 

Disestablished on 30 September 1994. The first 
squadron to be assigned the VA-42 designation. 

Squadron Insignia and Nickname 

The insignia for VA-42, the green pawn, was origi- 
nally approved by CNO for Bombing and Fighting 

Squadron 75 (VBF-75) 
on 28 October 1946. 
When VBF-75 was 
redesignated VF-4B on 
15 November 1946, the 
J insignia was carried 

/ over for use by 

&y _ Fighting Squadron 4B 
L V A il (VF-4B). On 1 
September 1948 VF-4B 
was redesignated 
Fighting Squadron 42 
(VF-42). This squadron 
continued to use the 
green pawn insignia 
until it was disestab- 
lished on 8 June 1950. 
When a new Fighting Squadron 42 (VF-42) was 
established on 1 September 1950 they adopted the 
green pawn insignia that had been used by the former 
VF-42. In 1953 the insignia was carried over to VA-42 
following its redesignation from VF-42. 

The green pawn insignia is a simple, uncluttered 
and highly recognizable design. The symbol of the 
pawn was chosen because it has the most potential 
power of any piece on the chess board. The pawn is 
canted at a 45 degree angle inside a shield design. 

Colors are as follows: 
green pawn; back- 
ground of the shield is 
white outlined in green; 
and the scroll is white 
outlined in green with 
green lettering. 

A new insignia was 
approved for the 
squad-ron by CNO on 
19 Octo-ber 1992. The 
new insig-nia design 
had been used by VA- 
176 until it was disestab- 
lished. Colors for the 
mailed fist and lightning 



The Green Pawn insignia was used 
by the squadron for almost 40 
years. 




In 1992, the squadron's insignia 
was officially changed from the 
Green Pawn to the mailed fist 
and lighting holt previously used 
by Attack Squadron 1 76. 



bolt were: a blue background and scroll outlined in 
white; the mailed fist was outlined in white with a 
blue background; white stars; yellow lightning bolt; 
and the lettering was white. 

Nickname: Green Pawns, 1950-1992. 

Thunderbolts, 1992-1994. 

Chronology of Significant Events 

20 Oct- 15 Nov 1951: During training operations in 
the Caribbean, the squadron operated aboard three 
different carriers. They departed from Norfolk aboard 
Midway (CVB 41) and then transferred to Wright (CVL 
49) while the ships were off the coast of Puerto Rico. 
A couple of days later the squadron was transferred to 
Cabot (CVL 28) while operating at sea. 

Jan-Apr 1956: The squadron operated aboard the 
Navy's first super carrier, Forrestal (CVA 59), during 
her shakedown cruise. 

24 Oct 1958: The primary mission of VA-42 was 
changed to the training of fleet replacement pilots in 
the AD (A-l) Skyraider. The training involved all- 
weather flight training, low-level navigation flights, 
simulated special weapons training flights, convention- 
al weapons training flights, and day and night carrier 
qualifications. 

19 Feb 1959: VA-42 graduated its first AD Skyraider 
replacement pilot. 

9 Mar 1959: With the acquisition of the T-28B air- 
craft, VA-42's instrument instructors used this plane to 
conduct all-weather flight training for the light attack 
community. 

10 Nov 1962: VA-42 pilots flew three A-1H 
Skyraiders from Argentia, Newfoundland, to Rota, 
Spain, via Lajes, Azores. The squadron claims this was 
the first trans-Atlantic flight conducted by A-1H 
Skyraiders. 

1 Feb 1963: VA-42 became the first fleet squadron to 
receive the A-6A Intruder. The squadron also initiated 
the Fleet Introduction Program for the all-weather A- 
6A. VA-42's new mission was the training of A-6A 
Bombardier/Navigators, as well as its pilots. It was 
also responsible for conducting the A-6A Fleet 
Replacement Aviation Maintenance Program which 
trained maintenance personnel. 

12 Jun 1963: The Green Pawns received the first A- 
6A (bureau number 149939) with a complete weapon 
system, thereby permitting the initiation of weapon 
system indoctrination flight training program for VA- 
42's instructor pilots and bombardier/navigators. 

3 Sep 1963: Formal flight training in the A-6A fleet 
replacement program began with the convening of 
Class 1-63- This training was for VA-75 pilots and bom- 
bardier/ navigators . 

8 Sep 1963: The squadron's last A-1H Skyraider 
(bureau number 135324) was transferred. This brought 
to a close the training of A-l replacement pilots by VA- 



66 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



42. VA-42 still maintained one A-1E and two T-28Bs 
for use in propeller instrument training. 

14 Oct 1963: The Green Pawns conducted the first 
fleet night arrested landings and catapult launchings 
with the A-6A aboard the Forrestal (CVA 59). 

12 Mar 1964: The squadron's last T-28B was trans- 
ferred, and the instrument training program for fleet A- 
1 pilots came to an end. Two days later, their last 
Skyraider, an A-1E, was transferred. 

13 Mar 1964: VA-75 became the first fully trained 
fleet A-6A squadron ready for deployment following 
successful completion of VA-42's fleet introduction 
program on the A-6A. 

15 Dec 1964: VMA-242 became the first Marine 
Corps squadron to complete transition training in the 
A-6A and qualify for fleet deployment with the 
Intruder. 

28 Jan 1968: With the acquisition of the TC-4C air- 
craft, VA-42 was able to provide more training on air- 
borne radar operation for A-6A bombardier/navigators. 
The new aircraft was equipped with a complete A-6A 
cockpit console and weapon system, multiple bom- 
bardier/navigator stations, plus ECM equipment, and 
other radar operational capabilities. 

Nov 1968: VA-42's A-6A pilot training syllabus was 
modified to include lessons learned from the Intruder's 
employment in combat. The new tactics phase includ- 
ed air combat maneuvering and Sidewinder missile 
shoots, while conventional weapons training was 
made more realistic. 

12 Nov 1969: With the acquisition of the updated 
Intruder, the A-6B, in June 1969, the squadron devel- 
oped a new training syllabus for the A-6B Standard 
ARM aircraft and a detachment from VA-165 became 
the first to complete this course of instruction on 12 
November 1969- 

21 Nov 1969: The squadron assumed the duties of 
providing A-6 orientation training for Air Intelligence 
Officers reporting to fleet A-6 squadrons. Lieutenant 
(jg) Erickson became the first Air Intelligence Officer 
to complete the training on 21 November 1969- 

1 Oct 1971: When COMMATWING ONE was estab- 
lished on 1 October, VA-42 was reassigned from COM- 
FAIRNORFOLK to this command, and VA-42's 
Commanding Officer, CDR Andrassy, was also 
assigned as Commander of Medium Attack Wing One, 
making him dual-hatted. 

5 Jan 1973: VA-42's Commanding Officer, CDR Zick, 
was relieved of his duties as COMMATWING ONE by 
CAPT Turk ending the dual-hatted role of the 
squadron's commanding officer. 

1980: Lieutenant (jg) Beth Hubert was trained as an 
A-6 Intruder pilot by the Green Pawns and became 
the first woman naval aviator to qualify as an A-6 
pilot. 

Jan 1982: VA-42 implemented a training program for 
the Harpoon weapons system. 



Jun 1982: A VA-42 pilot became the first female 
naval aviator to make an arrested landing in an A-6 
during carrier qualifications on Lexington (AVT 16). 




Squadron F4U-4 Corsairs prepare to launch from Midway (CVA 41) 
during her cruise to the Med in 1953. 



Home Port Assignments 



Location 


Assignment Date 


NAAS Oceana 


01 Sep 1950 


NAS Jacksonville 


19 Sep 1950 


NAAS Cecil Field 


09 Jun 1951 


NAAS Oceana (later NAS*) 


27 Aug 1951 


* NAAS Oceana redesignated NAS Oceana 


on 1 April 1952. 


Commanding Officers 




Date Assumed Command 


LCDR Ross B. Spencer 


01 Sep 1950 


LCDR Millard C. Thrash 


22 Aug 1951 


LCDR Shelley B. Pittman 


01 Jul 1953 


LCDR Leroy P. Smith 


08 Oct 1953 


CDR L. W. Squires 


09 Aug 1955 


CDR Clifton R. Largess, Jr. 


10 Jul 1957 


CDR Robert (nmn) Linwick, Jr. 


15 Aug 1958 


CDR M. J. Stack 


05 Aug 1959 


CDR F. M. McLinn 


10 Aug I960 


CDR Ted L. Farrell 


22 Nov 1961 


CDR J. S. Herman 


28 Dec 1962 


CDR W. S. Nelson 


22 Nov 1963 


CDR L. A. Snead 


20 Aug 1965 


LCDR J. C. Ellison 


17 Jun 1966 


CDR W. N. Small 


18 Jul 1966 


CDR A. H. Barie 


Jun 1967 


CDR Frank Cramblet 


20 Jun 1968 


CDR Robert J. Sample 


18 Jul 1969 


CDR Jerrold M. Zacharias 


02 Jul 1970 


CDR Michael F. Andrassy 


09 Jul 1971 


CDR Richard A. Zick 


31 Aug 1972 


CDR Thomas E. Shanahan 


17 Aug 1973 


CDR Samuel L. Sayers 


10 Jan 1975 


CDR William H. Greene, Jr. 


12 Mar 1976 


CDR Jackson E. Cartwright 


24 Jun 1977 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 67 




A squadron Skyraider refuels an F9F-8P Cougar from VTP-62 in 1958. 



Commanding Officers — Continued 





Date Assumed Command 


CDR John K. Peiguss 


29 Sep 


1978 


CAPT William R. Galbraith 


18 Jan 


1980 


CDR John A. Pieno 


24 Apr 


1981 


CDR Herbert A. Browne, Jr. 


02 Jul 


1982 


CDR John M. Luecke, Jr. 


30 Sep 


1983 


CDR Allen H. White 


10 Jan 


1985 


CDR Robin Y. Weber 


30 Jul 


1986 


CDR Garth A. Van Sickle 


17 Jul 


1987 


CDR Stephen H. Baker 


26 Oct 


1988 


CDR John T. Meister 


13 Dec 


1989 


CDR Daniel J. Franken 


03 Jul 


1991 


CDR Bernard M. Satterwhite, Jr. 


15 Dec 


1992 



Aircraft Assignments 



Type of Aircraft Date Type First Received 


F4U-4 


Sep 1950 


AD-4 


Sep 1953 


AD-4L 


Oct 1953 


AD-6 


Nov 1953 


AD-4N 


Dec 1953 


T-28B 


09 Mar 1959 


A-6A 


01 Feb 1963 


TC-4C 


28 Jan 1968 


A-6B 


Jun 1969 


A-6C 


1971 


A-6E 


02 Dec 1971 


KA-6D 


1976 



68 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 




A flight of squadron AD (A-l) Skyraiders. 



Major Overseas Deployments 



Date of 


Date of 


Air 


Carrier 


Type of 


Area of 


Departure 


Return 


Wing 




Aircraft 


Operation 


06 Mar 1951 


08 Jun 1951 


AirDet 


CVL 48 


F4U-4 


Med 


01 Dec 1952 


19 May 1953 


CVG-6 


CVA41 


F4U-4 


Med 


30 Nov 1954 


18 Jun 1955 


ATG-181 


CVA 15 


AD-6 


Med 


12 Oct 1956 


22 May 1957 


ATG-181 


CVA 20 


AD-6 


WestPac 


09 Jun 1958 


08 Aug 1958 


ATG-181 


CVA 11 


AD-6 


NorLant 




A T-28B Trojan used by the squadron for instrument all-weather 
flight training. 



Air Wing Assignments 



Air Wing 


Tail Code 


Assignment Date 


CVG-6 


C 


01 Sep 1950 


ATG-181* 


I 


24 July 1956 


CVG-8 


AJ 


14 Aug 1958 


RCVG-4f 


AD 


24 Oct 1958 


COMFAIRNORFOLKi: 


AD 


01 May 1970 


COMMATWING ONE 


AD 


01 Oct 1971 



* VA-42 had operated as part of ATG-181 prior to July 1956. 
However, ATG-181 was not assigned a tail code letter until 24 July 
1956. Prior to July 1956 VA-42 still carried the tail code for CVG-6 
even though it deployed as part of ATG-181. 

t RCVG-4 redesignated RCVW-4 on 20 December 1963. 

% On 1 June 1970, RCVW-4 was disestablished. The AD tail code that 
had been allocated to RCVW-4 and its assigned squadrons contin- 
ued to be used by the squadrons that had been in RCVW-4. VA-42 
continued to use the AD tail code for its aircraft. 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 69 




A squadron TC-4C Academe used to train Naval Flight Officers as bombardier navigators. 



Unit Awards Received 

Unit Award Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 

MUC Jan 1979 Dec 1981 

01 Oct 1986 30 Sep 1988 




A flight of the squadron's A-6E Intruders on a training mission in 1974. 



70 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 




VA-44 

Lineage 

Established as Bombing Squadron SEVENTY FIVE 
(VB-75) on 1 June 1945. 

Redesignated Attack Squadron THREE B (VA-3B) on 
15 November 1946. 

Redesignated Attack Squadron FORTY FOUR (VA- 
44) on 1 September 1948. 

Disestablished on 8 June 1950. The first squadron to 
be assigned the VA-44 designation. 

Squadron Insignia and Nickname 

The squadron's insignia was approved by CNO on 
23 August 1945. VB-75's insignia colors were as fol- 
lows: white background 
outlined in forest green; 
the head, arms, body 
and antenna of the bee 
were royal blue and the 
wings were light blue 
with royal blue vains; 
the V on the bee was 
yellow, his eyeball was 
white, eyelid light blue, 
and pupil black; deep 
scarlet nose, dark gray 
mouth with an inner lin- 
ing of deep scarlet; 
white teeth and deep 
scarlet drops of blood; 
the bee's gloves were white; its lower body had bands 
of green and yellow with a deep scarlet tip; dark gray 
telescope with white highlights and a white lens, for- 
est green bomb with yellow fins and the rocket had 
yellow fins and nose while the body was forest green; 
the banner was royal blue with yellow lettering. 

When redesignated as 
an attack squadron, a 
new insignia was 
approved by CNO on 8 
August 1947. The indian 
head and bomb insignia 
represented the bomb- 
ing and scouting mis- 
sion of the carrier based 
squadron. Its colors 
were: red background 
with a blue border out- 
lined in black; black 
bomb with the center 
portion white; the indi- 
an head silhouette was 
black with the center 
portion white; the for- 



This insignia was approved for 
use by the squadron when it was 
designated VB-75. 




A new insignia was approved for 
the squadron following its redesig- 
nation to VA-3B. Note the use of 
the squadron designation in the 
insignia design. During World 
War II, squadron numbers or des- 
ignations were not permitted in 
the design. 



ward part of the carrier was black while the fantail 
was white; blue feather tipped with red; and the scroll 
was white, outlined in black with black letters. 

When the squadron was redesignated VA-44 it sub- 
mitted a request to change its insignia to a scarlet 
chess knight centered on a white shield. There is no 
record of official approval by CNO for this insignia. 

Nickname: unknown 

Chronology of Significant Events 

4 Jun 1945: The squadron began its first flight oper- 
ations. 

Jan-Feb 1946: VB-75 deployed aboard Franklin D. 
Roosevelt (CVB 42) for her shakedown cruise to the 
Caribbean and Brazil. While visiting Rio de Janeiro the 
squadron, air group, and carrier represented the U.S. 
at the inauguration of Brazilian president, Eurico G. 
Dutra. 



Home Port Assignments 



location 

NAAS Chincoteague 
NAS Norfolk 
NAS Jacksonville 



Assignment Date 

1 Jun 1945 
Mar 1946 
12 Feb 1949 



LT Ben K. Harrison (acting) 
LCDR John W. McManus 
LCDR Elmer Maul 
LCDR Oscar I. Chenoweth, Jr. 
LT K. F. Rowell (acting) 
LCDR Robert N. Miller 



Commanding Officers 

Date Assumed Command 
01 Jun 1945 
10 Jun 1945 
20 Dec 1946 
03 Dec 1947 
30 Jan 1949 



28 Feb 1949 




A formation of squadron AD-1 Skyraiders in flight, circa 1948 
(Courtesy Robert lawson Collection). 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS — Volume I 7 1 



Aircraft Assignment 



Type of Aircraft 



SBF-4E 

SB2C-4E 

SB2C-5 



AD-1 



Date of 
Departure 

08 Jan 1946 
08 Aug 1946 
13 Sep 1948 
06 Jan 1950 



Date of 
Return 

19 Mar 1946 
04 Oct 1946 
23 Jan 1949 
23 May 1950 



AD-1Q 



AM-1 



Date Type First Received 

Jun 1945 
Aug 1945 
Mar 1946 
20 Mar 1947 



Major Overseas Deployments 



Aircraft Assignment — Continued 

Type of Aircraft 



AD-1 



Air 
Wing 

CVBG-75 
CVBG-75 
CVG-4 
CVG-4 



Carrier 

CVB 42 
CVB 42 
CVB 42 
CVB 41 



Type of 
Aircraft 

SB2C-4E 
SB2C-5 
AD-1 
AD-1 



Date Type First Received 

May 1948 
25 Feb 1949 
12 Oct 1949 



Area of 
Operation 

Carib/SoLant 
Med 
Med 
Med 



Air Wing 

CVBG-75/CVBG-3/ CVG-4* 



Air Wing Assignments 



Tail Code 
F 



Assignment Date 

01 Jun 1945 



* CVBG-75 was established on 1 June 1945, redesignated CVBG-3 on 15 November 1946; redesignated CVG-4 on 1 September 1948 and dises- 
tablished on 8 June 1950. 




A squadron AM-1 Mauler launches from Midway (CVB 41), circa 1949 (Courtesy Robert Lawson Collection). 



72 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 




The squadron insignia used by 
VF-44 and VA-44. Note the unique 
use of the 4 of clubs and 4 of 
hearts to identify the squadron 's 
designation number. 



SECOND VA-44 

Lineage 

Established as Fighter Squadron FORTY FOUR (VF- 
44) on 1 September 1950. 

Redesignated Attack Squadron FORTY FOUR (VA- 
44) on 1 January 1956. 

Disestablished on 1 May 1970. The second squadron 
to be assigned the VA-44 designation. 

Squadron Insignia and 
Nickname 

The squadron's 
insignia was approved 
by CNO on 11 
December 1952. The 
insignia consisted of a 
blue shield; a yellow 
banner across the shield 
with the word "Hornets" 
in red; two white play- 
ing cards, one had four 
black clubs and the 
other four red hearts; the 
caricature of the hornet 
was yellow and black 
with a red eye and white details. When the squadron 
was redesignated VA-44, it retained the same insignia. 
Nickname: Hornets, 1950-1970. 

Chronology of Significant Events 

13 Jun 1953: The squadron conducted its first com- 
bat operations, striking targets in Korea. 

Sep-Oct 1957: During the squadron's deployment 
aboard Wasp (CVS 18), its mission was temporarily 
changed from attack to a fighter role in order to pro- 
vide air protection for the VS squadrons operating 
from the carrier. 

1 Jun 1958: The squadron's mission changed from a 
light attack squadron to a fleet replacement training 
squadron. The new mission involved flight training for 
pilots and maintenance training for enlisted personnel. 
Under this concept, pilots and enlisted personnel 
ordered to East Coast fleet A4D squadrons completed 
the course of instruction provided by VA-44 before 
reporting to their assigned fleet squadrons. 

6 Jun 1958: Fleet All Weather Training Unit 
Detachment ALFA, an instrument training detachment, 
was disestablished and its personnel and aircraft were 
transferred to VA-44. 

8 Aug 1958: The squadron graduated its first 
replacement pilot under the new training program for 
attack pilots. 

Jan 1959: The squadron's first AD Skyraiders arrived 



and preparations began for the additional mission of 
replacement training for this aircraft, plus the A4D 
Skyhawk. 

15 Nov 1961: The squadron graduated the 1,000th 
enlisted maintenance trainee on the A4D Skyhawk. 

15 Feb 1963: The propeller training section of the 
squadron was removed from VA-44 and established as 
a separate squadron and designated VA-45. VA-44 con- 
tinued in its training mission concentrating on A-4 
Skyhawk training. It became a strictly jet squadron fly- 
ing A-4Bs, A-4Cs and TF-9Js. 




A squadron F4U-4 Corsair on the deck of Boxer (CVA-21) during a 
combat tour to Korea, circa 1953 (Courtesy Robert Lawson Collection). 



Home Port Assignments 



Location 



NAS Jacksonville 
NAAS Cecil Field 
NAS Jacksonville 
NAS Cecil Field 



Assignment Date 

01 Sep 1950 
19 Sep 1950 
13 Oct 1952 
18 Feb 1963 



Commanding Officers 





Date Assumed Command 


LCDRJ. B. Bain (acting) 


01 Sep 1950 


LCDR P. E. Greenlee, Jr. 


11 Sep 1950 


LCDR Reid W. Stone 


09 Dec 1951 


LCDR W. D. Houser 


10 Nov 1952 


CDR V. P. O'Neil 


Nov 1953 


CDR C. A. Crow, Jr. 


Oct 1954 


LCDR Theron J. Taylor 


27 Jan 1956 


CDR T. R. Sedell 


Jun 1957 


CDR Clifford A. McDougal 


30 Jun 1958 


CDR Damon W. Cooper 


14 Jul 1959 


CDR A. L. Detweiler 


22 Jul I960 


CDR W. B. Barrow, Jr. 


21 Jul 1961 


CDR M. C. Griffin 


17 Apr 1962 


CDR S. W. Callaway, Jr. 


06 Mar 1963 


CDR Harold K. Matthes 


May 1964 


CDR Max E. Malan 


Jul 1965 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS — Volume I 73 



Commanding Officers — Continued 



Aircraft Assignment 



CDR James W. Roberts 
CDRJoe D. Adkins 
CDR J. H. Wynn III 
CDR Robert E. Holt 



Date Assumed Command 

22 Sep 1966 
Oct 1967 
Feb 1969 
Jan 1970 



Type of Aircraft 




A squadron F2H-2 Banshee is prepared for launch from Intrepid 
(CVA 11) during her Med deployment in 1955. 



F4U-5 
F4U-4 



F2H-2 



F9F-8 

F9F-8T/TF-9J* 



A4D-1 



TV-2 
T-28B 



A4D-2/A-4B'" 



AD-5 and 6/A-1E and H" 



A4D-2N/A-4C* 



A-4E 
TA-4F 



A-4F 
A-4L 



Date Type First Received 

Sep 1950 
01 Dec 1951 
Dec 1953 
Apr 1956 
23 Jan 1958 
04 Feb 1958 
Jun 1958 
Jun 1958 
Sep 1958 
Jan 1959 
09 Feb I960 
Oct 1964 
03 Aug 1966 
Nov 1969 
Dec 1969 



* The F9F-8T, A4D-2, AD-5 and 6, and A4D-2N designations were 
changed in 1962 to TF-9J, A-4B, A-1E and H, and A-4C, respectively. 



Major Overseas Deployments 



Date of 
Departure 

20 Mar 1951 
19 Apr 1952 
26 Apr 1953 

28 May 1955 
30 Aug 1957 



Date of 
Return 

06 Oct 1951 
12 Oct 1952 
04 Dec 1953 

22 Nov 1955 
22 Oct 1957 



A ir 
Wing 

CVG-1 
CVG-4 

CVG-4/ATG-1* 

CVG-4 
t 



Carrier 

CVB 43 
CVB 43 

CVA 39/CVA 21* 

CVA 11 
CVS 18 



Type of 
Aircraft 

F4U-5 

F4U-4 
F4U-4 

F2H-2 
F9F-8 



Area of 
Operation 

Med 
Med 

Med/IO/ 
WestPac/Korea 
Med 
NorLant 



* VF-44 deployed to Korea as part of CVG-4 embarked in Lake Champlain (CVA 39) and conducted its first line period from Lake Champlain. 
On 30 June 1953, the squadron was transferred to ATG-1 aboard Boxer (CVA 21). The squadron remained aboard Boxer until 9 October 1953 
when it transferred back to CVG-4 and Lake Champlain. 

t Unable to locate records indicating a carrier air group aboard during this deployment on Wasp (CVS 18). Antisubmarine carrier air groups were 
not established until I960. 




Air Wing Assignments 



A squadron F9F-8T (TF-9J) Cougar in flight, circa 1964 (Courtesy 
Robert Lawson Collection). 



Air Wing 


Tail Code 


Assignment Date 


CVG-4 


F 


01 Sep 1950 


CVG-1 


T 


19 Mar 1951 


CVG-4 


F 


08 Oct 1951 


ATG-1 




30 Jun 1953 


CVG-4 


F 


09 Oct 1953 


COMFAIRJACKSONVILLE 




1957 


ATG-202 


AQ 


15 Feb 1958 


CVG-4/RCVG-4/RCVW-4* 


AD 


15 Mar 1958 



* CVG-4 was redesignated RCVG-4 in April 1958. On 20 December 
1963, RCVG-4 was redesignated RCVW-4. 



74 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



Unit Awards Received 



Unit Award Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 

KPUC 09 Jun 1953 27 Jul 1953 

KSM 09 Jun 1953 27 Jul 1953 

UNSM 09 Jun 1953 27 Jul 1953 




Squadron A-4 Skyhawks in flight with the day-glow paint scheme. 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS — Volume I 7 5 



VA-45 

Lineage 

Established as Torpedo Squadron SEVENTY FIVE 
CVT-75) on 1 June 1945. 

Redesignated Attack Squadron FOUR B (VA-4B) on 
15 November 1946. 

Redesignated Attack Squadron FORTY FIVE (VA-45) 
on 1 September 1948. 

Disestablished on 8 June 1950. The first squadron to 
be assigned the VA-45 designation. 

Squadron Insignia and Nickname 

VT-75's insignia was approved by CNO on 10 
August 1945. Colors for the Fish-Hawk insignia were: 

light blue background 
outlined in black by two 
concentric cirles; white 
clouds with black out- 
lines; turquoise waves; 
riding astride a torpedo 
was an animated hawk 
clothed in a green flying 
suit with white para- 
chute straps and sitting 
on a gray parachute 
pack; brown shoes; yel- 
low hands and beak; 
red eye; black hair and 
tongue; gray face; pink earphones with a black center 
and a white band outlined in black; gray rocket and 
gun with red tips; brown torpedo with a yellow nose, 

white teeth, red eye and 
outlined in black; and 
the words "The Fish- 
Hawks" were black. 

There is no record of 
the insignia used by the 
squadron after it was 
redesignated VA-4B. 
When the squadron was 
redesignated VA-45, it 
adopted a new insignia 
which was approved by 
CNO on 15 April 1949. 
This insignia was a 
black chess knight on a 
white shield outlined in 
black. 

Nickname: Fish- 
Hawks, 1945-unknown. 




The insignia approved for use by 
\T-75. 




The squadron 's second insignia 
was part of its carrier air group 's 
approach for insignia used by its 
assigned squadrons. In the air 
group, the king chess piece was for 
the air group, the knight chess 
piece was for the attack squadron 
and the pawn was for the fighter 
squadron. 



Chronology of Significant Events 

Jan-Feb 1946: VT-75 deployed aboard Franklin D. 
Roosevelt (CVB 42) for her shakedown cruise to the 
Caribbean and Brazil. While visiting Rio de Janeiro the 
squadron, air group, and carrier represented the U.S. 
at the inauguration of Brazilian president, Eurico G. 
Dutra. 



Home Port Assignments 



Location 

NAAS Chincoteague 
NAS Norfolk 
NAS Jacksonville 



Assignment Date 

01 Jun 1945 
20 Mar 1946 
14 Feb 1949 



Commanding Officers 



LT Richard W. Bond (acting) 
LT Paul J. Davis, Jr. 
LCDR James E. Mahan 
LCDR Garald R. Stablein 
LCDR Chester L. Dillard (acting) 
LCDR Lucien G. Powell, Jr. 
LCDR Leroy V. Swanson 
LCDR Frederick C. Kidd 



Date Assumed Command 

01 Jun 1945 
11 Jun 1945 
28 Jun 1945 
31 Oct 1946 
19 Feb 1947 

26 May 1947 
15 Jun 1948 

27 May 1950 




A squadron SB2C-4E prepares to launch from Franklin D. Roosevelt 
(CVB-42), January 1946 (Courtesy Robert Lawson Collection). 



Aircraft Assignment 



Type of Aircr aft 



SBF-4E 
SBW-4E 
SB2C-4E 
SB2C-5 



AD-1 



AM-1 



AD-1 



Date Type First Received 

Jun 1945 
Jun 1945 
Sep 1945 
Mar 1946 

27 Mar 1947 
Feb 1949 

20 Oct 1949 



76 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



Major Overseas Deployments 



Date of 
Departure 

08 Jan 1946 
08 Aug 1946 
13 Sep 1948 
06 Jan 1950 



Date of 
Return 

19 Mar 1946 
04 Oct 1946 
23 Jan 1949 
23 May 1950 



Air 
Wing 

CVBG-75 
CVBG-75 
CVG-4 
CVG-4 



Type of 
Carrier 

CVB 42 
CVB 42 
CVB 42 
CVB 41 



Area of 
Aircraft 

SB2C-4E 
SB2C-5 
AD-1 
AD-1 



Operation 

Carib/SoLant 
Med 
Med 
Med 




Air Wing 



Air Wing Assignments 



Tail Code 



CVBG-75/ CVBG-3/ CVG-4* 



Assignment Date 

01 Jun 1945 



* CVBG-75 was established on 1 June 1945; redesignated CVBG-3 
on 15 November 1946; redesignated CVG-4 on 1 September 1948 
and disestablished on 8 June 1950. 



A squadron AM-1 Mauler in flight; note the squadron 's insignia on 
the cowling, circa 1949 (Courtesy Wallace Russel Collection). 





A squadron AD Skyraider taxies on flight deck of Intrepid (CVA-11), circa 1955 (Courtesy Robert Lawson Collection). 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS — Volume I 77 



SECOND VA-45 

Lineage 

Established as Attack Squadron FORTY FIVE (VA-45) 
on 1 September 1950. 

Disestablished on 1 March 1958. The second 
squadron to be assigned the VA-45 designation. 

Squadron Insignia and Nickname 

The squadron's insignia was approved by CNO on 
10 April 1951. A blackbird in a cocky stance became 

the focal point of the 
insignia's design. Colors 
for the insignia were: an 
oval design with a light 
blue background; black 
crow and cigar; the 
bird's legs, feet and 
gloves were yellow; red 
tongue; the cigar ash 
and shaded area of the 
gloves were red; white 
star and spats; green 
derby; and the lower 
portion of the insignia 
had a dark green back- 
ground with the num- 
bers 4 and 20 in yellow. 
The numbers 4 and 20 
were taken from the 




The well-known 4 and 20 black 
birds insignia was first used by 
this squadron. 



nursery rhyme, "Four and Twenty Blackbirds" and rep- 
resent the original 24 pilots assigned to the squadron. 
Nickname: Blackbirds, 1950-1958. 

Chronology of Significant Events 

13 Jun 1953: The squadron flew its first combat 
operation while deployed to Korea aboard Lake 
Champlain (CVA 39). 



Home Port Assignments 



Location 

NAS Jacksonville 
NAAS Cecil Field 
NAS Jacksonville 



Assignment Date 

01 Sep 1950 
18 Sep 1950 
12 Oct 1952 



Commanding Officers 



LCDR G. O. Wood 
LCDR Richard H. Mills 
LCDR William F. Krantz 
CDR Daniel W. Wildfong 
CDR Glendon Goodwin 



Date Assumed Command 

01 Sep 1950 
11 Apr 1952 
Oct 1953 
Nov 1954 
Dec 1955 



Aircraft Assignment 



Type of Aircraft 



AD-2 
AD-4 
AD-6 



Date Type First Received 

Sep 1950 
14 Feb 1952 
Jun 1954 



Squadron personnel load 5-inch high-velocity aircraft rockets on one of its AD-6 Skyraiders prior to launch. 



78 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



Major Overseas Deployments 



Date of 


Date of 


Air 


Type of 


Area of 




Departure 


Return 


Wing 


Carrier 


Aircraft 


Operation 


15 May 1951 


04 Oct 1951 


CVG-4 


CV 34 


AD-2 


Med 


19 Apr 1952 


12 Oct 1952 


CVG-4 


CVB 43 


AD-4 


Med 


26 Apr 1953 


04 Dec 1953 


CVG-4 


CVA 39 


AD-4 


WestPac/Korea 


28 May 1955 


22 Nov 1955 


CVG-4 


CVA 11 


AD-6 


Med 


01 Jul 1957 


24 Feb 1958 


CVG-4 


CVA 15 


AD-6 


Med 



Air Wing Assignments 



Unit Awards Received 



Air Wing 

CVG-4 



Tail Code 
F 



Assignment Date Unit Award Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 

01 Sep 1950 KPUC 09Jun 1953 27 Jul 1953 

KSM 09 Jun 1953 27 Jul 1953 

UNSM 09 Jun 1953 27 Jul 1953 






A squadron AD-6 Skyraider launches from the deck of Intrepid (CVA 11) in 1955. 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 79 




VA-46's insignia with the distinc- 
tive McDougal clan tartan. 



VA-46 

Lineage 

Established as Attack Squadron FORTY SIX (VA-46) 
on 24 May 1955. 

Disestablished on 30 June 1991. The first squadron 
to be assigned the VA-46 designation. 

Squadron Insignia and Nickname 

VA-46's insignia was approved by CNO on 25 
November I960. The circular insignia had a blue field 

outlined by two concen- 
tric black lines; the 
McDougal clan tartan, 
drawn from the heritage 
of the squadron's first 
commanding officer, 
had dark blue and white 
lines on a red back- 
ground, interspaced 
with green squares; the 
crest was white, out- 
lined in black with the 
Latin words Vincere Vel 
Mori, meaning to con- 
quer or to die; a white stylized aircraft outlined in 
black; and the banner was white with the designation 
VA 46 in black. 

Nickname: Clansmen, 1960-1991. 

Chronology of Significant Events 

14 Jul 1956: VA-46 departed the U.S. aboard 
Randolph (CVA 15) for deployment to the 
Mediterranean, equipped with Sidewinder missiles. 
This was the first overseas deployment of the 
Sidewinder. 

Oct-Nov 1956: VA-46, along with other units of 
ATG-202, provided air support for the evacuation of 
foreign nationals from Alexandria, Egypt, during the 
Suez War. 

Aug 1965: VA-46 and other units of the air wing 
aboard Shangri-La (CVA 38) operated off the coast of 
Cyprus in response to a crisis in that country between 
Greek and Turkish Cypriots. 

25 Jul 1967: The squadron engaged in its first com- 
bat operations. 

29 Jul 1967: While aircraft were being prepared for 
the second launch of the day against targets in 
Vietnam, a fire broke out on the flight deck of 



Forrestal (CVA 59). Flames engulfed the fantail and 
spread below decks touching off bombs and ammu- 
nition. Heroic efforts by VA-46 personnel, along with 
other members of CVW-17 and ship's company, 
brought the fires under control. Damage to the carri- 
er and aircraft was severe and the casualty count 
included 132 dead, two missing and presumed dead 
and 62 injured. 

4 May- 15 Nov 1968: VA-46 transitioned to the A-7 
Corsair II. 

17 Sep 1970: While enroute to the Caribbean for 
training exercises, John F. Kennedy (CVA 67) with VA- 
46 and other units of CVW-1 embarked, received 
emergency orders to deploy immediately to the 
Mediterranean due to the Jordanian Crisis and the 
hijacking of four airliners by Arab terrorists. They 
remained on station off the coast of Israel until 
November. 

Oct 1973: Due to the outbreak of war between 
Israel and Egypt and Syria, Kennedy and her air wing, 
while operating in the North Atlantic after just com- 
pleting a Mediterranean deployment, were ordered 
back to the Mediterranean. During the latter part of 
October through mid November, VA-46 conducted 
flight operations while the carrier was on station south 
of Crete. 

22 Nov 1975: During night operations Kennedy col- 
lided with Belknap (CG 26) causing major damage to 
the cruiser. Eight VA-46 personnel received awards for 
their heroism and devotion to duty as a result of their 
actions following the collision. 

17-19 Sep 1985: VA-46, along with other units of 
CVW-1, were the first to conduct flight operations 
from a carrier operating inside a fjord. America 
(CV 66) operated in Vestfjord, Norway, during this 
evolution. 

14 Apr 1986: Because of terrorist activities linked to 
Lybia, American forces struck targets in that country. 
During that action, VA-46 provided air-to-surface 
Shrike and Harm missile strikes against Libyian radar 
missile sites. 

Sep-Oct 1990 and Dec 1990-Jan 1991: The 

squadron participated in Operation Desert Shield, the 
build up of American and Allied forces to counter a 
threatened invasion of Saudi Arabia by Iraq and as 
part of an economic blockade of Iraq to force its with- 
drawal from Kuwait. 

17 Jan 1991: Operation Desert Storm, combat opera- 
tions to remove Iraqi forces from Kuwait, was launched. 
The squadron's A-7E Corsair lis participated in the first 
combat strike against Iraqi targets in Baghdad. 



80 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 




Commanding Officers — Continued 



A squadron F9F-8 Cougar preparing for a launch from Randolph 
(CVA15). 



Home Port Assignments 



Location 

NAS Cecil Field 



Assignment Date 

24 May 1955 



Commanding Officers 



LT Charles L. Marshall (acting) 
CDR Clifford A. McDougal 
CDR A. R. Hawkins 
CDR Kent L. Lee 



Date Assumed Command 
24 May 1955 
22 Jun 1955 
10 May 1957 
15 Aug 1958 





Date Assumed Command 


CDR Alfred J. Hall, Jr. 


21 Sep 


1959 


CDR Hugh J. Tate 


07 Sep 


I960 


CDR S. W. Callaway, Jr. 


13 Dec 


1961 


CDR W. H. Sells 


10 Dec 


1962 


CDR R. P. McKenzie 


04 Dec 


1963 


CDR M. P. Mead 


28 Oct 


1964 


CDR R. L. Lawler, Jr. 


12 Nov 


1965 


CDR Fred S. Dunning, Jr. 


17 Nov 


1966 


CDR Jack F. O'Hara 


Nov 


1967 


CDR Alan G. Murdoch 


04 Sep 


1968 


CDR Fred J. Withers 


30 Jan 


1970 


CDR Marvin D. Reynolds 


10 Mar 


1971 


CDR Dale Lewey 


03 Mar 


1972 


CDR Jeremy D. Taylor 


23 Mar 


1973 


CDR Ronald R. Boyle 


13 Jun 


1974 


CDR Edward F. Bronson 


Aug 


1975 


CDR David A. Page 


23 Nov 


1976 


CDR James T. Matheny 


16 Feb 


1978 


CDR Phillip J. Rooney 


24 May 


1979 


CDR Morris M. Demple, Jr. 


08 Jul 


1980 


CDR Thomas R. Mitchell III 


01 Oct 


1981 


CDR John W. Peterson 


23 Dec 


1982 


CDR Dean M. Hendrickson, Jr. 


13 Jun 


1984 


CDR Robert C. Kolsterman 


21 Jan 


1986 


CDR Tommy H. Van Brunt 


May 


1987 


CDR Edward J. Fahy, Jr. 


04 Nov 


1988 


CDR Mark Fitzgerald 


22 May 


1990 







A squadron A-4C Skyhawk flies over Shangri-La (CVA 38) during their deployment to the Med in 1962. 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS — Volume I 81 



Aircraft Assignment 



Aircraft Assignment — Continued 



Type of Aircraft 




Date Type First Received 

Jun 1955 
Aug 1955 
Mar 1958 
29 Aug I960 
Jan 1967 



Type of Aircraft 



A-4B 



A-7B 
A-7E 



Date Type First Received 

Sep 1967 
15 Nov 1968 
Aug 1977 



' The A4D-2N designation was changed to A-4C in 1962. 



Major Overseas Deployments 



Date of 


Date of 


Air 




Type of 


Area of 


Departure 


Return 


Wing 


Carrier 


Aircraft 


Operation 


1 A T, ,1 1 CjS^ 


1 Q FrO 1 1 0^7 

ly rcu ly 7 1 


\TC* 90? 

Al U iUi 


cva i ^ 

\ j VA 1 J 


FQF 8 
r 7f o 


Mr-ri 

1V1CL1 


1 3 Fr-h 1 QSO 
1 j rcu ly J>y 


30 Alio 10^0 

0\> Aug lyjy 


y . v vjr-u 


rvA 1 1 

v j VA 1 1 


A4r>-9 


1V1CL1 


9Q To n 1 0(^0 
z,ojau lyuu 


JA A110 10(^0 

L*T AUg I7UU 


C\7C 1 
^ V v r 1 


rvA 4? 


A4r> ? 

/A4LJ Z< 


1V1CLI 


0? FrO i 1 Q(i1 
rcu lyui 


1 J) LvLtty I7UI 


V u 1U 


PVA 38 

v j VA JO 




Mprl 

1V1CL1 


07 FrO i 1 Qli? 


?Q Ano 10(^9 
Z*o lyUZ 


n/r, 1 o 

^ V u 1U 


PVA 38 

Kj VA JO 




Mr>rl 

1V1CL1 




OS Muv 1 Qrv4 


Vj V vjr 1U 


rVA 38 

Vj VA JO 


A-4r 


1V1C(_1 


1 0 FrO i 1 CW^ 
1U rcu lyUJ 


ocp iyu ; 


fvr, 1 o 

v ^ V U 1U 


r"\/A 38 

\ , VA JO 


a 4r 


1V1CL1 


1 1 Mar 1 Q(i6 


ZU Wt-L I7UU 




rvA 6o 

V_i V A UU 


A-4r 


1V1CL1 


06 Tun 1 0(^7 

UU J Ull lyU / 


1J lJCU I7U/ 


rvw-1 7 

V W 1 / 


rvA so 

v- va }y 


A-4F 

A 4E 


XY/ptitP'j r /\7\ pttici m 

WCoLldk,/ VlCllldlll 


00 Tid 1 QItQ 
Uy J Lll 1 yuy 


77 To n 1 Q70 
ZiZ. j ait 1 y / u 


rvw-3 


rvA 6o 

V A UU 


A-7R 

A / 1 ' 


Mr-rl 

1V1CL1 


14 Sep 1970 


01 Mar 1971 


CVW1 


CVA 67 


A-7B 


Med/NorLant 


01 Dec 1971 


06 Oct 1972 


CVW-1 


CVA 67 


A-7B 


Med/NorLant 


16 Apr 1973 


01 Dec 1973 


CVW-1 


CV67 


A-7B 


Med/NorLant 


28 Jun 1975 


27 Jan 1976 


CVW-1 


CV67 


A-7B 


Med 


02 Sep 1976 


09 Nov 1976 


CVW-1 


CV67 


A-7B 


NorLant 


15 Jan 1977 


01 Aug 1977 


CVW-1 


CV67 


A-7B 


Med 


29 Jun 1978 


08 Feb 1979 


CVW-1 


CV67 


A-7E 


Med 


04 Aug 1980 


28 Mar 1981 


CVW-1 


CV67 


A-7E 


Med 


23 Aug 1982 


30 Oct 1982 


CVW-1 


CV66 


A-7E 


NorLant/Med/Carib 


08 Dec 1982 


02 Jun 1983 


CVW-1 


CV66 


A-7E 


Med/IO 


24 Apr 1984 


14 Nov 1984 


CVW-1 


CV66 


A-7E 


Carib/Med/IO 


24 Aug 1985 


09 Oct 1985 


CVW-1 


CV66 


A-7E 


NorLant 


10 Mar 1986 


10 Sep 1986 


CVW-1 


CV66 


A-7E 


Med 


29 Feb 1988 


29 Aug 1988 


CVW-7 


CVN 69 


A-7E 


Med 


15 Aug 1990 


28 Mar 1991 


CVW-3 


CV67 


A-7E 


Med/Red Sea 



Air Wing Assignments 



Air Wing Assignments — Continued 



Air Wing Tail Code 

CVG-4 F 

ATG-202 X/AQ* 

CVG-1 AB 

CVG-6 AF 

CVG-1 AB 

CVG-10/CVW-lOf AK 

CVW-3 AC 

CVW-17 AA 

CVW-3 AC 

CVW-1 AB 



Assignment Date 

24 May 1955 
Jul 1955 
15 Feb 1958 
13 Jan 1959 
30 Aug 1959 
05 Dec I960 
01 Jan 1966 
01 Jan 1967 
01 Jan 1968 
12 Feb 1970 



Air Wing Tail Code 

CVW-7 AG 

COMLATWING 1* 

CVW-3 AC 



Assignment Date 

01 Oct 1986 
Sep 1988 
01 Mar 1989 



* ATG-202's tail code was changed from X to AQ in the latter part of 
1957. The effective date was most likely the beginning of FY 58 (1 
July 1957). 

t Carrier Air Groups were redesignated Carrier Air Wings on 20 
December 1963, hence, CVG-10 became CVW-10. 

$ The squadron was detached from CVW-7 and came under the 
operational and administrative control of Commander Light Attack 
Wing 1. 



82 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 





Unit Awards Received 






unit Mwaras tieceivea — 


Continued 


Unit Award 


Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 


Unit Award 


Inclusive Dates 


Covering Unit Award 


NAVF 

1N.TVV 


01 Oct 1978 


30 Sep 1979 




91 Mnr 1 086 


97 Tim 1 086 

/ J LIU lyOU 




01 Oct 1980 


31 Dec 1981 


MT TP 


1 7 Ma r 1 08(i 


72 Mar 1 08(i 

ivldl I70U 




01 Jan 1986 


31 Dec 1986 




1 7 Tan 1 001 
1 / J ail Lyy 1 


98 Fi=h 1001 
z.o rcu i//i 




01 Jan 1988 


31 Dec 1988 


ST P)P 


04 Ana 1080 


98 Mir 1 081 


MT TP 


29 Sep 1970 


31 Oct 1970 




93 Ano 1 08? 


0? Tim 

UZi J Ull l/OJ 




01 Dec 1977 


01 Mar 1979 


VNSM 


15 Tul 1067 


17 Tul 1067 




03 Jun 1983 


20 Dec 1984 




23 Jul 1967 


31 Jul 1967 




29 Aug 1985 


20 Sep 1985 




12 Aug 1967 


13 Aug 1967 


NEM 


01 Jan 1983 


20 Jan 1983 


KLM 


17 Jan 1991 


28 Feb 1991 




06 May 1983 


08 May 1983 


SASM 


14 Sep 1990 


12 Mar 1991 




A flight of squadron A- 7E Corsair lis in 1979- 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 83 



VA-52 

Lineage 

Established as Fighter Squadron EIGHT HUNDRED 
EIGHTY FOUR (VF-884), a reserve squadron, on 1 
November 1949. 

Called to active duty on 20 July 1950. 

Redesignated Fighter Squadron ONE HUNDRED 
FORTY FOUR (VF-144) on 4 February 1953. 

Redesignated Attack Squadron FIFTY TWO (VA-52) 
on 23 February 1959- The first to be assigned the VA- 
52 designation. 

Squadron Insignia and Nickname 

VF-884 was assigned to NAS Olathe, Kansas, prior 
to being called to active duty. The insignia, approved 
by CNO on 29 January 1951, portrayed its association 

with the state of 
Kansas. The circular 
designed insignia cen- 
tered around a deter- 
mined looking Jay- 
hawk with a club in its 
hand. Inside the 
insignia were the 
words "Bitter Birds," 
reflecting the squad- 
ron's feelings about 
the Korean Conflict 
and its call to active 
duty. Colors for the 
insignia were: blue 
Jayhawk with red head 
and yellow beak, 
gloves and shoes; black club; and a white back- 
ground outlined in red. 

When VF-884 was redesignated VF-144 on 4 
February 1953 the old insignia apparently fell out of 
use and a new insignia was not approved until 23 May 
1956. The new design depicted a stylized bird diving 
in the sky surrounded by a cone-shaped barrier. 




The design of the squadron's first 
insignia identifies their reserve 
home and reflects their feelings 
about being activated for the 
Korean Conflict. 




This stylized insignia was ap- 
proved for squadron use follow- 
ing its redesignation as VF-144. 



The knight and turtle insignia 
has been in use by the squadron 
for over three decades. 



Colors were: a blue background outlined in black; six 
white stylized stars, three above and three below the 
bird; a white outer cone with a yellow inner part; and 
a black bird. 

In 1959 VF-144 was redesignated VA-52 and a 
squadron insignia was approved by CNO on 5 January 
I960. This design depicts a stylized knight riding a sea 
turtle and armed with a mace. The knight and turtle 
are superimposed on a target. With the assignment of 
an attack mission the squadron's new insignia was 
designed to portray the pilot in the role of the knight, 
the legendary protector of honor. His means of trans- 
portation was a sea turtle, a capable and speedy per- 
former in his element, the sea. Using his mace, a 
feared weapon from an earlier time, he exemplified 
the squadron's powerful striking capability. Colors for 
the insignia were: the outer part of the circular 
insignia was outlined in black; the next concentric cir- 
cle was a light blue, followed by alternating colors of 
red and white to form the target; a white and black 
knight and turtle, with the boots and gloves of the 
knight a solid black; the spikes of the mace were solid 
black; the turtle was shaded black; the eye of the tur- 
tle was red; and a white scroll with black lettering. 

Nickname: Bitter Birds, 1951-circa 1953. 

Knightriders, circa 1960-present. 

Chronology of Significant Events 

20 Jul 1950: VF-884 called to active duty as a result 
of the Korean conflict. 

28 Jul 1950: Squadron reported for active duty at 
NAS San Diego. 

Mar 1951: In the later part of March, VF-884 aircraft 
conducted their first combat operations, flying close 
air support missions on Korea's eastern coast. 

24 May 1951: VF-884's first Commanding Officer, 
Lieutenant Commander G. F. Carmichael died after 
parachuting from his F4U which had been hit by 
enemy ground fire. 

4 Oct 1952: Lieutenant E. F. Johnson was attacked 
and shot down by enemy MIG aircraft. This was the 
first VF-884 and CVG-101 aircraft shot down by enemy 
aircraft. 

8 Nov 1952: Lieutenant Commander Bowen, VF- 
884's third Commanding Officer, was listed as missing 
in action when his aircraft crashed near Pyongyang, 
North Korea. 

4 Feb 1953: VF-884 was redesignated VF-144 during 
its second combat tour in Korea. In this change, the 
reserve squadron number was replaced by an active 
squadron number. 

21 Feb 1953: VF-144 completed the last line period 
of its second combat tour in Korea. Its primary mis- 
sions had been close air support of ground troops, 
interdiction of enemy main supply routes, and the 
destruction of military supplies, vehicles and troops. 

18 Aug 1958: The squadron returned to NAS 



84 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



Miramar following Rangefs (CVA 61) first major 
deployment. The cruise took the squadron from 
Virginia to California, via Cape Horn, transferring 
Ranger from the Atlantic to the Pacific Fleet. 

23 Feb 1959: The squadron's mission was changed 
to attack and it was redesignated VA-52. 

13 Jul-1 Aug 1964: VA-52 aircraft participated in 
Yankee Team operations in South Vietnam and Laos, 
involving aerial reconnaissance to detect Communist 
military presence and operations. Other missions 
included weather reconnaissance and SAR. 

2-4 Aug 1964: During a Desoto Patrol mission 
(intelligence collection missions begun in 1962), 
Maddox (DD 731) was attacked by three motor torpe- 
do boats on 2 August off the coast of North Vietnam. 
Following this incident the squadron flew 44 sorties in 
support of the destroyers on the Desoto Patrol. 

4 Aug 1964: During the night, two destroyers on 
Desoto Patrol, Turner Joy (DD 951) and Maddox (DD 
73D, believing themselves under attack by North 
Vietnamese motor torpedo boats, called for air sup- 
port. Several A-1H Skyraiders from the squadron, 
along with several F-8s, were launched from 
Ticonderoga (CVA 14). Commander George H. 
Edmondson and Lieutenant Jere A. Barton reported 
gun flashes and bursts of light at their altitude which 
they felt came from enemy antiaircraft fire. 

5 Aug 1964: Four Skyraiders from VA-52, piloted by 
Commander L. T. McAdams, Lieutenant Commander L. 
E. Brumbach and Lieutenant (jg)s R. E. Moore and P. 
A. Carter, participated in "Pierce Arrow," retaliatory 
strikes against the North Vietnamese. Along with other 
aircraft from CVG-5, they struck the Vinh oil storage 
facilities and destroyed about ninety percent of the 
complex. The four aircraft returned with no battle 
damage. 

6-29 Oct 1964: The squadron conducted rescue 
combat air patrols missions in support of "Yankee 
Team" operations. 

7 Feb 1966: Lieutenant (jg) Harvey M. Browne was 
awarded the Silver Star for conspicuous gallantry and 
intrepidity during rescue missions in the Republic of 
Vietnam. 

13 Apr 1966: Commander John C. Mape was killed 
in action, becoming the third VA-52 commanding offi- 
cer to be lost in combat action. 

21 Apr 1966: The squadron completed its second 
combat tour of duty in Vietnam, having participated in 
Rolling Thunder operations designed to interdict the 
enemy's lines of communication into Laos and South 
Vietnam. 

9 Mar 1967: Commander John F. Wanamaker 
received the Silver Star for conspicuous gallantry and 
intrepidity during operations against North Vietnam. 



27 Apr 1967: This was the last day of line opera- 
tions for VA-52 and the completion of her third com- 
bat tour to Vietnam. During this deployment squadron 
operations included rescue combat air patrol missions, 
coastal reconnaissance, Steel Tiger missions and Sea 
Dragon operations. Steel Tiger involved concentrated 
strikes in southern Laos. Sea Dragon operations 
involved spotting for naval gunfire against waterborne 
cargo and coastal radar and gun battery sites. 

7 Sep 1968: VA-52 deployed aboard Coral Sea (CVA 
43). This was the first A-6 Intruder deployment aboard 
a Midway Class carrier. 

8 Dec 1970-23 Jun 1971: During this period VA-52's 
main emphasis was on operations in Laos against the 
enemy's lines of communication and their transporta- 
tion networks. 

23 Nov 1971 : Commander Lennart R. Salo became 
the first Naval Flight Officer to command an A-6 
Intruder squadron. 

3 Apr 1972: VA-52 commenced line operations from 
Yankee Station a few days earlier than scheduled as a 
result of the North Vietnamese invasion across the 
DMZ in South Vietnam on 30 March. During this line 
period heavy air raids were conducted against North 
Vietnam. These were the first major heavy air raids 
into North Vietnam since October 1968 and became 
known as operation Freedom Train. 

16 Apr 1972: VA-52 conducted strikes in the 
Haiphong, Vinh, and Thanh Hoa as part of operation 
"Freedom Porch." 

9 May 1972: Operation Pocket Money, the mining of 
Haiphong harbor, was launched. VA-52's Intruders 
took part in a diversionary attack at Phu Qui railroad 
yard while aircraft from Coral Sea conducted the actu- 
al mining. 

10 May 1972: Linebacker I operations began and 
involved concentrated air strikes against targets in 
North Vietnam above the 20th parallel. During these 
operations VA-52's aircraft flew armed reconnaissance, 
Alpha strikes (large coordinated attacks), mine seeding 
operations, tanker operations, and standard arm sor- 
ties (use of antiradiation missiles to destroy missile 
radar sites). 

1-27 Jun 1972: VA-52 flew special single aircraft 
night missions designated Sneaky Pete as part of 
Linebacker I operations. 

23 Nov 1973: VA-52 deployed with CVW-11 aboard 
Kitty Hawk (CV 63) as part of the first CV concept air 
wing on the west coast. VA-52's Intruders were 
equipped with new ASW electronic equipment, the 
Multi-Channel Jezebel Relay pods. 

24-28 Jul 1979: VA-52 and other elements of CVW- 
15, participated in search and assistance operations to 
aid Vietnamese boat people. A total of 114 people 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 85 



were rescued through the efforts of the air wing and 
Kitty Hawk. These operations continued during 
August. 

27 Oct 1979: South Korea's President Park Chung 
Hee was assassinated and Kitty Hawk immediately 
departed the Philippine Sea for the southwest coast of 
Korea, where they remained until 4 November. 

29 Dec 1979: During operations off Kitty Hawk, the 
squadron's commanding officer, Commander Walter D. 
Williams, was lost at sea in a KA-6D. 

3 Dec 1979-23 Jan 1980: After the assault on the 
American Embassy in Tehran and the taking of 
hostages on 4 November 1979, Kitty Hawk entered the 
Indian Ocean and operated in the Arabian Sea 
throughout this period. 

19 May 1981: While transiting the South China Sea 
VA-52 aircraft spotted a small boat with 47 Vietnamese 
refugees on board and reported their location for res- 
cue operations. 



10-12 Oct 1983: Carl Vinson (CVN 70), with CVW- 
15 and VA-52, were kept on station in the Sea of Japan 
after the attempted assassination of South Korea's 
president. 

14-31 Aug 1986: VA-52 participated in the first carri- 
er operations in the Bering Sea since World War II. 
Most of the squadron's 400 hours and 200 sorties were 
made under adverse weather conditons. 

20-31 Jan 1987: VA-52 conducted its second period 
of operations in the Northern Pacific and Bering Sea. 
At one point the most effective means of clearing 
snow and ice from Carl Vinson's flight deck was the 
jet exhaust from the squadron's aircraft. 

23 Sep 1987: During night operations off Carl 
Vinson the squadron's Commanding Officer, 
Commander Lloyd D. Sledge, was lost at sea. 

Aug 1988: The squadron flew sorties in support of 
Earnest Will operations, the escorting of reflagged 
Kuwait tankers in the Persian Gulf. 




Squadron F4U-4 Corsairs launch from Boxer (CV 21) during a combat deployment to Korea in 1951. 



86 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



Home Port Assignments Commanding Officers — Continued 



Location 


Date of Assignment 




Date Assumed Command 


NAS Olathe 


01 Nov 1949 


CDR James R. McGuire 25 Aug 1978 


NAS San Diego 


28 Jul 1950 


CDR Walter D. "Williams 08 Nov 1979 


NAS Miramar 


Mar 1953 


CDR Peter A. Rice 29 Dec 1979 


NAS Moffett Field 


15 Jan 1962 


CDR David T. Waggoner 09 May 1981 


NAS Alameda 


29 Aug 1963 


CDR Bruce V. Wood 27 Aug 1982 


NAS Whidbey Island 


01 Jul 1967 


CDR Donald L. Sullivan 10 Feb 1984 
CDR James M. Burin 26 Jul 1985 


Commanding Officers 


CDR Lloyd D. Sledge 08 Dec 1986 
CDR Richard P. Dodd 23 Sep 1987 




Date Assumed Command 


CDR Timothy Thomson 31 Mar 1989 


LCDR Glenn F. Carmichael 


01 Nov 1949 


CDR James M. Zortman 05 Oct 1990 


LCDR Gordon E. Hartley 


May 1951 






LCDR Frederick W. Bowen 


07 Mar 1952 




Aircraft Assignment 


LCDR Robert E. McElwee 


08 Nov 1952 






LCDR John C. Coulthard 
LCDR Dallas E. Runion 


Jan 1953 
Jul 1954 


Type of Aircraft 


Date Type First Received 


F8F-1 


* 


CDR Gerald A. Robinson 


Mar 1956 


F4U-4 


01 Aug 1950 


CDR Donald Michie 


09 Aug 1957 


F9F-5 


Apr 1953 


CDR A. S. Taddeo 


24 Feb 1959 


F9F-4 and F9F-6 


t 


CDR A. R. English 


28 Oct I960 


F9F-8B 


Apr 1956 


CDR M. E. Beaulieu 


30 Jan 1962 


F9F-8 


Aug 1956 


CDR Raymond W. West 


17 Jan 1963 


AD-5 


Dec 1958 


CDR George H. Edmondson 


09 Jan 1964 


AD-6t- 


Dec 1958 


CDR Lee T. McAdams 


29 Dec 1964 


AD-7§ 


Mar 1959 


CDR John C. Mape 


10 Dec 1965 


A-6A 


10 Nov 1967 


CDR Robert R. Worchesek 


19 Apr 1966 


A-6B 


Oct 1970 


CDR Lester W. Berglund, Jr. 


30 Jun 1967 


KA-6D 


** 


CDR James A. McKenzie 


20 Jan 1969 


A-6E 


Jul 1974 


CDR Robert H. Kobler 

CDR Douglas R. McCrimmon 

CDR Lennart R. Salo 


29 Jan 1970 
20 Nov 1970 
23 Nov 1971 


* The squadron was not assigned aircraft before its call to active 
duty. Pilots trained in and flew F8F-ls that were assigned to the air 
station where the squadron was home ported. 


CDR Charles H. Kinney 
CDR Robert S. Owen 
CDR Clifton E. Banta 
CDR Daryl L. Kerr 
CDR William R. Galbraith 


03 Oct 1972 
02 Oct 1973 
17 Jan 1975 
23 Apr 1976 
20 May 1977 


t The squadron operated a few of these models in the mid 1950s. 

£ AD-6 designation was changed to A-1H in 1962. 

§ AD-7 designation was changed to A-1J in 1962. 

** The KA-6Ds were received some time between September and 
December 1971. 




VF-144's F9F-8 Cougar on the flight line at NAS Miramar, California, in 1957. 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 87 



Major Overseas Deployments 



Date of 


Date of 


Air 


Carrier 


Type of 


Area of 


Depci t~tu- ve 


Return 






A iv craft 


Operation 


02 Mar 1951 


24 Oct 1951 


CVG-101 


CV 21 


F4U-4 


WestPac/Korea 


11 Aug 1952 


17 Mar 1953 


CVG-101 


CVA 33 


F4U-4 


WestPac/Korea 


03 Feb 1954 


06 Aug 1954 


CVG-14 


CVA 15 


F9F-5 


Med 


Jun 1955 


03 Feb 1956 


CVG-14 


CVA 21 


F9F-5 


WestPac 


21 Jan 1957 


25 Jul 1957 


CVG-14 


CVA 12 


F9F-8 


WestPac 


20 Jun 1958 


20 Aug 1958 


CVG-14 


CVA 61 


F9F-8 


SoLant/SoPac 


05 Mar I960 


10 Oct I960 


CVG-5 


CVA 14 


AD-6 


WestPac 


10 May 1961 


15 Jan 1962 


CVG-5 


CVA 14 


AD-6 


WestPac 


21 Jul 1962 


11 Sep 1962 


CVG-5* 


CVA 16 


AD-6/7 


SoPac/SoLant 


03 Jan 1963 


16 Jul 1963 


CVG-5 


CVA 14 


A-1H/J 


WestPac/NorPac 


13 Apr 1964 


06 Dec 1964 


CVW-5 


CVA 14 


A-1H/J 


WestPac 


28 Sep 1965 


13 May 1966 


CVW-5 


CVA 14 


A-1H/J 


WestPac/Vietnam 


15 Oct 1966 


29 May 1967 


CVW-19 


CVA 14 


A-1H/J 


WestPac/Vietnam 


07 Sep 1968 


18 Apr 1969 


CVW-15 


CVA 43 


A-6A 


WestPac/Vietnam 


06 Nov 1970 


17 Jul 1971 


CVW-11 


CVA 63 


A-6A/B 


WestPac/Vietnam 


17 Feb 1972 


28 Nov 1972 


CVW-11 


CVA 63 


A-6A/B & KA-6D 


WestPac/Vietnam 


23 Nov 1973 


09 Jul 1974 


CVW-11 


CV63 


A-6A & KA-6D 


WestPac/IO 


21 May 1975 


15 Dec 1975 


CVW-11 


CV63 


A-6E & KA-6D 


WestPac 


25 Oct 1977 


5 May 1978 


CVW-11 


CV63 


A-6E & KA-6D 


WestPac 


30 May 1979 


25 Feb 1980 


CVW-15 


CV63 


A-6E & KA-6D 


WestPac/IO 


01 Apr 1981 


23 Nov 1981 


CVW-15 


CV63 


A-6E & KA-6D 


WestPac/IO 


01 Mar 1983 


29 Oct 1983 


CVW-15 


CVN 70 


A-6E & KA-6D 


World Cruise 


18 Oct 1984 


24 May 1985 


CVW-15 


CVN 70 


A-6E & KA-6D 


WestPac/IO 


12 Aug 1986 


05 Feb 1987 


CVW-15 


CVN 70 


A-6E & KA-6D 


NorPac/WestPac/IO 


15 Jun 1988 


14 Dec 1988 


CVW-15 


CVN 70 


A-6E & KA-6D 


NorPac/WestPac/IO 


05 Sep 1989 


09 Nov 1989 


CVW-15 


CVN 70 


A-6E & KA-6D 


NorPac 


01 Feb 1990 


31 Jul 1990 


CVW-15 


CVN 70 


A-6E & KA-6D 


WestPac/IO 



* Only two squadrons from CVG-5 were aboard Lexington for her transfer cruise from the Pacific Fleet to the Atlantic Fleet. 




A squadron A-1H Skyraider in 1966. The squadron began it active duty in prop planes, then transitioned to F9Fjets in 1953 and returned to 
props when it received its first Skyraiders in 1958 (Courtesy Robert Lawson Collection). 



88 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



Air Wing Assignments 



Unit Awards Received — Continued 



Air Wing 


Tail Code 


Assignment Date 


CVG-101 


A 


28 Jul 1950 


CVG-14* 


A 


04 Feb 1953 


CVG-14 


NKf 


1957 


CVG-5/CVW-5t- 


NF 


26 Sep 1958 


CVW-19§ 


NM 


25 Aug 1966 


COMFAIRWHIDBEY 


01 Jul 1967 


CVW-15 


NL 


Jun 1968 


CVW-11 


NH 


** 


CVW-15 


NL 


01 Jul 1978 


* CVG-101, a reserve carrier air group, was redesignated CVG-14 on 


4 February 1953. 






t CVG-14's tail code was changed from A to NK in 


the latter part of 


1957. The effective date was most likely the beginning of FY 58 (1 


July 1957). 






Carrier Air Groups 


were redesignated Carrier Air Wings on 20 


December 1963, hence, CVG-5 became CVW-5. 




§ On 1 July 1967, VA-52 detached from CVW-19 and moved to their 


new home port at NAS Whidbey Island to transition from the A-l to 


the A-6. 






** The squadron was 


assigned to CVW-11 sometime in late 1969 or 


early 1970. 






Unit Awards Received 




Unit Award 


Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 


KPUC 


26 Mar 1951 


08 Oct 1951 




17 Sep 1952 


23 Feb 1953 


AFEM 


11 Aug 1964 


22 Sep 1964 




07 Oct 1964 


29 Oct 1964 




02 Nov 1964 


06 Nov 1964 




21 Nov 1964 


28 Nov 1964 




05 May 1990 


01 Jun 1990 


HSM 


17 May 1981 






02 Oct 1981 




MUC 


13 Nov 1979 


08 Feb 1980 




10 Nov 1984 


07 May 1985 



Unit Award 

NAVE 

NEM 

NUC 



RVNGC 
VNSM 



Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 


01 Ort 


1 087 


1 =i Flpr 1 088 




1 083 


31 Der 1084 


01 Tnl 
Ul JU1 


1 071 
ly 1 1 


31 Pt^i- 1079 

ji uec ly/z 


Zj 1NOV 


1 070 


98 Tor-i 1 08f) 

zo J an iyou 


a j May 


lyol 


Cot-. 1 OQ1 

3U oep iyoi 


ao A im 
UZ Aug 


iyo4 


AC 4, m 1 A^/l 

ID Aug iy04 


1U KJCl 


1 O^vQ 
lyoo 


31 A/Tn* 1 O^vO 

3i Mar tyoy 


07 Dec 


1 A"7A 

19/0 


O/i Ti,« 1 A"7 1 

24 Jun 19/1 


/ \ r\ TV T _ „ 

09 Mar 


1 A - 70 

1972 


/A /.' \T„ TT -1 ("1—7 "1 

04 Nov 1972 


A1 c ^« 

01 Sep 




r\ i \ I A/^A 

01 Apr 1969 


AC 1\T^,. 

05 Nov 




01 Dec 1965 


22 Dec 


1965 


14 Jan 1966 


22 Jan 


1966 


1 T'^'L^ "I A/' Z' 

16 Feb 1966 


06 Mar 


1^00 


$i Mar l^oo 


10 Apr 


"i pi/i a 


zl Apr lyoo 


12 Nov 


"i C\K.K. 
l^DO 


1 O TA , „ 1 A/C/C 


03 Jan 


lyo7 


0/ reb lyo/ 


lj reb 


1 Of^~7 


io Mar iyo/ 


Zo Mar 


lyD/ 


zo Apr iyo/ 


oa i v . , . 
Ay uec 


lyOo 


ji) jan lyoy 


AO 1 n . . 1 -. 

08 Feb 


1969 


AO A yf,i 1 A/^A 

02 Mar 1969 


iy Mar 


tyoy 


2 A. Iiif nr 1 0^.0 

Mar iyoy 


07 Dec 


1 A"7A 

19/0 


2 A 1 v . 1 A"7A 

30 Dec 19/0 


iz Jan 


1 A~71 

19/1 


A/i U , , 1 ^ 1 A" 71 

U4 Feb 19/1 


1 A U , , I 

19 Feb 


19/1 


A1 A /r^»- 1 A - 71 

Ul Mar iy/i 


AA A .. 

09 Apr 


1 A" 71 

19/1 


Oz£ A «^ 1 A"71 

26 Apr 19/1 


03 May 


1971 


17 May 1971 


29 May 


1971 


23 Jun 1971 


08 Mar 


1972 


25 Mar 1972 


03 Apr 


1972 


22 May 1972 


01 Jun 


1972 


27 Jun 1972 


07 Jul 


1972 


04 Aug 1972 


14 Aug 


1972 


05 Sep 1972 


15 Sep 


1972 


02 Oct 1972 


12 Oct 


1972 


31 Oct 1972 




A squadron A-6E Intruder in 1984. Notice the lance and knight helmet markings taken from the squadron's insignia. 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 89 



VA-54 

Lineage 

Established as Scouting Squadron TWO B (VS-2B) 
on 3 July 1928. 

Redesignated Scouting Squadron THREE (VS-3) on 1 
July 1937. 

Redesignated Bombing Squadron FOUR (VB-4) on 1 
March 1943. 

Redesignated Bombing Squadron FIVE (VB-5) on 15 
July 1943. 

Redesignated Attack Squadron FIVE A (VA-5A) on 
15 November 1946. 

Redesignated Attack Squadron FIFTY FOUR (VA-54) 
on 16 August 1948. 

Disestablished on 1 December 1949- The first 
squadron to be assigned the VA-54 designation. 

Squadron Insignia and Nickname 

The squadron's first insignia was approved by BuAer 
prior to the squadron's winter cruise in 1930. A point- 
ing bird dog was adopt- 
ed to reflect the duties 
as a scouting squadron. 
The dog was black with 
^^F-B mjy^"^"" white spots and white 

outlines highlighting the 
%M ~ ^P^k dog's features. 

J _ J 1 In 1933, VS-2B re- 

versed the color for the 
dog, giving it an overall 
white color with black 
markings. This insignia 
was used by the 
squadron following its 
redesignations to VS-3 
in 1937, VB-4 in March 
1943 and VB-5 in July 1943. On 24 October 1945, CNO 
approved a new insignia for VB-5. It was a modifica- 
tion of an insignia used by a previous VB-5 squadron 



As a scouting squadron, the 
pointing bird dog was an appro 
priate design for the squadron 's 
first insignia. 






Following World War II, the 
squadron adopted this insignia. 



The squadron 's pointing bird 
dog insignia was modified in 
1933 when the colors of the dog 
were reversed. 



During World War II, the 
squadron adopted this insignia 
to keep it in line with its mission 
as a bombing squadron. 



that had been in exis- 
tence prior to World 
War II. It was a winged 
devil's head with a red 
ball of fire and a black 
bomb with red mark- 
ings. The devil's helmet 
and beard were black; 
the face and horn was 
red; yellow goggles and 
mustache; and red 
wings outlined in black. 

CNO approved a 
change to the squadron 
insignia on 3 June 1946. The new insignia had a yel- 
low circle with a green bomb, outlined in black, with 
a red tip on the bomb. Overlaying the bomb were 
four aces and the joker. The playing cards had a white 
background, outlined in black, with the aces in the 
appropriate colors, while the joker was black with red 
eyes and mouth. The five cards signified the 
squadron's number. The squadron continued to use 
the insignia when it was redesignated VA-54. 
Nickname: unknown. 

Chronology of Significant Events 

Jan-Feb 1929: Fleet Problem IX was the first time 
the Navy's two large carriers, Saratoga (CV 3) (with 
VS-2B embarked) and Lexington (CV 2), participated 
in a major fleet exercise. 

Mar-Apr 1930: In March, Fleet Problem X was con- 
ducted in the Caribbean Sea, followed by Fleet 
Problem XI in April. 

May 1930: VS-2B's aircraft joined with the planes 
from 9 other squadrons, which included Saratoga, 
Lexington and Langley Air Groups, for a three-day tour 
of east coast cities from Norfolk, Virginia to Boston. 
The flight was commanded by Captain Kenneth 
Whiting and consisted of 36 torpedo and bombing 
planes, 57 fighting planes, 24 scouting planes, 3 
amphibian utility planes, 3 Ford tri-motored transports 
and 2 staff planes. It was the largest air parade that had 
ever been assembled on the east coast. 

5 Nov 1931: The squadron's commanding officer, 
Lieutenant Commander Oscar W. Erickson, was killed 
in an airplane crash at sea. 

1931-1934: The squadron participated in Fleet 
Problems XII through XIX. 

31 May 1934: A fleet review for President Franklin 
D. Roosevelt was held in New York Harbor. 

1935-1938: The squadron participated in Fleet 
Problems XVI through XV. 

Apr-May 1940: The squadron participated in Fleet 
Problem XXI. This was the last major fleet problem 
conducted before Pearl Harbor and America's involve- 
ment in World War II. 



90 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



Aug 1942: VS-3 and the other squadrons in Saratoga 
Air Group provided air support for the landings on 
Guadalcanal. 

24-25 Aug 1942: VS-3 participated in the Battle of 
Eastern Solomons and, along with other squadrons in 
the Saratoga Air Group, attacked and sunk the 
Japanese carrier Ryujo. Enroute back to Saratoga after 
their attack on the Ryujo, Lieutenant Commander Kirn, 
and ten of his SBDs attacked a Japanese flight of four 
Vals (Aichi D3A, Japanese Navy Type 99 Carrier 
Bombers), downing three and damaging the fourth. 

Sep-Nov 1942: VS-3 operated from Espiritu Santo, 
New Hebrides until its return to CONUS in December. 

6-24 Jul 1943: VB-5 departed Norfolk embarked in 
Yorktown (CV 10) enroute to Hawaii via the Panama 
Canal. 

31 Aug 1943: VB-5, embarked in Yorktown, partic- 
pated in a raid on Marcus Island. 

5-6 Oct 1943: The squadron participated in a raid 
on Wake Island. 

Nov-Dec 1943: VB-5 participated in operations 
against the Gilberts in support of the landings on Makin 
and Tarawa, as well as strikes against the Marshalls. 

Jan-Feb 1944: The squadron flew strikes against the 
Marshall Islands and provided air support for the inva- 
sion of the Marshalls. 

16-17 Feb 1944: VB-5, along with other squadrons 
in Air Group 5, flew strikes against the the Japanese 
stronghold of Truk. 

22 Feb 1944: CVG-5's aircraft, including VB-5, raided 
the Marianas striking targets on Saipan. 

30 Mar-1 Apr 1944: VB-5's SBDs struck ships and 
facilities at Palau in the Caroline Islands. 

21-23 Apr 1944: Strikes were flown by VB-5 against 
targets on Wade Island and Hollandia in New Guinea. 
These operations were in support of the landings at 
Hollandia by General Douglas MacArthur's forces. 

29-30 Apr 1944: VB-5 conducted another strike 
operation against Truk. 

14 May 1944: Following a ten-month combat tour, 
which began in August 1943, Air Group 5 was relieved 
aboard Yorktown by Air Group 1 and the Air Group, 
including VB-5, returned to CONUS. 

07 Feb 1945: CVG-5, with VB-5, embarked in 
Franklin (CV 13) and departed NAS Alameda for 
Hawaii, arriving there on 13 February. This was the 
beginning of the squadron's third major combat tour 
in the Pacific. 

19 Mar 1945: Following the launch of CVG-5 aircraft, 
including SB2Cs from VB-5, for an attack against the 
city of Kobe, Japan, the Franklin was hit by two enemy 
bombs from a Japanese aircraft. Fires were ignited on 
the second and third decks from the first bomb and the 
second triggered munitions on the carrier. All CVG-5's 
aircraft still on the carrier were destroyed. The damage 
was one of the most extensive experienced by an Essex 
class carrier during World War II. A total of 724 were 



killed and 265 wounded. However, the crew's heroic 
efforts saved the ship. CVG-5 personnel were trans- 
ferred to Sante Fe (CL 60). CVG-5 aircraft in the air 
landed on other carriers, primarily Bennington (CV 20). 
Personnel in the water were picked up by destroyers. 

May 1949: VA-54 was the last fleet squadron to 
operate the SB2C aircraft. The squadron completed its 
Operational Readiness Inspection on 19 May and the 
last operational flight of the SB2C. 




This photo shows a squadron 02U laying a smoke screen. 

Home Port Assignments 

Location Assignment Date 

NAS San Diego 03 Jul 1928 

Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides Sep 1942* 

NAS San Diego Dec 1942 

MCAS El Centra Jan 1943 

NAS San Diego Mar 1943 

NAS Norfolk Apr 1943 

NAS Pearl Harbor Jul 1943* 

NAS Barbers Point Sep 1943* 

NAS Puunene Oct 1943* 

NAS Hilo Dec 1943* 

NAS Kaneohe Dec 1943* 

NAS Alameda 25 Jun 1944 

NAAS Fallon 25 Jul 1944 

NAAS Vernalis 29 Oct 1944 

NAAS Santa Rosa 10 Nov 1944 

Hawaii Feb 1945* 

NAS Klamath Falls 08 May 1945 

NAS Pasco 28 Sep 1945 

NAAS Brown Field 03 Dec 1945 

NAS Barbers Point 25 Mar 1946 

NAS San Diego 20 May 1946 

NAS Seattle 13 Jan 1947 

NAS San Diego 20 Mar 1947 

* Temporary shore assignment during World War II. 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 9 1 



This is a close-up view of the squadron 02U laying a smoke screen. 



Commanding Officers 




Squadron SU aircraft are parked on the forward flight deck of 
Lexington (CV 2) as she passes through the Panama Canal. 



LT Forrest P. Sherman (acting)* 

LCDR Virgil C. Griffin 

LT Forrest P. Sherman (acting) 

LCDR Dewitt C. Watson 

LCDR Adolph P. Schneider 

LCDR Oscar W. Erickson 

LT Robert P. McConnell (acting) 

LCDR Gordon Rowe 

LCDR Theodore C. Lonnquest 

LT Harold M. Martin (acting) 

LCDR Felix B. Stump 

LCDR John F. Gillon 

LCDR Frederick W. McMahon 

LCDR Charles F. Greber 

LCDR Robert C. Sutliff 

LCDR Sutlia 

LCDR Herbert L. Hoerner 

LCDR Louis J. Kirn 

LCDR Robert M. Milner 

LCDR Edgar E. Stebbins 

LT Charles P. Mason 

LCDR John G. Sheridan 

LT Harold W. Calhoun (acting) 



Date Assumed Command 
03 Jul 1928 
03 Jul 1928 
Apr 1929 
21 Jun 1929 
01 Jun 1931 
17 Aug 1931 
05 Nov 1931 
Jun 1932 
Dec 1932 
Jul 1932 
13 Jul 1934 
Jun 1936 
Jun 1937 
Jun 1938 
t 

03 Apr 1941 

01 Oct 1941 
May 1942 
Mar 1943 
Sep 1943 

25 Jun 1944 
02 Jul 1944 

15 May 1945 



92 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



Commanding Officers — Continued 



Date Assumed Command 


LTJG F. D. Brunner (acting) 


31 May 


1945 


LCDR Paul J. Knapp 


25 Jun 


1945 


LT Eugene M. Yoder (acting) 


28 Aug 


1945 


LTJG H. M. Ziskin (acting) 


07 Sep 


1945 


LCDR Howard L. Grimmell (acting) 


08 Sep 


1945 


LCDR Allen L. Lewis (acting) 


07 Nov 


1945 


LCDR Allen L. Lewis 


05 Dec 


1945 


CDR Walter F. Madden 


04 Oct 


1947 


LCDR Willard L. Nyburg (acting) 


21 Jun 


1948 


CDR Edgar S. Keats 


27 Jul 


1948 


LCDR R. A. Newcomb 


04 Feb 


1949 


LCDR D. K. English 


08 Apr 


1949 



* Lieutenant Sherman was the senior officer assigned to the 
squadron during its establishment ceremonies. Following the estab- 
lishment ceremonies Lieutenant Commander Griffin reported aboard 
and became the commanding officer. 

t Assumed command sometime between October 1939 and June 
1940. 




A formation of squadron SUs, circa 1933- 



Aircraft Assignment 



Aircraft Assignment 



Type of Aircraft 

uo 

FU-1 

02U-1 

02U-2 

03U-2 

SU-1 

SU-3 

SU-2 

SBU-1 



SBC-3 
SBC-4 



SBD-3 



Date Type First Received 

Jul 1928 
27 Aug 1928 
Dec 1928 
Dec 1928 
Dec 1931 
May 1932 
Nov 1932 
Dec 1932 
Jan 1936 
Aug 1937 
Mar 1941 
Aug 1941 



Type of Aircraft 



SBD-4 



SB2C 



SBD-5 



SB2C-3 

SBW-3 

SB2C-4 

SB2C-4E 

SB2C-5* 



F4U-4 



AD-1 
AD-4 



Date Type First Received 

Jan 1943 
Apr 1943 
Jun 1943 
25 Jun 1944 
25 Jun 1944 
Sep 1944 
Dec 1944 
Mar 1946 
19 Apr 1948 
May 1949 
Oct 1949 



1 The squadron continued to operate the SB2C-5s until May 1949- 



Major 



Date of 


Date of 


Air 


Departure 


Return 


Wing 


15 Jan 1929 


Mar 1929 


Saratoga 






Air Group 


15 Feb 1930 


21 Jun 1930 


Saratoga 






Air Group 


05 Feb 1931 


15 Apr 1931 


Saratoga 






Air Group 


Feb 1932 


19 Mar 1932 


Saratoga 






Air Group 


23 Jan 1933 


17 Feb 1933 


Saratoga 






Air Group 



Deployments 



Type of Area of 

Carrier Aircraft Operation 

CV 3 02U-2 Central America/ 

Pacific 

CV 3 02U-2 Pacific/Carib 

CV 3 02U-2 Pacific/Carib 

CV 3 03U-2 Hawaii 

CV 3 SU-1/2/3 Hawaii 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 93 




A formation of squadron SBC-3s in 1938 ( Courtesy Robert Lawson Collection). 



Major Overseas Deployments 



Date of 


Date of 


Air 




Type of 


Area of 


Departure 


Return 


Wing 


Carrier 


Aircraft 


Operation 


09 Apr 1934 


09 Nov 1934 


Saratoga 


CV 3 


SU-1/2/3 


Pacific/Carib/ 






Air Group 






East Coast 


May 1935 


Jun 1935 


Saratoga 


CV 3 


SU-2/3 


Hawaii/NorPac 






Air Group 








Apr 1936 


Jun 1936 


Saratoga 


CV 3 


SBU-1 


Central America 






Air Group 






Pacific 


Apr 1937 


May 1937 


Saratoga 


CV 3 


SBU-1 


Hawaii 






Air Group 








15 Mar 1938 


Apr 1938 


Saratoga 


CV 3 


SBC-3 


Hawaii 






Air Group 








02 Apr 1940 


21 Jun 1940 


Saratoga 


CV 3 


SBC-3 


Hawaii 






Air Group 








08 Dec 1941 


19 Feb 1942 


Saratoga 


CV 3* 


SBD-3 


Hawaii 






Air Group 








07 Jul 1942 


Sep 1942 


Saratoga 


CV 3t 


SBD-3 


SoPac 






Air Group 








22 Aug 1943 


07 Sep 1943 


CVG-5 


CV 10 


SBD-5 


Pacific 


29 Sep 1943 


11 Oct 1943 


CVG-5 


CV 10 


SBD-5 


Pacific 


10 Nov 1943 


09 Dec 1943 


CVG-5 


CV 10 


SBD-5 


Pacific 


16 Jan 1944 


11 May 1944 


CVG-5 


CV 10 


SBD-5 


Pacific 


03 Mar 1945 


19 Mar 1945 


CVG-5 


CV 13 


SB2C-4E 


Pacific 


31 Mar 1947 


16 Jun 1947 


CVG-5 


CV 38 


SB2C-5 


WestPac 



* The squadron was operating from Saratoga in the Hawaiian area when, on 11 January 1942, the ship was hit by a torpedo from a Japanese 
submarine. With VS-3 aboard, Saratoga departed Hawaii and returned to Bremerton, Washington, for repairs. The other squadrons in Saratoga's 
Air Group remained in Hawaii. 

t Saratoga was torpedoed for a second time on 31 August 1942 and VS-3 was transferred ashore at Espiritu Santo in early September. 



94 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 




Air Wing Assignments 



A close-up view of a squadron SBC-3 in flight. Part of the squadron's 
pointing bird dog insignia is visible on the fuselage just below the pilot. 



Air Wing 

Saratoga Air Group* 
t 

CVG-5 



Tail Code 



Assignment Date 

Jul 1928 
Sep 1942 
15 Feb 1943 



* Squadrons assigned to the carriers prior to 1 July 1938 were part of 
that carrier's air group. However, it was not until 1 July 1938, when 
air group commander billets were established, that the air groups 
themselves became offical organizations. 

t When VS-3 was transferred ashore at Espiritu Santo, New 
Hebrides, from Saratoga the squadron's association with the 
Saratoga Air Group came to an end. 

$ CVG-5 aircraft were assigned the tailcode S on 12 December 1946. 





1 * 




Squadron SB2C-5 Helldivers fly over Boulder Dam in 1948. 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 95 



Unit Awards Received 



Unit Awards Received — Continued 



Unit Award 



PUC 



Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 



Unit Award 



Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 



NAVE 

Campaign Medal 
(Asiatic/Pacific) 



31 Aug 1943 
05 Oct 1943 
19 Nov 1943 

29 Jan 1944 
29 Mar 1944 

01 Jul 1947 
07 Aug 1942 
23 Aug 1942 



06 Oct 1943 
05 Dec 1943 
23 Feb 1944 
30 Apr 1944 
30 Jun 1948 
09 Aug 1942 
25 Aug 1942 



31 Aug 1943 
05 Oct 1943 
19 Nov 1943 

29 Jan 1944 
16 Feb 1944 
21 Feb 1944 

30 Mar 1944 
21 Apr 1944 
29 Apr 1944 



06 Oct 1943 
04 Dec 1943 
08 Feb 1944 
17 Feb 1944 
22 Feb 1944 
01 Apr 1944 
24 Apr 1944 
01 May 1944 




A squadron AD-1 Skywarrior loaded with dud rockets and general purpose bombs. The squadron's joker and card insignia and Battle E award 
are on the fuselage just forward of the pilot. 



96 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



SECOND VA-54 

Lineage 

Established as Bomber Fighter Squadron ONE HUN- 
DRED FIFTY THREE (VBF-153) on 26 March 1945. 

Redesignated Fighter Squadron SIXTEEN A (VF-16A) 
on 15 November 1946. 

Redesignated Fighter Squadron ONE HUNDRED 
FIFTY TWO (VF-152) on 15 July 1948. 

Redesignated Fighter Squadron FIFTY FOUR (VF-54) 
on 15 February 1950. 

Redesignated Attack Squadron FIFTY FOUR (VA-54) 
on 15 June 1956. 

Disestablished on 1 April 1958. The second 
squadron to be assigned the VA-54 designation. 

Squadron Insignia and Nickname 

The squadron's first insignia was approved by CNO 
on 17 July 1945. The insignia was designed by Walt 

Disney Productions. 
Colors for the dog on a 
winged bomb were: 
white background, pale 
yellow circle outline; 
blue powder head 
bomb with black body, 
blue middle fin, and 
bright orange corsair 
wings with white high- 
lights; the dog was a 
mottled brown and 
black, jowls and chest a 
flesh color, nose black 
with white highlights, 
right eye ringed in black, eyeballs white, pupils blue 
with black centers, mouth black, and tongue red; box- 
ing gloves orange; and collar black with blue loop and 
black leash. 

Following the redesignation to VF-16A the squadron 
had a new insignia approved on 26 May 1948. Colors 
for the flying ace of spades were: black outer circle 
and red inner circle; black background; gold wings 
outlined in black; ace of spades and card markings 
were black; red bloodspots; copper arrowhead out- 
lined in black. When the squadron was redesignated 
VF-152 it retained the flying ace of spades insignia. 

A new squadron insignia was approved by CNO on 
14 February 1951, a year after the squadron had been 
redesignated VF-54. The insignia's design was based 
on the statement "through Hell or High Water." Colors 
for this insignia were: sky blue background in the 
upper half and sapphire blue in the lower half of the 
insignia, the overall insignia outlined in black; a crim- 
son devil's head was encircled by yellow, red and 
amber flames; the devil's features include black hair, 




The squadron's first insignia was 
designed by Walt Disney Productions. 




The squadron 's second insignia, 
approved in 1948, depicts the 
nickname "Coppperheads . " 



The squadron 's last insignia, 
the devil's head, gave them the 
nickname "Hell's Angels." 



eyebrows, mustache and highlights; his eyes were 
white with emerald pupils and vermilion iris; the 
mouth was white; and gold anchor, shield and wings. 
The squadron's motto was Angeli Inferni meaning 
Hell's Angels. When the squadron was redesignated 
VA-54 in 1956, it continued to use the Hell's Angels 
insignia. 

Nickname: Copperheads, until 1951. 

Hell's Angels, 1951-1958. 

Chronology of Significant Events 

29 Jun 1950: VF-54 was deployed aboard Valley 
Forge (CV 45) in the Western Pacific when hostilities 
erupted in Korea on 25 June. The carrier was ordered 
north from the Philippines and the squadron's aircraft 
conducted a sweep along the western coast of Taiwan 
due to the concern that the North Korean invasion of 
South Korea might be a prelude to an invasion of that 
island by the Chinese Communists. 

3 Jul 1950: The squadron participated in its first 
combat strikes since its establishment in 1945. These 
strikes were the first made by carrier aircraft in the 
Korean War. VF-54's Corsairs struck targets in 
Pyongyang, North Korea. 

15 Sep 1950: VF-54 provided air support for the 
landings at Inchon, South Korea. 

26 Jul 1954: VF-54's AD-4 Skyraiders were on a SAR 
mission looking for survivors, rafts or debris from a 
British Cathay Pacific DC-4 airliner, that had been shot 
down by the Chinese Communists, when they were 
attacked by two Chinese LA-7 fighter aircraft. Two of 
the squadron's Skyraiders, along with an F4U, shot 
down the two LA-7s 13 miles southeast of Hainan 
Island. 

Sep 1957: Bon Homme Richard (CVA 3D, with VA- 
54 embarked, operated in the vicinity of Taiwan in 
response to a buildup of Chinese Communist forces 
on the mainland opposite Taiwan. 

Dec 1957: The squadron began the transition from 
propeller aircraft to jets. 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 97 




A squadron F6F-5 Hellcat inflight, circa 1947 (Courtesy Robert Lawson Collection). 



Home Port Assignments 



Commanding Officers 



Location 


Assignment Date 


NAS Wildwood 


26 Mar 1945 


NAAS Oceana 


01 Jun 1945 


NAS Norfolk 


02 Jul 1946 


NAS Alameda 


11 Aug 1946 


NAS Sand Point 


04 May 1948 


NAS Alameda 


28 Jun 1948 


NAS San Diego 


01 Dec 1949 


NAS Miramar 


19 May 1952 




A squadron F8F-1 Bearcat on the deck of Tarawa (CV 40) in 1948 
(Courtesy Robert Laivson Collection). 



LCDR Hayden M. Jensen 
LCDR Levern E. Forkner 
CDR Robert G. Boyd 
LCDR Douglas K. English 
LCDR Paul N. Gray 
LCDR Henry Suerstedt, Jr. 
LCDR Christian Fink 
CDR Donald E. Bruce 
CDR Frank M. McLinn 
CDR William A. Lewiston 
CDR Emmit W. Blackburn 



Date Assumed Command 

26 Mar 1945 
01 May 1947 

09 Jul 1948 
01 Dec 1949 
16 Jan 1951 

27 Jun 1952 
21 Jul 1953 

Dec 1954 
Sep 1955 
Jun 1956 
16 Dec 1957 



Aircraft Assignment 



Type of Aircraft 



F4U-1 



E6F-5 



F8F-1 
E8F-2 



AD-4 



F4U-4B 



AD-1/4 
AD-6 
AD-5 
AD-7 



F9F-8B 



Date Type First Received 

26 Mar 1945 
04 Jun 1945 
10 Sep 1945 
21 Oct 1947 
May 1949 
01 Dec 1949 
14 Dec 1949 
Mar 1951 
Dec 1954* 
Dec 1954 
Jan 1957 
Dec 1957 



* VF-54 operated AD-6s for a short period of time between October 
and December 1953. 



98 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



Major Overseas Deployments 



Pinto nf 


D/ito nf 






i\}ti& nf 

iypc oj 


A \ ~£)fi n f 


Departure 


Return 


Wing 


Carrier 


Aircraft 


Operation 


31 Mar 1947 


08 Oct 1947 


CVAG-15 


CV 36 


F6F-5 


WestPac 


01 May 1950 


01 Dec 1950 


CVG-5 


CV45 


F4U-4B 


WestPac/Korea 


28Jun 1951 


25 Mar 1952 


CVG-5 


CV 9 


AD-2/3/4 


WestPac/Korea 


20 Nov 1952 


25 Jun 1953 


CVG-5 


CVA45 


AD-4 


WestPac/Korea 


12 Mar 1954 


Nov 1954 


CVG-5 


CVA47 


AD-4 


WestPac 


29 Oct 1955 


17 May 1956 


CVG-5 


CVA 33 


AD-6 


WestPac 


12 Jul 1957 


09 Dec 1957 


CVG-5 


CVA 31 


AD-6/7 


WestPac 





A squadron F4U-4B Corsair prepares to launch from Valley Forge(CV 45) during a combat deployment to Korea in 1950 (Courtesy Robert 
Lawson Collection). 




Air Wing Assignments 



A squadron AD-6 Skyraider coming in for a landing on Kearsarge 
(CVA 33) during its 1955-1956 WestPac deployment. 



Air Wing 

CVG-153/CVAG- 

15/CVG-15* 
CVG-5 



Tail Code 
B/At 

S/NFi: 



Assignment Date 

26 Mar 1945 
01 Dec 1949 



* CVG-153 was redesignated CVAG-15 on 15 November 1946 and 
then redesignated CVG-15 on 1 September 1948. 

t CVAG-15 was assigned the tail code B on 12 December 1946. It 
was changed to A on 4 August 1948. 

i CVG-5's tail code was changed from S to NF in the latter part of 
1957. The effective date was most likely the beginning of FY 58 (1 
July 1957). 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 99 



Unit Awards Received 



Unit Awards Received — Continued 



Unit Award 
NAVE 

NUC 



KPUC 



Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 



01 Jul 1948 
03 Jul 1950 
01 Jan 1953 
21 Aug 1951 
01 Jul 1950 



30 Jun 1949 
18 Nov 1950 

05 Jun 1953 
05 Mar 1952 
18 Nov 1950 



Unit Award 



KSM 



Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 



30 Dec 1952 
15 Aug 1951 
30 Jun 1950 
13 Aug 1951 



10 Jun 1953 

11 Mar 1952 
23 Nov 1950 
01 Nov 1951 



Squadron F9F-8B Cougars on the flight line at NAS Miramar, California, in 1958. 



1 00 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



VA-55 

Lineage 

Established as Torpedo Squadron FIVE (VT-5) on 15 
February 1943. 

Redesignated Attack Squadron SIX A (VA-6A) on 15 
November 1946. 

Redesignated Attack Squadron FIFTY FIVE (VA-55) 
on 16 August 1948. 

Disestablished on 12 December 1975. The first 
squadron to be designated VA-55. 




In the mid-1950s, the 
squadron adopted the sea- 
horse insignia that became 
a well-known design. 




This TORPCATS insignia was used 
by VT-5 during World War II but 
was never officially approved. 



Squadron Insignia and Nickname 

The squadron's first insignia was not submitted or 
approved by CNO. This insignia was a horned black cat, 

grasping a rat, astride a 
torpedo. The colors were: 
a red background with a 
black cat; the cat's face, 
claws and horns were 
red; the rat had a yellow 
face and a red body; the 
torpedo had a yellow 
nose and tail section with 
a red center and black 
markings; and the word 
Torpcats was black. 

On 10 July 1946, a 
new squadron insignia 
was approved by CNO. 
The insignia design was the face of a cat grasping a 
torpedo in its mouth. Colors were: a lemon yellow 
background; a blue cat's head with green eyes, gray 
jowls, black nose and whiskers, and white teeth; the 
torpedo was red with white highlights and outlined in 
black. This insignia was used by VT-5, VA-6A and VA- 
55 until September 1955. 

On 27 September 1955 a new insignia was approved. 
The winged seahorse insignia was outlined by alternat- 
ing white and dark green square blocks; the upper half 

of the insignia was 
turquoise and the lower 
half dark blue; the waves 
were highlighted in 
white; the seahorse was 
silver with gold wings 
and highlighted with 
black markings; the 
rocket was silver with 
red tail fins and nose, 
black markings, and a 
flame of red and yellow. 
This squadron insignia was Nickname: Torpcats, 

approved for use in the post- 1943—1955. 
World War II period, retaining the Warhorses 1955—1975 
cat and torpedo motif. 




Chronology of Significant Events 

15 Feb 1943: VGS-30 was disestablished and person- 
nel from the squadron were used to form VT-5 and 
VF-1. 

6-24 Jul 1943: The squadron departed Norfolk 
embarked in Yorktown (CV 10) enroute to Hawaii via 
the Panama Canal. 

31 Aug 1943: Embarked in Yorktown, the squadron 
participated in a raid on Marcus Island. 

5-6 Oct 1943: The squadron participated in a raid 
on Wake Island. 

Nov-Dec 1943: The squadron supported the land- 
ings on Makin and Tarawa, in the Gilberts, and flew 
strikes against Kwajalein in the Marshalls. 

Jan-Feb 1944: The squadron provided air support 
for the invasion of the Marshalls. 

16-17 Feb 1944: Squadron aircraft flew strikes 
against the Japanese stronghold of Truk. 

22 Feb 1944: The squadron participated in a raid on 
the Marianas, striking targets on Saipan. 

30 Mar-1 Apr 1944: Squadron aircraft struck ships 
and facilities at Palau in the Caroline Islands. The 
strike on 30 March was the first time the squadron's 
TBFs were armed with torpedoes in combat. 

21-23 Apr 1944: Strikes were flown against targets 
on Wakde Island and Hollandia in New Guinea. These 
operations were in support of the landings at 
Hollandia by General Douglas MacArthur's forces. 

29-30 Apr 1944: The squadron participated in 
another strike operation against Truk. 

30 Apr 1944: The squadron's commanding officer, 
Lieutenant Commander Dick Upson, failed to return 
from a SAR mission to locate a downed pilot. 

14 May 1944: Following a ten-month combat tour 
beginning in August 1943, Air Group 5 was relieved 
aboard Yorktown by Air Group 1 and returned to 
CONUS to reform on 25 June 1944. 

07 Feb 1945: Embarked in Franklin (CV 13), the 
squadron departed NAS Alameda for Hawaii, arriv- 
ing there on 13 February. This was the beginning of 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS — Volume I 101 



the squadron's second major combat tour in the 
Pacific. 

19 Mar 1945: VT-5 was preparing to launch its air- 
craft for an attack against the city of Kobe, Japan, 
when the Franklin was hit by two enemy bombs from 
a Japanese aircraft. Fires were ignited on the second 
and third decks from the first bomb and the second 
triggered munitions on the carrier. All VT-5's aircraft 
on the flight and hangar deck were destroyed by the 
ensuing explosions and fire. The damage was one of 
the most extensive experienced by an Essex class carri- 
er during World War II. A total of 724 men were killed 
and 265 wounded. VT-5's commanding officer, 
Lieutenant Commander Edmands, was lost in the 
action. All surviving VT-5 personnel were transferred 
from Franklin and returned to CONUS. 

3 Jul 1950: Participated in the first combat strikes by 
carrier aircraft against the North Koreans. The 
squadron flew its AD-4 Skyraiders on strikes against 
airfields, supply lines and transportation facilities in 
and around Pyongyang, North Korea. This was also 
the first use of the AD Skyraider in combat. 

12 Sep 1950: Pre-invasion strikes against targets in 
and around Inchon and Seoul, Korea, began in prepa- 
ration for the landing at Inchon. 

15 Sep 1950: Strikes were flown to support the land- 
ings at Inchon. 

16 May 1951: All VA-55 personnel, except 16 officers 
and 5 enlisted men, embarked USNS General William 
Weigel (TAP 119) enroute to Japan for duty with Air 
Group 19 aboard Princeton (CV 37). The remainder of 
the personnel were airlifted to Japan on 17 May. 

29 May 1951: VA-55 embarked on Princeton, 
replaced VA-195 in Air Group 19, and proceeded to 
Korea for combat operations. 

Mar 1954: The squadron was deployed to the 
Western Pacific aboard Essex (CVA 9) when the carrier 
was ordered to operate off the coast of Vietnam dur- 
ing the Viet Minh's assault against the French at Dien 
Bien Phu. 

Jul-Sep 1957: Operated intermittently off the coast 
of Taiwan due to the build-up of Chinese Communist 
forces and the threat of a possible invasion of Taiwan 
or its off-shore islands. 

Sep 1958: Operated in the Formosa Straits during 
the Chinese Communist shelling of Quemoy and 
Matsu. 

30-31 Oct 1962: Participated in cross deck opera- 
tions on HMS Victorious (R 38) in the South China Sea. 
Apr 1963: Ticonderoga, with VA-55 embarked, 



deployed to the South China Sea following several 
defeats of neutralist forces by the Communists in Laos. 
After a ceasefire agreement was arranged, the ship 
resumed normal Seventh Fleet operations on 5 May. 

Jul-Sep 1964: Participated in special Yankee 
Teamoperations involving missions over Laos and 
South Vietnam. 

2 and 4 Aug 1964: The squadron flew air support for 
Maddox (DD 73 1) and Turner Joy (DD 951) while the 
destroyers were on Desoto Patrol missions (intelli- 
gence collection missions begun in 1962) off the coast 
of North Vietnam. 

5 Aug 1964: VA-55's Skyhawks participated in opera- 
tion Pierce Arrow, retaliatory strikes against the North 
Vietnamese. Along with other aircraft from CVG-5, 
they were part of the mission that struck the Vinh oil 
storage facility. Ninety percent of the complex was 
destroyed. 

Oct-Nov 1964: The squadron continued to operate 
from Ticonderoga off the coast of South Vietnam and 
participated in special Yankee Team operations, flying 
missions over South Vietnam. 

3 Jun 1966: The squadron's commanding officer, 
Commander M. J. Chewning, while on a mission over 
North Vietnam, lost the use of his left arm due to a 
shrapnel hit. He continued his mission, striking a road 
target, and then returned to the carrier, making a one- 
handed carrier landing. For his exploits he was award- 
ed the Silver Star and the Purple Heart. 

15 Jun 1966: Lieutenant Commander Theodore F. 
Kopfman was awarded the Silver Star, in absentia, for 
his actions on a mission over North Vietnam. During 
the sortie his aircraft was shot down and he was taken 
prisoner. He was released by North Vietnam and 
returned to the United States in 1973. 

Apr 1972: The squadron participated in Operation 
Freedom Train, tactical air sorties against military and 
logistic targets in the southern part of North Vietnam. 
It also provided close air support for forces in South 
Vietnam following a massive invasion by North 
Vietnam. 

May 1972: Participated in the early phase of opera- 
tion Linebacker I, heavy air strikes against targets in 
North Vietnam. 

Jun 1973: Missions were flown in support of 
Operation End Sweep, the clearing of mines in the ter- 
ritorial waters of North Vietnam. 

Oct 1973: With the outbreak of war between Israel, 
Egypt and Syria, the Hancock (CVA 19), with VA-55 
embarked, was directed to leave Yankee Station and 
operate in the Arabian Sea and Gulf of Aden. 



1 02 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 




VT-5 flight crews in front of a squadron TBM-3. The squadron TORPCATS insignias on all the flight jackets, circa summer 1945. 



Home Port Assignments 



Location 

NAS Norfolk (NAAF Pungo) 

Hawaii 

NAS Alameda 

NAAS Monterey 

NAAS Santa Rosa 

Hawaii 

NAS Seattle 

NAS Klamath Falls 

NAS Pasco 

NAAS Brown Field, Chula Vista 
NAS Barbers Point 
NAS San Diego 
NAS Miramar 
NAS Lemoore 



Assignment Date 

15 Feb 1943 
Jul 1943* 
May 1944 
Aug 1944f 
Oct 1944f 
Feb 1945+ 
Apr 1945§ 
08 May 1945 
02 Sep 1945 
04 Dec 1945 
25 Mar 1946 
21 May 1946 
20 Mar 1952 
Jan 1962 



t Temporary shore station for the squadron while it conducted train- 
ing in preparation for its next combat cruise. 

£ Temporary shore assignment in Hawaii when not aboard Franklin 
(CV 13), no specific air station listed. 

§ Temporary shore station awaiting reforming of squadron in May 
1945. 



Commanding Officers 



'" Temporary shore assignments at various air stations in Hawaii 
when not aboard Yorktown (CV 10). 



LCDR Richard Upson 

LT Andrew C. Lett (acting) 

LCDR Allan C. Edmands 

LT Charles H. Carr (acting) 

LCDR Tom B. Bash 

LTJohn D. Cornwell (acting) 

LT William L. Dodd (acting) 

LCDR Allard G. Russell 

LCDR William A. Rawls (acting) 

CDR Charles H. Crabill, Jr. 



Date Assumed Command 

15 Feb 1943 

30 Apr 1944 
18 Jun 1944 

08 May 1945 
18 May 1945 

31 Aug 1945 
12 Oct 1945 
21 Oct 1945 
01 Oct 1947 

24 Dec 1947 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 103 



Commanding Officers — Continued 



Commanding Officers — Continued 



LCDR Norman D. Hodson 
LCDR A. L. Maltby, Jr. 
LCDR L. W. Chick 
LCDR Jack T. Dowler 
LCDR R. J. Thompson 
CDRJack T. Dowler 
CDR Franklin V. Bernhard 
CDR Billy D. Holder 
CDR D. H. Stinemates 
CDR J. E. McQuary 
CDR H. M. Richey 
CDR Lloyd F. Cooper 
CDR Earl F. Godfrey 
CDR E. J. Lawrence 
CDR H. Urban, Jr. 
CDR J. E. Krimmel 
CDR M. J. Chewning 
CDR E. E. Holt (acting) 
CDR E. E. Holt 
CDR Robert E. Kirksey 
CDR John F. Wellings 
CDR Frederick W. Lawler 
CDR Richard A. Hendricks 
CDR Maurice D. Fitzgerald 



Date Assumed Command 

14 Jan 1949 
17 Jan 1951 

03 Oct 1951 
Feb 1953 
Oct 1953 
Aug 1954 
Nov 1955 

20 Mar 1957 

21 Feb 1958 
06 Feb 1959 
13 Nov 1959 
23 Nov I960 
23 Feb 1962 
01 May 1963 
01 May 1964 
28 May 1965 

04 Apr 1966 
03 Jun 1966 
09 Aug 1966 

17 Oct 1967 

18 Dec 1968 
27 Sep 1969 
27 Mar 1970 

1971 



CDR George J. Fenzil, Jr. 
CDR P. M. Feran 
CDR Aimer C. Void 



Date Assumed Command 

03 Jun 1972 
1973 
21 Jun 1974 



Aircraft Assignment 



Type of Aircraft 



TBF-1 
TBF-1C 
TBM-3 
TBM-3E 
TBM-3Q 
TBM-3J 



AD-1 
AD-4 
AD-6 
AD-7 



11 



4B 



A4D-2 
A4D-2N/A-4C* 
A-4E 
A-4C 
A-4F 



Date Type First Received 

01 Mar 1943 
Oct 1943 
Sep 1944 
Jun 1945 
Oct 1946 
Mar 1947 
18 Jun 1949 
03 Oct 1949 
Jul 1954 
Dec 1956 
Nov 1957 
Mar 1959 
Jan 1962 
Jul 1963 
12 Sep 1966 
29 Dec 1967 



: The A4D-2N designation was changed to A-4C in 1962. 



Squadron AD-4Q Skyraiders at NAS San Diego, California, in December 1950 following their return from a Korean combat tour aboard Valley 
Forge (CV 45) (Courtesy Robert Lawson Collection). 



1 04 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



Major Overseas Deployments 



Date of 


Date of 


Air 




Type of 


Area of 


Departure 


Return 


Wing 


Carrier 


Aircraft 


Operation 


22 Aug 1943 


07 Sep 1943 


CVG-5 


CV 10 


TBF-1 


Pacific 


29 Sep 1943 


11 Oct 1943 


CVG-5 


CV 10 


TBF-1 


Pacific 


10 Nov 1943 


09 Dec 1943 


CVG-5 


CV 10 


TBF-1 C 


Pacific 


16 Jan 1944 


11 May 1944 


CVG-5 


CV 10 


TBF-1C 


Pacific 


03 Mar 1945 


19 Mar 1945 


CVG-5 


CV 13 


TBF-3 


Pacific 


31 Mar 1947 


16 Jun 1947 


CVG-5 


CV 38 


TBM-3E/Q/J 


WestPac 


01 May 1950 


01 Dec 1950 


CVG-5 


CV45 


AD-4/4Q 


WestPac/Korea 


16 May 1951 


29 Aug 1951 


CVG-19 


CV 37* 


AD-4/4Q/4W 


WestPac/Korea 


16 Jun 1952 


06 Feb 1953 


ATG-2 


CVA 9 


AD-4/4B 


WestPac/Korea 


01 Dec 1953 


12 Jul 1954 


ATG-2 


CVA 9 


AD-4/4B 


WestPac 


01 Apr 1955 


23 Nov 1955 


ATG-2 


CVA 47 


AD-6 


WestPac 


06 Apr 1957 


18 Sep 1957 


ATG-2 


CVA 19 


AD-6/7 


WestPac 


21 Aug 1958 


12 Jan 1959 


ATG-4 


CVA 20 


FJ-4B 


WestPac 


06 Mar I960 


11 Oct I960 


CVG-5 


CVA 14 


A4D-2 


WestPac 


10 May 1961 


15 Jan 1962 


CVG-5 


CVA 14 


A4D-2 


WestPac 


25 Jul 1962 


17 Sep 1962 


CVG-5 


CVA 64 


A4D-2 


SoLant/West Coast 


03 Jan 1963 


15 Jul 1963 


CVG-5 


CVA 14 


A-4C 


WestPac 


14 Apr 1964 


15 Dec 1964 


CVW-5 


CVA 14 


A-4E 


WestPac/Vietnam 


10 Dec 1965 


25 Aug 1966 


CVW-14 


CVA 61 


A-4E 


WestPac/Vietnam 


29 Apr 1967 


04 Dec 1967 


CVW-14 


CVA 64 


A-4C 


WestPac/Vietnam 


18 Jul 1968 


03 Mar 1969 


CVW-21 


CVA 19 


A-4F 


WestPac/Vietnam 


02 Aug 1969 


15 Apr 1970 


CVW-21 


CVA 19 


A-4F 


WestPac/Vietnam 


22 Oct 1970 


03 Jun 1971 


CVW-21 


CVA 19 


A-4F 


WestPac/Vietnam 


07 Jan 1972 


03 Oct 1972 


CVW-21 


CVA 19 


A-4F 


WestPac/Vietnam 


08 May 1973 


08 Jan 1974 


CVW-21 


CVA 19 


A-4F 


WestPac/IO 


18 Mar 1975 


20 Oct 1975 


CVW-21 


CV 19 


A-4F 


WestPac 



* See chronology entry for 16 May 1951. 



Air Wing Assignments 



Air Wing 


Tail Code 


Assignment Date 


CVG-5 


S* 


15 Feb 1943 


CVG-19 (X)f 




23 Apr 1951 


CVG-19 


B 


29 May 1951 


ATG-2 


W/NB:j: 


11 Sep 1951 


CVG-5 


NF 


01 Apr 1958 


ATG-4 


ND 


18 Aug 1958 


CVG-5/CVW-5§ 


NF 


19 Jan 1959 


CVW-14 


NK 


01 Jun 1965 


CVW-21 


NP 


05 Feb 1968 


* The tail code S was assij 


med to the air 


group and squadron on 12 



December 1946. 

t The squadron was assigned to Air Group 19 (X-ray), an air group 
that was organized in CONUS and then sent to Japan to replace the 
squadrons in Air Group 19 which had been operating in Korea 
aboard Princeton (CV 37). 

% ATG-2 was assigned the letter W as its tail code on 24 July 1956. 
The tail code was changed to NB in 1957. The effective date for this 
change was most likely the beginning of FY 58 (1 July 1957). 

§ CVG-5 became CVW-5 when Carrier Air Group designations were 
changed to Carrier Air Wings on 20 December 1963. 



Unit Awards Received 

Unit Award Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 



NAVE 


01 Jul 1948 


30 Jun 1949 




01 Jul 1949 


30 Jun 1950 




1965 


1966 


AFEM 


02 Aug 1964 


05 Aug 1964 




11 Aug 1964 


22 Sep 1964 




07 Oct 1964 


29 Oct 1964 




02 Nov 1964 


06 Nov 1964 




21 Nov 1964 


28 Nov 1964 




02 Dec 1968 


04 Dec 1968 




30 Oct 1969 






03 Jan 1970 


08 Jan 1970 




22 Feb 1970 


25 Feb 1970 


MUC 


21 Aug 1969 


31 Mar 1970 




20 Nov 1970 


07 Mar 1971 


NUC 


02 Aug 1964 


05 Aug 1964 




10 Jan 1966 


06 Aug 1966 




18 May 1967 


26 Nov 1967 




01 Aug 1968 


22 Feb 1969 




08 Feb 1972 


14 Sep 1972 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 1 05 



Unit Awards Received — Continued 



Unit Awards Received — Continued 



Unit Award 

RVNGC 

VNSM 



Inclusive Dates 

30 Mar 1972 
15 Jan 1966 

23 Feb 1966 

30 May 1966 

08 Jun 1967 

18 Jun 1967 
01 Aug 1967 
25 Sep 1967 

24 Oct 1967 
23 Aug 1968 
13 Sep 1968 

23 Oct 1968 
20 Dec 1968 

29 Jan 1969 

31 Aug 1969 
03 Oct 1969 

24 Nov 1969 
18 Jan 1970 

09 Mar 1970 

19 Nov 1970 
29 Dec 1970 

23 Jan 1971 
09 Mar 1971 
17 Apr 1971 
07 Feb 1972 

25 Mar 1972 



Covering Unit Award 
15 Jul 1972 
12 Feb 1966 
22 Mar 1966 

30 Jun 1966 
11 Jun 1967 
25 Jul 1967 

03 Sep 1967 
15 Oct 1967 
12 Nov 1967 

04 Sep 1968 
15 Oct 1968 
28 Nov 1968 

15 Jan 1969 

10 Feb 1969 
24 Sep 1969 
27 Oct 1969 
17 Dec 1969 

11 Feb 1970 
26 Mar 1970 

08 Dec 1970 
15 Jan 1971 

31 Jan 1971 
10 Apr 1971 
04 May 1971 

09 Mar 1972 
02 May 1972 



Unit Award 


Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 




11 May 1972 


01 Tun 1972 




12 Jun 1972 


14 Jul 1972 




24 Jul 1972 


17 Aue 1972 

_l_ / il Ug J. y 1 Ad 




27 Aug 1972 


14 Sen 1972 


PUC 


31 Aug 1943 






05 Oct 1943 


06 Oct 1943 

\J\j V-/ ^. I ±y^^} 




19 Nov 1943 


05 Dec 1943 




29 Jan 1944 


23 Feb 1944 




29 Mar 1944 


30 Anr 1944 


Campaign Medal 31 Aug 1943 




(Asiatic/Pacific) 05 Oct 1943 


06 Oct 1943 




19 Nov 1943 


04 Dec 1943 




29 Jan 1944 


08 Feb 1944 




16 Feb 1944 


17 Feb 1944 

-i / -i V- _i_ y ± ± 




21 Feb 1944 


22 Feb 1944 




30 Mar 1944 


01 Anr 1944 

\j a. ± xi-/ x A- y x x 




21 Apr 1944 


24 Apr 1944 




29 Apr 1944 


01 May 1944 




17 Mar 1945 


19 Mar 1945 


KSM 


27 Jun 1950 


03 Nov 1950 




29 May 1951 


16 Aug 1951 




26 Jul 1952 


25 Jan 1953 


UNSM 


27 Jun 1950 


03 Nov 1950 




29 May 1951 


16 Aug 1951 




26 Jul 1952 


25 Jan 1953 




A squadron A-4F Skyhawk piloted by lieutenant Duncan, 14 February 1975. 



1 06 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



SECOND VA-55 
Lineage 

Established as Attack Squadron FIFTY FIVE (VA-55) 
on 7 October 1983. 

Disestablished on 1 January 1991- The second 
squadron to be to be assigned the VA-55 designation. 

Squadron Insignia and Nickname 

The squadron adopted the insignia used by the first 

VA-55. It was approved 
by CNO on 12 May 
1983. Colors for the fly- 
ing seahorse were: alter- 
nating white and dark 
green square blocks 
outline the circular 
insignia; the upper half 
of the insignia was light 
blue and the lower half 
dark blue; the waves 
were highlighted in 
white; the seahorse was 
light gray-green with 
white and dark green 
markings; the wings 
were gold with dark green markings; the flames from 
the seahorse and rocket were red, outlined in yellow; 
and the rocket was white with a red tip. 
Nickname: Warhorses, 1983-1991. 

Chronology of Significant Events 

25 Mar 1986: Due to the initiation of hostile fire by 
Libya on 24 March, a squadron aircraft attacked a 
Libyan Nanuchka II class guided missile patrol boat 
with Rockeye cluster bombs. The Libyan vessel was 
damaged by the attack and then sunk by a Harpoon 
strike from VA-85, an Intruder squadron operating 
from Saratoga (CV 60). 




The squadron adopted the same 
flying seahorse insignia used by 
the first VA-55. 



14-15 Apr 1986: Six of the squadron's Intruders par- 
ticipated in an attack against Benina Airfield at 
Benghazi, Libya. Numerous parked aircraft were 
destroyed and the surrounding hangars, support facili- 
ties, aircraft aprons, and other airfield equipment and 
vehicles were damaged. These strikes were in 
response to the involvement of Libyan trained terror- 
ists in a specific incident (Berlin disco bombing in 
which American servicemen were killed). 

Aug-Sep 1989: Coral Sea (CV 43), with VA-55 
embarked, was ordered to operate off the coast of 
Lebanon following terrorist claims to have killed an 
American hostage, Lieutenant Colonel William R. 
Higgins, and the capture of Sheik Obeid from Lebanon 
by Israeli forces. The unstable situation in Lebanon 
ultimately led to the evacuation of the American 
Embassy. Squadron aircraft flew missions in support of 
the evacuation. 

22 Feb 1991: The squadron held a disestablishment 
ceremony at NAS Oceana. It was officially disestab- 
lished on 1 January 1991 ■ 



Home Port Assignment 



Location 

NAS Oceana 



Assignment Date 

07 Oct 1983 



Commanding Officers 



CDR Stan W. Bryant 
CDR Robin Y. Weber 
CDR Warren C. Chewning 
CDR Ralph E. Suggs 
CDR John W. Henson 



Date Assumed Command 

07 Oct 1983 
18 May 1985 

27 Jun 1986 
07 Dec 1987 

07 Jan 1989 



Aircraft Assignment 



Type of Aircraft 



A-6E 
KA-6D 



Major Overseas Deployments 



Date of 
Departure 

01 Oct 1985 
29 Sep 1987 
31 May 1989 



Date of 
Return 

19 May 1986 
28 Mar 1988 
30 Sep 1989 



Air 
Wing 

CVW-13 

CVW-13 
CVW-13 



Carrier 

CV43 
CV43 
CV43 



Type of 
Aircraft 

A-6E/KA-6D 

A-6E 

A-6E 



Date Type First Received 

25 Jan 1984 
Feb 1984 



Area of 
Operation 



Med 
Med 
Med 



Air Wing 

COMMATWING-1* 
CVW-13 



Air Wing Assignments 

Tail Code 



AK 



Assignment Date 

07 Oct 1983 
01 Mar 1984 



* Administratively assigned to Commander Medium Attack Wing 
ONE. 



Unit Awards Received 

Unit Award Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 

NAVE 01 Jan 1985 31 Dec 1985 

01 Jan 1986 31 Dec 1986 

NEM 20 Jan 1986 05 May 1986 

NUC 02 Oct 1985 19 May 1986 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 107 



Unit Awards Received — Continued Unit Awards Received — Continued 

Unit Award Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award Unit Award Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 

23 Mar 1986 17 Apr 1986 MUC 01 Jan 1985 31 Dec 1986 

AFEM 20 Jan 1986 05 May 1986 30 Mar 1988 30 Sep 1989 




A squadron A-6E Intruder; note the flying seahorse insignia on the tail. 



1 08 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 




The squadron's stylized insignia is 
an example of an excellent design 
that remained viable throughout 
the squadron 's 30 years of history 
and numerous aircraft changes. 



VA-56 

Lineage 

Established as Attack Squadron FIFTY SIX (VA-56) 
on 4 June 1956. 

Disestablished on 31 August 1986. The first 
squadron to be assigned the VA-56 designation. 

Squadron Insignia and Nickname 

The squadron's insignia was officially approved by 
CNO on 25 March 1957. A boomerang with a speed 

arrow and electron rings 
represented the 
squadron's capabilities 
as a jet attack squadron 
with modern electronic 
equipment. The circular 
insignia had a gold cir- 
cumference outlined in 
dark blue, with a white 
background; a yellow 
boomerang outlined in 
dark blue and with 
white racing strips; dark 
blue speed arrow and 
stars; and the electron 
rings and banner letter- 
ing were black with a white banner outlined in dark 
blue and gold. 

Nickname: Boomerangs, 1957-circa 1958. 

Champions, circa 1958-1986. 

Chronology of Significant Events 

25-31 Oct 1961: VA-56 participated in Operation 
Crosstie with HMS Victorious (R-38), conducting flight 
operations from the deck of Victorious to evaluate the 
compatibility of USN/RN aircraft, armament, and han- 
dling facilities. 

16 Jul- 15 Sep 1962: The squadron was embarked in 
Constellation (CVA 64) during her transit from the East 
Coast, via Cape Horn, to her new home port on the 
West Coast. 

Jul 1964: VA-56's A-4E Skyhawks participated in spe- 
cial Yankee Team operations, providing aerial refuel- 
ing support and experimenting with the tactic of 
employing A-4Es as armed escorts for the RF-8 and 
RA-3 reconnaissance aircraft flying missions over Laos 
and South Vietnam to detect Communist military pres- 
ence and operations. 

2-4 Aug 1964: During a Desoto Patrol mission 
(intelligence collection missions begun in 1962) 
Maddox (DD 731) was attacked by three motor torpe- 
do boats on 2 August off the coast of North Vietnam. 
Following this incident, the squadron flew sorties in 
support of the destroyers on Desoto Patrol. 



5 Aug 1964: VA-56's Skyhawks participated in Pierce 
Arrow, retaliatory strikes against the North Vietnamese. 
Along with other aircraft from CVW-5, they were part 
of the first sortie that struck the antiaircraft gun 
emplacements at the Vinh oil storage facility. Ninety 
percent of the complex was destroyed by the sorties 
flown against this facility. The squadron also partici- 
pated in strikes against the Ben Thuy naval base, 
resulting in the sinking and destruction of several tor- 
pedo boats. 

10-29 Oct, 1-5 and 22-28 Nov 1964: The squadron 
continued to participate in special Yankee Team oper- 
ations off the coast of Vietnam. 

7 Feb 1966: Lieutenant Commander Render Crayton 
was awarded the Silver Star (in absentia) for his 
actions while engaged in a combat mission over North 
Vietnam. 

10 Jun 1967: The squadron's commanding officer, 
Commander Sherman, failed to return from a strike in 
North Vietnam and is now listed as missing in action, 
presumed dead. 

Jan-Feb 1968: While embarked in Enterprise (CVAN 
65) and en route to Yankee Station, the carrier was 
ordered to the Sea of Japan for operations following 
the seizure of Pueblo (AGER 2) by the North Koreans 
on 23 January. 

19 Jun 1968: Lieutenant Commander Crater received 
the Silver Star for his actions in coordinating the suc- 
cessful night rescue of a downed F-4 crewman in 
North Vietnam. This action was part of the rescue 
operations in which Lieutenant Lassen, a helicopter 
pilot and not a member of VA-56, received the Medal 
of Honor for his exploits. 

1 Nov 1968: The squadron's last A-4E Skyhawk was 
transfered and training began for the transition to the 
A-7 Corsair II. 

May 1972: On 12 May Midway (CVA 41), with VA-56 
embarked, shifted its operations from the area of An 
Loc, South Vietnam to targets in North Vietnam. It par- 
ticipated in the mining and interdiction of Haiphong 
Harbor and North Vietnam's extensive coastal water- 
way system. This was an extension of operation 
Pocket Money which was initiated on 9 May by 
squadrons from Kitty Hawk (CVA 63) and Coral Sea 
(CVA 43). It also participated in operation Linebacker 
I, the concentration of heavy strikes against targets in 
North Vietnam to interdict the flow of supplies into 
the country and reduce its ability to prosecute the war. 
Linebacker I operations lasted until 22 October. 

29-30 Apr 1975: Midway, including elements of VA- 
56, participated in operation Frequent Wind, the evac- 
uation of American citizens from Saigon, South 
Vietnam. 

Aug 1976: VA-56, embarked in Midway, operated in 
Korean waters following the killing of two American 
officers in the DM2 by the North Koreans. 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 109 



Apr-May 1979: Midivay, with VA-56 embarked, 
deployed to the Gulf of Aden to relieve Constellation 
(CV 64) and maintain a U.S. carrier presence following 
the out break of fighting between North and South 
Yemen and the fall of the Shah of Iran. 

Oct 1979: As a response to anti-American demon- 
strations in Iran, Midway and its air wing, including 
VA-56, were ordered to deploy to the Indian Ocean 
for the second time in 1979- 

Nov 1979-Feb 1980: Following the Iranian seizure 
of the American Embassy in Teheran and the taking of 
American hostages on 4 November, Midway proceed- 
ed to the Gulf of Oman and remained on station until 
relieved in early February 1980. 

May-Jun 1980: Midway, with VA-56 embarked, 
operated off the coast of Korea due to the civil unrest 
in South Korea and the massacre of several hundred 
people in the town of Kwangju. 

May 1986: The squadron was reassigned to NAS 
Lemoore as a result of the change in CVW-5's compo- 
sition from A-7 and F-4 aircraft to FA-18A. It began the 
transfer of its personnel and aircraft in preparation for 
the disestablishment of the squadron on 31 August. 



Commanding Officers 




A flight of squadron F9F-8 Cougars that deployed aboard Bon 
Homme Richard's (CVA 31) 1957 WestPac cruise. 



Home Port Assignments 



NAS Miramar 
NAS Lemoore 

NS Yokosuka/ Midway (CV 41)"' 
NAS Lemoore 



Location Assignment Date 

04 Jun 1956 
30 Jun 1961 
30 Jun 1973 
May 1986 



* Under the Overseas Home Port Program, VA-56 and CVW-5 were 
permanently based aboard Midway (CV 41) and home ported with 
the carrier at Naval Station Yokosuka, Japan. The home port was 
officially changed on 30 June 1973. However, Midiv ay did not arrive 
in Japan until 5 October. Elements of VA-56, when not operating 
from Midway, were based ashore at NAF Atsugi or Misawa, Japan. 





Date Assumed Command 


CDR Richard O. Devine 


04 Jun 


1956 


CDR C. G. Mitchell 


31 Dec 


1957 


LCDR R. L. Walker 


10 Dec 


1958 


CDR R. McBride 


05 Dec 


1959 


CDR W. H. Hoover 


06 Jan 


1961 


CDR James A. Homyak 


31 Jan 


1962 


CDR Donald L. Campbell 


17 Mar 


1963 


CDR Wesley L. McDonald 


10 Feb 


1964 


CDR William G. Nealon 


23 Mar 


1965 


CDR Carl Ray Smith, Jr. 


28 Feb 


1966 


CDR Peter W. Sherman 


17 Mar 


1967 


CDR Ernest R. Seymour 


14 Jun 


1967 


CDR John L. Nicholson, Jr. 


31 Jul 


1968 


CDR Joseph E. Potosnak 


11 Dec 


1969 


CDR John W. Weed 


Oct 


1970 


CDR Neil L. Harvey 


21 Aug 


1971 


CDR Walter Lewis Chatham 


02 Aug 


1972 


CDR Charles G. Andres 


03 Aug 


1973 


CDR Ronald N. Artim 


30 Jul 


1974 


CDR Gary L. Starbird 


26 Sep 


1975 


CDR Robert E. Smith 


19 Dec 


1976 


CDR Roger P. Flower 


30 Mar 


1978 


CDR Leon C. Bryant 


19 Jun 


1979 


CDR Charles S. Mitchell IV 


22 Aug 


1980 


CDR Edwin E. Shipe III 


28 Dec 


1981 


CDR Garold S. McDaniel 


22 Mar 


1983 


CDR Paul R. Statskey 


25 Jul 


1984 


CDR J. R. Hutchison 


24 Jan 


1986 



Aircraft Assignment 



Type of Aircraft 



F9F-3 

F9F-8B 

F9F-8 



FJ-4B 



A4D-1 

A4D-2/A-4B" 
A-4E 
A-4C 
A-4E 



A-7B 
A-7A 
A-7E 



Date Type First Received 

Jun 1956 
Jul 1956 
Oct 1956 
29 May 1958 

23 Dec 1958 
Apr 1959 

15 Jul 1963 
23 Jul 1966 
18 Aug 1967 
Jan 1969 
Mar 1973 

24 Apr 1977 



' The A4D-2 designation was changed to A-4B in 1962. 



1 1 0 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 




A squadron A-4C Skyhawk with Enterprise markings, 1966. 



Major Overseas Deployments 



Date of 


Date of 


Air 




Type of 


Area of 


Departure 


Return 


Wing 


Carrier 


Aircraft 


Operation 


12 Jul 1957 


09 Dec 1957 


CVG-5 


CVA 31 


F9F-8 


WestPac 


06 Mar I960 


10 Oct I960 


CVG-5 


CVA 14 


A4D-2 


WestPac 


10 May 1961 


15 Jan 1962 


CVG-5 


CVA 14 


A4D-2 


WestPac 


03 Jan 1963 


15 Jul 1963 


CVG-5 


CVA 14 


A-4B 


WestPac 


14 Apr 1964 


15 Dec 1964 


CVW-5 


CVA 14 


A-4E 


WestPac/Vietnam 


28 Sep 1965 


13 May 1966 


CVW-5 


CVA 14 


A-4E 


WestPac/Vietnam 


19 Nov 1966 


06 Jul 1967 


CVW-9 


CVAN 65 


A-4C 


WestPac/Vietnam 


03 Jan 1968 


18 Jul 1968 


CVW-9 


CVAN 65 


A-4E 


WestPac/Vietnam 


14 Oct 1969 


01 Jun 1970 


CVW-2 


CVA 61 


A-7B 


WestPac/Vietnam 


16 Apr 1971 


06 Nov 1971 


CVW-5 


CVA 41 


A-7B 


WestPac/Vietnam 


10 Apr 1972 


03 Mar 1973 


CVW-5 


CVA 41 


A-7B 


WestPac/Vietnam 


11 Sep 1973 


05 Oct 1973 


CVW-5 


CVA 41 


A-7A 


WestPac* 


26 Nov 1973 


22 Dec 1973 


CVW-5 


CVA 41 


A-7A 


WestPac 


29 Jan 1974 


06 Mar 1974 


CVW-5 


CVA 41 


A-7A 


WestPac 


18 Oct 1974 


20 Dec 1974 


CVW-5 


CVA 41 


A-7A 


WestPac 


13 Jan 1975 


18 Feb 1975 


CVW-5 


CVA 41 


A-7A 


WestPac 


31 Mar 1975 


29 May 1975 


CVW-5 


CVA 41 


A-7A 


WestPac 


04 Oct 1975 


19 Dec 1975 


CVW-5 


CV41 


A-7A 


WestPac/IO 


13 Mar 1976 


26 Apr 1976 


CVW-5 


CV41 


A-7A 


WestPac 


19 May 1976 


22 Jun 1976 


CVW-5 


CV 41 


A-7A 


WestPac 


09 Jul 1976 


04 Aug 1976 


CVW-5 


CV41 


A-7A 


WestPac 


01 Nov 1976 


17 Dec 1976 


CVW-5 


CV41 


A-7A 


WestPac 


11 Jan 1977 


01 Mar 1977 


CVW-5 


CV 41 


A-7A 


WestPac 


19 Apr 1977 


02 Sep 1977 


CVW-5 


CV41 


A-7E 


WestPact 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS — Volume I 111 



Major Overseas Deployments — Continued 



LJtAlti OJ 


LJClie OJ 






Type of 


Area of 


Departure 


Return 


Wing 


Carrier 


Aircraft 


Operation 


27 Sep 1977 


21 Dec 1977 


CVW-5 


CV 41 


A-7E 


WestPac/IO 


11 Apr 1978 


23 May 1978 


CVW-5 


CV 41 


A-7E 


WestPac 


09 Nov 1978 


23 Dec 1978 


CVW-5 


CV 41 


A-7E 


WestPac 


11 Jan 1979 


20 Feb 1979 


CVW-5 


CV 41 


A-7E 


WestPac 


07 Apr 1979 


18 Jun 1979 


CVW-5 


CV 41 


A-7E 


IO 


20 Aug 1979 


14 Sep 1979 


CVW-5 


CV 41 


A-7E 


WestPac 


30 Sep 1979 


20 Feb 1980 


CVW-5 


CV 41 


A-7E 


IO 


14 Jul 1980 


26 Nov 1980 


CVW-5 


CV 41 


A-7E 


WestPac/IO 


23 Feb 1981 


05 Jun 1981 


CVW-5 


CV 41 


A-7E 


WestPac/IO 


26 Jun 1981 


16 Jul 1981 


CVW-5 


CV 41 


A-7E 


WestPac 


03 Sep 1981 


06 Oct 1981 


CVW-5 


CV 41 


A-7E 


WestPac 


26 Apr 1982 


18 Jun 1982 


CVW-5 


CV 41 


A-7E 


WestPac 


14 Sep 1982 


11 Dec 1982 


CVW-5 


CV 41 


A-7E 


NorPac/WestPac 


02 Jun 1983 


13 Aug 1983 


CVW-5 


CV41 


A-7E 


WestPac 


25 Oct 1983 


11 Dec 1983 


CVW-5 


CV 41 


A-7E 


WestPac 


28 Dec 1983 


23 May 1984 


CVW-5 


CV41 


A-7E 


IO 


15 Oct 1984 


12 Dec 1984 


CVW-5 


CV41 


A-7E 


WestPac 


01 Feb 1985 


14 Oct 1985 


CVW-5 


CV 41 


A-7E 


IO/WestPac 


15 Nov 1985 


12 Dec 1985 


CVW-5 


CV41 


A-7E 


WestPac 


17 Jan 1986 


30 Mar 1986 


CVW-5 


CV41 


A-7E 


WestPac 



* The squadron and Midway (CVA 41) arrived at their new home port, Naval Station Yokosuka, Japan. Since the squadron was permanently for- 
ward deployed all future deployments for the squadron will cover only those operations outside the home waters of Japan. The squadron 
returned to CONUS in May 1986, ending its overseas basing assignment. 

t The squadron was shorebased at NAS Cubi Point during the latter part of April to August 1977 undergoing transitional training in the A-7E. 



Air Wing Assignments 

Air Wing Tail Code Assignment Date 

CVG-5/CVW-5* S/NFf 04 Jun 1956 

CVW-9 NG 01 Jul 1966 

COMFAIRALAMEDA Oct 1968 

CVW-2 NE 09 Jun 1969 

CVW-5 NF 01 Jun 1970 



• Carrier Air Groups were redesignated Carrier Air Wings on 20 
December 1963, hence, CVG-5 became CVW-5. 

t CVG-5's tail code was changed from S to NF in 1957. The effective 
date was most likely the beginning of FY 58 (1 July 1957). 

Unit Awards Received 

Unit Award Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 



NAVE 


01 Jul 1959 


30 Jun I960 




01 Jul 1977 


31 Dec 1978 


AFEM 


26 Sep 1961 


30 Sep 1961 




27 Sep 1961 


01 Oct 1961 




10 Oct 1961 


14 Oct 1961 




16 Oct 1961 


17 Oct 1961 




02 Aug 1964 


05 Aug 1964 




11 Aug 1964 


22 Sep 1964 




07 Oct 1964 


29 Oct 1964 




02 Nov 1964 


06 Nov 1964 



Unit Awards Received — Continued 



Unit Award Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 





21 Nov 1964 


28 Nov 1964 




10 Jan 1970 


13 Jan 1970 




12 Apr 1970 


13 Apr 1970 




29 Apr 1975 


30 Apr 1975 


HSM 


29 Apr 1975 


30 Apr 1975 


MUC 


27 Oct 1969 


12 May 1970 




07 May 1971 


28 Oct 1971 




01 Jan 1978 


20 May 1979 




13 Nov 1979 


08 Feb 1980 




27 Jul 1982 


01 May 1984 


NEM 


15 Apr 1979 


06 Jun 1979 




21 Nov 1979 


07 Feb 1980 




19 Aug 1980 


13 Nov 1980 




12 Mar 1981 


19 May 1981 


NUC 


02 Aug 1964 


05 Aug 1964 




18 Dec 1966 


20 Jan 1967 




14 Jan 1968 


26 Jun 1968 




29 Apr 1975 


30 Apr 1975 




01 Jan 1978 


30 Jun 1979 


PUC 


30 Apr 1972 


09 Feb 1973 


RVNGC 


30 Mar 1972 


15 Jul 1972 


VNSM 


05 Nov 1965 


01 Dec 1965 




22 Dec 1965 


14 Jan 1966 




22 Jan 1966 


16 Feb 1966 



1 1 2 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



Unit Awards Received — Continued 



Unit Awards Received — Continued 



Unit Award 



Inclusive Dates 

06 Mar 1966 
10 Apr 1966 
17 Dec 1966 
31 Jan 1967 

20 Mar 1967 
28 Apr 1967 
04 Jun 1967 

21 Feb 1968 
26 Mar 1968 
11 Jun 1972 
16 Jul 1972 

23 Aug 1972 
23 Oct 1972 
03 Dec 1972 
31 Dec 1972 
04 Jan 1973 
30 Apr 1968 
30 May 1968 

07 Jan 1969 
15 Feb 1969 



Covering Unit Award 
31 Mar 1966 

21 Apr 1966 

17 Jan 1967 
03 Mar 1967 

18 Apr 1967 
26 May 1967 

21 Jun 1967 
17 Mar 1968 
24 Apr 1968 
07 Jul 1972 
13 Aug 1972 
10 Sep 1972 
23 Nov 1972 

22 Dec 1972 

24 Jan 1973 
21 May 1968 
27 Jun 1968 
30 Jan 1969 
16 Mar 1969 



Unit Award 



Inclusive Dates 

04 Apr 1969 

16 Nov 1969 

17 Dec 1969 
29 Jan 1970 
27 Feb 1970 

16 Apr 1970 

17 May 1971 
29 Jun 1971 

31 Jul 1971 

26 Sep 1971 
01 May 1972 

11 Jun 1972 
16 Jul 1972 
23 Aug 1972 

23 Oct 1972 
03 Dec 1972 
31 Dec 1972 

04 Jan 1973 

03 Feb 1973 



Covering Unit Award 

17 Apr 1969 
07 Dec 1969 

12 Jan 1970 

18 Feb 1970 
30 Mar 1970 
14 May 1970 

09 Jun 1971 
20 Jul 1971 

17 Aug 1971 
11 Oct 1971 
01 Jun 1972 
07 Jul 1972 

13 Aug 1972 

10 Sep 1972 
23 Nov 1972 
22 Dec 1972 

24 Jan 1973 
09 Feb 1973 




A flight of squadron A-7 Corsair Us, 1973- 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 113 



SECOND VA-64 

Lineage 

Established as Attack Squadron SIXTY FOUR (VA- 
64) on 1 July 1961. 

Disestablished on 7 November 1969- The second 
squadron to be assigned the VA-64 designation. 

Squadron Insignia and Nickname 

The squadron's insignia was approved by CNO on 
26 December 1961. Colors for the insignia were: a 




18 Nov-5 Dec 1962: On 18 November, in an unusu- 
al at-sea evolution, VA-64 switched places with VA-34 
and embarked in Enterprise (CVAN 65). The comple- 
ments of both squadrons were lifted between carriers 
by helicopters. Following the transfer the squadron 
continued to operate in the Caribbean as part of the 
Cuban quarantine. 

Mar 1964: The squadron conducted operations in 
the vicinity of Cyprus during a conflict between 
Turkish and Greek Cypriots. 

31 Jul-3 Oct 1964: The squadron participated in 
operation Sea Orbit, the first circumnavigation of the 
world by a nuclear task force. The sixty-five day voy- 
age was accomplished without logistic replenishment. 
The squadron participated in numerous air power 
demonstrations during the voyage. 

8 Jun 1967: VA-64's aircraft were part of an Air Wing 
6 strike group that was launched to defend Liberty 
(AGTR 5) when she came under attack by the Israelis. 
When word was received that the attack had been a 
mistake on the part of the Israelis the aircraft were 
recalled. 

Nov 1968: The squadron provided an A-4C, two 
pilots and seven enlisted personnel to augment the 
VSF-1 detachment aboard Wasp. The detachment pro- 
vided the ship with a day time air defense capability. 




Home Port Assignments 



Location 



NAS Oceana 
NAS Cecil Field 



Assignment Date 

01 Jul 1961 
15 Feb 1965 



The Black Lancers' insignia. 

white background outlined in black; the knight's hel- 
met was black with white markings and red plumage; 
and the scrolls had a white background, outlined in 
black, with black lettering. 

Nickname: Black Lancers, circa 1961-1969- 

Chronology of Significant Events 

17 Feb-17 Jun 1962: VA-64 Det 48, formed to pro- 
vide an air defense capability for Carrier Anti- 
submarine Air Groups, deployed aboard Wasp (CVS 
18) for a North Atlantic cruise. The detachment's des- 
ignation was changed to VA-64 Det 18B in April 1962. 
Lieutenant Commander E. D. Herbert was officer-in- 
charge of the detachment during the cruise. 

Oct- 18 Nov 1962: The squadron was embarked in 
Independence (CVA 62) operating in the Caribbean 
Sea in support of the Cuban quarantine. 



Commanding Officers 



LCDR Paul A. Anderson 
CDR R. A. Uhwat 
CDR F. E. Babineau 
CDR David E. Scherrer 
CDR Max D. Barr 
CDR James E. Kneale 
CDR Keith C. Spayde, Jr. 
CDR Jerald W. Bucklin 
CDR Stuart T. Meredith 



Date Assumed Command 

01 Jul 1961 
31 May 1962 
20 Jun 1963 
28 Jun 1964 
12 Jun 1965 
07 Jun 1966 
12 Jun 1967 
29 May 1968 
1969 



Aircraft Assignment 



Type of Aircraft 



A4D-2N/A-4C* 
A4D-2t 



Date Type First Received 

18 Jul 1961 
28 Dec 1961 



* The A4D-2N was redesignated A-4C in 1962. 
t The A4D-2 was used by VA-64 Detachment 48. 



1 1 4 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



Major Overseas Deployments — Continued 



Date of 


Date of 


Air 




Type of Area of 


D&pa vtu ve 


RctUYYl 


VPing 


CdTvieT 


Aircraft Operation 


06 Feb 1963 


04 Sep 1963 


CVG-6 


CVAN 65 


A-4C Med 


08 Feb 1964 


03 Oct 1964 


CVW-6 


CVAN 65 


A-4C Med/World Cruise 


30 Nov 1965 


10 Jul 1966 


CVW-6 


CVA 66 


A-4C Med 


10 Jan 1967 


20 Sep 1967 


CVW-6 


CVA 66 


A-4C Med 


30 Apr 1968 


27 Jan 1969 


CVW-7 


CVA 62 


A-4C Med 


03 Sep 1969 


09 Oct 1969 


CVW-7 


CVA 62 


A-4C NorLant 




Air Wing Assignments 


* CVG-6 was 


redesignated CVW-6 when all Carrier Air Group (CVG) 








designations 


were changed to Carrier Air Wings (CVW) on 20 


Air Wing 


Tail Code 


Assignment Date 


December 1963- Sometime in the latter part of 1962 CVG-6's tail 


AF 


code was changed from AF to AE. 


CVG-6 


01 Jul 1961 






CVG-1 


AB 


08 Feb 1962 






COMFAIRNORFOLK 


31 Jul 1962 




Unit Awards Received 


CVG-7 


AG 


01 Oct 1962 






CVG-6/CVW-6" 


AF/AE* 


18 Nov 1962 


Unit Award 


Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 


CVW-7 


AG 


16 Oct 1967 


AFEM 


24 Oct 1962 20 Nov 1962 




A squadron A-4C Skyhawk is prepared for launch from America (CVA 66) in 1965. 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 115 



SECOND VA-65 

Lineage 

Established as Torpedo Squadron SEVENTY FOUR 
(VT-74) on 1 May 1945. 

Redesignated Attack Squadron TWO B (VA-2B) on 
15 November 1946. 

Redesignated Attack Squadron TWENTY FIVE (VA- 
25) on 1 September 1948. 

Redesignated Attack Squadron SIXTY FIVE (VA-65) 
on 1 July 1959. 

Diesestablished on 31 March 1993- The second 
squadron to be assigned the VA-65 designation. 

Squadron Insignia and Nickname 

The squadron's first insignia was approved by CNO 




The beast was the squadron's first insignia. It was designed by the 
squadron when they were flying the SB2C, nicknamed the "Beast. " 



on 9 August 1945. During the time when the 
squadron's insignia was approved, VT-74 was flying 
the SB2C which was nicknamed the Beast. Conse- 
quently, the squadron's insignia took on the shape of 
a beast riding a torpedo. There is no record of the col- 
ors used for this insignia. 





Following the squadron 's redes- 
ignation as an attack squadron, 
the knight chess piece insignia 
was approved. 



The squadron 's last insignia, the 
prowling tiger, was in use for over 
40 years and was a well-known 
insignia in naval aviation. 



After VT-74 was redesignated VA-2B, it continued to 
use the old insignia until 17 April 1947 when CNO 
approved a new insignia for the squadron. The 
insignia adopted by VA-2B reflected the squadron's 
new attack mission. The horsehead chess piece was 
designed to relate the squadron's power to that of a 
medieval knight and the fleur-de-lis represented 
integrity. Colors for the insignia were: a yellow back- 
ground; red scroll with yellow lettering, black banner 
with a black and white pole; white knight with a yel- 
low collar; a white lightning bolt; and the Fleur-de-lis 
was red with a black band. 

The Knight insignia continued as the official insignia 
for the squadron following its redesignation to VA-25 
on 1 September 1948. A new insignia for VA-25 was 
approved by CNO on 4 April 1950. The new insignia 
was a front view of a tiger on the prowl. Colors were: 
yellow background; brown tiger with green eyes, and 
white teeth, whiskers and claws; and a red tongue and 
mouth. When VA-25 was redesignated VA-65 in 1959 
the tiger insignia was retained and remained VA-65 's 
insignia until its disestablishment. 

Nickname: Tigers, 1950-1993. 

Chronology of Significant Events 

7 Nov 1945: Squadron embarked in Midway (CVB 
41) for her shakedown cruise. The squadron had origi- 
nally been established for the purpose of being part of 
the Midway Air Group. 

Jul-Aug 1948: The squadron participated in operation 
CAMID III, close air support for amphibious landings. 
During this operation the squadron became the first VA 
unit in the Atlantic Fleet to fire Tiny Tim rockets. 

1-20 Jun 1961: Following a four-hour notice for an 
emergency deployment, VA-65 deployed to the 
Caribbean Sea aboard Intrepid (CVA 11) due to unset- 
tled conditions in the Dominican Republic following 
the assassination of General Trujillo. 

3 Aug- 11 Oct 1962: VA-65 was aboard for the maid- 
en cruise of the world's first nuclear powered aircraft 
carrier, Enterprise (CVAN 65), during her deployment 
to the Mediterranean Sea. 

19 Oct-6 Dec 1962: VA-65 was back at sea aboard 
Enterprise one week after returning from a Med cruise 
and headed for the Caribbean Sea due to the Cuban 
missile crisis. The squadron participated in the naval 
quarantine of Cuba. 

31 Jul- 3 Oct 1964: The squadron participated in 
Operation Sea Orbit as part of CVW-6 aboard Enter- 
prise. This operation was an around-the-world voyage 
of a task force composed of all nuclear powered 
ships. The sixty-five day cruise was accomplished 
without logistic support, which demonstrated the 
capability of these ships to steam to any area in the 
world and project power without support. 

15 Jun 1966: VA-65 conducted its first combat sortie. 



1 1 6 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



1 Jul 1966: VA-65's aircraft joined other CVW-15 air- 
craft in attacking and sinking three North Vietnamese 
patrol vessels that were approaching Coontz (DLG 9) 
at high speed. 

25-31 Oct 1966: Due to the inclement weather, the 
squadron's all-weather A-6As were used to the maxi- 
mum. During this period VA-65 flew 37 percent of all 
Yankee Team sorties in North Vietnam. 

29 Jul 1967: VA-65 personnel were among those 
killed or injured when a flight deck explosion and fire 
occurred on Forrestal (CVA 59) during operations on 
Yankee Station. 

Jul-Dec 1967: Due to the fire on the Forrestal and 
her departure from combat duty on Yankee Station, 
VA-65 sent a detachment (Det-64) to the Constellation 
(CVA 64) to augment VA-196 for the remainder of the 
ship's 1967 combat tour in Vietnam. 

May-Jun 1969: Kitty Hawk (CVA 63), with VA-65 
aboard, relieved Enterprise in the Sea of Japan. 
Enterprise had been ordered to operate in the area as 
a result of the shoot down in April of an unarmed 
Navy EC- 121 reconnaissance aircraft by North Korean 
MiGs. VA-65 conducted operations in the area during 
this two month period. 

9 Sep-5 Oct 1970: VA-65 operated from 
Independence (CVA 62) on Bravo Station off the coast 
of Israel as a result of the crisis in Jordan and the 
hijacking of three commerical airliners. 

7 Oct-3 Nov & 9-21 Nov 1973: After the outbreak of 
the Yom Kippur War (Arab-Israeli War of 1973), VA-65 
operated from Independence in an area southwest of 
Crete and provided tanker support to fighter aircraft 
escorting Air Force One on Secretary of State 
Kissinger's mission to Israel as well as tanker support 
for A-4 Skyhawks being ferried to Israel from the 
United States. 

4-22 Aug 1974: Independence, with VA-65 
embarked, operated between Crete and Cyprus in 
response to the crisis in Cyprus and the death of the 
American Ambassador to Cyprus at the hands of anti- 
American demonstrators. 

12 Mar 1975: During exercises in the Caribbean Sea, 
VA-65 conducted cross deck operations with HMS Ark 
Royal. 

Nov 1975: During the NATO exercise Ocean Safari 
in the North Altantic, the squadron once again con- 
ducted cross deck operations with HMS Ark Royal. 

15 Apr 1980: VA-65 deployed aboard Dwigbt D. 
Eisenhower (CVN 69) to the Indian Ocean after 
Iranians took the American Embassy personnel 
hostage. 

22 Dec 1980: VA-65 returned from its deployment 
that included only one port visit of five days in dura- 
tion and a total of 246 days at sea. 

24 Jun 1982: VA-65 provided support during the 
evacuation of American and foreign civilians from 
Beiruit, Lebanon. 



7 Mar 1985: VA-65 and Dwight D. Eisenhower cut 
short a port visit to Palma, Spain and departed on a 
high speed transit to the Eastern Mediterranean due to 
the increased tension in Lebanon. The squadron oper- 
ated in the vicinity of Lebanon until early April. 

1 Sep 1986: VA-65 was assigned to CVW-13 and 
Coral Sea (CV 43) as part of the Coral Sea Concept 
whereby two A-6 Intruder squadrons would be part of 
the air wing and share a common aircraft maintenance 
department. The concept was intended to reduce the 
number of personnel needed to support the squadrons. 

29 Sep 1987: VA-65 deployed to the Mediterranean 
Sea aboard Coral Sea as the first Night Vision Goggle 
(NVG) capable A-6 squadron. 

Aug-Sep 1989: Coral Sea (CV 43), with VA-65 
embarked, was ordered to operate off the coast of 
Lebanon following terrorist claims to have killed an 
American hostage, Lieutenant Colonel William R. 
Higgins, and the capture of Sheik Obeid from Lebanon 
by Israeli forces. The unstable situation in Lebanon 
ultimately led to the evacuation of the American 
Embassy. Squadron aircraft flew missions in support of 
the evacuation. 

Jan-Feb 1990: The squadron was embarked in 
Abraham lincoln (CVN 72) for her shakedown cruise. 

Jan-Feb 1991: The squadron participated in 
Operation Desert Storm, the liberation of Kuwait from 
Iraqi forces. Squadron aircraft struck targets in Iraq, 
Iraqi forces in Kuwait, and Iraqi naval units. The 
squadron claimed the destruction (sinking) of 22 Iraqi 
naval vessels during the conflict. 

Apr-May 1991: VA-65 participated in Operation 
Provide Comfort, flying close air support sorties over 
Northern Iraq in support of the 24th Marine 
Expeditionary Unit's mission to aid the Kurdish 
refugees in Iraq. 

26 Mar 1993: The squadron held a disestablishment 
ceremony at NAS Oceana, it was officially disestab- 
lished on 31 March 1993. 




A rare photo of a squadron SB2C in post-World War II markings. 
What is even more interesting is the fact that a torpedo squadron 
was assigned an aircraft designed primarily as a bomber. 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



117 



Home Port Assignments 



Commanding Officers — Continued 



Location 

NAAF Otis Field, Camp Edwards 

NAS Norfolk 

NAAS Charlestown 

NAAS Oceana 

CGAS Elizabeth City 

NAAS Oceana/NAS Oceana* 



Assignment Date 
01 May 1945 
Oct 1945 
Feb 1946 
Jun 1946 
20 Nov 1950 
20 Sep 1951 



* NAAS Oceana was redesignated NAS Oceana on 1 April 1952. 



Commanding Officers 





Date Assumed Command 


LCDR Howard U. Bush 


01 May 


1945 


LCDR John J. Hilton 


05 Oct 


1945 


LCDR J. C. Micheel 


16 Nov 


1946 


CDR K. W. Caffey 


09 Apr 


1947 


CDR Arthur B. Sweet 


11 Jun 


1948 


LCDR William W. Jones (Acting) 


07 Sep 


1949 


CDR Arthur M. Ershler 


10 Nov 


1949 


CDR Ray C. Tylutki 


31 May 


1951 


LCDR Jean C. Mills 


27 Oct 


1952 


CDR Thomas H. Stetson 


Sep 


1953 


CDR Roy P. Gee 


Feb 


1955 


CDR William G. Weber 


Apr 


1956 


LCDR John R. O Neil, Jr. 


25 Nov 


1957 


CDR Leland B. Cornell 


17 Dec 


1957 


CDR William D. McNair 


11 Sep 


1959 


CDR Maurice O. Rishel 


16 Nov 


I960 


CDR W. F. Offtermatt 


23 Oct 


1961 


CDR Harry W. Swinburne, Jr. 


19 Oct 


1962 


CDR William J. Whitney 


04 Jul 


1963 


CDR Norman E. Larsen 


01 May 


1964 


CDR William N. Small 


30 Nov 


1964 


CDR Robert C. Mandeville 


30 Jun 


1966 


CDR Frank Cramblet 


Jun 


1967 


CDR St. Clair Smith 


14 Jun 


1968 


CDR Michael F. Andrassy 


16 Jun 


1969 


CDR Peter B. Easton 


19 Jun 


1970 


CDR William P. Lyons 


10 Jun 


1971 


CDR Thomas E. Shanahan 


23 Jun 


1972 


CDR Paul F. Hollandsworth 


29 Jun 


1973 


CDR Charles D. Hawkins, Jr. 


25 Jun 


1974 


CDR George H. Strohsahl, Jr. 


27 Jun 


1975 


CDR Donald L. Hahn 


14 Sep 


1976 


CDR William R. Needham 


16 Dec 


1977 


CDR Herbert A. Browne, Jr. 


23 Mar 


1979 


CDR Joseph W. Prueher 


20 Jun 


1980 


CDR Dickey P. Davis 


25 Sep 


1981 


CDR Robert E. Houser 


07 Dec 


1982 


CDR William J. Fallon 


03 May 


1984 


CDR Robert L. Leitzel 


06 Sep 


1985 


CDR Stephen H. Baker 


13 Feb 


1987 


CDR Michael C. Vogt 


12 Aug 


1988 



CDR Ralph H. Coon 
CDR Thomas J. Ross 
CDR James K. Stark, Jr. 



Date Assumed Command 

23 Feb 1990 
12 Aug 1991 
04 Sep 1992 




Squadron AD-6 Skyraiders are directed to the catapult aboard 
Intrepid (CVA 11) in 1961. 



Aircraft Assignment 



Type of Aircraft 



SBW-4E 
SB2C-4E 
SB2C-5 



TBM-3E 



SBW-5 



SNJ-4 



AD-1 
AD-4 

AD-6/A-1H* 



A-6A 
A-6B 
KA-6D 
A-6E 



Date Type First Received 

May 1945 
Jul 1945 
Feb 1946 
Feb 1946 
1946 
Jul 1947 
Jul 1947 
01 Dec 1949 
Oct 1953 
Mar 1965 
Dec 1968 
1971t 
03 May 1972 



* AD-6 designation changed in 1962 to A-1H. 

t The KA-6D was received sometime between April and June 1971. 




A squadron A-6A Intruder inflight with a load of bombs, 1970. 



1 1 8 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



Major Overseas Deployments 



Date of 


Date of 


Air 




Type of 


Area of 


Departure 


Return 


Wing 


Carrier 


Aircraft 


Operation 


29 Oct 1947 


11 Mar 1948 


CVBG-1 


CVB 41 


AD-l 


Med 


03 May 1949 


25 Sep 1949 


CVG-2 


CVB 43 


AD-1 


Med 


10 Jan 1951 


18 May 1951 


CVG-6 


CVB 42 


AD-4 


Med 


09 Jan 1952 


05 May 1952 


CVG-6 


CVB 41 


AD-4 


Med 


26 Aug 1952 


08 Oct 1952 


CVG-6 


CVB 41 


AD-4 


NorLant 


01 Dec 1952 


19 May 1953 


CVG-6 


CVA41 


AD-4 


Med 


04 Jan 1954 


04 Aug 1954 


CVG-6 


CVA41 


AD-6 


Med 


09 Oct 1955 


30 Apr 1956 


CVG-6 


CVA 39 


AD-6 


Med 


03 Sep 1957 


21 Oct 1957 


CVG-6 


CVA 11 


AD-6 


NorLant 


12 Feb 1959 


30 Aug 1959 


CVG-6 


CVA 11 


AD-6 


Med 


04 Aug I960 


17 Feb 1961 


CVG-6 


CVA 11 


AD-6 


Med 


03 Aug 1961 


01 Mar 1962 


CVG-6 


CVA 11 


AD-6 


Med 


03 Aug 1962 


11 Oct 1962 


CVG-6 


CVAN 65 


A-1H 


Med 


19 Oct 1962 


06 Dec 1962 


CVG-6 


CVAN 65 


A-1H 


Carib 


06 Feb 1963 


04 Sep 1963 


CVG-6 


CVAN 65 


A-1H 


Med 


08 Feb 1964 


03 Oct 1964 


CVW-6 


CVAN 65 


A-1H 


Med/World Cruise 


12 May 1966 


03 Dec 1966 


CVW-15 


CVA 64 


A-6A 


WestPac/Vietnam 


06 Jun 1967 


15 Sep 1967 


CVW-17 


CVA 59 


A-6A 


WestPac/Vietnam 


30 Dec 1968 


04 Sep 1969 


CVW-11 


CVA 63 


A-6A/B 


WestPac/Vietnam 


23 Jun 1970 


31 Jan 1971 


CVW-7 


CVA 62 


A-6A 


Med 


16 Sep 1971 


16 Mar 1972 


CVW-7 


CVA 62 


A-6A/KA-6D 


NorLant/Med 


21 Jun 1973 


19 Jan 1974 


CVW-7 


CV62 


A-6E/KA-6D 


Med 


19 Jul 1974 


21 Jan 1975 


CVW-7 


CV62 


A-6E/KA-6D 


Med 


15 Oct 1975 


05 May 1976 


CVW-7 


CV62 


A-6E/KA-6D 


NorLant/Med 


31 Mar 1977 


21 Oct 1977 


CVW-7 


CV62 


A-6E/KA-6D 


Med 


16 Jan 1979 


13 Jul 1979 


CVW-7 


CVN 69 


A-6E/KA-6D 


Med 


15 Apr 1980 


22 Dec 1980 


CVW-7 


CVN 69 


A-6E/KA-6D 


IO 


20 Aug 1981 


07 Oct 1981 


CVW-7 


CVN 69 


A-6E/KA-6D 


NorLant 


05 Jan 1982 


13 Jul 1982 


CVW-7 


CVN 69 


A-6E/KA-6D 


Med 


27 Apr 1983 


02 Dec 1983 


CVW-7 


CVN 69 


A-6E/KA-6D 


Med 


08 May 1984 


20 Jun 1984 


CVW-7 


CVN 69 


A-6E/KA-6D 


Carib/NorLant 


10 Oct 1984 


08 May 1985 


CVW-7 


CVN 69 


A-6E/KA-6D 


Med 


08 Jul 1985 


22 Aug 1985 


CVW-7 


CVN 69 


A-6E/KA-6D 


Carib 


29 Sep 1987 


28 Mar 1988 


CVW-13 


CV43 


A-6E 


Med 


31 May 1989 


30 Sep 1989 


CVW-13 


CV43 


A-6E 


Med 


28 Dec 1990 


28 Jun 1991 


CVW-8 


CVN 71 


A-6E 


Med/Red Sea/ 












Persian Gulf 




A KA-6Dfrom VA-65 refuels an RA-5C Vigilante, 1971. 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 119 



Air Wing Assignments 



Unit Awards — Continued 



Air Wing 


Tail Code 


Assignment Date 


CVG-74 




01 May 1945 


CVBG-1* 


M 


15 Nov 1946 


CVG-2f 


M 


01 Sep 1948 


CVG-6 


C 


Aug 1950 


CVG-6 


AF* 




CVG-6/CVW-6§ 


AE§ 




RCVW-4 


AD 


01 Jan 1965 


COMFAIRNORFOLK 




05 Jun 1965 


CVW-15 


NL 


20 Feb 1966 


COMFAIRNORFOLK 




03 Dec 1966 


CVW-17 


AA 


22 Dec 1966 


COMFAIRNORFOLK 




15 Sep 1967 


CVW-11 


NH 


1968 


COMFAIRNORFOLK 




Sep 1969 


CVW-7 


AG 


Feb 1970 


CVW-13 


AK 


01 Sep 1986 


CVW-8 


AJ 


30 Oct 1989 



Unit Award 
AFEM 



* CVG-74 was redesignated CVBG-1 on 15 November 1946. 

t CVBG-1 was redesignated CVG-2 on 1 September 1948. 

% CVG-6's tail code was changed from C to AF in the latter part of 

1957. The effective date was most likely the beginning of FY 58 (1 

July 1957). 

§ CVG-6's tailcode was changed from AF to AE sometime in the lat- 
ter part of 1962. Carrier Air Groups (CVG) were redesignated Carrier 
Air Wings (CVW) on 20 December 1963, hence, CVG-6 became 
CVW-6. 



Unit Award 
NAVE 



Unit Awards 

Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 



1948 
01 Jul 1951 
01 Jul 1959 
1967 
01 Oct 1977 
01 Oct 1979 
01 Jan 1984 



1948* 
30 Jun 1952 
30 Jun I960 

1967t 
30 Sep 1978 

30 Sep 1980 

31 Dec 1984 



MUC 
NEM 

NUC 
VNSM 



KLM 

SASM 

JMUC 



Inclusive Dates 

01 Jan 1991 

24 Oct 1962 
15 May 1969 

25 May 1969 

05 Jun 1969 

07 Jun 1969 
25 Jun 1969 

06 Jun 1983 
27 Jul 1983 

01 Sep 1983 
27 Oct 1983 
09 Sep 1970 
30 Mar 1988 
29 Apr 1980 

22 Jul 1980 
25 May 1983 

15 Jan 1969 
29 Apr 1980 

21 Jul 1983 
27 Oct 1984 

17 Jan 1991 
14 Jun 1966 

27 Jul 1966 

08 Sep 1966 
19 Oct 1966 

23 Jul 1967 
12 Aug 1967 

27 Jan 1969 
12 Mar 1969 
17 Apr 1969 

28 Jun 1969 
27 Jul 1969 
7 Jan 1991 

14 Jan 1991 
05 Apr 1991 



Covering Unit Award 

31 Dec 1991 
21 Nov 1962 

27 May 1969 

15 Jun 1969 

14 Jun 1983 
30 Aug 1983 

19 Oct 1983 

20 Nov 1983 
05 Oct 1970 

30 Sep 1989 

16 Jul 1980 

08 Dec 1980 
27 May 1983 

27 Aug 1969 
10 Dec 1980 
20 Nov 1983 
24 Apr 1985 
07 Feb 1991 

13 Jul 1966 

31 Aug 1966 
01 Oct 1966 

09 Nov 1966 
30 Jul 1967 

01 Mar 1969 
05 Apr 1969 

10 May 1969 

15 Jul 1969 
16 Aug 1969 

28 Feb 1991 
20 Apr 1991 

16 Jul 1991 



• The award covers the competitive year 1948. 
t The award covers the competitive year 1967. 




A British Victor tanker refuels a squadron KA-6D Intruder and an F-4 Phantom U. Note the refueling line and basket being trailed by the squadron 's KA-6D. 



1 20 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



SECOND VA-66 

Lineage 

Reserve Fighter Squadron SIX SEVENTY ONE (VF- 
671) was called to active duty on 1 February 1951. 

Redesignated Fighter Squadron EIGHTY ONE (VF- 
81) on 4 February 1953. 

Redesignated Attack Squadron SIXTY SIX (VA-66) 
on 1 July 1955. 

Disestablished on 1 October 1986. The second 
squadron to be assigned the VA-66 designation. A VA-66 
detachment continued in existence until 31 March 1987. 

Squadron Insignia and Nickname 

The squadron's first insignia was approved by CNO 
on 28 September 1953- No description or photograph 
of it is available in the squadron records. 

The squadron's sec- 
ond insignia was 
approved by CNO on 25 
January 1955. This 
insignia, a rooster toting 
a machine gun, became 
a well known design 
during the next three 
decades. Colors for the 
insignia were: a black 
background outlined in 
red; the rooster was red 
with black markings; his 
feet and beak were yel- 
low, as well as the life 
vest; the face, hands 
and neck were white 
with black markings 
and he had black eyes; his claws and spurs were gray; 
the machine gun was gray with black markings and 
white smoke trailing from the barrel; and the banner 
was white, outlined in black and with black letters. 
The insignia continued in use following the squadron's 
redesignation on 1 July 1955. 

Nickname: Waldomen, circa 1950s-early 1960s. 
Waldos, circa early 1960s-1987. 

Chronology of Significant Events 

Jan-Feb 1953: VF-81, with its F9F-5s, participated in 
operational tests aboard the Navy's first angled deck 
carrier, Antietam (CVA 36). 

Apr 1954: VF-81 became the first operational fleet 
squadron to receive and operate the F7U Cutlass. 

27 May 1959: During the squadron's deployment to 
the Mediterranean Sea, the commanding officer, 
Commander McNeil, was killed in an aircraft accident 
during a practice Carrier Controlled Approach. 




The official records do not con- 
tain a copy of the squadron's first 
insignia. However, the second 
insignia, a rooster toting a 
machine gun, is a well-known 
design in naval aviation. 



14 Aug 1962: The squadron participated in cross 
deck operations aboard the British carrier HMS 
Hermes (R-12). 

Oct-Dec 1962: While embarked in Enterprise (CVAN 
65), the squadron participated in the Cuban Blockade. 

31 Jul-3 Oct 1964: Enterprise (CVAN 65), with VA-66 
embarked, participated in operation Sea Orbit, the first 
circumnavigation of the world by a nuclear task force. 
The sixty-five day voyage was accomplished without 
replenishment. The squadron participated in numer- 
ous air power demonstrations during the voyage. 

8 Jun 1967: VA-66's aircraft were part of an Air Wing 
6 strike group that was launched to defend Liberty 
(AGTR 5) when she came under attack by the Israelis 
during the 1967 Israeli-Arab War. "When word was 
received that the attack had been a mistake on the 
part of the Israelis, the aircraft were recalled. 

Jun 1970: VA-66, embarked in Forrestal (CVA 59), 
operated in the Eastern Mediterranean after Americans 
were taken hostage by the Popular Front for the 
Liberation of Palestine in Amman, Jordan. 

Oct-Nov 1973: Embarked on Independence (CV 62), 
the squadron operated south of Crete during the Arab- 
Israeli War. 

Aug 1974: Independence (CV 62) relieved America 
(CV 66) off Cyprus following a coup on the island. 
During the crisis the American Ambassador was killed 
and anti-American demonstrations took place which led 
to the evacuation of U.S. citizens to American vessels. 

15 Apr 1980: Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) 
deployed to the Indian Ocean as part of the continu- 
ing response to the hostage crisis in Iran. 

22 Dec 1980: The squadron returned from its 
deployment to the Indian Ocean after spending a total 
of 246 days at sea. "With only one port visit, the 
longest at sea period was for 153 days. 

Jun 1982: After the Israeli invasion of Lebanon on 6 
June, VA-66 operated in the Eastern Mediterranean. 
During the latter part of June the American carrier 
forces in the Mediterranean included Eisenhower (CVN 
65), Independence (CV 62), Forrestal (CV 59), and 
John F. Kennedy (CV 67). 

24 Jun 1982: VA-66 provided air support during the 
evacuation of Americans from Beirut, Lebanon, prior 
to the siege of Beirut by the Israelis. 

25 Oct 1983: Due to the bombing of the Marine 
Corps barracks in Beirut, Eisenhower (CVN 65) termi- 
nated its visit to Naples anddeparted for the eastern 
Mediterranean. The squadron operated in the vicinity 
of Lebanon until the latter part of November. 

7 Mar 1985: Eisenhower (CVN 65) cut short a visit to 
Palma, Spain, and made a high speed transit to the 
Eastern Mediterranean due to the increased tension in 
Lebanon. 

1 Oct 1986: The Waldos of VA-66 were officially dis- 
established but continued to operate as a detachment. 
The detachment continued to operate because its pri- 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 121 



mary mission during the deployment was to provide 
Harm missile support for the air wing and carrier. 

30 Jan 1987: Kennedy (CV 67) cancelled its port visit 
to Malaga, Spain, and made a high speed transit to the 
eastern Mediterranean due to the increased tension 
over the hostages held in Lebanon. 

31 Mar 1987: VA-66 Detachment was disestablished. 




A squadron F4U-4 Corsair during its deployment to the Med aboard 
Tarawa (CV 40) in 1952 (Courtesy Duane Kasulka Collection). 

Home Port Assignments 

Location Assignment Date 

NAS Atlanta 01 Feb 1951 

NAS Jacksonville 05 Apr 1951 

NAS Quonset 28 Sep 1951 

NAS Oceana 11 Jun 1952 

NAS Cecil Field 15 Mar 1965 



Commanding Officers — Continued 





Date Assumed Command 


CDR E. C. Griffin 


28 Jun 


1959 


CDR R. I. Kasten 


06 Jul 


I960 


CDR J. S. Herman 


26 May 


1961 


CDR J. M. Tierney 


04 May 


1962 


CDR R. E. Spruit 


31 May 


1963 


CDR D. L. Hancock 


11 May 


1964 


CDR W. B. Bagwell 


23 Apr 


1965 


CDR L. Wayne Smith 


06 Jun 


1966 


CDR E. M. Crow 


06 Jun 


1967 


CDR W. E. Ramsey 


May 


1968 


CDR A. J. Karpaitis 


Feb 


1969 


CDR B. A. White 


Jan 


1970 


CDR W. C. Nix 


Aug 


1970 


CDR J. J. Fleming 


Jun 


1971 


CDR L. E. Barringer 


Jun 


1972 


CDR R. C. Macke 


13 Aug 


1973 


CDR D. P. March 


Nov 


1974 


CDR Robert T. Davis 


05 Mar 


1976 


CDR Stuart J. Fitrell 


03 Jun 


1977 


CDR James E. Gill 


Jun 


1978 


CDR Frank H. Gerwe, Jr. 


02 Aug 


1979 


CDR Kent W. Ewing 


11 Oct 


1980 


CDR Richard D. Lichtermann II 


05 Feb 


1982 


CDR Robert W. Nordman 


13 Apr 


1983 


CDR Robert J. Kelsey 


03 Oct 


1984 


CDR Richard L. Marquis 


15 Apr 


1986 



Aircraft Assignment 



Commanding Officers 





Date Assumed Command 


CDR H. K. Pryce 


01 Feb 1951 


CDR J. M.James 


30 Sep 1952 


CDR Herman J. Harders 


Oct 1953 


CDR W. Manby, Jr. 


Jun 1955 


CDR Uncas L. Fretwell 


Aug 1955 


CDR Robert J. Selmer 


Sep 1956 


CDR W. J. McNeil, Jr. 


16 Dec 1957 


CDR D. V. Marshall, Jr. (acting) 


27 May 1959 



Type of Aircraft 



F4U-4 



F£F_2_ 



F9F-5 



F7TM 



FQF-SB 



A4D-1 
A4D-2 

A4D-2N/A-4C* 



A-7E 



Date Type First Received 

Feb 1951 
13 Jun 1952 
05 Dec 1952 
Apr 1954 
Aug 1956 
Mar 1958 
Jun 1958 
Mar 1961 
Oct 1970 



: The A4D-2N designation was changed to A-4C in 1962. 



Major Overseas Deployments 



Date of 


Date of 


Air 




Type of 


Area of 


Departure 


Return 


Wing 


Carrier 


Aircraft 


Operation 


28 Nov 1951 


11 Jun 1952 


CVG-8 


CV40 


F4U-4 


Med 


26 Apr 1953 


21 Oct 1953 


CVG-8 


CVA 43 


F9F-5 


Med 


04 Nov 1955 


02 Aug 1956 


CVG-3 


CVA 14 


F7U-3 


Med 


03 Sep 1957 


22 Oct 1957 


CVG-6 


CVA 11 


F9F-8B 


NorLant 


13 Feb 1959 


30 Aug 1959 


CVG-6 


CVA 11 


A4D-2 


Med 


04 Aug I960 


17 Feb 1961 


CVG-6 


CVA 11 


A4D-2 


Med 


03 Aug 1961 


01 Mar 1962 


CVG-6 


CVA 11 


A4D-2N 


Med 



Major Overseas Deployments — Continued 

Air Type of Area of 

Wing Carrier Aircraft Operation 



1 22 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



Date of Date of 

Departure Return 

03 Aug 1962 11 Oct 1962 CVG-6 
06 Feb 1963 04 Sep 1963 CVG-6 
08 Feb 1964 03 Oct 1964 CVW-6 

30 Nov 1965 10 Jul 1966 CVW-6 
10 Jan 1967 20 Sep 1967 CVW-6 

04 Jun 1968 08 Feb 1969 CVW-10 
02 Dec 1969 08 Jul 1970 CVW-17 
16 Sep 1971 16 Mar 1972 CVW-7 
21 Jun 1973 19 Jan 1974 CVW-7 

19 Jul 1974 21 Jan 1975 CVW-7 

15 Oct 1975 05 May 1976 CVW-7 

31 Mar 1977 21 Oct 1977 CVW-7 

16 Jan 1979 13 Jul 1979 CVW-7 
15 Apr 1980 22 Dec 1980 CVW-7 

20 Aug 1981 07 Oct 1981 CVW-7 

05 Jan 1982 13 Jul 1982 CVW-7 
27 Apr 1983 02 Dec 1983 CVW-7 
08 May 1984 20 Jun 1984 CVW-7 
10 Oct 1984 08 May 1985 CVW-7 
08 Jul 1985 22 Aug 1985 CVW-7 
18 Aug 1986 02 Mar 1987 CVW-3 




A squadron F7U-3 Cutlass on the flight line, believed to be at NAS 
Port Lyautey, Morocco. The squadron was stationed at the air station 
during part of its 1953 Med cruise. 



Air Wing Assignments 



Air Wing 


Tail Code 


Assignment Date 


CVG-8 


E 


09 Apr 1951 


CVG-6 


c 


01 Jul 1955 


CVG-3 


K 


Nov 1955 


CVG-6/ CVW-6* 


C/AF/AEt 


Aug 1956 


CVW-7 


AG 


06 Oct 1967 


CVW-10 


AK 


Jan 1968 


CVW-17 


AA 


02 Jun 1969 



CVAN 65 


A4D-2N 


Med 


CVAN 65 


A-4C 




Med 


CVAN 65 


A-4C 




Med /World Cruise 


CVA 66 


A-4C 




Med 


CVA 66 


A-4C 




Med 


CVS 11 


A-4C 




\V7pctPo c /Vi ptn a m 


CVA 59 


A-4C 




Med 


CVA 62 


A-7E 




NnrT ant/Mprl 


CV 62 


A-7E 




Med 


CV 62 


A-7E 




Med 


CV 62 


A-7E 




NorT ant/Med 


CV62 


A-7E 




Med 


CVN 69 


A-7E 




Med 


CVN 69 


A-7E 




IO 


CVN 69 


A-7E 




NorLant 




A-7E 




Meu 


CVN 69 


A-7E 




Meu 


CVN 69 


A-7E 




Carib/NorLant 


CVN 69 


A-7E 




Med 


CVN 69 


A-7E 




Carib 


CV67 


A-7E 




Med 




Air Wing Assignments- 


—Continued 


Air Wing 




Tail Code 


Assignment Date 


COMLATWING-1 




09 Jul 1970 


CVW-7 




AG 


1971 


CVW-3 






01 Oct 1986+- 



• CVG-6 was redesignated CVW-6 when all Carrier Air Group (CVG) 
designations were redesignated Carrier Air Wings (CVW) on 20 
December 1963. 



t CVG-6's tail code was changed from C to AF in 1957. The effective 
date was most likely the beginning of FY 58 (1 July 1957). Sometime 
in the latter part of 1962 CVG-6's tail code was changed from AF to 
AE. 

£ VA-66 deployed with CVW-3 in John F. Kennedy (CV 67) in August 
1986. Administratively, it continued to be assigned to CVW-7 until its 
offical disestablishment on 1 October 1986. After that date, the same 
organization continued to operate as a detachment assigned to 
CVW-3 until the deployment ended in March 1987. 




A squadron A4D-2 Skyhawk in 1959- 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 1 23 



Unit Awards Received 



Unit Awards Received — Continued 



Unit Award 


Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 


Ar tM 


?4 Oct 196? 


03 npr 196? 




06 Tun 1983 

V7VJ I nil _1 y\J^J 


14 Tun 1983 




27 Jul 1983 


30 Aug 1983 




01 Sep 1983 


19 Oct 1983 




27 Oct 1983 


20 Nov 1983 


NEM 


19 Oct 1962 


23 Oct 1962 




29 Apr 1980 


16 Jul 1980 




22 Jul 1980 


08 Dec 1980 




25 May 1983 


27 May 1983 


NUC 


06 Jul 1968 


16 Jan 1969 



Unit Award 


Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 




29 Apr 1980 


10 Dec 1980 




21 Jul 1983 


20 Nov 1983 


RVNGC 


01 Oct 1968 


01 Nov 1968 


SLOC 


Oct 1978 


Dec 1979 


VNSM 


11 Jul 1968 


12 Jul 1968 




14 Jul 1968 


15 Jul 1968 




23 Jul 1968 


22 Aug 1968 




14 Oct 1968 


14 Nov 1968 




03 Dec 1968 


27 Dec 1968 



Two squadron A- 7E Corsair lis show the difference between the old and new paint schemes in 1984. The gun-toting rooster insignia is on the tail 
of both aircraft. 



1 24 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



VA-72 

Lineage 

Established as Bomber Fighter Squadron EIGHTEEN 
(VBF-18) on 25 January 1945. 

Redesignated Fighter Squadron EIGHT A (VF-8A) on 
15 November 1946. 

Redesignated Fighter Squadron SEVENTY TWO (VF- 
72) on 28 July 1948. 

Redesignated Attack Squadron SEVENTY TWO (VA- 
72) on 3 January 1956. 

Disestablished on 30 June 1991- The first squadron 
to be assigned the VA-72 designation. 

Squadron Insignia and Nickname 

The squadron's first insignia was approved by CNO 
on 9 April 1946. Colors for the bear-cat insignia were: 

white upper background 
and sky blue lower 
background outlined in 
black; black bear-cat 
with white markings and 
a red tongue; white 
cloud with sky blue 
markings; white and 
black carrier and the 
waves extending from 
the carrier were white, 
streaked with black; and 
a black bomb and gun 
with white markings. 




The bearcat was the squadron 's 
first insignia. 



On 5 December 1950 a new insignia was 
approved by CNO. Colors for the peregrine falcon 
were: a red outline with upper background white 
and the lower background blue; the falcon had a 
black head with gray feathers and black markings; 
the beak, eye and feet were yellow with black mark- 
ings and the 
tongue was red. 

Following the 
squadron's redes- 
ignation in 1956 
it continued to 
use the falcon 
insignia but mod- 
ified it to include 
a scroll with the 
word ATAKRON 
72. The scroll is 
outlined in red, 
with a white 

„ , , , , , background and 

The hawk insignia was adopted by the 

squadron in 1950. blue letters. 





In the mid-1950s, the squadron 
modified the hawk insignia. This 
insignia was used by VA- 72 for 35 
years until its disestablishment. 



Nickname: Hawks, 
circa early 1950s-early 
1960s. 

Blue Hawks, early 
1960s-1991. 

Chronology of 
Significant Events 

Sep-Dec 1946: Parti- 
cipated in Leyte (CV 32) 
shakedown cruise in the 
Caribbean and a good- 
will cruise to South 
America for the inauguration of Chile's President. 

19 Aug 1948: Squadron commanding officer, 
Lieutenant Commander B. F. Haker, lost at sea while 
attempting a carrier approach. 

25 Jan 1949: Cross deck operations with the British 
carrier HMS Triumph in the Mediterranean. 

Apr 1961: The squadron operated from 
Independence (CVA 62) in an area south of 
Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, during the Bay of Pigs, the 
unsuccessful invasion of Cuba by American supported 
Cuban exiles. 

22 Oct-22 Nov 1962: Participated in the Cuban 
Quarantine while embarked in Independence. 

10-16 May 1963: A detachment of three aircraft 
deployed in Wasp (CVS 18) to provide courier service 
during a Mercury Project space flight of the Faith 7 
capsule. 

17 Oct 1965: The squadron's executive officer, 
Commander H. B. Southworth, led the first successful 
strike against a surface-to-air SA-2 missile installation 
in North Vietnam. The strike was composed of four 
VA-72 A-4Es and one A-6A from VA-75. 

18 Sep 1970: While operating in the Caribbean 
aboard John F. Kennedy (CVA 67), the squadron was 
ordered to deploy with the carrier to the 
Mediterranean due to the fighting between Jordanian 
and Palestinian forces and the intervention of Syria on 
behalf of the Palestinians. 

Oct 1973: With the outbreak of war in the Middle 
East (Yon Kippur War), Kennedy and her air wing, 
while operating in the North Atlantic after just com- 
pleting a Mediterranean deployment, were ordered 
back to the Mediterranean. VA-72 conducted flight 
operations while the carrier was on station south of 
Crete, from the latter part of October through mid 
November. 

17-19 Sep 1985: VA-72, along with other units of 
CVW-1, were the first to conduct flight operations from 
a carrier operating inside a fjord. America (CV 66) 
operated in Vestfjord, Norway, during this evolution. 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 125 



22-27 Mar 1986: During Freedom of Navigation 
Exercises in the Gulf of Sidra and the resulting combat 
action with Libyan forces, VA-72 flew patrols to protect 
the task force from attack by surface ships or sub- 
marines and also provided tanker missions for fighters 
flying combat air patrols. 

14 Apr 1986: The United States initiated Operation 
Eldorado Canyon, air strikes against targets in Libya. 
VA-72 provided air-to-surface missile support for possi- 
ble employment against surface-to-air missile radar 
sites. 

Sep-Oct 1990 and Dec 1990-Jan 1991: The 

squadron participated in Operation Desert Shield, the 
build up of American and Allied forces to counter a 
threatened invasion of Saudi Arabia by Iraq and as 
part of an economic blockade of Iraq to force its with- 
drawal from Kuwait. 

17 Jan 1991: Operation Desert Storm, combat opera- 
tions to remove Iraqi forces from Kuwait, was 
launched. The squadron's A-7E Corsair lis participated 
in the first combat strike against Iraqi targets in 
Baghdad. 

29 Jan 1991: Squadron aircraft flew their first combat 
mission in the Kuwait theater, striking Iraqi troops, 
tanks and artillery positions. 

27 Feb 1991: Squadron aircraft participated in the 
last naval air combat strike of the war, hitting retreat- 
ing Iraqi troops east of An Najef, Iraq. During the 43 
days of war the squadron flew 362 sorties without the 
loss of a pilot or aircraft. 

8Jun 1991: The last two squadron aircraft participat- 
ed in the Desert Storm Victory Parade Fly Over in 
Washington, D.C. 




A VBF-18 F8F Bearcat on Leyte's (CV 32) flight deck during her 
goodwill cruise to South America in 1946. In the background are 
other Carrier Air Group 18 aircraft. 



Home Port Assignments 



Location Assignment Date 



NAS Astoria 


25 Jan 1945 


NAS San Diego 


22 Apr 1945 


NAS Quonset Point 


14 Nov 1945 


NAS Oceana 


03 Sep 1957 


NAS Cecil Field 


15 Feb 1966 


Commanding Officers 




Date Assumed Command 


LT Mohl C. Norton, Jr. (Acting) 


25 Tan 1945 


LCDR Jeremy Morrison 


05 Mar 1945 


CDR Sam E. Clark 


14 Sep 1945 


LCDR Frank Malinasky 


11 Jun 1947 


LCDR Burton F. Haker 


06 Jul 1948 


LT G. F. Colleran (acting) 


19 Aug 1948 


LCDR Frank Malinasky 


20 Oct 1948 


LCDR Carlton H. Clark 


20 Jun 1949 


LCDR John B. Jorgensen 


04 Jul 1950 


LCDR Archibald W. Curtis 


09 Jul 1951 


CDR Gordon J. Brown 


Tan 1953 


LCDR Carlton F. Naumann 


12 Nov 1954 


LCDR Robert F. Hunt 


08 Feb 1956 


CDR C. K. Ruiz 


2^ Tul 1957 


CDR John K. Beling 


04 Feb 1959 


CDR C. A. Hill, Jr. 


04 Mar I960 


CDR W. W. Kendall Miller, Jr. 


12 May 1961 


CDR Frederick S. Gore 


16 Apr 1962 


CDR T. L. Neilson 


25 Mar 1963 


CDR Grover C. Walker 


17 Feb 1964 


CDR Joe D. Adkins 


10 Feb 1965 


CDR Harrison B. South worth 


11 Feb 1966 


CDR E. J. Hofstra 


15 Mar 1967 


CDR R. A. Phillips 


15 Mar 1968 


CDR S. E. Latimer, Jr. 


10 Apr 1969 


CDR D. B. Young, Jr. 


17 Oct 1969 


CDR R. K. Shea 


09 Sep 1970 


CDR M. G. Basford 


02 Jul 1971 


CDR J. F. Donahue 


08 Jul 1972 


CDR Robert J. Kelly 


14 Jul 1973 


CDR Edward D. Estes 


12 Sep 1974 


CDR Robert F. Brennock 


16 Oct 1975 


CDR Patrick M. Commons 


16 Dec 1976 


CDR Hugh A. Merrill 


06 Apr 1978 


CDR Howard E. Koss 


Jul 1979 


CDR Carter B. Refo 


Oct 1980 


CDR Robert L. Kiem 


16 Feb 1982 


CDR C. A. Cook 


09 Jun 1983 


CDR Arthur F. Richardson 


21 Nov 1984 


CDR Gordon G. Stewart 


03 May 1986 


CDR James B. Waddell 


15 Oct 1987 


CDR John R. Sanders 


15 Jun 1989 



1 26 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 




A F9F-5 Panther on Bennington 's (CVA 20) elevator during her cruise to the Med in 1953-1954. This particular squadron F9F was assigned to 
Captain H. E. Ball, an Air Force exchange pilot with VF-72. 



Aircraft Assignment Aircraft Assignment— Continued 



Type of Aircraft Date Type First Received 


Type of Aircraft 






Date Type First Received 


F6F-3/5 


07 Feb 1945 


F9F-5 






Feb 1953 


F8F-1 


10 Aug 1945 


A4D-1 






Sep 1956 


F8F-1B 


Jan 1947 


A4D-2 






12 Feb 1958 


F8F-2 


20 Mar 1948 


A4D-2N/A-4C* 






Mar 1961 


F8F-1 


01 Dec 1948 


A-4E 






May 1964 


F8F-1B 


09 Feb 1950 


A-4B 






Mar 1967 


F9F-2 


16 Mar 1951 


A-7B 






Jan 1970 


F9F-5 


11 Oct 1951 


A-7E 






13 Sep 1977 


F9F-2 


Feb 1952 


* The A4D-2N designation was 


changed to A-4C in 1962. 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 1 27 



Major Overseas Deployments 



Date of 


Date of 


Air 




Type of 


Area of 


Depd vtu t~e 


Return 


Wing 


Cavnev 


Aircraft 


Operation 


16 Sep 1946 


12 Dec 1946 


CVG-18 


CV 32 


F8F-1 


Carib/East Coast 












of South America 


03 Apr 1947 


09 Jun 1947 


CVAG-7 


CV 32 


F8F-1B 


Med 


30 Jul 1947 


19 Nov 1947 


CVAG-7 


CV 32 


F8F-1B 


Med 


04 Jan 1949 


23 May 1949 


CVG-7 


CV47 


F8F-1 


Med 


10 Jul 1950 


10 Nov 1950 


CVG-7 


CVB 41 


F8F-1B 


Med 


20 May 1952 


08 Jan 1953 


CVG-7 


CV 31 


F9F-2 


WestPac/Korea 


16 Sep 1953 


21 Feb 1954 


CVG-7 


CVA 20 


F9F-5 


NorLant/Med 


02 Sep 1958 


12 Mar 1959 


CVG-7 


CVA 15 


A4D-2 


Med 


04 Aug I960 


03 Mar 1961 


CVG-7 


CVA 62 


A4D-2 


Med 


04 Aug 1961 


19 Dec 1961 


CVG-7 


CVA 62 


A4D-2N 


Med 


19 Apr 1962 


27 Aug 1962 


CVG-7 


CVA 62 


A4D-2N 


Med 


06 Aug 1963 


04 Mar 1964 


CVG-7 


CVA 62 


A-4C 


Med 


08 Sep 1964 


05 Nov 1964 


CVW-7 


CVA 62 


A-4E 


NorLant/Med 


10 May 1965 


13 Dec 1965 


CVW-7 


CVA 62 


A-4E 


WestPac/Vietnam 


21 Jun 1966 


21 Feb 1967 


CVW-1 


CVA 42 


A-4E 


WestPac/Vietnam 


24 Aug 1967 


19 May 1968 


CVW-1 


CVA 42 


A-4B 


Med 


07 Jan 1969 


29 Jul 1969 


CVW-8 


CVA 38 


A-4B 


Med 


14 Sep 1970 


01 Mar 1971 


CVW-1 


CVA 67 


A-7B 


Carib/Med/NorLant 


01 Dec 1971 


06 Oct 1972 


CVW-1 


CVA 67 


A-7B 


Med/NorLant 


16 Apr 1973 


01 Dec 1973 


CVW-1 


CVA 67 


A-7B 


Med/NorLant/Med 


28 Jun 1975 


27 Jan 1976 


CVW-1 


CV 67 


A-7B 


Med 


02 Sep 1976 


09 Nov 1976 


CVW-1 


CV67 


A-7B 


NorLant 


15 Jan 1977 


01 Aug 1977 


CVW-1 


CV 67 


A-7B 


Med 


29 Jun 1978 


08 Feb 1979 


CVW-1 


CV67 


A-7E 


Med 


04 Aug 1980 


28 Mar 1981 


CVW-1 


CV67 


A-7E 


Med 


23 Aug 1982 


30 Oct 1982 


CVW-1 


CV 66 


A-7E 


NorLant/Med/Carib 


08 Dec 1982 


02 Jun 1983 


CVW-1 


CV66 


A-7E 


Med/IO 


24 Apr 1984 


14 Nov 1984 


CVW-1 


CV66 


A-7E 


Carib/Med/IO 


24 Aug 1985 


09 Oct 1985 


CVW-1 


CV66 


A-7E 


NorLant 


10 Mar 1986 


10 Sep 1986 


CVW-1 


CV 66 


A-7E 


Med 


29 Feb 1988 


29 Aug 1988 


CVW-7 


CVN 69 


A-7E 


Med 


15 Aug 1990 


28 Mar 1991 


CVW-3 


CV67 


A-7E 


Med/Red Sea 




A squadron A-4 Skyhawk launches from Independence (CVA 62). Notice the combat markings on the aircraft just forward of the jet intake show- 
ing the number of combat sorties flown by the aircraft. 



1 28 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



Air Wing Assignments 



Unit Awards Received — Continued 



Air Wing Tail Code Assignment Date 

CVG-18/ CVAG-7/ CVG-7/ L/AGf 25 Jan 1945 
CVW-7* 

CVW-1 AB 07 Mar 1966 

CVW-8 AJ 26 Aug 1968 

RCVW-4t- AD 22 Sep 1969 

CVW-1 AB 02 Mar 1970 

CVW-7 AG 01 Oct 1986 

COMLATWING 1§ Sep 1988 

CVW-3 AC 01 Mar 1989 

* CVG-18 was redesignated CVAG-7 on 15 November 1946. On 1 
September 1948, CVAG-7 was redesignated CVG-7. CVG-7 was 
redesignated CVW-7 when Carrier Air Group (CVG) designations 
were redesignated Carrier Air Wings (CVW) on 20 December 1963- 

t The tail code was changed from L to AG in 1957. The effective 
date for this change was most likely the beginning of FY 58 (1 July 
1957). 

£ The squadron was assigned to RCVW-4 during its transition to the 
A-7B. 

§ The squadron detached from CVW-7 and came under the opera- 
tional and administrative control of Commander Light Attack Wing 1. 



Unit Awards Received 

Unit Award Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 

NAVE 01 Jan 1970 30 Jun 1971 

AFEM 24 Oct 1962 20 Nov 1962 
15 Jun 1965 

29 Jun 1965 03 Jul 1965 

MUC 29 Sep 1970 31 Oct 1970 



Unit Award 


Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 




01 Dec 1977 


01 Mar 1979 




29 Aug 1985 


20 Sep 1985 


NEM 


18 Oct 1962 


23 Oct 1962 




01 Tan 1983 

\J a J <Xii AyyjJ 


20 Tan 1 983 




06 Mav 1983 

\J\J ±*ACl\ A y V J y 


08 Mav 1983 




21 Mar 1986 


27 Tun 1986 


NT TP 

IN Uvj 


05 Tun 1965 

\j y i k~v i i a y \j _j 


21 Nov 1965 

i—i 1 ± 1 v Ay yj y 




23 Mar 1986 

ljJ a"ACLa A /UV 


17 Anr 1986 

J. / jtviji a yyy\j 




17 Tan 1991 

a / j ciii a y y J. 


28 Feb 1991 

u a v~ a y y a 


JtVV IN v_TV_, 


21 Oct 1965 

.-j ± v^/ v_ l ± y\j y 

23 Oct 1965 






25 Oct 1965 


02 Nov 1965 




09 Nov 1965 

\J y 1\ \_J V _L y \J _y 


10 Nov 1965 




04 Aup 1980 

\Ji riUg ±y(J)\J 


28 Mar 1981 

) IV AO.I a / ul 




23 Aue 1982 


02 Tun 1983 


V IN OiVl 


04 Jul 1965 


09 Aug 1965 

\j y J- 1 Lt f3 Ay\jy 




25 Aus 1965 


21 Sen 1965 

u a l s v— ■ l_/ a y yj y 




14 Oct 1965 

1 1 ^ — ' l Ay yj y 


12 Nov 1965 

1 11 yj v Ay \j y 




30 Jul 1966 






09 Aug 1966 


12 Sep 1966 




01 Oct 1966 


03 Oct 1966 




19 Oct 1966 


14 Nov 1966 




24 Nov 1966 


28 Dec 1966 




20 Jan 1967 


21 Jan 1967 


KSM 


18 Jun 1952 


24 Dec 1952 


KLM 


17 Jan 1991 


28 Feb 1991 


SASM 


14 Sep 1990 


12 Mar 1991 




A flight of squadron A-7 Corsair lis. 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 129 



VA-75 

Lineage 

Established as Torpedo Squadron EIGHTEEN (VT- 
18) on 20 July 1943. 

Redesignated Attack Squadron EIGHT A (VA-8A) on 
15 November 1946. 

Redesignated Attack Squadron SEVENTY FIVE (VA- 
75) on 27 July 1948. 

Disestablished on 30 November 1949- The first 
squadron to be designated VA-75. 

Squadron Insignia and Nickname 

The squadron's first insignia was in use by the 
squadron prior to its approval by CNO on 24 March 

1945. Colors for "The 



Carrier Clowns" insignia 
were: a blue back- 
ground with an orange 
center and a dark blue 
strip through the center; 
the words "The Carrier 
Clowns" in black; a 
white Zebra with black 
markings; a black bird 
with white markings; 
orange bombs; and a 
torpedo with yellow tip, 




The Carrier Clowns insignia was 
used by VT-18. 




a white front section 
and the remainder in 
black. 

Following the 
squadron's redesigna- 
tion a new insignia was 
approved by CNO on 
30 December 1946. 
Colors for the knight 
insignia were: a rust 
background with a gold 
border; a white horse 
with blue bridle and 
gold harness; the shield 
was blue with a gold 

anchor; a silver knight holding a gold torpedo. The 
squadron continued to use this insignia following its 
redesignation to VA-75. 

Nickname: The Carrier Clowns, circa 1943-1946. 

Chronology of Significant Events 

24-26 Oct 1944: The squadron participated in the 
Battle for Leyte Gulf. On 24 October VT-18's TBMs 
flew sorties against a powerful Japanese surface force 



Following the squadron 's redesig- 
nation to attack, the knight 
insignia was approved 



in the Sibuyan Sea. These attacks contributed to the 
sinking of the Musashi, one of the two largest battle- 
ships in the world. On 25 October, the squadron's 
planes were part of a Fast Carrier Task Force that 
attacked a Japanese carrier force in the Battle of Cape 
Engano. Four Japanese carriers were sunk during that 
engagement. On the 26th, squadron planes participat- 
ed in an attack on the Japanese surface force which 
was retiring from the Battle Off Samar. 

Sep-Dec 1946: The squadron participated in Leyte 
(CV 32) shake-down cruise in the Caribbean and a 
goodwill cruise to South America for the inauguration 
of Chile's Presient. 



Home Port Assignments 



Location 

NAS Alameda 
NAAS Monterey 
NAAS Hollister 
NAS Hilo 
NAS Kaneohe 
NAS Alameda 
NAS Astoria 
NAS San Diego 
NAS Quonset Point 



Assignment Date 

20 Jul 1943 
28 Oct 1943* 
Nov 1943* 
Feb 1944* 
Jun 1944* 
20 Dec 1944 
25 Jan 1945 
22 Apr 1945 
14 Nov 1945 



* Temporary shore assignments while the squadron conducted train- 
ing in preparation for combat deployment. 



Commanding Officers 



LTJG Al Long (acting) 
LCDR Lloyd W. Van Antwerp 
ENS Joseph B. Baker (acting) 
LTJohn G. Williams (acting) 
LTJohn G. Williams 
LT Jack C. Heishman 
LCDR James L. Hooper 
LCDR Charles A. Iarrobino 
CDR Morris R. Doughty 



Date Assumed Command 

20 Jul 1943 
02 Aug 1943 
25 Jan 1945 
31 Jan 1945 
25 Apr 1945 
19 Sep 1945 
04 Feb 1946 
01 Dec 1947 
13 Oct 1948 



Aircraft Assignment 



Type of Aircraft 



TBF-1 

TBM-1 

TBM-1C 

TBM-3 

TBM-3E 

TBM-3Q 



AD-3 



Date Type First Received 

Jul 1943 
Sep 1943 
Nov 1943 
Feb 1945 
22 Apr 1945 
06 May 1946 
18 Apr 1949 



1 30 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 




A squadron TBM-3 takes off from Leyte (CV 32) during its goodwill cruise to South America in 1946. 



Major Overseas Deployments 



Date of 


Date of 


Air 




Type of 


Area of 


Departure 


Return 


Wing 


Carrier 


Aircraft 


Operation 


16 Aug 1944 


20 Dec 1944 


CVG-18 


CV 11 


TBM-1C 


Pacific 


16 Sep 1946 


12 Dec 1946 


CVG-18 


CV 32 


TBM-3E/Q 


Carib/East Coast 












of South America 


03 Apr 1947 


09 Jun 1947 


CVAG-7 


CV 32 


TBM-3E/Q 


Med 










& TBM-3J 




30 Jul 1947 


19 Nov 1947 


CVAG-7 


CV 32 


TBM-3E/Q 


Med 


04 Jan 1949 


23 May 1949 


CVG-7 


CV47* 


TBM-3E/Q 


Med 



* Only half of the squadron's personnel and aircraft deployed aboard Philippine Sea (CV 47), the other half remained at NAS Quonset Point. 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS — Volume I 131 



Air Wing Assignments 



Unit Awards Received 



Air Wing Tail Code Assignment Date 

CVG-18/ CVAG-7/ CVG-7* Lf 20 Jul 1943 

* CVG-18 was redesignated CVAG-7 on 15 November 1946 and then 
redesignated CVG-7 on 1 September 1948. 

t The tail code L was assigned to CVAG-7 in December 1946. 



Unit Award 
WW-II Campaign 

Medal (Asiatic/ 

Pacific) 



Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 
Oct 1944 Nov 1944 




A squadron AD-4 Skyraider launches from deck of Bon Homme Richard (CVA 31), November 1952 (Courtesy Robert Lawson Collection). 



1 32 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



SECOND VA-75 

Lineage 

Established as Bombing Squadron EIGHTEEN (VB- 
18) on 20 July 1943. 

Redesignated Attack Squadron SEVEN A (VA-7A) on 
15 November 1946. 

Redesignated Attack Squadron SEVENTY FOUR (VA- 
74) on 27 July 1948. 

Redesignated Attack Squadron SEVENTY FIVE (VA- 
75) on 15 February 1950. The second squadron to be 
assigned the VA-75 designation. 

Squadron Insignia and Nickname 

The squadron's first insignia was approved by CNO 
on 14 January 1944. Colors for the Sunday Punchers 

winged glove and 
bomb insignia were: 
white background with 
royal blue outlines and 
lettering; the glove was 
dark brown with yellow 
lacing; wings were yel- 
low with black outlines; 
and the bomb was 
black with black and 
yellow fins. 

Following the squad- 
ron's redesignation in 
1946, a new insignia 
was approved by CNO 
on 25 June 1947. Colors 
for the insignia of a boy riding a bomb were: a light 
blue background outlined in gold; Sunday Punchers 
lettering was medium blue and the VA-7A lettering on 
the trunks was gold; the bomb was medium blue with 
black highlights; the boy had tan skin with red cheeks, 

yellow hair, black eyes; 
wearing red trunks and 
black boots with white 
tops; the gloves were 
brown. 

Sometime after the 
squadron's redesigna- 
tion to VA-75 it reverted 
to the winged glove and 
bomb insignia. The col- 
ors are the same as 
those used in the previ- 
ously approved insignia. 

Nickname: Sunday 
Punchers, 1943-present. 




The winged glove was the 
squadron 's first insignia used 
between 1944 to 1947. It was 
readopted sometime after 1950. 




This insignia was used by the 
squadron from 1947 to sometime 
around 1950. 



Chronology of Significant Events 

5 Feb 1944: Lieutenant Commander Dickson, the 
squadron's commanding officer, was killed in a train- 
ing exercise when his aircraft went into a high speed 
stall and crashed during a practice dive. 

12 Oct 1944: Squadron commanding officer, 
Commander Mark Eslick, was lost in combat during an 
attack on Kiirun Harbor, Formosa. 

24-26 Oct 1944: The squadron participated in the 
Battle for Leyte Gulf, part of the operations surround- 
ing the occupation of Leyte. On 24 October VB-18's 
SB2Cs flew sorties against a powerful Japanese surface 
force in the Sibuyan Sea. These attacks contributed to 
the sinking of the mighty Musashi, one of the two 
largest battleships in the world. On 25 October the 
squadron's planes were part of a Fast Carrier Task 
Force that attacked the Japanese carrier force in the 
Battle of Cape Engano. Four Japanese carriers were 
sunk during this engagement. On the 26th, squadron 
planes participated in attacks on the Japanese surface 
force which was retiring from the Battle Off Samar. 

24 Oct 1944: While assigned to VB-18, Lieutenant 
Donald L. Wilson was awarded the Navy Cross for 
scoring a direct hit on a Japanese battleship during the 
Battle for Leyte Gulf. Following World War II, 
Lieutenant Wilson became the squadron's command- 
ing officer. 

25 Oct 1944: The squadron's commanding officer, 
Lieutenant Commander George D. Ghesquiere was 
awarded the Navy Cross for leading his squadron in 
an attack against a Japanese carrier task force during 
the Battle of Cape Engano, in which he scored a direct 
hit on a Japanese carrier. 

26 Oct 1944: Lieutenant Benjamin G. Preston was 
awarded a Gold Star in lieu of his third Navy Cross for 
leading a division of dive bombers in an attack against 
the Japanese carrier task force during the Battle of 
Cape Engano. In 1953 he became the commanding 
officer of the squadron. 

Sep-Dec 1946: The squadron participated in Leyte 
(CV 32) shake-down cruise in the Caribbean and a 
goodwill cruise to South America for the inauguration 
of Chile's President. 

25 Jan 1949: Cross deck operations with the British 
carrier HMS Triumph in the Mediterranean. 

23 Jun 1952: The squadron's first combat action in 
Korea was a joint operation with Air Group 7 and the 
U.S. Air Force in an attack against hydro-electric com- 
plexes in North Korea that had previously been 
restricted from attack. 

11 Jul 1952: The squadron participated in a com- 
bined attack against Pyongyang, North Korea, with air- 
craft from CVG-7, Princeton (CV 37), the U.S. Air 
Force, Marine Corps, Australian Air Force and British 
Royal Navy. 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 133 



5 Dec 1952: On a strike against enemy troop con- 
centrations the squadron's commanding officer, 
Commander H. K. Evans, was lost when his aircraft 
was hit by antiaircraft fire and crashed. 

Apr 1961 : The squadron operated from Indepen- 
dence (CVA 62) in an area south of Guantanamo Bay, 
Cuba, during the Bay of Pigs, the unsuccessful inva- 
sion of Cuba by American supported Cuban exiles. 

22 Oct-22 Nov 1962: Participated in the Cuban 
Quarantine while embarked in Independence. 

14 Nov 1963: The first operational fleet squadron to 
be assigned the A-6A Intruder. 

May-Dec 1965: VA-75 was the first squadron to 
deploy with the A-6A Intruder and operate the aircraft 
in a combat environment. 

18 Sep 1965: The squadron's commanding officer, 
Commander Leonard Vogt, was lost during a combat 
mission while engaged in a night bombing attack on 
enemy patrol boats. 

24 Feb 1968: Commander Jerrold M. Zacharias and 
Lieutenant Commander Michael L. Hall were awarded 
the Navy Cross for their action with VA-35 in planning 
and executing a coordinated A-6A strike on Hanoi. 

Sep and Oct 1970: VA-75 operated from Saratoga 
(CVA 60) while on station in the eastern Mediterranean 
during the continuing crisis with the Palestinians in 
Jordan and the invasion of Jordan by Syria. 

7 Oct 1971: VA-75 became the first A-6 squadron to 
drop sonobuoys. The integrated A-6A radar system 
and the A-6B antiradiation system were utilized for 
exact positioning and release of the sonobuoys. This 
event was part of an overall evaluation of the CV 
Concept being conducted by the Saratoga to deter- 
mine the carrier's capability to operate effectively in 
both the attack and ASW roles. 

Jun-Oct 1972: Participated in Linebacker I opera- 
tions, heavy air strikes against targets in North Vietnam 
and mining operations along coastal waters. 

6 Aug 1972: Commander Charles Earnest and 
Lieutenant Commander Grady L. Jackson were award- 
ed the Silver Star for directing a successful night inland 
rescue of a downed pilot in a heavily defended area 
of North Vietnam. 

10 Oct 1972: Lieutenant Commander John A. Pieno 
and Lieutenant Junior Grade John R. Fuller were 
awarded the Silver Star for their actions as bom- 
bardier/navigators of a two plane attack, at dusk, on 
the North Vietnamese airfield of Bai Thong. 

28 Nov 1972: The squadron's commanding officer, 
Commander Charles Earnest, was lost in an aircraft 
accident following a catapult launch from Saratoga 
while operating on Yankee Station. 

19-29 Dec 1972: Participated in Linebacker II opera- 
tions, the resumption of heavy bombing strikes above 
the 20th parallel in North Vietnam. This operation con- 
centrated attacks around Hanoi and the coastal areas 
of Haiphong. 



18 Jan 1975: Following violent demonstrations 
against the American Embassy in Nicosia, Cyprus, VA- 
75 operated from Saratoga off the coast of Cyrpus. 

Apr 1976: As tensions increased in Lebanon, 
Saratoga and her air wing wing operated south of 
Crete, prepared to provide support for the evacuation 
of Americans from that country if it became necessary. 

8 Jan 1980: The squadron's commanding officer, 
Commander A. J. Lynch, and Lieutenant Charles J. 
Morrow were lost when their aircraft struck several 
parked planes during a night landing and careened 
into the sea. 

Jun 1982: Israel invaded Lebanon and John F. 
Kennedy (CV 67) was ordered to operate off the coast 
of Lebanon. VA-75 operated from the carrier, preparing 
for possible air support if it became necessary to evac- 
uate Americans from Beirut, Lebanon. 

4 Dec 1983: During Kennedy's operations off the 
coast of Lebanon in support of the Multinational 
Peacekeeping Force, several of the carrier's F-14 
reconnaissance aircraft received hostile fire from 
Syrian surface-to-air missile and anti-aircraft positions 
on 3 December. A retaliatory strike was flown by ele- 
ments from CVW-3 and aircraft from Independence 
(CV 62) against the Syrian antiaircraft positions near 
Hammana, Lebanon. The squadron's commanding 
officer, Commander Glover, led three of VA-75 's A-6Es 
in the strike and succeeded in destroying an anti-air- 
craft position. VA-75 also provided two KA-6D tanker 
aircraft for the operation. 

6 Feb 1984: VA-75 launched its alert aircraft from 
Kennedy in response to a request from U.S. Marines 
(part of the Multinational Peacekeeping Force) at the 
Beirut International Airport to surpress attacks against 
their positions. The squadron's A-6E dropped its laser 
guided bombs on the enemy positions and effectively 
ended the attack. 

Feb 1987: With the increased tensions in Lebanon 
surrounding the American hostages, Kennedy was 
ordered to operate off the coast of Lebanon. VA-75 
flew operations from the carrier in preparation for 
possible evacuation. 

Jan 1989: During routine training exercises off the 
northeastern tip of Libya, two F-14 Tomcats were 
approached by two Libyan MiG-23 jets, and after 
repeated attempts for a peaceful intercept, the F-l4s 
shot down the Libyan aircraft. VA-75's KA-6D tankers 
provided refueling support for the two F-l4s involved 
in the shoot down. 

Aug 1989: During a training exercise, a squadron A-6E 
SWIP aircraft was the first to fire a Sidewinder (AIM-9H) 
air-to-air missile, scoring a direct hit with the missile. 

Sep-Oct 1990 and Dec 1990-Jan 1991: The 
squadron participated in Operation Desert Shield, the 
build up of American and Allied forces to counter a 
threatened invasion of Saudi Arabia by Iraq and as 
part of an economic blockade of Iraq to force its with- 
drawal from Kuwait. 



1 34 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 




Commanding Officers — Continued 

Date Assumed Command 



A squadron SB2C-5 Helldiver on a flight over Valparaiso Harbor dur- 
ing its goodwill cruise to South America aboard Leyte (CV 32) in 1946. 



Home Port Assignments 



Location 

NAS Alameda 
NAAS Watsonville 
NAAS Crows Landing 
NAS Hilo 
NAS Kaneohe 
NAS Alameda 
NAS Astoria 
NAS San Diego 
NAS Quonset Point 
NAS Oceana 



Assignment Date 

20 Jul 1943 

26 Sep 1943* 
10 Dec 1943* 
29 Feb 1944* 
05 Jun 1944* 
20 Dec 1944 

25 Jan 1945 
22 Apr 1945 

27 Nov 1945 
Oct 1957 



* Temporary shore assignments while the squadron conducted train- 
ing in preparation for combat deployment. 



CDR Benjamin G. Preston 


Tan 


1953 


CDR Griffith P Stokes 

VJi_y XV V 1 X 11 1 XLX XX. t J LV-/XVV-, i J 


Sep 


1954 

± y y~ 


CDR Samuel M Tharn Tr 

vji_/ XV lJCXX X 1 LI V,X i. VX . llltllLV. 


Tan 

j an 


1956 


CDR Clifford T Brown 

Vji_/ XV Vjlll X V_JX VJ. 1 j • XJ1 v_/ VV X X 


02 Mav 


1957 


CDR C R Anderson 

Vjiy xv vj. ±v. n.i ivj.v.iovyii 


02 Jul 


1958 


CDR C S Curtis 


10 Tul 


1959 


CDR Stanley Montunnas 


May 


i960 


COR Alnhonse G Goodherlet 

Vj1_/1V j. 11 L/1XV/A 1U V, V_l . V_l Vy^^V^l /V^l IV. L 


Apr 


1961 


CDR K H Tvons 

Vj1_/1v 1 V . XX. Xj y KJ1 li> 


13 Anr 


1962 


CDR T A Denton Tr 

V_j_L/XV J . C\ . JJ^l 1LW1 1, J 1 . 


05 Apr 


1963 


CDR William L Harris Tr 

VJ1_/1V VV llllLllll Xj. lltlllli?^ J 


02 Aug 


1963 


CDR Tennarcl A Sne^H 

VjX_/ XV 1 jV. V-'X XclX VJ. i V . lJI 1 V, Ck V.1 


08 Mav 


1964 


COR Tennarcl F Vopt Tr 

vjiyiv xjv- v^x xcxx vj. x . vwiiL^ Ji- 




1965 


CDR William R Warwick 

VjJj'iv vv ixxxcxxn i } . vv cix vv ivrv 


18 Sep 


1965 


CDR Robert J. Sample 


08 Jul 


1966 


CDR Terrolrl A/T 7arh^Ti;is 

Vj1_/1V I V,X X WXVX -LVX . * i CA \ ' 1 l { 1 XCLiJ 


30 Jun 


1967 


CDR Alastair S Falconer 


31 Tul 


1968 


CDR Richard P Bordone 

Vj1_/ XV XVXv-X 1 1 1 1 VJ. X . \-J WX VXV7X XV., 


25 Tul 


1969 

i.j \jy 


CDR Charles J. Cellar, Jr. 


03 Tul 


1970 


CDR Everett W. Foote 


03 Jun 


1971 


CDR Charles M. Earnest 


07 Jun 


1972 


CDR William H Greene Tr 

Vj1_/1v VV 1XXXCXXX1 XX. VJlV^^llV.^ «J 


28 Nov 


1972 


CDR Morgan M France 

vjly XV iviv/l tlcll 1 ivx. 1 nil lv.\. 


22 Feb 


1974 


CDR Melvin L. Seidel 


07 Apr 


1975 

-i y / J 


CDR David T Oshurn 

v_/l_/ XV 1 ' <X V XvJ. Xj • Vy Cj y_s LI 1 X X 


02 Jul 


1976 


CDR Kenneth R Werhan 

VJly XV 1 V L 1 111L. Ill XV. VWllltlll 


18 Oct 


1977 


CDR Anthony J. Lynch 


12 Jan 


1979 


CDR Rodney A. Bankson 


08 Jan 


1980 


CDR Joseph S. Mobley 


30 Jan 


1981 


CDR Earl D. Wolfgang 


19 Mar 


1982 


CDR James R. Glover 


13 Oct 


1983 


CDR Gregory C. Brown 


03 Apr 


1985 


CDR Alfred G. Harms, Jr. 


26 Oct 


1986 


CDR John T. Meister 


14 Apr 


1988 


CDR Robert E. Besal 


29 Sep 


1989 



Commanding Officers 





Date Assumed Command 


LCDR Charles C. Gold 


20 Jul 


1943 


LCDR Harlan R. Dickson 


27 Nov 


1943 


LCDR George D. Ghesquiere 


05 Feb 


1944 


LCDR Mark Eslick, Jr. 


12 Feb 


1944 


LCDR George D. Ghesquiere 


12 Oct 


1944 


LT Max H. Matzick (acting) 


25 Jan 


1945 


LT Donald L. Wilson (acting) 


01 Feb 


1945 


LT Donald L. Wilson 


25 Apr 


1945 


LCDR William D. Carter 


19 Aug 


1946 


LCDR L. Weidlein (acting) 


15 Jun 


1948 


LCDR William B. Morton 


21 Jun 


1948 


LCDR Nils R. Larson 


16 Dec 


1949 


LCDR H. K. Evans 


10 Mar 


1951 


LCDR W. M. Harnish (acting) 


05 Dec 


1952 




A squadron F4U-4 Corsair launches from Bon Homme Richard (CV 
3D, circa 1952 (Courtesy Robert Lawson Collection). 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume 1 135 



Aircraft Assignment 



Aircraft Assignment — Continued 



Type of Aircraft 



SBD-5 



SB2C-1 

SB2C-1C 

SB2C-3 

SB2C-4 

SB2C-4E 

SBW-5 

SB2C-5 



F4U-4B 
F4U-4 



Date Type First Received 

20 Jul 1943 
25 Mar 1944 
25 Apr 1944 
10 Jul 1944 
Feb 1945 
Mar 1945 
Jul 1946 
Jul 1946 
15 Apr 1948 
Dec 1948 



Type of Aircraft 




Date Type First Received 

Jun 1949 
Jun 1950 
Aug 1954 
Apr 1956 
14 Nov 1963 
21 Dec 1967 
18 Dec 1970 
06 Aug 1973 



* The AD-6 designation was changed to A-1H in 1962. 



Major Overseas Deployments 



Date of 


Date of 


Air 




Type of 


Area of 


Departure 


Return 


Wing 


Carrier 


Aircraft 


Operation 


16 Aug 1944 


20 Dec 1944 


CVG-18 


CV 11 


SB2C-3 


Pacific 


16 Sep 1946 


12 Dec 1946 


CVG-18 


cv 32 


SB2C-5/ SBW-5 


Carib/East Coast 












of South America 


03 Apr 1947 


09 Jun 1947 


CVAG-7 


cv 32 


SB2C-5/SBW-5 


Med 


30 Jul 1947 


19 Nov 1947 


CVAG-7 


cv 32 


SB2C-5 


Med 


04 Jan 1949 


23 May 1949 


CVG-7 


cv 32 


F4U-4 


Med 


10 Jul 1950 


10 Nov 1950 


CVG-7 


CVB 41 


AD-4 


Med 


20 May 1952 


08 Jan 1953 


CVG-7 


cv 31 


AD-4 


WestPac/Korea 


16 Sep 1953 


21 Feb 1954 


CVG-7 


CVA 20 


AD-4 


NorLant/Med 


04 May 1955 


10 Dec 1955 


CVG-7 


CVA 12 


AD-6 


WestPac 


03 Sep 1957 


22 Oct 1957 


CVG-7 


CVA 60 


AD-6 


NorLant 


02 Sep 1958 


12 Mar 1959 


CVG-7 


CVA 15 


AD-6 


Med 


04 Aug I960 


03 Mar 1961 


CVG-7 


CVA 62 


AD-6 


Med 


04 Aug 1961 


19 Dec 1961 


CVG-7 


CVA 62 


AD-6 


Med 


19 Apr 1962 


27 Aug 1962 


CVG-7 


CVA 62 


AD-6 


Med 


10 May 1965 


13 Dec 1965 


CVW-7 


CVA 62 


A-6A 


WestPac/Vietnam 


13 Jun 1966 


01 Feb 1967 


CVW-7 


CVA 62 


A-6A 


Med 


18 Nov 1967 


28 Jun 1968 


CVW-11 


CVA 63 


A-6A/B 


WestPac/Vietnam 


09 Jul 1969 


22 Jan 1970 


CVW-3 


CVA 60 


A-6A 


Med 


17 Jun 1970 


09 Nov 1970 


CVW-3 


CVA 60 


A-6A/B 


Med 


07 Jun 1971 


28 Oct 1971 


CVW-3 


CVA 60 


A-6A/B & KA-6D 


NorLant/Med 


11 Apr 1972 


13 Feb 1973 


CVW-3 


CVA 60 


A-6A/B & KA-6D 


WestPac/Vietnam 


27 Sep 1974 


19 Mar 1975 


CVW-3 


CV 60 


A-6E & KA-6D 


Med 


06 Jan 1976 


28 Jul 1976 


CVW-3 


CV 60 


A-6E & KA-6D 


Med 


11 Jul 1977 


23 Dec 1977 


CVW-3 


CV 60 


A-6E & KA-6D 


Med 


03 Oct 1978 


08 Apr 1979 


CVW-3 


CV 60 


A-6E & KA-6D 


Med 


10 Mar 1980 


27 Aug 1980 


CVW-3 


CV 60 


A-6E & KA-6D 


Med 


04 Jan 1982 


14 Jul 1982 


CVW-3 


CV 67 


A-6E & KA-6D 


Med/IO 


25 May 1983 


01 Jul 1983 


CVW-3 


CV 67 


A-6E & KA-6D 


NorLant 


27 Sep 1983 


02 May 1984 


CVW-3 


CV 67 


A-6E & KA-6D 


SoLant/Med 


18 Aug 1986 


03 Mar 1987 


CVW-3 


CV 67 


A-6E & KA-6D 


Med 


02 Aug 1988 


01 Feb 1989 


CVW-3 


CV 67 


A-6E & KA-6D 


Med 


15 Aug 1990 


28 Mar 1991 


CVW-3 


CV 67 


A-6E & KA-6D 


Med/Red Sea 



1 36 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 




A formation of squadron AD-6 Skyraiders. 



Air Wing Assignments 



Unit Awards Received 



Air Wing 

CVG- 1 8/ CVAG-7/ 
CVG-7/CVW-7* 
COMFAIRNORFOLK 
CVW-11 

COMFAIRNORFOLK 
CVW-3 



Tail Code 
L/AG** 

NH 

AC 



Assignment Date 

20 Jul 1943 

01 Jul 1967 
10 Oct 1967 
28 Jun 1968 
15 Oct 1968 



Unit Award 
NUC 



* CVG-18 was redesignated CVAG-7 on 15 November 1946. On 1 
September 1948, CVAG-7 was redesignated CVG-7. CVG-7 was 
redesignated CVW-7 when Carrier Air Group (CVG) designations 
were redesignated Carrier Air Wings (CVW) on 20 December 1963. 

** The tail code was changed from L to AG in 1957. The effective 
date for this change was most likely the beginning of FY 58 (1 July 
1957). 



WW-II Campaign 
Medal (Asiatic/ 
Pacific) 

NAVE 

AFEM 



Inclusive Dates 

22 Jun 1952 

05 Jun 1965 
18 May 1972 
14 Aug 1988 

17 Jan 1991 
Oct 1944 



01 Jul 1968 
24 Oct 1962 
17 Jun 1965 
29 Jun 1965 
06 Nov 1983 
02 Dec 1983 
31 Jan 1984 



Covering Unit Award 
18 Dec 1952 
21 Nov 1965 
08 Jan 1973 
22 Jan 1989 
28 Feb 1991 
Nov 1944 



31 Dec 1969 
20 Nov 1962 

03 Jul 1965 
27 Nov 1983 

21 Jan 1984 

22 Feb 1984 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 137 





Unit Awards Received- 


-Continued 




Unit Awards Received- 


-Continued 


Unit Award 


inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 


Unit Award 


inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 




25 Feb 1984 


29 Feb 1984 




13 May 1968 


01 Jun 1968 


MT 1C 


17 Sep 1970 


18 Oct 1970 




06 May 1972 


07 May 1972 




01 Jan 1973 


31 Dec 1973 




17 May 1972 


22 Jun 1972 




01 Oct 1979 


15 Nov 1980 




30 Jun 1972 


16 Jul 1972 




15 Jul 1982 


22 Apr 1984 




27 Jul 1972 


23 Aug 1972 


MEM 
IN JZiiVl 


18 Oct 1962 


23 Oct 1962 




02 Sep 1972 


19 Sep 1972 


PT TP 


23 Dec 1967 


01 Jun 1968 




29 Sep 1972 


21 Oct 1972 


VNSM 


04 Jul 1965 


09 Aug 1965 




25 Oct 1972 


26 Oct 1972 




25 Aug 1965 


21 Sep 1965 




03 Nov 1972 


08 Dec 1972 




14 Oct 1965 


12 Nov 1965 




18 Dec 1972 


31 Dec 1972 




22 Dec 1967 


22 Feb 1968 


KSM 


18 Jun 1952 


24 Dec 1952 




04 Mar 1968 


27 Mar 1968 


SASM 


14 Sep 1990 


28 Mar 1991 




12 Apr 1968 


01 May 1968 


KLM 


17 Jan 1991 


28 Feb 1991 




A squadron A-6E Intruder refuels from a French Super Etendard off Lebanon in 1984. 



1 38 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



VA-76 

Lineage 

Established as Attack Squadron SEVENTY SIX (VA- 
76) on 1 June 1955. 

Disestablished on 30 September 1969- The first 
squadron to be assigned the VA-76 designation. 

Squadron Insignia and Nickname 

The squadron's in- 
signia was approved 
by CNO on 28 March 
1956. The following 
colors were used for 
the insignia: blue 
background with a 
dark blue border; 
purple hat with black 
crown, red piping on 
brim and a white 
cockade; black mus- 
ket; and the scroll 
was gold with red let- 
tering and outlined in 
dark blue. 

Nickname: Spirits (from motto Fighting Spirits of 
76), 1955-1969. 




The squadron 's insignia, reflecting 
their motto "Fighting Spirits of 76. " 



exercise. The aircraft were used for limited daylight 
fighter protection for embarked ASW aircraft. 

29 May-15 Jun 1965: While temporarily based 
ashore at Naval Station Roosevelt Roads, Puerto Rico, 
the squadron flew armed reconnaissance sorties over 
the Dominican Republic during a crisis in that country. 

11 May 1966: The squadron's commanding officer, 
Commander J. B. Linder, was awarded the Silver Star 
for leading the squadron on a strike against a mobile 
SAM site at Thanh Hoa, North Vietnam. 

6 Dec 1966: The squadron's commanding officer, 
Commander A. D. McFall, was killed when his aircraft 
crashed following a night launch from Bon Homme 
Richard (CVA 3D. 

1 May 1967: During a sortie against North Vietnam's 
MiG airfield at Kep, Lieutenant Commander Theodore 
R. Swartz shot down a MiG- 17 with air-to-ground 
rockets. This was the first, and only, MiG aircraft to be 
downed by an A-4 Skyhawk during the Vietnam con- 
flict. Lieutenant Commander Swartz received the Silver 
Star for his action. 

14 Jul 1967: The squadron's commanding officer, 
Commander R. B. Fuller, was shot down during a sor- 
tie over North Vietnam. He was released from captivity 
on 4 March 1973 following the 27 January 1973 cease- 
fire agreement with North Vietnam. 



Chronology of Significant Events 

Nov-Dec 1956: The squadron operated from 
Forrestal (CVA 59) off the coast of the Azores during 
the Suez Crisis, awaiting a call to enter the 
Mediterranean if necessary. 

Jun 196I: The squadron deployed aboard Intrepid 
(CVA 11) and operated in the Caribbean during the 
Dominican Republic crisis. 

19 Oct-08 Dec 1962: The squadron deployed 
aboard Enterprise (CVAN 65) and operated in the 
Caribbean during the Cuban missile crisis and naval 
blockade. 

Mar 1964: Conducted operations in the vicinity of 
Cyrpus during a conflict in that country between 
Turkish and Greek Cypriots. 

31 Jul-3 Oct 1964: While embarked in Enterprise, the 
squadron participated in Operation Sea Orbit, the first 
circumnavigation of the world by a nuclear task force. 
The sixty-five day voyage was accomplished without 
replenishment. The squadron participated in numerous 
air power demonstrations during the voyage. 

8-25 Feb 1965: A detachment of the squadron's A- 
4C Skyhawks, configured with Sidewinder missiles, 
were embarked in Essex (CVS 9) for an Atlantic Fleet 



Home Port Assignments 

Location Assignment Date 

NAS Oceana 01 Jun 1955 

NAS Lemoore 24 Aug 1966 



Commanding Officers 





Date Assumed Command 


CDR F. J. Gibson 


01 Jun 1955 


CDR W. R. McQuilkin 


30 Jul 1957 


LCDR H. R. Cheuvront 


03 Oct 1958 


CDR H. Ricks 


04 Dec 1959 


CDR L. M. Nearman 


14 Dec I960 


CDR W. R. Bascom 


18 Dec 1961 


CDR J. R. Sanderson 


15 Nov 1962 


CDR George A. Reaves III 


11 Dec 1963 


CDR Richard C. Boyd 


30 Nov 1964 


CDR James B. Linder 


21 Oct 1965 


CDR Albert D. McFall 


01 Oct 1966 


CDR Robert B. Fuller (acting) 


06 Dec 1966 


CDR Robert B. Fuller 


19 Dec 1966 


LCDR R. A. Mauldin 


14 Jul 1967 


CDR J. J. Barth 


1968 


CDR R. A. Mauldin 


1969 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume 1 139 




Type of Aircraft 



F2H-2 



F9F-8 
F9F-8B 



Aircraft Assignment 



A squadron F2H-2 Banshee in 1956. 

Aircraft Assignment — Continued 

Type of Aircraft 



Date Type First Received 

Jul 1955 
06 Jan 1956 
Apr 1956 



A4D-2 

A4D-2N/A-4C* 



Date Type First Received 

27 May 1959 
02 Mar 1962 



' The A4D-2N designation was changed to A-4C in 1962. 



Major Overseas Deployments 



Date of 


Date of 


Air 




Type of 


Area of 


Departure 


Return 


Wing 


Carrier 


Aircraft 


Operation 


15 Jan 1957 


22 Jul 1957 


CVG-1 


CVA 59 


F9F-8B 


Med 


09 Jun 1958 


08 Aug 1958 


ATG-181 


CVA 11 


F9F-8B 


NorLant 


04 Aug I960 


17 Feb 1961 


CVG-6 


CVA 11 


A4D-2 


Med 


03 Aug 1961 


01 Mar 1962 


CVG-6 


CVA 11 


A4D-2 


Med 


03 Aug 1962 


11 Oct 1962 


CVG-6 


CVAN 65 


A4D-2N 


Med 


06 Feb 1963 


04 Sep 1963 


CVG-6 


CVAN 65 


A-4C 


Med 


08 Feb 1964 


03 Oct 1964 


CVW-6 


CVAN 65 


A-4C 


Med/World Cruise 


26 Oct 1965 


21 Jun 1966 


CVW-9 


CVAN 65 


A-4C 


WestPac/Vietnam 


26 Jan 1967 


25 Aug 1967 


CVW-21 


CVA 31 


A-4C 


WestPac/Vietnam 


30 Apr 1968 


27 Jan 1969 


CVW-7 


CVA 62 


A-4C 


Med 



1 40 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



Air Wing Assignments 



Air Wing Assignments — Continued 



Air Wing 


Tail Code 


Assignment Date 


ATG-182 


Q* 


01 Jim 1955 


CVG-1 


T 


Nov 1956 


ATG-182 


AN 


23 Jul 1957 


ATG-181 


AM 


15 Mar 1958 


CVG-6 


AF 


08 Aug 1958 


CVG-8 


AJ 


01 Apr 1959 


CVG-6/CVW-6t 


AF/AE 


29 Aug 1959 


CVW-9 


NG 


22 Sep 1965 



Air Wing 
CVW-21 
CVW-7 

COMFAIRALAMEDA 



Tail Code 

NP 

AG 



Assignment Date 

01 Sep 1966 
Dec 1967 
27 Jan 1969 



•The tail code O was not assigned until 24 July 1956. 

t CVG-6 was redesignated CVW-6 when Carrier Air Group (CVG) 
designations were redesignated Carrier Air Wings (CVW) on 20 
December 1963. Sometime in the latter part of 1962 CVG-6's tail 
code was changed from AF to AE. 




Squadron F9F-8Bs prepares for launch from Forrestal (CVA 59) during her first deployment to the Med in 1957. 



Unit Awards Received 



Unit Awards Received — Continued 



Unit Award 
AFEM 

NEM 

PUC 
VNSM 



Inclusive Dates 

03 Jun 1965 
24 Oct 1962 
19 Oct 1962 

04 Jun 1961 
26 Feb 1967 
02 Dec 1965 
04 Feb 1966 
16 Mar 1966 
22 Apr 1966 



Covering Unit Award 
06 Jun 1965 

03 Dec 1962 
23 Oct 1962 
18 Jun 1961 
30 Jul 1967 
14 Jan 1966 
23 Feb 1966 
12 Apr 1966 

14 May 1966 



Unit Award 



Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 



RVNGC 



23 May 1966 

25 Feb 1967 
17 Apr 1967 
27 Jun 1967 
02 Dec 1965 
11 Dec 1965 
21 Dec 1965 

24 Dec 1965 

26 Dec 1965 



06 Jun 1966 
21 Mar 1967 
07 May 1967 
29 Jul 1967 



30 Dec 1965 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 141 



Unit Awards Received — Continued 



Unit Awards Received — Continued 



Unit Award 



Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 



Unit Award 



Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 



01 Jan 1966 
04 Jan 1966 
04 Feb 1966 
19 Feb 1966 
23 Feb 1966 
27 Mar 1966 
30 Mar 1966 

02 Apr 1966 
11 Apr 1966 



02 Jan 1966 
14 Jan 1966 



28 Mar 1966 
31 Mar 1966 



29 Apr 1966 

28 Feb 1967 
07 Mar 1967 
11 Mar 1967 
13 Mar 1967 
16 Mar 1967 
20 Mar 1967 

29 Apr 1967 
16 May 1967 



21 Mar 1967 
01 May 1967 
18 May 1967 




A squadron A-4C Skyhawk on the elevator of Enterprise (CVAN 65) in 1965. 



1 42 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



VA-84 

Lineage 

Established as Attack Squadron EIGHTY FOUR (VA- 
84) on 15 September 1948. 

Disestablished on 29 November 1949- The first 
squadron to be assigned the VA-84 designation. 

Squadron Insignia and Nickname 

The squadron's insignia was approved by CNO on 9 
May 1949- The following colors were used in the 




insignia: the four cards had a white background and 
were outlined in black; the card on the left had a red 
letter "A" with a torpedo, outlined in black, with a red 
tip and aft section and a yellow tailfin and mid-section; 
the next card had a black letter "A" with two bombs, 
outlined and shaded in black, with a yellow tip and aft 
section, red tailfin and mid-section; the third card had a 
red letter "A" with three missiles outlined in black, red 
tip and tailfins and a white mid-section; the fourth card 
had a black "A" with black and white crossed machine 
guns and red bullets with black base and tips; the air- 
plane was blue with black and white markings, a green 
strip on the tail, the nose was green and white, the 
gloves were green with white and yellows markings 
and a red star outlined in black with a white center, 
the lips and eye of the plane were yellow with a black 
pupil, the teeth were white and the tongue was red; 
the cloud was white, outlined in black with light blue 
shading at the bottom. 
Nickname: unknown. 



Home Port Assignments 



The squadron 's short-lived insignia. 



Location 

NAAS Oceana 
NAS Jacksonville 



Assignment Date 

15 Sep 1948 
05 Nov 1948 




Squadron pilots in front of a squadron AM-1 Mauler, circa 1948. 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



143 



Commanding Officers 



Aircraft Assignment — Continued 



LCDR R. P. Kline 



Date Assumed Command 

15 Sep 1948 



Type of Aircraft 



AM-1 



Date Type First Received 

20 Nov 1948 




A squadron AM-1 Mauler in flight, circa 1949 (Courtesy Robert Lawson Collection). 



1 44 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



VA-85 



Commanding Officers 



Lineage 

Established as Attack Squadron EIGHTY FIVE (VA- 
85) on 15 September 1948. 

Disestablished on 29 November 1949. The first 
squadron to be assigned the VA-85 designation. 

Squadron Insignia and Nickname 

There are no records of an approved insignia or 
nickname for VA-85. 

Home Port Assignments 



Location 

NAAS Oceana 
NAS Jacksonville 



Assignment Date 

15 Sep 1948 
05 Nov 1948 



LCDR Frank B. Stone 



Date Assumed Command 

15 Sep 1948 



Type of Aircraft 



TBM-3E 



AM-1 



Air Wing 

CVG-8 



Aircraft Assignment 



Date Type First Received 

Oct 1948 
30 Nov 1948 



Air Wing Assignments 



Tail Code 
E 



Assignment Date 

15 Sep 1948 




A squadron AM-1 Mauler aboard Midway (CVB 41 ) in May 1949 (Courtesy Wallace Russel Collection). 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 1 45 




I 




SECOND VA-85 

Lineage 

Attack Squadron EIGHT HUNDRED FIFTY NINE 
(VA-859) was a reserve squadron called to active duty 
on 1 February 1951. 

Redesignated Attack Squadron EIGHTY FIVE (VA- 
85) on 4 February 1953. 

Disestablished on 30 September 1994. The second 
squadron to be assigned the VA-85 designation. 

Squadron Insignia and Nickname 

The squadron's insignia was approved by CNO on 
22 May 1951. Colors for the woodpecker astride a 

rocket were: a blue 
gray background out- 
■l lined in black; brown 

Ik woodpecker shaded 
with white and differ- 
ent tones of brown; 
the shoes, gloves and 
T ^^^^ face of the bird were 
white; the beak and 
Mae West lifejacket 
were yellow; its eyes 
were green with black 
pupils and a red head; 
the bomb was dark 
blue with a red flame and the rocket was shaded light 
green on top and dark green on the bottom, outlined 
in black. 

Following the squadron's redesignation a new 
insignia was approved by CNO on 24 May 1954. 
Colors for the winged bomb insignia were: blue back- 
ground outlined in red; the clouds and wings were sil- 
ver with black markings; the lightning bolt was yel- 
low, edged with red; and the bomb was black with 
silver shading. 

The CNO approved a 
change in the squadron's 
insignia on 7 May 1958. 
Colors for the black fal- 
con insignia are as fol- 
lows: a white back- 
ground outlined in black; 
the falcon is black with a 
white eye; the scroll has 
a white background out- 
lined in black, with black 
lettering. 

Nickname: Black 
Falcons, 1958-1994. 



The squadron's first insignia. 





The stylized black falcon was 
used by the squadron for over 
35 years before its disestab- 
lishment. 



The squadron 's second insignia 
was a more stylized designed 
reflecting its attack mission. 



Chronology of Significant Events 

May 1958: As part of an Atlantic Fleet training exer- 
cise (LANTRAEX 1-58), two of the squadron's AD-6 
Skyraiders, flown by Lieutenant (jg)s Strang and 
Woods, flew nonstop from Forrestal (CVA 59), operat- 
ing off the coast of Jacksonville, Florida, to NAS North 
Island. The flight was conducted below 1000 feet to 
demonstrate the low level and long range capability of 
the squadron. Two days later the aircraft returned, 
nonstop, to Forrestal. 

5 Feb 1963: The squadron's commanding officer, 
Commander C. H. Mundt, was killed in an air crash. 

22 Dec 1965: The squadron's commanding officer, 
Commander B. J. Cartwright, and his bombardier/navi- 
gator, Lieutenant Ed Gold, failed to return from a 
strike into North Vietnam and are listed as missing in 
action, presumed dead. 

21 Apr 1966: The squadron's commanding officer, 
Commander J. E. Keller, and his bombardier/navigator, 
Lieutenant Commander E. E. Austin, were killed in 
action during a mission over North Vietnam. 

27 Apr 1966: While serving with VA-85 as a bom- 
bardier/navigator in an A-6A, Lieutenant (jg) Brian E. 
Westin was awarded the Navy Cross for heroism dur- 
ing a combat mission over North Vietnam when he 
risked his own life to save that of his wounded pilot, 
Lieutenant W. R. Westerman. 

6 Sep 1968: The squadron's commanding officer, 
Commander K. L. Coskey, was shot down over North 
Vietnam. His bombardier/navigator, Lieutenant 
Commander R. G. McKee, was rescued but Commander 
Coskey became a POW. He survived the internment at 
Hanoi and was released on 14 March 1973- 

Jul 1974: Following a coup that overthrew the gov- 
ernment of Cyprus, VA-85 operated from Forrestal in 
the vicinity of Cyprus and provided air cover for the 
evacuation of Americans and foreign nationals from 
the island. 

May-Jun 1981: Following increased military action 
and Israeli reprisal raids against Syrian missile posi- 
tions in southern Lebanon, Forrestal was ordered to 
the eastern Mediterranean. VA-85 operated from the 
carrier while on station off the coast of Lebanon. 

Jul 1982: Following the Israeli invasion of Lebanon in 
June and the siege of west Beirut, Forrestal operated off 



1 46 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



the coast of Lebanon with VA-85 prepared to provide 
air support for a possible evacuation of Americans. 

Aug-Sep 1982: Forrestal and its embarked squadrons 
provided air cover for the landing of 800 U.S. Marines 
in Beirut, Lebanon. The Marines became part of the 
multi-national peacekeeping force in that country. 

4 Dec 1983: During Kennedy 's operations off the 
coast of Lebanon in support of the Multi-national 
Peacekeeping Force, several of the carrier's F-14 recon- 
naissance aircraft received hostile fire from Syrian sur- 
face-to-air missile and anti-aircraft positions on 3 
December. A retaliatory strike was flown by elements 
of CVW-3 and aircraft from Independence (CV 62) 
against the Syrian antiaircraft positions near Hammana, 
Lebanon. One of the squadron's A-6Es was lost in the 
attack, its pilot, Lieutenant Mark Lange, was killed and 
the NFO, Lieutenant Robert Goodman, was captured 
by the Syrians. He was released 4 January 1985. 

Jul 1984: The squadron operated in the Caribbean 
and off the coast of Central America to assist the Coast 
Guard with drug interdiction operations. 

10 Oct 1985: The squadron's KA-6D tanker aircraft 
refueled F-l4s from Saratoga (CV 60) enroute to their 
intercept of an Egyptian 737 airliner that was carrying 
Arab terrorists who had hijacked the Italian cruise ship 
Achille Lauro on 7 October and murdered an American 
citizen. The F-l4s forced the airliner to land at NAS 
Sigonella, Sicily, leading to the capture of the terrorists. 

24 Mar 1986: Libyan missiles were fired at U.S. 
Naval forces operating in the Gulf of Sidra. This action 
precipitated a retaliation against Libya by squadrons 



from Saratoga (CV 60), America (CV 66) and Coral 
Sea (CV 43). VA-85's A-6Es conducted a follow-up 
attack with Rockeye bombs on a Libyan Combattante 
II G-class fast attack missile craft that had been hit by 
a Harpoon missile fired by a VA-34 aircraft. The attack 
resulted in the sinking of the Combattante II. VA-85 
aircraft also attacked a Nanuchka II class missile 
corvette with Rockeyes, damaging the corvette. 

25 Mar 1986: VA-55 attacked a Nanuchka with 
Rockeyes, damaging but not stopping the corvette. A 
VA-85 aircraft then launched a Harpoon against the 
corvette which resulted in its sinking. 

6 Sep 1989: Squadron aircraft flew missions in sup- 
port of the evacuation of personnel from the American 
Embassy in Beirut, Lebanon, due to the unstable situa- 
tion in that country. 

17 Jan-28 Feb 1991: The squadron participated in 
Operation Desert Storm, combat strikes against targets 
in Iraq and the Kuwaiti theater of operations. During 
this period of combat the squadron flew 585 combat 
sorties, consisting of 1,700 flight hours and expended 
over 850 tons of ordnance. 

Aug 1993: Squadron aircraft flew missions over 
Bosnia-Hercegovina in support of U. N. Operation 
Deny Flight. 

Nov 1993: Squadron aircraft flew sorties over 
Mogadishu, Somalia, in support of U. N. Operation 
Continue Hope. 

Dec 1993: Squadron aircraft provided support for 
reconnaissance missions over southern Iraq, part of 
Operation Southern Watch. 




A squadron AD-6 Skyraider during its deployment to the Med aboard Lake Champlain (CVA 39) in 1954-1955. 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



147 



Home Port Assignments 



Commanding Officers — Continued 



Location 

NAS Niagara Falls 
NAS Jacksonville 
NAS Quonset Point 
NAS Oceana 



Assignment Date 

01 Feb 1951 
05 Apr 1951 
26 Sep 1951 
11 Jun 1952 



Commanding Officers 



LCDR Richard E. Moot 
LCDR Joe W. Williams, Jr. 
CDR Adolph Mencin 
CDR Charles H. Jaep III 
CDR Jack C. Heishman 
CDR M. G. Bramilla, Jr. 
CDR E. M. Coppola 
CDR Howard C. Lee 
CDR William Carrier, Jr. 
CDR N. O. Scott, Jr. 
CDR Clinton H. Mundt 
CDR John C. McKee 
CDR A. H. Barie 
CDR Billie J. Cartwright 
CDR J. E. Keller 
CDR Ronald J. Hays 
CDR J. C. Patterson 
CDR Ken L. Coskey 
CDR Charles B. Hunter 
CDR Herbert A. Hope, Jr. 
CDR Donald H. Westbrock 
CDR David W. Timberlake 
CDR Michael R. Hall 
CDR Arthur M. Page 
CDR Donald V. Boecker 



Date Assumed Command 

01 Feb 1951 
26 Sep 1952 
Mar 1954 
06 May 1955 
Sep 1956 
Sep 1957 
05 Sep 1958 
25 Mar 1959 

29 Nov I960 
Dec 1961 

21 Dec 1962 

05 Feb 1963 
Feb 1964 

15 Apr 1964 

22 Dec 1965 
21 Apr 1966 
20 Jun 1967 
28 Jun 1968 

06 Sep 1968 
06 Jun 1969 
05 Jun 1970 

08 May 1971 

30 May 1972 
01 May 1973 

01 Jul 1974 



CDR Richard C. Allen 
CDR Charles R. Bubeck 
CDR Bruce B. Bremner 
CDR Ronald J. Zlatoper 
CDR Daniel P. Wright 
CDR John I. Dow 
CDR Kirby E. Hughes II 
CDR Paul L. Bernard 
CDR Robert W. Day 
CDR Robert A. Tolhurst 
CDR James B. Stone, Jr. 
CDR Dean W. Ellerman, Jr. 
CDR Lewis W. Crenshaw, Jr. 
CDR Ralph C. Miko 
CDR Bruce A. Weber 
CDR John W. Scheffler 



Date Assumed Command 

07 Nov 1975 

25 Feb 1977 
May 1978 

26 Jun 1979 
07 Aug 1980 

10 Dec 1981 
18 Feb 1983 
17 Aug 1984 

01 Jul 1985 
16 Sep 1986 

11 Mar 1988 
05 Jun 1989 
16 Aug 1990 
01 Sep 1991 
22 Sep 1992 
29 Sep 1993 



Aircraft Assignment 



Type of Aircraft 



TBM-3E 



AD-2 
AD-4 

AD-6/A-lHj: 



Date Type First Received 
* 

05 Mar 1951 

Jul 1952 
Jan 1954f 

06 Mar 1964 
18 Nov 1970 
09 Dec 1971 



* During its reserve duty prior to 1 February 1951, the squadron 
Hew the TBM-3E. 

t The full complement of AD-6s was not received until May 1954. 
$ The AD-6 designation was changed to A-1H in 1962. 
§ VA-85 was the first fleet squadron to receive the A-6E. 





A squadron Skyraider, circa 1963 or 1964. 



1 48 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



Major Overseas Deployments 



Date of 


Date of 


Air 




Type of 


Area of 


Departure 


Return 


Wing 


Carrier 


Aircraft 


Operation 


28 Nov 1951 


11 Jun 1952 


CVG-8 


CV 40 


AD-2 


Med 


26 Apr 1953 


21 Oct 1953 


CVG-8 


CVA 43 


AD-4 


Med 


27 Sep 1954 


15 Apr 1955 


CVG-8 


CVA 39 


AD-6 


Med 


12 Mar 1956 


05 Sep 1956 


CVG-8 


CVA 11 


AD-6 


Med 


28 Jan I960 


31 Aug I960 


CVG-8 


CVA 59 


AD-6 


Med 


09 Feb 1961 


25 Aug 1961 


CVG-8 


CVA 59 


AD-6 


Med 


03 Aug 1962 


02 Mar 1963 


CVG-8 


CVA 59 


AD-6/A-1H 


Med 


19 Oct 1965 


13 Jun 1966 


CVW-11 


CVA 63 


A-6A 


WestPac/Vietnam 


05 Nov 1966 


19 Jun 1967 


CVW-11 


CVA 63 


A-6A 


WestPac/Vietnam 


10 Apr 1968 


16 Dec 1968 


CVW-6 


CVA 66 


A-6A/B 


WestPac/Vietnam 


11 Aug 1969 


08 May 1970 


CVW-14 


CVA 64 


A-6A/B 


WestPac/Vietnam 


05 Jan 1971 


02 Jul 1971 


CVW-17 


CVA 59 


A-6A & KA-6D 


Med 


22 Sep 1972 


06 Jul 1973 


CVW-17 


CVA 59 


A-6E & KA-6D 


Med 


11 Mar 1974 


11 Sep 1974 


CVW-17 


CVA 59 


A-6E & KA-6D 


Med 


05 Mar 1975 


22 Sep 1975 


CVW-17 


CV 59 


A-6E & KA-6D 


Med 


04 Apr 1978 


26 Oct 1978 


CVW-17 


CV 59 


A-6E & KA-6D 


Med/NorLant 


27 Nov 1979 


07 May 1980 


CVW-17 


CV 59 


A-6E &KA-6D 


Med 


02 Mar 1981 


15 Sep 1981 


CVW-17 


CV 59 


A-6E & KA-6D 


Med/NorLant 


08 Jun 1982 


16 Nov 1982 


CVW-17 


CV 59 


A-6E & KA-6D 


Med/IO 


25 May 1983 


01 Jul 1983 


CVW-3 


CV 67 


A-6E 


NorLant 


27 Sep 1983 


02 May 1984 


CVW-3 


CV 67 


A-6E 


SoLant/Med 


25 Aug 1985 


16 Apr 1986 


CVW-17 


CV 60 


A-6E & KA-6D 


Med/IO 


05 Jun 1987 


17 Nov 1987 


CVW-17 


CV 60 


A-6E & KA-6D 


Med 


08 Feb 1989 


03 Apr 1989 


CVW-1 


CV 66 


A-6E & KA-6D 


Carib/NorLant 


11 May 1989 


10 Nov 1989 


CVW-1 


CV 66 


A-6E & KA-6D 


Med/IO 


28 Dec 1990 


18 Apr 1991 


CVW-1 


CV 66 


A-6E & KA-6D 


Med/Red Sea/ 












Persian Gulf 


21 Aug 1991 


11 Oct 1991 


CVW-1 


CV 66 


A-6E & KA-6D 


NorLant 


02 Dec 1991 


06 Jun 1992 


CVW-1 


CV 66 


A-6E & KA-6D 


Med/Red Sea/ 












Persian Gulf 


11 Aug 1993 


05 Feb 1994 


CVW-1 


CV 66 


A-6E 


Med 



Air Wing Assignments 



Air Wing 


Tail Code 


Assignment Date 


CVG-8 


E/AJ* 


05 Apr 1951 


CVG-1 


AB 


19 May 1963 


CVG-8/CVW-8f 


AJ 


25 May 1963 


COMFAIRNORFOLK 




06 Apr 1964 


CVW-11 


NH 


23 Jul 1965 


COMFAIRNORFOLK 




12 Aug 1965 


CVW-11 


NH 


23 Sep 1965 


COMFAIRNORFOLK 




10 Jun 1966 


CVW-11 


NH 


25 Sep 1966 


COMFAIRNORFOLK 




Jun 1967 


CVW-6 


AE 


01 Oct 1967 


CVW-14 


NK 


01 Apr 1969 


COMFAIRNORFOLK 




May 1970 


CVW-17 


AA 


01 Aug 1970 


CVW-3 


AC 


01 Jan 1983 


CVW-17 


AA 


31 Dec 1984 


CVW-1 


AB 


01 Jan 1988 



* The tail code was changed from E to AJ in 1957. The effective date 
for this change was most likely the beginning of FY 58 (1 July 
1957). 

t CVG-8 was redesignated CVW-8 when Carrier Air Group (CVG) 
designations were redesignated Carrier Air Wings (CVW) on 20 
December 1963. 



Unit Awards Received 

Unit Award Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 



NAVE 


01 Jul 1963 


30 Jun 1964 




01 Jan 1973 


30 Jun 1974 




01 Jul 1975 


30 Sep 1976 


AFEM 


16 Oct 1969 


24 Oct 1969 




16 Mar 1970 


23 Mar 1970 




06 Nov 1983 


27 Nov 1983 




02 Dec 1983 


21 Jan 1984 




31 Jan 1984 


22 Feb 1984 




25 Feb 1984 


29 Feb 1984 


MUC 


07 Sep 1969 


30 Apr 1970 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 1 49 



Unit Awards Received — Continued 



Unit Awards Received — Continued 



Unit Award 


Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 




15 Jul 1982 


22 Apr 1984 


NEM 


20 Jan 1986 


29 Mar 1986 


NUC 


04 Dec 1966 


28 Apr 1967 




12 May 1968 


20 Nov 1968 




10 Oct 1985 


11 Oct 1985 




23 Mar 1986 


29 Mar 1986 




17 Jan 1991 


07 Feb 1991 


RVNGC 


15 Jan 1966 


19 Jan 1966 




23 Jan 1966 


27 Jan 1966 




30 Jan 1966 






03 Feb 1966 






07 Mar 1966 






10 Mar 1966 






13 Mar 1966 






22 Apr 1966 




VNSM 


25 Nov 1965 


23 Dec 1965 




15 Jan 1966 


04 Feb 1966 




01 Apr 1966 


29 Apr 1966 



Unit Award 



SASM 
KLM 



Inclusive Dates 
08 May 1966 
08 Dec 1966 

02 Mar 1967 

12 Apr 1967 
08 May 1967 
29 May 1968 
06 Jul 1968 
17 Aug 1968 

27 Sep 1968 

11 Sep 1969 
01 Nov 1969 
07 Dec 1969 

05 Jan 1970 

12 Feb 1970 
26 Mar 1970 

15 Jan 1991 

17 Jan 1991 



Covering Unit Award 
26 May 1966 
03 Jan 1967 
28 Mar 1967 
28 Apr 1967 
23 May 1967 
28 Jun 1968 
03 Aug 1968 
12 Sep 1968 
30 Oct 1968 
03 Oct 1969 
23 Nov 1969 
22 Dec 1969 
30 Jan 1970 
01 Mar 1970 
17 Apr 1970 
03 Apr 1991 
28 Feb 1991 




A squadron A-6E Intruder, with CAG markings, landing aboard America (CV 66) in 1993- 



1 50 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 




VA-93 

Lineage 

Established as Fighter Squadron NINETY THREE 
(VF-93) on 26 March 1952. 

Redesignated Attack Squadron NINETY THREE (VA- 
93) on 15 September 1956. 

Disestablished on 31 August 1986. The first 
squadron to be assigned the VA-93 designation. 

Squadron Insignia and Nickname 

The squadron's first insignia was approved by CNO 
on 14 April 1954. Colors for the flying tiger shark 

insignia were: a back- 
ground of light blue 
with a buzz saw outline 
in red; the upper part of 
the shark was dark blue, 
the lower part white and 
the shark was outlined 
in black; gold wings 
with a white eye and 
red pupil; the carrier 
was gray outlined in 
black with white streaks 
The flying tiger shark was the running from the carrier 

squadron's first insignia. tQ ^ ^ of ^ shafk 

Following the squad- 
ron's redesignation a 
new insignia was ap- 
proved by CNO on 8 
May 1957. The skull and 
stylized aircraft insignia 
colors were: a dark blue 
background; white 
clouds outlined in black; 
black skull with white 
highlights and red eyes; 
yellow lightning bolts The skull and stylized aircraft 
outlined in black; silver insignia was adopted by the 
gray aircraft outlined in squadron in 1957. 

black and red contrails 
outlined in black; a 
white scroll outlined in 
black with black letters. 

A new insignia was 
approved by CNO on 19 
November 1965. 
Insignia colors for the 
stylized aircraft with a 
series of circles were: a 
dark blue outer circle 
followed by a medium 
blue circle, then a light 





The stylized aircraft design was the 
last insignia used by the squadron. 



blue circle and a white center; the stylized aircraft were 
dark blue with red contrails; the scroll had a white 
background outlined in black, with black lettering. 
Nickname: Blue Blazers, 1954-1976. 
Ravens, 1976-1986. 



Chronology of Significant Events 

May 1963: Following the military losses of the Lao 
neutralist to the Pathet Lao in the Plaine de Jarres, 
Laos, Ranger (CVA 61) transited to the South China 
Sea to support possible operations in Laos. 

15 Oct 1963: The squadron established a 
Detachment Q for deployment aboard the anti-subma- 
rine carrier Bennington (CVS 20) to provide daylight 
fighter protection for the ASW aircraft. The detachment 
flew A-4B Skyhawks. 

7 Feb 1965: Following a Viet Cong attack against the 
American advisors compound at Pleiku, South 
Vietnam, a reprisal strike, named Flaming Dart I, was 
ordered by the President. VA-93 participated in this 
strike, but upon reaching the target, the military bar- 
racks at Vit Thu Lu, the mission was aborted due to 
the weather. 

11 Feb 1965: Participated in Flaming Dart II, retalia- 
tory strikes against the military barracks at Chanh Hoa, 
North Vietnam. 

15 Mar 1965: Participated in Rolling Thunder strikes 
against ammunition storage area in Phu Qui, North 
Vietnam. 

May-Oct 1972: Participated in Operation Linebacker 
I, heavy air strikes against targets in North Vietnam to 
reduce that country's ability to continue the war effort 
in South Vietnam. 

Apr 1975: Participated in Operation Frequent Wind, 
the evacuation of American personnel from Saigon, 
South Vietnam as the country fell to the communists. 

Aug-Sep 1976: Operated near the Korea Peninsula 
following the murder of U.S. military personnel in the 
Korean DMZ by North Koreans. 

Nov-Dec 1979: In response to the seizure of the 
American Embassy and its staff, by an Iranian mob, 
and the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan, Midway (CV 
41) operated in the Arabian Sea. 

May-Jun 1980: Following the massacre of several 
hundred people in the city of Kwangju, South Korea, 
Midway operated off the coast of South Korea until 
the crisis had subsided. 

Dec 1981: Following unrest in Korea, Midway oper- 
ated off the coast of South Korea for several days. 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 151 



Home Port Assignment 



Commanding Officers — Continued 



Location 

NAS Alameda 
NAS Lemoore 

NS Yokosuka (NAF Atsugi & Misawa)* 
NAS Lemoore 



Assignment Date 

26 Mar 1952 
08 Mar 1962 
05 Oct 1973* 
16 Apr 1986 



* VA-93, along with CVW-5 and Midway (CVA 41), were part of a 
program to permanently assign a carrier and air wing to an overseas 
home port. Midways new home port was NS Yokosuka, Japan, and 
the squadron would normally operate out of NAF Atsugi or Misawa 
when the carrier was at NS Yokosuka. The assignment was effective 
30 June 1973. However, the squadron did not arrive until 5 October 
1973. 



Commanding Officers 



LCDR E. W. Smith (acting) 
LCDR W. E. Carver 
LCDR J. T. Barker 
CDR G. E. Hartley 
CDR Paul E. Padget 
CDR Robert F. Kanze 
CDR E. W. Gendron 
CDR William H. Hile, Jr. 
CDR J. W. Porter, Jr. 
CDR Robert F. Schoultz 



Date Assumed Command 

26 Mar 1952 

23 Apr 1952 
May 1953 

Jul 1955 

24 Sep 1956 
30 Apr 1958 

27 May 1959 
21 Jul I960 

09 Jun 1961 
27 Mar 1962 



CDR William M. Gortney 
CDR E. W. O'Callaghan 
CDR A. J. Monger 
CDR W. G. Sizemore 
CDR R. S. Salin 
CDR R. R. Wilson 
CDR Thomas W. Schaaf 
CDR David L. Glunt, Jr. 
CDR Edwin R. Kohn, Jr. 
CDR Carl E. Erie 
CDR Jerry L. Terrell 
CDR Douglas L. Clarke 
CDR Walter V. Roeser 
CDR William A. Dougherty, Jr. 
CDR Rodger W. Wright 
CDR John W. Patterson 
CDR Clarence S. Vaught 
CDR Eugene F. Mitchell 
CDR Marion R. Rackowitz 
CDR James H. Finney 
CDR Dennis W. Irelan 
CDR Harry W. Hartsell 
CDR David V. Park* 



Date Assumed Command 
02 Mar 1963 

05 Feb 1964 
11 Jan 1965 
04 Jan 1966 

Jan 1967 

17 Jan 1968 
10 Jul 1968 
19 Jan 1970 

19 Nov 1970 
22 Jul 1971 
13 Jul 1972 

29 Jan 1973 

10 May 1974 

06 Jun 1975 

18 Sep 1976 
3 Jan 1977 

30 Mar 1978 
22 Jun 1979 
22 Oct 1980 
21 Dec 1981 

11 May 1982 
04 Oct 1984 
15 Jun 1986 



* Commander Park assumed the duties of VA-93 as Officer in 
Charge, not Commanding Officer. 




A squadron F9F-8 Cougar flies along side a VC-61 Det M F9F-8 during deployment to WestPac in 1956 aboard Oriskany (CVA 34). 



1 52 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



Aircraft Assignment 



Aircraft Assignment — Continued 



Type of Aircraft 



FG-1D 



F9F-2 
F9F-5 
F9F-8 



A4D-1 
A4D-2 

A4D-2N/A-4C* 



Date Type First Received 

May 1952 
May 1952 
Sep 1953 
Jan 1955 
26 Nov 1956 
25 May 1958 
01 Sep I960 



Type of Aircraft 



A-4B 
A-4E 
A-4F 



A-7B 
A-7A 
A-7E 



Date Type First Received 

15 Oct 1963 
Sep 1966 
Sep 1967 

20 Apr 1969 
Mar 1973 
Apr 1977 



* The A4D-2N designation was changed to A-4C in 1962. 



Major Overseas Deployments 



Date of 


Date of 


Air 




Type of 


Area of 


Departure 


Return 


Wing 


Carrier 


Aircraft 


Operation 


15 Dec 1952 


14 Aug 1953 


CVG-9 


CVA 47 


F9F-2 


Korea 


11 May 1954 


12 Dec 1954 


CVG-9 


CVA 12 


F9F-5 


World Cruise 


11 Feb 1956 


13 Jun 1956 


CVG-9 


CVA 34 


F9F-8 


WestPac 


16 Sep 1957 


25 Apr 1958 


CVG-9 


CVA 14 


A4D-1 


WestPac 


06 Feb I960 


30 Aug I960 


CVG-9 


CVA 61 


A4D-2 


WestPac 


11 Aug 1961 


08 Mar 1962 


CVG-9 


CVA 61 


A4D-2N 


WestPac 


09 Nov 1962 


14 Jun 1963 


CVG-9 


CVA 61 


A-4C 


WestPac 


05 Aug 1964 


06 May 1965 


CVW-9 


CVA 61 


A-4C 


WestPac/Vietnam 


26 Oct 1965 


21 Jun 1966 


CVW-9 


CVAN 65 


A-4C 


WestPac/Vietnam 


05 Jan 1967 


22 Jul 1967 


CVW-5 


CVA 19 


A-4E 


WestPac/Vietnam 


27 Jan 1968 


10 Oct 1968 


CVW-5 


CVA 31 


A-4F 


WestPac/Vietnam 


14 Oct 1969 


01 Jun 1970 


CVW-2 


CVA 61 


A-7B 


WestPac/Vietnam 


16 Apr 1971 


06 Nov 1971 


CVW-5 


CVA 41 


A-7B 


WestPac/Vietnam 


10 Apr 1972 


03 Mar 1973 


CVW-5 


CVA 41 


A-7B 


WestPac/Vietnam 


11 Sep 1973 


05 Oct 1973 


CVW-5 


CVA 41 


A-7A 


WestPac* 


26 Nov 1973 


22 Dec 1973 


CVW-5 


CVA 41 


A-7A 


WestPac 


29 Jan 1974 


06 Mar 1974 


CVW-5 


CVA 41 


A-7A 


WestPac 


18 Oct 1974 


20 Dec 1974 


CVW-5 


CVA 41 


A-7A 


WestPac 


13 Jan 1975 


18 Feb 1975 


CVW-5 


CVA 41 


A-7A 


WestPac 


31 Mar 1975 


29 May 1975 


CVW-5 


CVA 41 


A-7A 


WestPac 


04 Oct 1975 


19 Dec 1975 


CVW-5 


CV 41 


A-7A 


WestPac/IO 


13 Mar 1976 


26 Apr 1976 


CVW-5 


CV 41 


A-7A 


WestPac 


19 May 1976 


22 Jun 1976 


CVW-5 


CV 41 


A-7A 


WestPac 


09 Jul 1976 


04 Aug 1976 


CVW-5 


CV 41 


A-7A 


WestPac 


01 Nov 1976 


17 Dec 1976 


CVW-5 


CV 41 


A-7A 


WestPac 


11 Jan 1977 


01 Mar 1977 


CVW-5 


CV 41 


A-7A 


WestPac 


19 Apr 1977 


25 Apr 1977 


CVW-5 


CV 41 


A-7A 


WestPacf 


18 Aug 1977 


02 Sep 1977 


CVW-5 


CV 41 


A-7E 


WestPac 


27 Sep 1977 


21 Dec 1977 


CVW-5 


CV 41 


A-7E 


WestPac/IO 


11 Apr 1978 


23 May 1978 


CVW-5 


CV 41 


A-7E 


WestPac 


09 Nov 1978 


23 Dec 1978 


CVW-5 


CV 41 


A-7E 


WestPac 


11 Jan 1979 


20 Feb 1979 


CVW-5 


CV 41 


A-7E 


WestPac 


07 Apr 1979 


18 Jun 1979 


CVW-5 


CV 41 


A-7E 


IO 


20 Aug 1979 


14 Sep 1979 


CVW-5 


CV 41 


A-7E 


WestPac 


30 Sep 1979 


20 Feb 1980 


CVW-5 


CV 41 


A-7E 


IO 


14 Jul 1980 


26 Nov 1980 


CVW-5 


CV 41 


A-7E 


WestPac/IO 


23 Feb 1981 


05 Jun 1981 


CVW-5 


CV 41 


A-7E 


WestPac/IO 


26 Jun 1981 


16 Jul 1981 


CVW-5 


CV 41 


A-7E 


WestPac 


03 Sep 1981 


06 Oct 1981 


CVW-5 


CV 41 


A-7E 


WestPac 


26 Apr 1982 


18 Jun 1982 


CVW-5 


CV 41 


A-7E 


WestPac 


14 Sep 1982 


11 Dec 1982 


CVW-5 


CV 41 


A-7E 


NorPac/WestPac 


02 Jun 1983 


14 Aug 1983 


CVW-5 


CV 41 


A-7E 


WestPac 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 1 53 



Major Overseas Deployments — Continued 



Date of 


Date of 


Air 




Type of 


Area of 


Departure 


Return 


Wing 


Carrier 


Aircraft 


Operation 


25 Oct 1983 


11 Dec 1983 


CVW-5 


CV 41 


A-7E 


WestPac 


28 Dec 1983 


23 May 1984 


CVW-5 


CV 41 


A-7E 


IO 


15 Oct 1984 


12 Dec 1984 


CVW-5 


CV41 


A-7E 


WestPac 


01 Feb 1985 


28 Mar 1985 


CVW-5 


CV 41 


A-7E 


WestPac 


10 Jun 1985 


14 Oct 1985 


CVW-5 


CV 41 


A-7E 


IO/WestPac 


15 Nov 1985 


12 Dec 1985 


CVW-5 


CV41 


A-7E 


WestPac 


17 Jan 1986 


30 Mar 1986 


CVW-5 


CV 41 


A-7E 


WestPac 



* Midway (CVA 41) with CVW-5 and its assigned squadrons, including VA-93, were forward deployed and home ported overseas at NS 
Yokosuka, Japan. Only operations outside the home waters of Japan are listed as deployments. 

t During the period 25 April to 17 August 1977, VA-93 was shore based at NAS Cubi Point, Philippines, transitioning from the A-7A to the A-7E. 




A squadron A-4E Skyhawk aboard Hancock (CVA 19) during their 1967 combat cruise to Vietnam. Notice the stylized aircraft on the fuselage aft 
of the jet intake. 



Air Wing Assignments 



Unit Awards Received 



Air Wing 

CVG-9/CVW-9t 
CVW-5 

COMFAIRALAMEDA 
CVW-2 

COMFAIRLEMOORE 

CVW-16 

CVW-5 



Tail Code 
N/NG* 
NF 

NE 

AH 

NF 



Assignment Date 

Mar 1952 
01 Aug 1966 
01 Nov 1968 
19 May 1969 
01 Jun 1970 
01 Sep 1970 
16 Feb 1971 



* The tail code was changed from N to NG in 1957. The effective 
date for this change was most likely the beginning of FY 58 (1 July 
1957). 

t CVG-9 was redesignated CVW-9 when Carrier Air Group (CVG) 
designations were redesignated Carrier Air Wings (CVW) on 20 
December 1963. 



Unit Award 


Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 


KPUC 


25 Jan 1953 


27 Jul 1953 


NUC 


31 Jan 1953 


27 Jul 1953 




29 Apr 1975 


30 Apr 1975 




01 Jan 1978 


30 Jun 1979 


MUC 


27 Oct 1969 


12 May 1970 




07 May 1971 


28 Oct 1971 




13 Nov 1979 


08 Feb 1980 




27 Jul 1982 


01 May 1984 


NAVE 


01 Jul 1962 


30 Jun 1963 




01 Jan 1970 


30 Jun 1971 




01 Jan 1982 


30 Jun 1983 


AFEM 


24 Jun I960 


25 Jun I960 




01 May 1963 


05 May 1963 



1 54 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 





Unit Awards Received- 


-Continued 


Unit Awards Received— 


-Continued 


Unit Award 


inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 


Unit Award Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 




19 Sep 1964 


20 Sep 1964 


12 Jun 1967 


27 Jun 1967 




01 Oct 1964 


09 Oct 1964 


20 Feb 1968 


24 Mar 1968 




28 Nov 1964 


30 Dec 1964 


13 Jun 1968 


07 Jul 1968 




17 Jan 1965 


17 Mar 1965 


21 Jul 1968 


18 Aug 1968 




04 Apr 1965 


13 Apr 1965 


27 Aug 1968 


14 Sep 1968 




04 May 1968 


07 May 1968 


16 Nov 1969 


07 Dec 1969 




10 Jan 1970 


13 Jan 1970 


17 Dec 1969 


06 Jan 1970 




12 Apr 1970 


13 Apr 1970 


29 Jan 1970 


18 Feb 1970 




29 Apr 1975 


30 Apr 1975 


27 Feb 1970 


30 Mar 1970 


HSM 


29 Apr 1975 


30 Apr 1975 


16 Apr 1970 


13 May 1970 


NEM 


15 Apr 1979 


06 Jun 1979 


17 May 1971 


09 Jun 1971 




21 Nov 1979 


07 Feb 1980 


29 Jun 1971 


20 Jul 1971 




19 Aug 1980 


13 Nov 1980 


31 Jul 1971 


17 Aug 1971 




12 Mar 1981 


19 May 1981 


26 Sep 1971 


11 Oct 1971 


PUC 


30 Apr 1972 


09 Feb 1973 


01 May 1972 


01 Jun 1972 


RVNGC 


30 Mar 1972 


15 Jul 1972 


11 Jun 1972 


07 Jul 1972 


VNSM 


02 Dec 1965 


14 Jan 1966 


16 Jul 1972 


13 Aug 1972 




04 Feb 1966 


23 Feb 1966 


23 Aug 1972 


10 Sep 1972 




16 Mar 1966 


12 Apr 1966 


19 Sep 1972 


12 Oct 1972 




22 Apr 1966 


14 May 1966 


23 Oct 1972 


23 Nov 1972 




23 May 1966 


06 Jun 1966 


03 Dec 1972 


22 Dec 1972 




05 Feb 1967 


25 Feb 1967 


31 Dec 1972 






15 Mar 1967 


12 Apr 1967 


04 Jan 1973 


24 Jan 1973 




28 Apr 1967 


04 Jun 1967 


03 Feb 1973 


09 Feb 197 




A flight of squadron A-7B Corsair lis in 1969- 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 1 55 



VA-94 

Lineage 

Established as Bombing Squadron NINETY NINE 
(VB-99) on 1 July 1943. 

Redesignated Bombing Squadron TWENTY (VB-20) 
on 15 October 1943. 

Redesignated Attack Squadron NINE A (VA-9A) on 
15 November 1946. 

Redesignated Attack Squadron NINETY FOUR (VA- 
94) on 12 August 1948. 

Disestablished on 30 November 1949- The first 
squadron to be assigned the VA-94 designation. 

Squadron Insignia and Nickname 

The squadron insignia was approved by CNO on 9 
December 1943- Colors for the cat and skull insignia 

were: light blue back- 
ground with white bor- 
der and dark blue out- 
line; the cat was black 
and white with green 
eyes; the skull was shad- 
ed white and green with 
black outlines and shad- 
ows; helmet was mus- 
tard yellow, goggles were 
brown with white shad- 
ing, the glasses were 
green and black; and a 
yellow bomb with brown 
and white shading. 
Twenty's Tough Kitty, 




The squadron insignia was ap- 
proved for use in December 1943- 



Nickname: 
1943-1946. 



Bombing 



Chronology of Significant Events 

Jul-Oct 1943: VB-99 was established as an experi- 
mental squadron for the new SB2C aircraft until its 
redesignation as VB-20 and assignment to CVG-20. 

31 Aug 1944: The squadron's first combat action 
involved an attack on the Bonin Islands. 

Sep 1944: The squadron participated in pre-invasion 
strikes on Palau Islands and provided air support for 
landings on Peleliu Island. 

Oct 1944: Squadron aircraft participated in air 
strikes against Okinawa, Formosa and Luzon. 

24 Oct 1944: The squadron participated in the Battle 
for Leyte Gulf. VB-20's SB2Cs flew sorties against a 
powerful Japanese surface force in the Sibuyan Sea. 
These attacks contributed to the sinking of the 
Musashi, one of the two largest battleships in the 
world. The following squadron personnel were award- 
ed the Navy Cross for this action: Ensigns M. E. 
Adams, R. J. Barnes, H. A. Koster, R. D. Olson, M. T. 



Ross, and D. D. J. Spanagel; Lieutenant (jg)s P. P. 
Cook, J. M. Glynn, R. D. Reed, J. P. Trytten, and J. E. 
Tsarnas; Lieutenants W. N. Christensen, J. S. Cooper, 
H. C. Hogan, R. E. Moore, R. D. Warner and R. S. 
Wilcox; and Commander R. E. Riera. 

25 Oct 1944: Squadron aircraft were part of the Fast 
Carrier Task Force that attacked the Japanese carrier 
force in the Battle of Cape Engano. Four Japanese car- 
riers were sunk during this engagement. The following 
squadron personnel were awarded the Navy Cross for 
their actions during the Battle of Cape Engano: 
Ensigns H. C. Bearden, D. F. Hughes, C. 2. Stevens III, 
and W. P. Wright; Lieutenant (jg) W. C. Phtilla; 
Lieutenants W. W. Anderson, C. Burkhart and L. C. 
Flynt; and Commander R. E. Riera. 

Nov 1944: Squadron aircraft flew strikes against a 
Japanese troop convoy in Ormoc Bay, Leyte and 
enemy positions on Luzon. 

Dec 1944: The squadron participated in strikes 
flown against Luzon. 

Jan 1945: Squadron aircraft flew strikes against 
Luzon, Formosa, Hong Kong, and Japanese convoys in 
South China Sea and Okinawa. 

12 Jan 1945: The following squadron personnel 
were awarded the Silver Star medal for action against 
a Japanese cruiser protecting a convoy of cargo ships: 
Lieutenants W. N. Christensen and W. W. Anderson 
and Lieutenant (jg) H. Rubner. 



Home Port Assignment 



Location 

NAS San Diego 
NAS Kaneohe 
NAS Barbers Point 
NAS Puunene 
NAS San Diego 
NAS Wildwood 
NAS Edenton 
NAAS Elizabeth City 
NAAS Charlestown 



Assignment Date 

01 Jul 1943 
21 Apr 1944* 
30 Apr 1944* 
17 Jun 1944* 
23 Feb 1945 
16 Apr 1945 
22 Jun 1945 
01 Nov 1945 
01 Mar 1946 



* Temporary shore assignment while the squadron conducted train- 
ing in preparation for combat deployment. 



Commanding Officers 



LCDR Louis J. Kirn 
LCDR Robert E. Riera 
LCDR Raymond E. Moore 
LT James S. Cooper (acting) 
LT James S. Cooper 
LCDR Lawrence G. Traynor 
LCDR Harlin M. Keister 



Date Assumed Command 

Jul 1943 
10 Nov 1943 
10 Nov 1944 
16 Apr 1945 
19 Apr 1945 

05 Jun 1947 

06 Jul 1948 



1 56 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



Aircraft Assignment 



Aircraft Assignment — Continued 



Type of Aircraft 



SBD-5 



SB2C-1C 

SB2C-3 

SB2C-4E 



Date Type First Received 
Jul 1943 

15 Nov 1943 
Jul 1944 
18 Apr 1945 



Type of Aircraft 



SBW-5 
SB7.C-5 



AD-2 



Date Type First Received 

04 Aug 1945 
Mar 1946 
04 Oct 1948 



Major Overseas Deployments 



Date of 
Departure 

16 Aug 1944 
23 Nov 1944 
09 Feb 1948 



Date of 
Return 

23 NOV 1944 

02 Feb 1945 
26 Jun 1948 



Air 
Wing 

CVG-20 
CVG-20 
CVAG-9 



Carrier 

CV 6* 

cv 16** 

CV47 



Type of 
Aircraft 

SB2C-3 
SB2C-3 
SB2C-5 



Area of 
Operation 

Pacific 
Pacific 
Carib/Med 



* The squadron transferred from Enterprise (CV 6) to Lexington (CV 16) and remained deployed in the Pacific. 

** The squadron completed its combat tour in the Pacific and transferred from Lexington (CV 16) to Kwajalein (CVE 98) for transporation back 
to the United States. 



Air Wing Assignments 

Air Wing Tail Code 

C VG-20/CVAG-9/ CVG-9* PS/D" 



Assignment Date 

15 Oct 1943 



* Established as CVG-20 on 15 October 1943. Redesignated CVAG-9 
on 15 November 1946. CVAG-9 redesignated CVG-9 on 1 September 
1948. CVG-9 was disestablished on 1 December 1949. 

** The tail code PS was assigned to Philippine Sea (CV 47) and CVG- 
9 in 1946. In 1948 the tail code for CVG-9 was changed to D. 



Unit Award 
NUC 



Unit Awards Received 



Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 



PUC 

Campaign Medal 
(Asiatic-Pacific) 



31 Aug 1944 
10 Oct 1944 

14 Dec 1944 
03 Jan 1945 

31 Aug 1944 
10 Oct 1944 

14 Dec 1944 
03 Jan 1945 



18 Sep 1944 
22 Nov 1944 
16 Dec 1944 

22 Jan 1945 

18 Sep 1944 
22 Nov 1944 
16 Dec 1944 

22 Jan 1945 




A flight of squadron SB2C-5 Helldivers during deployment to the 
Med in 1948 aboard Philippine Sea (CV 47). 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 157 




VA-95 

Lineage 

Established as Torpedo Squadron TWENTY (VT-20) 
on 15 October 1943- 

Redesignated Attack Squadron TEN A (VA-10A) on 
15 November 1946. 

Redesignated Attack Squadron NINETY FIVE (VA- 
95) on 12 August 1948. 

Disestablished on 30 November 1949- The first 
squadron to be designated VA-95. 

Squadron Insignia and Nickname 

The squadron's insignia was approved by CNO on 
21 March 1944. Colors for the vulture insignia were: 

background of light 
blue with an inner circle 
of white and a black 
outer circle; the bird 
was pearl gray with 
white highlights and 
outlined in black; the 
leg and ruff of feathers 
around the neck were 
white with blue mark- 
ings; the head, neck and 
feet a drab yellow, and 
the beak was black; the 
torpedo had shades of 
gray with a white, black 
and yellow streak, the nose was black and the torpedo 
was outlined in black; streaks emanating from the 
nose of the torpedo were blue and white. 
Nickname: unknown. 

Chronology of Significant Events 

1 Sep 1944: The squadron's first combat action 
involved strikes against shore installations on Chichi 
Jima in the Bonin Islands. 

Sep 1944: Squadron aircraft participated in strikes 
against Palau Islands in preparation for and support of 
the landings on Peleliu Island. 

Oct 1944: The squadron participated in strikes 
against Okinawa, Formosa and Luzon in preparation 
for and support of the landings on Leyte. 

15 Oct 1944: Lieutenant Edward B. Holley, flying a 
squadron TBM, shot down a Zero, Mitsubishi A6M 
fighter, over Luzon. 

24 Oct 1944: The squadron participated in the Battle 
for Leyte Gulf. VT-20's TBM-lCs flew sorties against a 
powerful Japanese surface force in the Sibuyan Sea. 
These attacks contrtibuted to the sinking of the mighty 
Musashi, one of the two largest battleships in the 
world. The following squadron personnel were award- 



Tie squadron insignia was ap 
proved in March 1944. 



ed the Navy Cross for their action against the Japanese 
task force: Ensigns W. T. Ross, W. J. Schaller, and G. 
Swint III; Lieutenant (jg) M. Throwbridge; Lieutenants 
C. H. H. Dickey, E. B. Holley, and R. E. McHenry, and 
Lieutenant Commander S. L. Prickett. 

25 Oct 1944: Squadron aircraft were part of the Fast 
Carrier Task Force that attacked the Japanese carrier 
force in the Battle of Cape Engano. Four Japanese car- 
riers were sunk during this engagement. The following 
squadron personnel were awarded the Navy Cross for 
their action during the Battle of Cape Engano : Ensigns 
T. E. Armour, J. L. Baxter, M. H. Krouse, and C. D. 
Leeper; Lieutenant (jg)s P. H. Bradley and C. F. 
Schlegel; and Lieutenants J. H. Howell, Jr., M. L. 
Leedom, E. E. Rodenburg, and R. J. Savage. 

Nov 1944: The squadron participated in strikes 
against a Japanese troop convoy in Ormoc Bay, Leyte 
and enemy positions on Luzon. 

Dec 1944: Strikes were flown against Luzon in 
preparation for the landings at Lingayan Gulf, Luzon. 

Jan 1945: Squadron aircraft flew strikes against 
Luzon, Formosa, Hong Kong, Japanese convoys in 
South China Sea and along coast of French Indochina, 
and Okinawa. 

12 Jan 1945: Lieutenant J. N. Howell, Jr and 
Lieutenant (jg) M. Throwbridge were awarded the 
Silver Star Medal for their action against a Japanese 
cruiser that was protecting a convoy off the coast of 
French Indochina. Their attacks contributed to the 
sinking of the cruiser. 



Home Port Assignments 



Location 

NAS San Diego 
NAS Barbers Point 
NAS Puunene 
NAS San Diego 
NAAF Lewiston 
NAS Edenton 
NAAS Elizabeth City 
NAAS Charlestown 



Assignment Date 

15 Oct 1943 
21 Apr 1944* 
17 Jun 1944* 
23 Feb 1945 

16 Apr 1945 
Jun 1945 

02 Nov 1945 
21 Mar 1946 



* Temporary shore assignment while the squadron conducted train- 
ing in preparation for combat deployment. 



Commanding Officers 



LCDR David E. Dressendorfer 
LCDR Samuel L. Prickett 
LCDR James N. Howell, Jr. 
LCDR J. J. Maechtlen 
LCDR Charles C. Ainsworth 



Date Assumed Command 

15 Oct 1943 
27 Dec 1943 

16 Apr 1945 

Jul 1947 
07 Feb 1949 



1 58 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



Aircraft Assignment 



Aircraft Assignment 



Type of Aircraft 



TBF-l/TBM-1 
TBM-1 C 



Date Type First Received 

Nov 1943 
Feb 1944 



Type of Aircraft 



TBM-3E 



AD-1 



Date Type First Received 
Jul 1945 
01 Aug 1949 



Major Overseas Deployments 



Date of 
Departure 

16 Aug 1944 
23 Nov 1944 
09 Feb 1948 



Date of 
Return 

23 NOV 1944 

02 Feb 1945 
26 Jun 1948 



Air 
Wing 

CVG-20 
CVG-20 
CVAG-9 



Carrier 

CV 6* 
CV l6t 
CV47 



Type of 
Aircraft 

TBM-1C 
TBM-1C 
TBM-3E 



Area of 
Operation 

Pacific 
Pacific 
Carib/Med 



Air Wing Assignments 



Unit Awards Received 



Air Wing Tail Code 

CVG-20/ CVAG-9/ PS/Df 
CVG-9* 



Assignment Date 

15 Oct 1943 



* Established as CVG-20 on 15 October 1943. Redesignated CVAG-9 
on 15 November 1946. CVAG-9 redesignated CVG-9 on 1 September 
1948. CVG-9 was disestablished on 1 December 1949. 

t The tail code PS was assigned to Philippine Sea (CV 47) and CVG- 
9 in 1946. In 1948 the tail code for CVG-9 was changed to D. 



Unit Award 
NUC 

PUC 

Campaign Medal 
(Asiatic-Pacific) 



Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 



31 Aug 1944 
10 Oct 1944 

14 Dec 1944 
03 Jan 1945 

31 Aug 1944 
10 Oct 1944 

14 Dec 1944 
03 Jan 1945 



18 Sep 1944 
22 Nov 1944 
16 Dec 1944 

22 Jan 1945 

18 Sep 1944 
22 Nov 1944 
16 Dec 1944 

22 Jan 1945 




A squadron TBM-1C aboard Enterprise (CV 6) in October 1944. Note the damage on the wing of the aircraft (Courtesy David Laucabaugh Collection). 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



159 




The squadron '$ plumed helmet 
insignia was approved in 1957. 



SECOND VA-95 

Lineage 

Established as Attack Squadron NINETY FIVE (VA- 
95) on 26 March 1952. 

Disestablished on 1 April 1970. The second 
squadron to be assigned the VA-95 designation. 

Squadron Insignia and Nickname 

The squadron's insignia was approved by CNO on 
16 January 1957. Colors for the knight plumed helmet 

were: black background 
on left hand side and 
silver on the right half 
of the circular design, 
with a silver outline on 
the left and a black out- 
line on the right; silver 
mace and black sword; 
the left side of the hel- 
met was silver with 
green and black mark- 
ings; the right side of 
the helmet was green 
with silver markings; 
the plume was red; and the scroll was silver, outlined 
in black with green lettering. 

Nickname: Skyknights, 1957-1963. 

Green Lizards, 1963-1970. 

Chronology of Significant Events 

Jan 1963: The squadron participated in cross deck 
operations with the British carrier HMS Hermes while 
operating in the western Pacific. 

May 1963: Following the military losses of Lao neu- 
tralists to the Pathet Lao in the Plaine de Jarres, Laos, 
Ranger (CVA 6l) transited to the South China Sea to 
support possible operations in Laos. 

Nov 1964-Apr 1965: The squadron particpated in 
support for photo reconnaissance missions and con- 
ducted strikes against targets in Laos. 

7 Feb 1965: Following a Viet Cong attack against the 
American advisors compound at Pleiku, South 
Vietnam, the President ordered a reprisal strike against 
North Vietnam, named Flaming Dart I. The squadron's 
target was the Vit Thu Lu Barracks. However, the 
strike turned back due to poor weather conditions. 

11 Feb 1965: Squadron aircraft participated in 
Flaming Dart II, retaliatory strikes against the Chanh 
Hoa military barracks near Dong Hoi, North Vietnam. 

Mar 1965: The squadron participated in Rolling 
Thunder strikes against the Phu Qui ammunition 
depot in North Vietnam. 

Apr 1966: The squadron departed Norfolk, Virginia, 



enroute to Vietnam as part of an air wing composed 
only of attack squadrons. 

Sep 1969: Following a coup that overthrew the 
Libyan monarchy Kennedy (CVA 67) cut short its visit 
to Cannes, France, and departed for operations in the 
Ionian Sea. The United States later extended diplomat- 
ic recognition to the new Libyan government. 

Home Port Assignments 





Location Assignment Date 


NAS Alameda 


26 Mar 1952 


NAS Moffett Field 


08 Mar 1962 


NAS Lemoore 


01 Apr 1963 


NAS Alameda 


04 Aug 1968 


Commanding Officers 




Date Assumed Command 


LCDR Samuel B. Berrey 


26 Mar 1952 


LT L. Wilson (acting) 


1953 


CDR David L. Berrey 


Aug 1953 


CDRJohn C. Allman 


Oct 1954 


CDR Donald L. Irgens 


Jan 1955 


CDR Martin J. Stack 


Sep 1956 


CDR F. L. Brady 


21 Mar 1958 


CDR Rollin E. Gray, Jr. 


20 Apr 1958 


CDR Carl Weisse 


04 Mar 1959 


CDR R. R. Renaldi 


02 Sep I960 


CDR Stanley F. Abele 


13 Jun 1961 


CDR H. G. Silliman 


17 Jul 1962 


CDR Harold J. Zenner 


19 Jul 1963 


CDR Dwight E. DeCamp 


05 Jun 1964 


CDR G. E. Jacobssen, Jr. 


15 Jun 1965 


CDR F. E. O'Connor, Jr. 


10 Jun 1966 


CDR W. E. Ohlrich, Jr. 


26 Jun 1967 


CDR M. A. Benero, Jr. 


1968 


CDR J. K. Hassett 


02 Jul 1969 



Aircraft Assignment 



Type of Aircraft Date Type First Received 


F6F-5 


21 Apr 1952 


AD-1 


19 May 1952 


AD-4NA 


03 Jul 1952 


AD-4 


Sep 1952 


AD-4L 


Oct 1952 


AD-6/A-1H* 


Oct 1953 


AD-7/A-1J* 


Sep 1956 


A-4C 


15 Jul 1965 


A-4B 


05 Dec 1965 


A-4C 


Sep 1968 


* The AD-6 and AD-7 designations were changed to A-1H and A-1J 



1962. 



1 60 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 




A squadron AD-6 Skyraider positioned on the forward part of the flight deck along with other air wing Skyraiders. The photo was taken during 
Hornet's (CVA 12) transit through the Suez Canal in June 1954 during her world cruise. 



Major Overseas Deployments 



Date of 


Date of 


Air 




Type of 


Area of 


Departure 


Return 


Wing 


Carrier 


Aircraft 


Operation 


15 Dec 1952 


14 Aug 1953 


CVG-9 


CVA 47 


AD-4/L/NA 


Korea 


11 May 1954 


12 Dec 1954 


CVG-9 


CVA 12 


AD-6 


World Cruise 


11 Feb 1956 


13Jun 1956 


CVG-9 


CVA 34 


AD-6 


WestPac 


16 Sep 1957 


25 Apr 1958 


CVG-9 


CVA 14 


AD-7 


WestPac 


06 Feb I960 


30 Aug I960 


CVG-9 


CVA 61 


AD-7 


WestPac 


11 Aug 1961 


08 Mar 1962 


CVG-9 


CVA 61 


AD-7 


WestPac 


09 Nov 1962 


14 Jun 1963 


CVG-9 


CVA 61 


AD-6/7 


WestPac 


05 Aug 1964 


06 May 1965 


CVW-9 


CVA 61 


A-1H/J 


WestPac/Vietnam 


04 Apr 1966 


21 Nov 1966 


CVW-10 


CVS 11 


A-4B 


WestPac/Vietnam 


15 Nov 1967 


04 Aug 1968 


CVW-8 


CVA 38 


A-4B 


Med 


05 Apr 1969 


21 Dec 1969 


CVW-1 


CVA 67 


A-4C 


Med 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 161 



Air Wing Assignments 



Unit Awards Received 



Air Wing 

CVG-9/CVW-9t 

COMFAIRALAMEDA 

CVW-10 

CVW-8 

COMFAIRALAMEDA 
CVW-1 

COMFAIRALAMEDA 



Tail Code 
N/NG* 

AK 
AJ 

AB 



Assignment Date 

26 Mar 1952 
02 Oct 1965 

01 Feb 1966 
Oct 1967 

26 Aug 1968 
Feb 1969 

02 Mar 1970 



* The tail code was changed from N to NG in 1957. The effective 
date for this change was most likely the beginning of FY 58 (1 July 
1957). 

t CVG-9 was redesignated CVW-9 when Carrier Air Group (CVG) 
designations were redesignated Carrier Air Wings (CVW) on 20 
December 1963. 



Unit Award 
KPUC 
NUC 
AFEM 



VNSM 



Inclusive Dates 

25 Jan 1953 
31 Jan 1953 
19 Sep 1964 
01 Oct 1964 
28 Nov 1964 

17 Jan 1965 
04 Apr 1965 
15 May 1966 

08 Jul 1966 

01 Sep 1966 

02 Oct 1966 



Covering Unit Award 
27 Jul 1953 
27 Jul 1953 
20 Sep 1964 

09 Oct 1964 
30 Dec 1964 

17 Mar 1965 
13 Apr 1965 
15 Jun 1966 

10 Aug 1966 
23 Sep 1966 

18 Oct 1966 




All 14 of the squadron 's A-4B Skyhawks are parked in numerical order on the flight line in 1967. 



1 62 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 




The squadron's "Green Lizard" 
insignia. 



THIRD VA-95 

Lineage 

Established as Attack Squadron NINETY FIVE (VA- 
95) on 1 April 1972. The third squadron to be assigned 
the VA-95 designation. 

Squadron Insignia and Nickname 

The squadron's insignia was approved by CNO on 
25 July 1972. Colors for the green lizard insignia are as 

follows: a white scroll 
with black letters and a 
black outline of the 
insignia and scroll; back- 
ground of the lower half 
is dark blue with black 
and yellow markings; 
background for the 
upper half is light blue 
with white rays outlined 
in black; the sun is 
orange with a yellow 
background; the lizard is 
green with black and 
yellow markings, the 
eye and teeth are white; and the trident is black. 
Nickname: Green Lizards, 1972-present. 

Chronology of Significant Events 

Apr 1973: The squadron provided support for 
Operation End Sweep, the clearing of mine fields 
along the coast of North Vietnam. 

Apr 1975: Squadron aircraft participated in 
Operation Frequent Wind, the evacuation of American 
personnel from Saigon. The squadron provided armed 
escort flights over the Saigon area for protection of the 
helos conducting the evacuation. 

15 May 1975: The squadron participated in the 
recovery of the American merchant ship SS Mayaguez 
following its capture by Cambodian gunboats. The 
squadron flew sorties in support of the Marine land- 
ings on Koh Tang Island and retaliatory strikes against 
Cambodian targets. Squadron aircraft struck the airfield 
and naval facility at Ream, Cambodia. The squadron's 
KA-6D aircraft were used to provide tanker support 
for the combat sorties. 

18-19 Apr 1988: The squadron participated in 
Operation Praying Mantis, retaliatory strikes against 
Iran after Samuel B. Roberts (FFG 58) struck an Iranian 
mine in international waters. Squadron aircraft attacked 
Iranian Boghammar speedboats, using Rockeye cluster 
bombs. They sunk one and damaged another. Later in 
the day, the Iranian frigate Sahand fired missiles at two 



of the squadron's aircraft while they were flying a sur- 
face combat air patrol for Joseph Strauss (DDG 16). The 
aircraft evaded the missiles and returned fire with two 
Harpoons and four laser-guided Skipper bombs. This 
attack was followed by a Harpoon firing from Joseph 
Strauss. The attack against the Sahand left her blazing. 
Eventually the fires reached her magazines, and the 
final explosions lead to her sinking. Following this 
action the sister ship of the Sahand, the Sabalan, left 
port and engaged several of the squadron's aircraft, fir- 
ing a missile at them. One of the squadron's Intruders 
responded with a laser-guided bomb that hit Sabalan, 
and she went dead in the water. The Sahalan was 
taken in tow by an Iranian tug, her fantail partially sub- 
merged. VA-95's aircraft were ordered not to continue 
the attack. The squadron continued to fly combat sor- 
ties during 19 April but no other action resulted. 

Oct-Nov 1990: During the Abraham Lincoln's CCVN 
72) cruise from the East to West Coast via Cape Horn, 
the squadron participated in joint exercises with the 
Argentinean, Chilean, and Ecuadorian Armed Forces. 



Home Port Assignments 



Location 

NAS Whidbey Island 



Assignment Date 

01 Apr 1972 



Commanding Officers 





Date Assumed Command 


CDR G. E. Wales 


01 Apr 1972 


CDR W. D. Zirbel 


1973 


CDR Van F. Westfall 


05 Apr 1974 


CDR Jerry W. Rogers 


1974 


CDR Robert M. McEwen 


29 Oct 1976 


CDR Ken G. Craig 


27 Jan 1978 


CDR Richard J. Toft 


1979 


CDR Patrick C. Hauert 


21 Aug 1980 


CDR Richard C. Wolter 


10 Dec 1981 


CDR Raymond T. Wojcik 


02 Feb 1983 


CDR John S. McMahon, Jr. 


01 Aug 1984 


CDR Jeremy C. Rosenberg 


01 Feb 1986 


CDR William H. Miller 


19 Jun 1987 


CDR John F. Schork 


01 Dec 1988 


CDR John R. Worthington 


25 May 1990 



Aircraft Assignment 



Type of Aircraft 



Date Type First Received 

1972* 
1972f 
1972f 
04 Feb 1976 



* The squadron received their first A-6A Intruders sometime 
between April and June 1972. 

t The squadron received their first A-6B and KA-6Ds sometime 
between October and December 1972. 




DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 163 



Major Overseas Deployments 



Date of 


Date of 


Air 




Type of 




Area of 


Departure 


Return 


Wing 


Carrier 


Aircraft 




Operation 


HQ Mar 1 073 


08 Nnv 1 073 




rVA 43 


A-6A/B & KA-6D 






07 Till 1 07^ 




rvA 43 


A-6A 8 


: KA-6D 




1 S Feb 1 Q77 


OS Ort 1077 

\1 J ULL i-y 1 / 




rv 43 


A-6E & 


: KA-6D 


WpstPar 


1 3 M-jr 1 Q70 


?? S(=n 1070 


rvw-1 1 

V W L 1 


rv 66 


A-6E & 


: KA-6D 


ivlCLl 


14 Apr 1981 


12 Nov 1981 


CVW-11 


CV66 


A-6E & 


: KA-6D 


Med/IO 


01 Sep 1982 


28 Apr 1983 


CVW-11 


CVN 65 


A-6E & 


: KA-6D 


NorPac/WestPac/IO 


30 May 1984 


20 Dec 1984 


CVW-11 


CVN 65 


A-6E & 


: KA-6D 


WestPac/IO 


15 Jan 1986 


12 Aug 1986 


CVW-11 


CVN 65 


A-6E & 


: KA-6D 


World Cruise 


25 Oct 1987 


24 Nov 1987 


CVW-11 


CVN 65 


A-6E & 


: KA-6D 


NorPac 


05 Jan 1988 


03 Jul 1988 


CVW-11 


CVN 65 


A-6E & 


: KA-6D 


WestPac/IO 


17 Sep 1989 


16 Mar 1990 


CVW-11 


CVN 65 


A-6E & 


: KA-6D 


World Cruise 


25 Sep 1990 


20 Nov 1990 


CVW-11 


CVN 72 


A-6E & 


: KA-6D 


East Coast to West 
Coast cruise via 
Cape Horn 




Air Wing Assignments 




Unit Awards Received- 


—Continued 


Air Wing 


Tail Code 


Assignment Date 


Unit Award 




Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 


CVW-15 


NL 


1972 


HSM 


29 Apr 1975 


30 Apr 1975 


CVW-11 


NH 


01 Jul 1978 


JMUA 


23 Oct 1982 
18 Apr 1988 


19 Apr 1988 




Unit Awards Received 


NAVE 


01 Jul 1980 
01 Jan 1988 


31 Dec 1981 
31 Dec 1988 


Unit Award 
AFEM 


Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 

29 Apr 1975 30 Apr 1975 
15 May 1975 

15 Feb 1988 09 Mar 1988 
25 Mar 1988 19 Apr 1988 


MUC 
NEM 


01 Jan 1990 
22 Apr 1975 
15 May 1975 
15 Feb 1988 
09 May 1981 
30 Apr 1986 


31 Dec 1990 
30 Apr 1975 

21 May 1988 
18 Oct 1981 
27 Jun 1986 




A squadron A-6E Intruder in flight, 1987. 



1 64 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



VA-96 

Lineage 

Established as Attack Squadron NINETY SIX (VA-96) 
on 30 June 1956. 

Disestablished on 10 April 1958. The first squadron 
to be assigned the VA-96 designation. 

Squadron Insignia and 
Nickname 

The squadron's 
insignia was approved 
by CNO on 20 February 
1957. Colors for the 
eagle crest and sword 
insignia were: light blue 
background outlined in 
orange, with an orange 
scroll and black letter- 
ing; the shield was 
orange with a black 
stylized eagle; the eagle's wing feathers, tongue and 
feet were white; the sword and maces were yellow. 
Nickname: unknown. 

Chronology of Significant Events 

4 Jun 1957: The squadron's commanding officer, 
Commander M. K. Dennis, was lost in a night midair 
collision while operating from Kearsarge (CVA 33) off 
the coast of California. 

Sep 1957: Kearsarge operated in the vicinity of 
Taiwan following the build up of Chinese communist 
forces opposite the offshore islands belonging to 
Taiwan. 




VA-96's approved insignia. 



-1 









A squadron AD Skyraider launches from Kearsarge (CVA 33) during 
its 1957—1958 western Pacific cruise. 



Home Port Assignments 



Location 

NAS Miramar 
NAS Moffett Field 



Assignment Date 

30 Jun 1956 
Aug 1956 



Commanding Officers 



CDR Milton K. Dennis 
CDR Stanley E. Sloan 



Date Assumed Command 

30 Jun 1956 
04 Jun 1957 



Aircraft Assignment 



Type of Aircraft 



AD-6 
AD-7 



Date Type First Received 

Jul 1956 
Mar 1957 



Date of 
Departure 

09 Aug 1957 



Air Wing 

ATG-3 



Date of 
Return 



Major Overseas Deployments 



02 Apr 1958 
Air Wing Assignments 

Tail Code 
Y/NC* 



Air 
Wing 

ATG-3 



Assignment Date 

30 Jun 1956 



Carrier 

CVA 33 



Type of 
Aircraft 

AD-6/7 



Area of 
Operation 

WestPac 



* The tail code was changed from Y to NC in 1957. The effective 
date for this change was most likely the beginning of FY 58 (1 July 
1957). 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 1 65 



VA-104 

Lineage 

Established as Fighter Squadron ONE HUNDRED 
FOUR (VF-104) on 1 May 1952. 

Redesignated Attack Squadron ONE HUNDRED 
FOUR (VA-104) in December 1953. 

Disestablished on 31 March 1959- The first squadron 
to be assigned the designation VA-104. 

Squadron Insignia and Nickname 

There is no record of official approval for the 
squadron insignia. The insignia on file for the 

squadon was a missile 
being shot by a long 
bow with an atomic 
explosion in the back- 
ground. Colors for this 
insignia were: a light 
blue background out- 
lined in yellow; the 
water was medium blue 
and the atomic explo- 
sion was white with 
shades of light and 
medium blue; the long 
bow was red with a 
black bow string; the missile had a black body, yel- 
low fins outlined in black, and a red tipped nose. 
Nickname: Hell's Archers. 




There is no record of an official 
approval for this insignia. 



Chronology of Significant Events 

Nov 1956: During the Suez War the squadron oper- 
ated from Coral Sea (CVA 43) off the coast of Egypt. It 
provided air support for the evacuation of Americans 
and foreign nationals from that country. 

Jul 1958: The squadron operated from Forrestal 
(CVA 59) in the eastern Atlantic, ready to enter the 
Mediterranean if needed for the U.S. Marines' landing 
in Beirut, Lebanon. 



Home Port Assignments 



Location 

NAAS Cecil Field* 
NAS Jacksonville 
NAS Cecil Field 
NAS Jacksonville 



Assignment Date 

01 May 1952 
Apr 1953 
Dec 1953 
Feb 1957 



* NAAS Cecil Field was redesignated NAS Cecil Field on 30 June 
1952. 

Commanding Officers 



LT J. R. Mills (acting) 
LCDR R. E. Sequin 
LCDR Harold H. Brock 
CDR D. H. Johnson 
CDR George E. Ford 
CDR Jack N. Durio 



Date Assumed Command 

01 May 1952 
13 May 1952 
Nov 1952 
Feb 1954 
10 Mar 1955 
Apr 1957 



Type of Ai rcraft 



FG-1D 
F4U-5 



AD-6 



Aircraft Assignment 

Date Type First Received 

May 1952 
Dec 1952 
Jan 1954 




A squadron F4U-5 aboard Randolph (CVA 15), circa 1953 (Courtesy Robert Lawson Collection). 



1 66 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



Major Overseas Deployments 



Date of 


Date of 


Air 




Type of 


Area of 


Departure 


Return 


Wing 


Carrier 


Aircraft 


Operation 


07 Jul 1954 


20 Dec 1954 


CVG-10 


CVA43 


AD-6 


Med 


13 Aug 1956 


11 Feb 1957 


CVG-10 


CVA 43 


AD-6 


Med 


02 Sep 1958 


12 Mar 1959 


CVG-10 


CVA 59 


AD-6 


Med 



Air Wing Assignments 

Air Wing Tail Code Assignment Date 

CVG-10 P/AK* 01 May 1952 

* The tail code was changed from P to AK in 1957. The effective date for this change was most likely the beginning of FY 58 (1 July 1957). 




A squadron AD Skyraider, piloted by Commander G. E. Ford, prepares to launch from Leyte (CVA 33) during carrier qualifications in 1955. 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



167 



VA-105 

Lineage 

Established as Attack Squadron ONE HUNDRED 
FIVE (VA-105) on 1 May 1952. 

Disestablished on 1 February 1959- The first 
squadron to be assigned the designation VA-105. 

Squadron Insignia and Nickname 

The squadron's 
insignia was approved 
by CNO on 2 March 
1953- Colors for the 
winged canon and 
bomb insignia were: a 
black bomb superim- 
posed on a yellow back- 
ground with a red fuse 
on the bomb; the canon 
was red with black 
markings; and the wings 
were yellow with black 
markings. 

Nickname: unknown. 




The squadron 's only insignia, ap 
proved March 1953- 



Chronology of Significant Events 

4 Mar 1958: The squadron's commanding officer, 
Commander E. F. Ternasky, was killed during a night 
ditching astern of Essex (CVA 9). 

Jul-Aug 1958: The squadron flew close air support 
missions during the landing of U.S. Marines in Beirut, 
Lebanon. Aircraft from VA-105 were the first to be on 
station during the landings. Squadron aircraft flew 
road and border reconnaissance sorties. Several air- 
craft were damaged by ground fire on their reconnais- 
sance missions. However, all aircraft returned to the 
Essex safely. 



Sep 1958: When the Chinese communists began 
shelling the Quemoy Island group in August, Essex 
was ordered to transit the Suez Canal and report to the 
Seventh Fleet for duty in the Taiwan Straits. The 
squadron flew numerous sorties in the Taiwan Straits 
until relieved on 26 September. 

Nov 1958: When the squadron was assigned to 
Replacement Air Group 4, its mission was changed to 
training personnel in the AD-6 Skyraider for assign- 
ment to fleet operating squadrons. 



Home Port Assignments 



Location 

NAAS Cecil Field* 
NAS Jacksonville 
NAS Cecil Field 
NAS Jacksonville 



Assignment Date 

01 May 1952 
Jul 1955 
Apr 1956 
Nov 1958 



* NAAS Cecil Field was redesignated NAS Cecil Field on 30 June 
1952. 



Commanding Officers 



CDR F. C. Auman 
LCDR R. S. Reeves 
CDR Samuel W. Forrer 
CDR Eugene F. Ternasky 
CDR L. W. S. Cummins 
LCDR U. W. Patrick, Jr. 



Date Assumed Command 

01 May 1952 
Aug 1953 
Oct 1954 
Jun 1956 
16 Mar 1958 
08 Dec 1958 



Aircraft Assignment 



Type of Aircraft 



AD-1 
AD-4 
AD-4NA 
AD-6 



Date Type First Received 

09 May 1952 
22 Sep 1952 
Sep 1952 
Nov 1954 




A squadron AD-4 Skyraider coming in for a landing during deployment aboard Tarawa (CVA 40) in 1953 



1 68 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



Major Overseas Deployments 



Date of 
Departure 

07 Jan 1953 
31 Oct 1955 
02 Feb 1958 



Date of 
Return 

03 Jul 1953 

16 Apr 1956 

17 Nov 1958 



Air 
Wing 

CVG-10 

ATG-201 

ATG-201 



Carrier 
CVA40 

CVA 20 
CVA 9 



Type of 
Aircraft 

AD-4/4NA 

AD-6 
AD-6 



Area of 
Operation 

Med 

WestPac 

Med/WestPac 



Air Wing Assignments 



Unit Awards Received 



Air Wing 

CVG-10 

ATG-201 

RCVG-4 



Tail Code 
P 

J/AP* 
AD 



Assignment Date 

01 May 1952 
1954 
16 Nov 1958 



* The tail code was changed from J to AP in 1957. The effective date 
for this change was most likely the beginning of FY 58 (1 July 1957). 



Unit Award Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 

NAVE 01 Jul 1953 30 Jun 1954 

01 Jul 1954 30 Jun 1955 

AFEM 16 Jul 1958 01 Aug 1958 

11 Aug 1958 20 Aug 1958 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 169 



SECOND VA-106 

Lineage 

Established as Bomber-Fighter Squadron SEVEN- 
TEEN (VBF-17) on 2 January 1945. 

Redesignated Fighter Squadron SIX B (VF-6B) on 15 
November 1946. 

Redesignated Fighter Squadron SIXTY TWO (VF-62) 
on 28 July 1948. 

Redesignated Attack Squadron ONE HUNDRED SIX 
(VA-106) on 1 July 1955. 

Disestablished on 7 November 1969- The second 
squadron to be assigned the VA-106 designation. 

Squadron Insignia and Nickname 

The squadron's first insignia was approved by CNO 
on 23 November 1945. Colors for the skeleton riding a 

rocket were: a back- 
ground with a deep pur- 
ple sky, aquamarine 
water and white clouds 
outlined in pale blue; 
the skeleton had a deep 
purple sombrero, a 
white face with light 
green shading and deep 
purple sockets, magenta 
shirt with an orange 
neckerchief, the hands 
were white with light 
green markings, teal 
trousers with a light blue cuff, tan boots with a brown 
sole, dark purple stirrups, tan saddle with pommel and 
under-portions brown; light gray rocket outlined in 
purple with yellow and orange lines emanating from 
the tail, light gray pistol outlined in purple with yellow 
smoke, magenta bomb, and a brown belt and holster. 

A new insignia was 
approved by CNO on 16 
April 1952. Colors for the 
helmet and shield 
insignia were: a gold 
background outlined in 
dark blue; dark blue 
shield; the Roman hel- 
met was gold with black 
markings; white arrow 
and stylized wing; and 

the scroll was gold with 

This insignia was adopted by the \~,\ ac k lettering 

squadron in the early 1950s. °" 

Following the squadron 's disestab- Nickname : unknown, 

lishment a new strike fighter 1945—1952 
squadron adopted this insignia in 

the 1980s. Gladiators, 1952-1969- 




The squadron's first insignia. 




Chronology of Significant Events 

Jan 1945: The squadron was established only a 
month before it entered combat. Personnel from VF-17 
were the core of the newly established Bomber 
Fighter Squadron 17. 

16-17 Feb 1945: The squadron participated in 
strikes against targets in and around the Tokyo area. 

20-22 Feb 1945: Squadron aircraft participated in 
strikes against Iwo Jima and provided air support for 
the landings on the island. 

25 Feb 1945: Conducted strikes in the Tokyo area. 

18-19 Mar 1945: Major strikes were conducted by 
squadron aircraft against Kanoya, the largest airfield 
on Kyushu and against the Japanese Fleet anchored at 
Kure Naval Base. On 19 March Lieutenant Edwin S. 
Conant was awarded the Silver Star for his action as 
flight leader on a fighter sweep over the Kure Bay. He 
shot down three planes during an engagement with 
the enemy and his flight group accounted for a total of 
24 enemy planes downed and probably eight or more 
damaged. 

21 Mar 1945: Lieutenant (jg) Henry E. Mitchell 
became an Ace when he shot down five Bettys 
(Japanese Navy Mitsubishi Attack Bombers) that were 
part of a sortie attacking the squadron's task force. He 
was later killed in action on 3 April 1945. For his 
action on 21 March he was awarded the Navy Cross 
posthumously. 

Mar-May 1945: The squadron conducted strikes in 
support of the Okinawa campaign. 

6 Apr 1945: Ensign Harold Yeremain became an 
Ace when he added three more aircraft to his total by 
downing two Zekes (Mitsubishi A6M Fighters, com- 
monly known as Zeros) and one Val (an Aichi Navy 
Carrier Bomber) during an engagement near 
Okinawa. Ensigns John J. Gafeney and William J. 
Kostik were awarded Silver Stars for their actions in 
shooting down three Japanese aircraft each during 
this engagement. 

7 Apr 1945: The unit participated in the combined 
task force strikes against the super battleship Yamato 
and its accompanying escorts, resulting in the sinking 
of Yamato, two cruisers and three destroyers. 

7 Apr 1945: Lieutenant Byron A. Eberts became an 
Ace when he brought his total to five by shooting 
down a Francis (a Yokosuka Japanese Navy Night 
Fighter). 

12 Apr 1945: Lieutenant Edwin S. Conant became an 
Ace when he shot down a Zeke (Zero) and a Tojo (a 
Japanese Army Nakajima Fighter) and brought his tally 
to six aircraft downed. 

14 Apr 1945: Ensigns Robert A. Clarke and William 



1 70 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 




J. Kostik became Aces when they each shot down a 
Zeke (Zero). 

16 Apr 1945: Lieutenant John M. Johnston became 
an Ace when he shot down four Zekes (Zeros), bring- 
ing his total to eight aircraft. For his action during this 
engagement he was awarded the Silver Star. 

May 1945: The squadron participated in strikes against 
Kyushu and Shikoku, hitting aircraft plants and airfields. 

14 May 1945: The squadron's commading officer, 
Lieutenant Commander H. W. Nicholson, was killed in 
action during a strike against Kyushu. 

14 May 1945: Lieutenant (jg) Carl V. Stone became 
an Ace when he added two Franks (a Japanese Army 
Fighter) to his total of downed aircraft. 

Aug 1956: Following the nationalization of the Suez 
Canal by Egypt on 26 July, Coral Sea (CVA 43) was 
ordered to the eastern Mediterranean as tensions 
increased and France and the United Kingdom began 
preparations for military action against Egypt. 

Oct-Nov 1956: On 29 October Israel invaded Egypt 
and a day later France and the United Kingdom joined 
in the invasion, with the intent of reoccupying the 
Suez Canal. Coral Sea was on station in the eastern 
Mediterranean during the American evacuation of 
Western nationals from Egypt and Israel. 

Jul 1959: During the NATO exercise Riptide, held off 
the east coast of the United States, the squadron con- 
ducted cross deck operations with the British carrier 
HMS Victorious. 

15-28 Nov I960: Following a request from 
Guatemala and Nicaragua, a Navy patrol was estab- 
lished off the coast of these Central American coun- 
tries to prevent infiltration by communists from Cuba. 
The squadron operated from Shangri-La (CVA 38) as 
part of the patrol force. 

2-19 Jun 1961: Following the assassination of the 
Dominican Republic's dictator, General Rafael Trujillo, the 
squadron operated from Shangri-La off the coast of that 
country until the domestic situation began to stabilize. 

22 Oct-28 Nov 1962: During the Cuban Missile 
Crisis the squadron was assigned to the U.S. Air 
Force's 19th Tactical Air Force, in an alert status. 

May 1963: The squadron operated from Shangri-La 
in the Caribbean during the period of unrest in Haiti 
and the civil strife with the Dominican Republic. 

29 Jul 1967: After four days on the line at Yankee 
Station tragedy struck Forrestal (CVA 59). A Zuni rock- 
et was accidentally ignited on the flight deck causing a 
chain reaction of explosions among the aircraft loaded 
with bombs and fuel. The squadron lost eight people 
out of the 132 killed, two missing and presumed dead 
and 62 injured. Those killed were Petty Officers Ft. 
Fontenot, W. W. Stewart, R. N. Plesh, J. A. Earick and 
Airman C. R. Rich, J. A. Velez, A. R. Metz and G. E. 
Wall. Numerous squadron personnel were cited for 
their acts of heroism during the tragedy. 




A squadron F8F-2 Bearcat prepares for launch from Coral Sea (CVB 
43) in September 1948 (Courtesy David Lucabaugh Collection). 



Home Port Assignments 



Location 

NAS Agana 
NAS Alameda 
NAAS Fallon 
NAS Brunswick 
NAS Norfolk 
NAAS Oceana 
NAS Norfolk 
NAAS Oceana 
NAAS Cecil Field 
NAS Jacksonville 
NAS Cecil Field 



Assignment Date 

02 Jan 1945* 
08 Jul 1945 
Sep 1945 
Feb 1946 
1946t 
25 Sep 1948 
22 Nov 1948 
20 Jan 1949 
18 Sep 1950+ 
13 Oct 1952 
Dec 1954 



* Temporary shore assignment while the squadron conducted train- 
ing in preparation for combat deployment. 

t The squadron was transferred from NAS Brunswick to NAS 
Norfolk sometime in July or August 1946. 

i The squadron's home port was changed to NAS Jacksonville on 5 
September 1950 and the move from NAAS Oceana was conducted 
between 6 and 7 September. On 18 September, Commander Fleet Air 
Jacksonville changed the squadron'a home port to NAAS Cecil Field. 




Two squadron F2H-2 Banshees fly over Lake Champlain (CVA 39) 
during their 1953 deployment to Korea. 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 171 



Commanding Officers 



LCDR Hugh W. Nicholson 
LT Edwin S. Connant (acting) 
LCDR Edwin S. Connant 
CDR C. E. Houston 
LCDR Walter O. Zoecklein (acting) 
LCDR James E. Shew 
LCDR Hugh A. Kelly 
CDR Douglas A. Clark 
LCDR William W. Kelly 
CDR Lewis W. Jenkins 
CDR Hollis H. Hills 
CDR O. L. Dauphin 
CDR Newton P. Foss 
CDR S. O. Bach 
CDR L. W. Baldwin, Jr. 
CDR L. E. Irvin 
CDR W. S. Nelson 
CDR G. E. R. Kinnear II 
CDR C. B. Crockett 
CDR James H. Scott 
CDR S. R. Foley, Jr. 
CDR S. E. Latimer, Jr. 
CDR Walter L. Clarke, Jr. 
CDR J. H. Harns 



Date Assumed Command 

11 Jan 1945 
14 May 1945 
20 Aug 1945 

01 Jul 1947 
1948 

02 Jul 1948 

03 Jan 1950 
19 Oct 1951 
25 Nov 1952 
27 Feb 1954 

Jul 1955 
Feb 1957 
25 Apr 1958 
05 Dec 1959 
22 Jul I960 
31 Jul 1961 
25 Jul 1962 
Jul 1963 
1 Aug 1964 
Jun 1965 
24 Jun 1966 
07 Aug 1967 
17 Nov 1967 
03 Mar 1969 




Squadron CO, Commander H. H. Hills, inspecting an F2H-2, 1955. 



Aircraft Assignment 



Type of Aircraft 



F6F-5 



F4U 
F4U-4 



F8F-2 



F9F-8B 



A4D-2 

A-4C 

A-4E 

A-4B 

A-4C 



Date Type First Received 

Jan 1945 
Sep 1945 
Feb 1946 
30 Jun 1948 
Feb 1950 

03 Aug 1950 
Oct 1955 

04 Jun 1958 
18 Dec 1962 

Nov 1966 
Feb 1969 
Mar 1969 




Personnel discuss the refueling probe on a squadron F9F-8 Cougar, 1955. 



1 72 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



Major Overseas Deployments 



Date of 


Date of 


Air 




Type of 


Area of 


Departure 


Return 


Wing 


Carrier 


Aircraft 


Operation 


10 Feb 1945 


13 Jun 1945 


CVG-17 


CV 12 


F6F-5 


Pacific 


27 Oct 1949 


23 Nov 1949 


CVG-6 


CVB 42 


F8F-2 


NorLant 


15 May 1951 


04 Oct 1951 


CVG-4 


CV 34 


F2H-2 


Med 


19 Apr 1952 


12 Oct 1952 


CVG-4 


CVB 43 


F2H-2 


Med 


26 Apr 1953 


04 Dec 1953 


CVG-4 


CVA 39 


F2H-2 


Korea/West 












Pac/Med 


07 Jul 1954 


20 Dec 1954 


CVG-10 


CVA43 


F2H-2 


Med 


13 Aug 1956 


11 Feb 1957 


CVG-10 


CVA 43 


F9F-8B 


Med 


07 Aug 1959 


26 Feb I960 


CVG-10 


CVA 9 


A4D-2 


Med 


06 Sep I960 


20 Oct I960 


CVG-10 


CVA 38 


A4D-2 


NorLant 


02 Feb 1961 


15 May 1961 


CVG-10 


CVA 38 


A4D-2 


Med 


07 Feb 1962 


28 Aug 1962 


CVG-10 


CVA 38 


A4D-2 


Med 


01 Oct 1963 


23 May 1964 


CVW-10 


CVA 38 


A-4C 


Med 


15 Feb 1965 


20 Sep 1965 


CVW-10 


CVA 38 


A-4C 


Med 


11 Mar 1966 


26 Oct 1966 


CVW-3 


CVA 60 


A-4C 


Med 


06 Jun 1967 


15 Sep 1967 


CVW-17 


CVA 59 


A-4E 


WestPac/Vietnam 


04 Jun 1968 


08 Feb 1969 


CVW-10 


CVS 11 


A-4E 


WestPac/Vietnam 


03 Sep 1969 


09 Oct 1969 


CVW-7 


CVA 62 


A-4C 


NorLant 




Squadron A-4C Skyhawks fly over Saratoga (CVA 60), 1966. 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 1 73 



Air Wing Assignments 



Unit Awards Received 



Air Wing 


Tail Code 


Assignment Date 


CVG-17/CVBG-17/ 


c 


02 Jan 1945 


CVBG-5/CVG-6* 






CVG-4 


F 


Sep 1950 


CVG-10 


P/AKf 


1954 


cvG-y 




12 Oct 1961 


CVG-10/CVW-10§ 


AK 


12 Nov 1961 


CVW-3 


AC 


01 Jan 1966 


CVW-17 


AA 


01 Feb 1967 


CVW-10 


AK 


10 Jan 1968 


CVW-7 


AG 


03 Mar 1969 



* CVG-17 was established on 1 January 1943, redesignated CVBG-17 
on 22 January 1946, then redesignated CVBG-5 on 15 November 
1946. CVBG-5 was then redesignated CVG-6 on 27 July 1948. 
t The tail code was changed from P to AK in 1957. The effective date 
for this change was most likely the beginning of FY 58 (1 July 1957). 
i The squadron was temporarily assigned to Air Group 1 for opera- 
tion Blow Torch, simulated nuclear strikes against North American 
targets, and for nuclear operational suitability tests aboard Franklin 
D. Roosevelt (CVA 42). 

§ CVG-10 was redesignated CVW-10 when Carrier Air Group (CVG) 
designations were redesignated Carrier Air Wings (CVW) on 20 
December 1963. 



Unit Award 

PUC 

Campaign Medal 
WW-II Asiatic- 
Pacific Area 

NAVE 



KPUC 

KSM 

VNSM 



NEM 



Inclusive Dates 

16 Feb 1945 



Feb 1945 
01 Jul 1949 
01 Jul 1955 
01 Jul 1959 
01 Jul 1965 
09 Jun 1953 
09Jun 1953 
15 Jul 1967 
23 Jul 1967 
12 Aug 1967 
05 Sep 1968 
14 Oct 1968 
03 Dec 1968 
03 Jun 1961 
14 Jun 1961 



Covering Unit Award 
10 Jun 1945 



Jun 1945 
30 Jun 1950 
30 Jun 1956 

30 Jun I960 

31 Dec 1966 
27 Jul 1953 

27 Sep 1953 

17 Jul 1967 
31 Jul 1967 

13 Aug 1967 
27 Sep 1968 

14 Nov 1968 
27 Dec 1968 
11 Jun 1961 

18 Jun 1961 




^4 



Squadron officers and an A-4C on Saratoga (CVA 60) during its 1966 cruise to the Med. Standing left to right: Marine Capt. J. W. Orr, LCdr. C C 
Smith, LCdr.f. E. Potosnak, LCdr. P. E. Phillips, Lt. W. R. Needham, LCdr. J. L. Burton, Lt. (jg)J. B. Mattly, Lt. S. C. Cole, LCdr. K. A. McMillen and 
Lt. E. L. DeSha. Kneeling left to right: Lt. (MC) H. K. Leathers LLL, Lt. L. W. Scott, Ens. M. W. Davis, Cdr. J. H. Scott, Cdr. S. R. Foley, Jr., Lt. (jg) R. L. 
Mattingly, Lt. R. A. Pennington, Ens. J. E. Cause and WOl G. E. Connolly. 



1 74 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



VA-112 

Lineage 

Established as Bomber-Fighter Squadron ELEVEN 
(VBF-11) on 9 April 1945. 

Redesignated Fighter Squadron TWELVE A (VF-12A) 
on 15 November 1946. 

Redesignated Fighter Squadron ONE HUNDRED 
TWELVE (VF-112) on 15 July 1948. 

Redesignated Attack Squadron ONE HUNDRED 
TWELVE (VA-112) on 15 February 1959. 

Disestablished on 10 October 1969- The first 
squadron to be assigned the designation VA-112. 

Squadron Insignia and Nickname 

The squadron's first insignia was approved by CNO 
on 28 August 1945. Colors for the dragon and two 

headed eagle were: a 



yellow background; 
black dragon; sky blue 
eagle with white heads 

i f It /V-'^X^i \l \ \ anc ^ rec ^ tongues; other 

markings and outlines 
were black. 

A new squadron 
insignia was approved 
by CNO on 9 November 
1945. There is no color 
description of this 
insignia in the official 
files. This insignia con- 
tinued to use the two- 
headed eagle. It replaced the dragon with a globe 
showing North and South America. Clouds surrounded 
the globe. 

The CNO approved a new squadron insignia on 12 
July 1948. Colors for the Custode Pads Armis (Armed 
Keeper of the Peace) insignia were: a light blue back- 
ground; the rocket and machine gun were black with 
white highlights; gold naval aviator wings outlined in 
black; upper half of the shield was purple and lower 

half was dark green; the 




The squadron 's first insignia was the 
double-headed eagle and dragon. 




The squadron 's second insignia 
replaced the dragon with a globe 
of the world surrounded by clouds. 



motto on the shield had 
a white background 
with light blue lettering; 
the dove was white with 
a red eye and green 
wreath in its beak; gray 
helmet highlighted in 
black, with a red plum; 
black sword; the shield 
and items on the shield 
were outlined in black; 
and the banner below 
the shield was white. 




The Custodes Pacis Armis insig- 
nia became the squadron's third 
design. 



This was the squadron 's last 
insignia, a modification of the 
Custodes Pacis Armis design. 



The squadron continued to use the Custode Paris 
Armis insignia following its redesignation to VA-112. 
However, the following color modifications were 
made: background was yellow outlined in black; upper 
half of shield was blue; lettering for the motto was red; 
the white banner was removed and a lower scroll was 
added with a yellow background and black lettering. 

Nickname: Broncos, 1961-1969. 

Chronology of Significant Events 

25 Mar 1948: Valley Forge (CV 45) operated in the 
Persian Gulf with Saudi Arabian Prince Ibn Saud 
embarked to view air operations. However, the air dis- 
play was cancelled because of a sand storm and hazy 
conditions. 

29 Apr 1948: Valley Forge (CV 45) moored port side 
to Dokkeskjaerkaien Dock, Bergen, Norway. The 
mooring was conducted without the aid of tugs, using 
the engine power of the squadron's eight F8Fs spotted 
on the forward deck and eight other aircraft on the aft 
deck. The mooring operation was called "Operation 
Pin wheel." 

5 Aug 1950: The squadron participated in its first 
combat operations, flying sorties against targets in the 
Mokpo-Kwangju area of South Korea. 

12-19 Sep 1950: The squadron participated in the 
pre-assault strikes against targets in and around 
Inchon, Korea, in preparation for the landings there 
on 15 September. These strikes included road, rail, 
and airfield sweeps and Combat Air Patrol. During and 
after the invasion the squadron continued to fly daily 
air sweeps, striking at targets of opportunity and the 
enemy's lines of communications. 

10 Nov 1950: The squadron's first encounter with 
MiG-15s occurred during a sortie over Sinuiju, Korea. 
One MiG-15 was damaged during the engagement. 

23-24 June 1952: The squadron participated in 
coordinated strikes against North Korean hydroelectric 
power plants, the first heavy attack conducted against 
these installations. Nine different hydroelectric power 
plants were struck by forces from Carrier Air Groups 
2, 7, 11, 19, and the 5th Air Force. 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



175 



6-13 Feb 1955: The squadron was on station and 
available for air support during the evacuation of over 
26,000 personnel from the Tachen Islands which had 
come under bombardment by the People's Republic of 
China in January 1955. 

24 Apr 1967: Squadron aircraft participated in a 
multi-carrier coordinated strike against North 
Vietnam's MiG base, Kep Airfield, northeast of Hanoi. 
This was the first time a strike had been conducted 
against a North Vietnam MiG airfield. 

10 May 1967: Commander M. L. Minnis, Sr., was 
awarded the Silver Star for action during a strike into 
North Vietnam against the thermal power plant at 
Haiphong. 

Apr 1969: Following the shoot down of a Navy EC- 
121 aircraft by the North Koreans, Ticonderoga (CVA 
14), along with two other attack carriers, was ordered 
to the Sea of Japan. 



Commanding Officers 




The squadron's snow-covered F8F-1 Bearcats, along with VF-llA's 
F8Fs, on the forward flight deck of Valley Forge (CV 45) during her 
visit to Bergen, Norway, in 1948. 



Home Port Assignments 



Location 

NAS Alameda 

NAAS Fallon 

NAAS Santa Rosa 

NAS Kahului, Hawaii 

NAS San Diego 

NAAS Miramar/NAS Miramar* 

NAS Lemoore 



Assignment Date 

09 Apr 1945 
30 Apr 1945 
31 Jul 1945 
21 Feb 1946 
25 Nov 1946 
07 Apr 1951 
11 Sep 1961 





Date Assumed Command 


LT Richard E. James (acting) 


09 Apr 1945 


LCDR Ralph W. Cousins 


17 Apr 1945 


LCDR George E. Savage 


09 Jun 1945 


LCDR Norman W. Ackley 


14 Oct 1945 


LCDR Melvin C. Hoffman 


31 Jan 1947 


CDR Joseph T. Lawler 


01 Jul 1948 


CDR R. Weymouth 


08 May 1950 


LCDR J. L. Butts, Jr. 


29 Aug 1950 


LCDR J. V. Rowney 


29 Jun 1951 


LCDR James Ferris 


11 Aug 1952 


LCDR R. W. Jackson (acting) 


01 Oct 1952 


LCDR C. E. Lair 


07 Oct 1952 


CDR George S. Morrison 


Mar 1954 


CDR Marcel N. Piller 


01 Oct 1955 


LCDR M. M. Casey, Jr. 


12 Apr 1957 


LCDR J. J. Konzen (acting) 


04 Mar 1959 


CDR Clyde J. Lee 


31 Mar 1959 


CDR Hugh N. Batten 


18 Feb I960 


CDR James T. Parady 


30 Mar 1961 


CDR J. F. Kirklighter 


25 Apr 1962 


CDR F. L. Leib 


09 Apr 1963 


CDR P. E. Russell 


08 May 1964 


CDR J. A. Chalbeck 


08 Jun 1965 


CDR J. H. Alvis 


08 Jul 1966 


CDR Marion L. Minnis 


31 Dec 1966 


CDR Charles H. Brown 


10 Nov 1967 


CDR Tommy L. Gatewood 


13 Sep 1968 




A squadron F9F-2B Panther launches from the deck of Philippine 
Sea (CV 47) during her combat cruise to Korea in 1951-1952. 



Aircraft Assignment 



Type of Aircraft Date 



NAAS Miramar was redesignated NAS Miramar on 1 March 1952. 



F6F-3/5 



F8F-1 
F8F-2 



F9F-2 

F9F-2B* 

F9F-3 

F9F-2B 

F9F-5 

F9F-6 



Type First Received 

Apr 1945 
11 Dec 1946 
03 Jan 1949 

11 Jan 1950 
Jul 1950 

31 May 1951 

12 Jul 1951 
Oct 1952 
Feb 1954 



1 76 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



Aircraft Assignment — Continued 



Type of Aircraft Date 



F9F-8 
F9F-8B 



F3H-2M 



A4D-1/2 
A4D-2N/A-4Cf 



Type First Received 

Jul 1955 
Apr 1956 

05 Apr 1957 
Apr 1959 

26 Mar 1961 



* The squadron's F9F-2s were modified at NAS Barbers Point and 
equipped with rocket launchers and bomb racks and designated 
F9F-2Bs. 

t The A4D-2N designation was changed to A-4C in 1962. 




A squadron F9F-8B Cougar on the deck of Essex (CVA 9) following a 
successful landing during deployment to WestPac in 1956-1957. 



Major Overseas Deployments 



Date of 


Date of 


A ir 




Type of 


Area of 


Departure 


Return 


Wing 


Carrier 


Aircraft 


Operation 


09 Oct 1947 


11 Jun 1948 


CVAG-11 


CV 45* 


F8F-1 


World Cruise 


05 Jul 1950 


07 Apr 1951 


CVG-11 


CV47t 


F9F-2B 


WestPac/Korea 


31 Dec 1951 


08 Aug 1952 


CVG-11 


CV47 


F9F-2B 


WestPac/Korea 


01 Jul 1953 


18 Jan 1954 


CVG-11 


CVA 33 


F9F-5 


WestPac 


07 Oct 1954 


12 May 1955 


CVG-11 


CVA 33 


F9F-6 


WestPac 


16 Jul 1956 


26 Jan 1957 


CVG-11 


CVA 9 


F9F-8B 


WestPac 


04 Oct 1958 


16 Feb 1959 


ATG-1 


CVA 14 


F3H-2M 


WestPac 


16 Jul I960 


18 Mar 1961 


CVG-11 


CVA 19 


A4D-2 


WestPac 


13 Sep 1962 


02 Apr 1963 


CVG-11 


CVA 63 


A-4C 


WestPac 


17 Oct 1963 


20 Jul 1964 


CVW-11 


CVA 63 


A-4C 


WestPac 


24 Aug 1965 


07 Apr 1966 


CVW-8 


CVA 59 


A-4C 


Med 


05 Nov 1966 


19 Jun 1967 


CVW-11 


CVA 63 


A-4C 


WestPac/Vietnam 


18 Nov 1967 


28 Jun 1968 


CVW-11 


CVA 63 


A-4C 


WestPac/Vietnam 


01 Feb 1969 


18 Sep 1969 


CVW-16 


CVA 14 


A-4C 


WestPac/Vietnam 



* During October through December the squadron operated primarily from NAS Barbers Point with ocassional exercises aboard Valley Forge 
(CV 45). 

t While docked at Yokosuka, Japan, the squadron transferred from Philippine Sea (CV 47) to Valley Forge (CV 45) on 30 March 1951 for its 
return trip to the U.S. Philippine Sea continued its tour of duty in Korea with another air group. 



Air Wing Assignments 



Air Wing 

CVG-ll/CVAG-11/ 

CVG-11* 
COMFAIRSANDIEGO 
ATG-1 
CVG-5 

CVG-11/CVW-11§ 
CVW-8 

COMFAIRALAMEDA 

CVW-11 

CVW-16 



Tail Code 
Vf/NHt- 



NA 
NF 
NH 
AJ 



NH 
AH 



Assignment Date 

09 Apr 1945 

03 Mar 1958 
28 Jun 1958 
13 Mar 1959 
Nov 1959 
08 Jul 1965 
08 Apr 1966 
1966** 
01 Oct 1968 



* CVG-11 was redesignated CVAG-11 on 15 November 1946. It was 
redesignated CVG-11 on 1 September 1948. 

t The tail code V was assigned to CVG-11 on 12 December 1946. 

£ The tail code was changed from V to NH in 1957. The effective 
date for this change was most likely the beginning of FY 58 (1 July 
1957). 

§ CVG-11 was redesignated CVW-11 when Carrier Air Group (CVG) 
designations were redesignated Carrier Air Wings (CVW) on 20 
December 1963. 

** VA-112 was reassigned to CVW-11 sometime between June and 
November 1966. There are no records available for VA-112 and 
CVW-11 for this period. 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 1 77 




A flight of squadron F3H-2M Demons, circa 1957-1958. 



Unit Awards Received 



Unit Awards Received — Continued 



Unit Award 


Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 


Unit Award 


KPUC 


01 Aug 1950 


16 Mar 1951 


MUC 




20 Jan 1952 


12 Jul 1952 


PUC 


NUC 


04 Aug 1950 


16 Mar 1951 


VNSM 


AFEM 


20 Apr 1969 


27 Apr 1969 






29 Jun 1969 








07 Jul 1969 


13 Jul 1969 






24 Jul 1969 








04 Aug 1969 








16 Aug 1969 


24 Aug 1969 






30 Aug 1969 








03 Sep 1969 








13 Sep 1969 


14 Sep 1969 





Inclusive Dates 

18 Feb 1969 
23 Dec 1967 

03 Dec 1966 

02 Mar 1967 
12 Apr 1967 

08 May 1967 

04 Mar 1968 

12 Apr 1968 

13 May 1968 

03 Mar 1969 
29 Mar 1969 

09 May 1969 
25 Jun 1969 



Covering Unit Award 

07 Sep 1969 
01 Jun 1968 

03 Jan 1967 
28 Mar 1967 
28 Apr 1967 
23 May 1967 
27 Mar 1968 
01 May 1968 

01 Jun 1968 
20 Mar 1969 
16 Apr 1969 

04 Jun 1969 
01 Aug 1969 




A squadron A-4C Skyhawk 
lands aboard Kitty Hawk (CVA 
63), circa 1967-1968. 



1 78 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



VA-114 

Lineage 

Established as Bombing Squadron ELEVEN (VB-11) 
on 10 October 1942. 

Redesignated Attack Squadron ELEVEN A (VA-11A) 
on 15 November 1946. 

Redesignated Attack Squadron ONE HUNDRED 
FOURTEEN (VA-114) on 15 July 1948. 

Disestablished on 1 December 1949. The first 
squadron to be assigned the VA-114 designation. 

Squadron Insignia and Nickname 

The squadron's 
insignia was approved 
by the Bureau of 
Aeronautics on 17 
September 1942. Colors 
for the Bellerophon- 
Pegasus insignia were: a 
black winged horse, 
rider, and bomb with 
white highlights; and a 
red shield and helmet 
plume. The Greek mo to 
translated as First to 
Attack. 

Nickname: unknown. 




This was the only insignia approved 
and used by the squadron. 



Chronology of Significant Events 

Apr-Jul 1943: The squadron was landbased at 
Guadalcanal and participated in the Solomons Cam- 
paign. Flying patrol, search and strike missions against 
targets primarily in and around New Georgia. 

10 Oct 1944: Squadron aircraft participated in the first 
strikes against Okinawa, opening the Leyte campaign. 

12 Oct 1944: The squadron participated in the first 
strikes against Formosa. 



25 Oct 1944: During the Battle for Leyte Gulf, the 
squadron participated in the engagement known as the 
Battle Off Samar. Launching from a range of 340 miles, 
which was beyond the normal combat radius for World 
War II carrier aircraft, 11 of the squadron's SB2Cs 
engaged the Japanese fleet after it broke off its engage- 
ment with the American escort carriers and destroyers 
guarding the landing force at Leyte. Hits were scored 
on a battleship and cruiser. A second strike by nine 
squadron aircraft later scored hits on two cruisers. 

Nov 1944: Squadron aircraft struck targets on Luzon 
in continued support for the capture of Leyte. 

Dec 1944: Targets were struck on Luzon in support 
of the landings on Mindoro. 

18 Dec 1944: While operating east of the 
Philippines, the task force, of which the squadron was 
part, was overtaken by an unusually severe typhoon 
causing the loss of three destroyers and damage to 
several other ships, including four light carriers. 

Jan 1945: In early January, the squadron struck 
ships and targets on Formosa in support of the land- 
ings in Lingayen Gulf, Luzon. 

9-20 Jan 1945: The squadron participated in opera- 
tions in the South China Sea, the first time an 
American Task Force had entered these waters since 
the beginning of the war. During these operations, 
squadron aircraft struck a large convoy of tankers; tar- 
gets along the coast of Indochina reaching almost to 
Saigon; Formosa was hit again; and then strikes were 
flown against Hong Kong. 

25 Mar 1948: Valley Forge (CV 45) operated in the 
Persian Gulf with Saudi Arabian Prince Ibn Saud em- 
barked to view air operations. The air display was can- 
celled because of a sand storm and hazy air conditions. 

29 Apr 1948: Valley Forge moored port side to 
Dokkeskjaerkaien Dock, Bergen, Norway. The mooring 
was conducted without the aid of tugs, using the engine 
power of the squadron's eight SB2C-5s spotted on the aft 
deck and eight other aircraft on the forward deck. The 
mooring operation was called "Operation Pinwheel." 



A squadron SBD-3 Dauntless on the flight 
deck, circa late 1942 (Courtesy Robert 
Lawson Collection). 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 1 79 



Home Port Assignments 



Commanding Officers — Continued 



Location 

NAS San Diego 

NAS Barbers Point 

NAF Nandi (in the Fiji Islands) 

NAF Guadalcanal 

NAS Alameda 

NAS Hilo 

NAS Barbers Point 
NAS Alameda 
NAAS Fallon 
NAAS Santa Rosa 
NAS Kahului, Hawaii 
NAS San Diego 



Assignment Date 

10 Oct 1942 
26 Nov 1942* 
Feb 1943* 
26 Apr 1943 
Aug 1943 
06 Apr 1944* 
19 Jun 1944* 
Feb 1945 
30 Apr 1945* 
26 Jul 1945* 
21 Feb 1946 
25 Nov 1946 



* Temporary shore assignment while the squadron conducted train- 
ing in preparation for combat deployment. 



Commanding Officers 



LCDR Weldon L. Hamilton 
LCDR Raymond B. Jacoby 
LT Charles A. Skinner (acting) 
LCDR Lloyd A. Smith 



Date Assumed Command 

10 Oct 1942 
30 Sep 1943 
01 Nov 1943 
15 Nov 1943 



LT Eugene M. Yoder (acting) 
LCDR Edwin John Kroeger 
LTJG George G. Beckham (acting 
LT Eugene M. Yoder (acting) 
LCDR Ried W. Stone 
LCDR Raymond A. Boyd 
LCDR F. E. Miller (acting) 
CDR Adolf L. Siegener 
LCDR J. E. Savage 
LCDR E. T. Deacon 



Date Assumed Command 

01 Nov 1944 

07 Nov 1944 
i 09 Apr 1945 

10 Apr 1945 

05 May 1945 
05 Jun 1947 
16 Jun 1948 
28 Jun 1948 
30 Jun 1949 

01 Aug 1949 



Aircraft Assignment 



Type of Aircraft 



SBD-3 
SBD-4 
SBD-5 



SB2C-1C 
SB2C-4/4E 
SB2C-5 



AD-1 
AD-2 



F8F-2 



Date Type First Received 

Oct 1942 
Feb 1943 
Oct 1943 
25 Nov 1943 
Apr 1945 
Jan 1946 
31 Aug 1948 
20 Dec 1948 
Nov 1949 




A squadron SB2C-5 flies over Gibraltar during its world cruise aboard Valley Forge (CV 45), 1948. 



1 80 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



Major Overseas Deployments 



Date of 
Departure 

Feb 1943 
29 Sep 1944 
09 Oct 1947 



Date of 
Return 

Aug 1943 
01 Feb 1945 
11 Tun 1948 



Air 
Wing 

CVG-11 
CVG-11 
CVAG-11 



Carrier 
* 

CV 12f 
CV45t- 



Type of 
Aircraft 

SBD-3/4 
SB2C-1C 
SB2C-5 



Area of 
Operation 

SoPac 
Pacific 

World Cruise 



* The squadron was landbased during operations in the South Pacific. 

t The squadron transferred to Kasaan Bay (CVE 69) on 1 February 1945 at Ulithi for its return trip back to the States. 

% During October through December 1947 the squadron operated from NAS Barbers Point with occasional exercises aboard Valley Forge (CV 
45). The squadron departed NAS Barbers Point, embarked on Valley Forge, and continued on its world cruise, stopping at Australia, China, 
Singapore, Ceylon, Saudi Arabia, Gibralter, Norway, England, New York, and Panama Canal Zone. 



Air Wing Assignments 



Air Wing 

CVG-1 1/CVAG-l 1/CVG-l It 



Tail Code 

v* 



Assignment Date 
10 Oct 1942 



* The tail code V was assigned on 7 November 1946. 

t CVG-11 was redesignated CVAG-11 on 15 November 1946. CVAG-11 was changed back to CVG-11 on 1 September 1948. 



Unit Awards Received 

Unit Award Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 

PUC 10 Oct 1944 22 Nov 1944 

14 Dec 1944 16 Dec 1944 

03 Jan 1945 22 Jan 1945 



Campaign Medal 
(Asiatic-Pacific) 



08 Feb 1943 



20 Jun 1943 



Unit Awards Received — Continued 

Unit Award Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 

10 Oct 1944 29 Nov 1944 

14 Dec 1944 16 Dec 1944 

09 Jan 1945 
12 Jan 1945 
16 Jan 1945 



A squadron AD-2 Skyraider loaded with weapons on the deck of Valley Forge (CV45), circa 1949 (Courtesy Robert lawson Collection). 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 181 



VA-115 

Lineage 

Established as Torpedo Squadron ELEVEN (VT-11) 
on 10 October 1942. 

Redesignated Attack Squadron TWELVE A (VA-12A) 
on 15 November 1946. 

Redesignated Attack Squadron ONE HUNDRED FIF- 
TEEN (VA-115) on 15 July 1948. The first squadron to 
be assigned the VA-115 designation. 

Squadron Insignia and Nickname 

The squadron's first insignia was approved by CNO 
on 25 June 1945. Colors for this Walt Disney designed 

insignia were: a grayish 
blue background out- 
lined in black with a 
wide outer red ring; 
deep green ocean; black 
torpedo with a white 
skull face and white 
markings and gray 
streaks with black out- 
lines and markings; the 
winged cherub was 
flesh color with white 
wings and eyes, black 
pupils and mouth, and 
a deep pink tongue; the 
cherub was wearing a deep green helmet and cream 
colored goggles with a black strap and black outlines. 

A new squadron 
insignia was approved 
by CNO on 17 
September 1956. Colors 
for the globe and 
abstract wing design 
are: a black back- 
ground; white globe 
with black lines; white 
stylized clock hands; 
gold stars and abstract 
wing design; gold scroll 
outlined in black with 
black lettering. 

Nickname: Arabs, 
1950s-1979. 

Eagles, 1979-present.* 




The squadron's first insignia was 
designed by Walt Disney Studio. 




A new stylized globe and wing 
insignia was approved for use by 
the squadron in 1956 and has 
become a well-known design. 



Chronology of Significant Events 

1 Jan-1 Feb 1943: A detachment of 6 aircraft from the 
squadron were sent to Kanton Island, in the Phoenix 
Islands, for antisubmarine defense and search missions. 




* During the squadron's deployment to the Indian Ocean in 1989, 
they temporarily changed their nickname back to Arabs to enhance 
the esprit de corps while operating in the Arabian Sea. 



The squadron's CO., LCdr. F. L. Ashworth, in his TBF-1 Avenger on 
Guadalcanal in May 1943. 



Apr-Jul 1943: The squadron was landbased at 
Guadalcanal and participated in the Solomons (New 
Georgia) Campaign. They flew patrol, search, spotting, 
strike, and night minelaying missions against targets in 
the Solomon Islands. 

5 May 1944: Squadron aircraft were involved in an 
antisubmarine attack off the coast of Hilo, Hawaii. The 
attack against the enemy submarine was assessed as 
probable by the squadron commander. 

10 Oct 1944: The squadron participated in the first 
strikes against Okinawa, part of the opening of the 
Leyte Campaign. 

25 Oct 1944: The Japanese Fleet, in three elements, 
converged on Leyte to oppose the landings. While 340 
miles from Leyte, which was beyond the normal com- 
bat radius for World War II carrier aircraft, squadron 
aircraft were launched for a strike on the central ele- 
ment of the Japanese Fleet. Its TBMs arrived over the 
enemy fleet after it had broken off its engagement, the 
Battle Off Samar, with the American escort carriers and 
destroyers guarding the landing and supply ships. The 
TBMs struck the retiring Japanese Central Fleet, scor- 
ing hits on a battleship and two cruisers. All the 
squadron's aircraft returned, completing a 600 mile 
round trip combat flight. For their actions during this 
engagement, the following squadron personnel were 
awarded the Navy Cross: Lieutenants Wilbur J. 
Engman, Melvin L. Tegge, and Thomas B. Adams and 
Lieutenant (jg)s Richard W. Russell, Lawrence E. 
Helmuth, John M. Davis and William Maier. 

26 Oct 1944: Strikes continued against the Japanese 
Fleet and Lieutenant Leroy H. Grau was awarded the 
Navy Cross for a successful torpedo attack against a 
Japanese light cruiser. 



1 82 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



Nov 1944: The squadron continued to provide sup- 
port for the Occupation of Leyte, striking targets on 
Luzon. 

13 Nov 1944: The squadron's commanding officer, 
Lieutenant Commander R. Denniston, Jr., was lost on a 
combat mission over Manila Harbor. 

Dec 1944: Squadron aircraft struck targets on Luzon 
in support of the landings on Mindoro. 

18 Dec 1944: While operating east of the 
Philippines the task force was overtaken by an unusu- 
ally severe typhoon causing the loss of three destroy- 
ers and damage to several other ships, including four 
light carriers. 

Jan 1945: In early January, the squadron struck 
ships and targets on Formosa and Luzon in support of 
the landings in Lingayen Gulf, Luzon. 

9-20 Jan 1945: The squadron participated in opera- 
tions in the South China Sea, the first time an 
American Task Force had entered these waters since 
the beginning of the war. The squadron struck targets 
at Cam Ranh Bay and a convoy off Qui Nhon, French 
Indo-China; shipping at the Pescadores Island; and 
Hong Kong. 

12-18 Sep 1950: The squadron participated in the 
pre-assault strikes against targets in and around 
Inchon, Korea, in preparation for the landings there 
on 15 September. During and after the invasion, the 
squadron continued to fly deep support missions into 
the areas surrounding Inchon, striking at targets of 
opportunity. 

9 Nov 1950: The squadron's first encounter with 
MiG-15s was during a mission against Sinuiju, Korea. 
All the aircraft returned safely to Philippine Sea. 

Dec 1950: The squadron provided close air support 
for American troops in the Chosen Reservoir area. 

Feb-Jul 1952: The squadron's combat missions in 
Korea during this time period centered on rail interdic- 
tion, with some strikes against North Korean trans- 
portation, communication, industrial and supply facili- 
ties. 

23-24 Jun 1952: The squadron participated in coor- 
dinated strikes against North Korean hydroelectric 
power plants, these were the first heavy attacks con- 
ducted against these installations. Nine different 
hydroelectric power plants were struck by forces from 
Carrier Air Groups 2, 7, 11, 19, and the 5th Air Force. 

Feb 1955: The squadron flew air cover missions dur- 
ing the evacuation of over 26,000 personnel from 
Tachen Islands which had come under bombardment 
by the People's Republic of China in January. 

Aug-Sep 1958: The squadron was part of the task 
force that provided support to the Republic of China 
during the shelling of the Quemoy Island group by the 
Chinese Communists. 

May-Jun 1964: During the Laotian crisis, the 
squadron flew Combat Air Patrol and Search and 
Rescue sorties over the country. 



Aug 1967-Jan 1970: During this period the squadron 
was in an inactive stand-down status. There were no 
aircraft and only a few administrative personnel 
assigned. The inactive status was a transitional period, 
awaiting the time when the squadron would assume 
an active status and receive the A-6 Intruder. This is 
the only known instance in which a squadron was not 
disestablished but remained on the active squadron 
inventory in an inactive status. The squadron resumed 
an active status on 1 January 1970. 

May-Oct 1972: The squadron participated in 
Linebacker I operations, heavy air strikes against tar- 
gets in North Vietnam to interdict the flow of supplies. 

Apr-May 1975: The squadron participated in 
Operation Frequent Wind, the evacuation of American 
personnel from Saigon, South Vietnam, as the country 
fell to the communists. 

Aug-Sep 1976: The squadron operated near the 
Korean Peninsula following the murder of U.S. military 
personnel in the Korean DMZ by North Koreans. 

Apr-May 1979: Midway, with VA-115 embarked, 
deployed to the Gulf of Aden to relieve Constellation 
(CV 64) and maintain a U.S. carrier presence following 
the outbreak of fighting between North and South 
Yemen and the fall of the Shah of Iran. 

Oct 1979: As a response to anti- American demon- 
strations in Iran, Midway and its air wing, including 
VA-115, were ordered to deploy to the Indian Ocean 
for the second time in 1979. 

Nov-Dec 1979: In response to the seizure of the 
American Embassy and its staff by an Iranian mob, 
Midway returned to the Arabian Sea. 

May-Jun 1980: Following the massacre of several 
hundred people in the city of Kwangju, South Korea, 
the squadron operated from Midway off the coast of 
South Korea until the crisis subsided. 

Dec 1981: Following unrest in South Korea the 
squadron operated from Midway off the coast of 
South Korea for several days. 

29 Feb 1988: During an exercise in the Gulf of Siam, 
a squadron aircraft spotted a boatload of Vietnamese 
refugees, leading to their rescue by Midway (CV 41). 

Sep 1988: During the Summer Olympics in Seoul, 
South Korea, the squadron was embarked on Midway 
and operating in the Sea of Japan to demonstrate U.S. 
support for a peaceful Olympics. 

Nov 1990-Jan 1991 : The squadron flew missions in 
support of Operation Desert Shield, the build-up of 
American and Allied forces to counter a threatened 
invasion of Saudi Arabia by Iraq and were part of an 
economic blockade of Iraq to force its withdrawal 
from Kuwait. 

20 Jan-9 Mar 1991: The squadron participated in 
Operation Desert Storm, striking Iraqi naval targets 
and bases, airfields and bridges, a communication cen- 
ter, and providing close air support for Allied ground 
forces. 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 183 




A squadron TBF-1 Avenger on Guadalcanal with Lt. (jg) George Gay, LCdr W. L. Hamilton and LCdr F. L. Ashworth, May 1943. 



Home Port Assignments 



Commanding Officers 



Location Assignment Date 

NAS San Diego 10 Oct 1942 

NAS Pearl Harbor 01 Nov 1942* 

NAS Barbers Point 07 Nov 1942* 

NAF Nandi (in the Fiji Islands) 28 Feb 1943* 

NAF Guadalcanal (Henderson Field) 17 Apr 1943 

NAS Alameda 19 Aug 1943 

NAS Hilo 08 Apr 1944* 

NAS Barbers Point 19 Jun 1944* 

NAS Alameda 24 Feb 1945 

NAAS Fallon 30 Apr 1945* 

NAAS Santa Rosa 26 Jul 1945 

NAS Kahalui 22 Feb 1946 

NAS San Diego 26 Nov 1946 

NAS Miramar 15 Sep 1952 

NAS Moffett Field 08 Dec 196lf 

NAS Lemoore 03 Apr 1963 

NAS Whidbey Island 01 Jan 1970 
NS Yokosuka (NAF Atsugi & Misawa) 05 Oct 1973+ 

* Temporary shore assignment while the squadron conducted train- 
ing in preparation for combat deployment. 

t On 30 June 1961 the squadron's home port was changed to NAS 
Moffett Field. However, the squadron did not arrive there until 8 
December 1961. 

X VA-115, along with CVW-5 and Midway (CVA 41), were part of a 
program to permanently assign a carrier and air wing to an overseas 
home port. Midway's new home port was Naval Station Yokosuka, 
Japan, and the squadron would normally operate out of NAF Atsugi 
or Misawa when the carrier was in NS Yokosuka. The assignment 
was effective 30 June 1973. However, the squadron did not arrive 
until 5 October 1973. 





Date Assumed Command 


LCDR Frederick L. Ashworth 


10 Oct 1942 


LCDR Radcliffe Denniston, Jr. 


25 Sep 1943 


LT Wilbur J. Engman (acting) 


13 Nov 1944 


LCDR John A. Fidel 


25 Dec 1944 


LT John W. Carmody 


12 Sep 1946 


LCDR George B. Riley 


14 Oct 1946 


LCDR Lawrence B. Green 


09 Jan 1948 


LCDR William H. House 


14 Oct 1948 


LCDR Richard W. Fleck 


16 Jan 1950 


CDR Charles H. Carr 


30 Jun 1951 


LCDR J. H. Sands (acting) 


08 Jul 1952 


LCDR J. M. Ritzdorf (acting) 


17 Sep 1952 


CDR J. D. Taylor 


18 Oct 1952 


CDR C. L. Dillard 


Jun 1954 


CDR C. W. Smith, Jr. 


May 1955 


CDR Leone E. Kirk, Jr. 


Mar 1957 


LCDR R. L. Bothwell 


04 Jun 1958 


CDR G. W. Gaiennie 


09 Oct 1959 


CDR J. F. Driscoll 


27 Feb 1961 


CDR C. H. Bowen 


15 Jan 1962 


CDR George A. Parker 


03 Jan 1963 


CDR Merrill C. Pinkepank 


21 Jan 1964 


CDR M. C. Cook (acting) 


05 Aug 1964 


CDR D. D. Smith 


Oct 1964 


CDR M. C. Cook 


22 Jul 1965 


CDR H. G. Bailey 


15 Jul 1966 


CDR C. E. Hathaway 


Aug 1967* 


CDR O. E. Krueger 


Jul 1968* 


CDR R. H. Caldwell 


Jul 1969* 



1 84 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



Commanding Officers — Continued Aircraft Assignment 





Date Assumed Command 


Type of Aircraft 


Date Type First Received 


CDR C. J. Ward 


16 Jan 


1 C\~1C\ 

1970 


TBF-1 


Oct 1942 


CDR E. I. Carmichael 


09 Jul 


1971 


TBM-1 


13 Oct 1943 


CDR Paul D. Barrish 


11 T. . 1 

11 Jul 


1972 


TBM-1C 


Nov 1943 


CDR J. C. Presley 


06 Jul 


1973 


TBM-3 


19 Dec 1944 


CDR James J. Hower 


12 Jun 


1974 


TBM-3E 


Apr 1945 


CDR Russell E. Whipps 


22 Dec 


1975 


TBM-3Q 


Jan 1947 


CDR Jay T. Grafton 
CDR Louis E. Thomassy 


28 Jan 


1977 


TBM-3W 


Oct 1947 


24 Feb 


1978 


AD-1 


Dec 1948 


CDR Rodney C. Franz 


26 Jun 


1979 


AD-2 


20 Dec 1948 


CDR Joseph D. Favaro 


01 Nov 


1980 


AD-3Q 


Aug 1949 


CDR Robert R. Wittenburg 


21 Apr 


1981 


AD-4 


Dec 1949 


CDR William W. Radican 


16 Jul 


1982 


AD-4Q 


Jul 1950 


CDR William A. Gouslin 


27 Dec 


1983 


ATI ZiT 


iVlcly LyjL 


CDR Richard J. Rhoades 


20 Jun 


1985 


AD-4NA 


Aug 1952 


CDR Paul D. Cash 


19 Dec 


1986 


AD-6/A-1H* 


Jan 1954 


CDR David P. Polatty III 
CDR Terry J. Toms 


10 Jun 

Nov 


1988 


AD-7/A-1T* 


Nov 1958 


1989 


A-6A 


03 Apr 1970 


CDR James D. Kelly 


01 Jul 


1991 


KA-6D 
A-6B 


Feb 1971 
Oct 1973 


* During the squadron's inactive period between August 1967 and 


A-6E 


Apr 1977 


January 1970 the squadron was under the administrative control of 




VA-125. The Commanding Officer 
Commanding Officer of VA-115. 


of VA-125 was also the 


* The AD-6 and AD-7 designations were changed to A-1H and A-1J 
in 1962. 




A photo of Manila harbor following an attack by squadron TBMs in Squadron TBM-3s on the deck of Valley Forge (CV 45) depart Ports- 

November 1944. mouth, England, during its world cruise in 1947-1948. 



Major Overseas Deployments 



Date of 


Date of 


Air 




Type of 


Area of 


Departure 


Return 


Wing 


Carrier 


Aircraft 


Operation 


Feb 1943 


Jul 1943 


CVG-11 


* 


TBF-1 


SoPac 


29 Sep 1944 


01 Feb 1945 


CVG-11 


CV 12f 


TBM-1C/3 


Pacific 


09 Oct 1947 


11 Jun 1948 


CVAG-11 


CV45t- 


TBM-3E/Q/W 


World Cruise 


05 Jul 1950 


07 Apr 1951 


CVG-11 


CV47§ 


AD-4/4Q 


WestPac/Korea 


31 Dec 1951 


08 Aug 1952 


CVG-11 


CV47 


AD-4/4L 


WestPac/Korea 


01 Jul 1953 


18 Jan 1954 


CVG-11 


CVA 33 


AD-4NA/4B 


WestPac 


07 Oct 1954 


12 May 1955 


CVG-11 


CVA 33 


AD-6 


WestPac 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 1 85 



Major Overseas Deployments — Continued 



Date of 


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ividy 17/ /o 


CVW- , 
Vj v w y 


rv 41 

Vj V Trl 


rt UL CX l\ A Ul J 


Wr-titP'jr 

WCiiLl dVj 


00 Nnv 1078 

Uy 1MJV Ly/O 


73 Dr-r 1 07R 
z."y uct Ly 1 0 


rvw. s 

Vj v w y 


rv 41 

Vj V T:l 


A-^F Rr KA-f.D 

jTV UjC CX l\ . \ \ H J 


WCiilT dVj 


11 T-j n 1 070 
1 1 jd.ii Ly 1 j 


70 Fr-h 1070 
z,v7 irci-' Ly 1 y 


rvw. t 

Vj v w y 


rv 41 

Vj V T:l 


A-(^F ^ KA-^D 

ri UE CX I \ . \ \ H ^ 


WCiiLl dV. 


07 Anr 1070 
u/ ix]Ji Ly i y 


1Q Tim 1070 
10 j uii Ly 1 y 


rvw. t 

Vj v w y 


rv 41 

Vj V T:l 


A-^F &■ KA-i^D 

UU. CX I \ V H J 


TO 

lw 


70 Ana 1070 

Z.U rSWQ Ly I J 


14 Sr-n 1070 
14 l ^ t -l- , Ly/y 


rvw.s 

Vj v vv -y 


rv 41 

Vj V T:l 


ri UE CX l\ VII J 


WCiiLl dV. 


XC\ 1070 
;2U i3Cp Ly/y 


90 Fr-h 10R0 

Z.V7 1TCI-' Lyovj 


rvw. t 

Vj v vv y 


rv 41 

Vj V T:l 


rt UJ7 CX l\ V 1 1 J 


TO 

1U 


14 Tnl 10R0 

It J Ul 1 /Ou 


7f\ Nnv 10R0 


rvw ^ 

Vj v w y 


rv 41 

Vj V T:l 


A-(^F Rr KA-i^D 

rt UJ7 CX I \ V 1 1 J 


XY/p^tP^r/TO 


?3 Fr-h 1081 
l.j raj 1701 


OS Tim 10^.1 

V7_JJU11 LyOL 


rvw. t 

Vj v w y 


rv 41 

Vj V T:l 


A-(^F Rr KA-i^D 

UU. CX I \ A VII J 


YY/^^tPyir/TO 


?<^ Tun 1 081 

Z.U J Ul 1 L yO L 


1(^ Tnl 1QR1 
1U JUl 1 701 


rvw i 

Vj v w y 


rv 41 

Vj V T:l 


A-(aF Rr KA-^D 


WCMl dVj 


0^ ^r-n 1081 
uc> ocp I70I 


0i^ Ort 1081 

UU UlL I70I 


rvw t 

Vj V VV 7 


rv 41 

Vj V ^±1 


A ^F Rr K A 6Vi 

n-UE CX [\ ^ V 1 1 7 


XYA^ctPir 


?f\ Anr 108? 


1R Tim 108? 
10 j uii lyoz. 


rvw i 

Vj v w y 


rv 41 

Vj V Trl 


A-(aF Rr KA-^D 

rt UE CX l\ VII J 


YY/p^tP^r 

WCiiLl dV. 


1 4 ^r-n 1 OR? 


I 1 Dr-r 1 OR? 

II jjct Lyo^ 


rvw t 

Vj V W y 


rv 41 

Vj V Trl 


A ^F Rr K A 6Vi 

A UU CX l\ ^ V 1 1 7 


MnrPar /\Y/i^ctPar 


0? Tim 1 083 

UZ.JU11 I7OJ 


U Ana 1 0R^ 


rvw i 

Vj v w y 


rv 41 

Vj V T:l 


A-^F Rr KA-i^D 

ri VIE CX l\ r\ V 1 1 J 


YY/r-^tP-ar 
wciiir dVj 


?S Ort 1083 


I 1 Dr-r 1 0R^ 

II 17Ct I7OJ 


rvw. s 

Vj v w y 


rv 41 

Vj V T:l 


UEj CX l\ A 111 J 


wciiir dv. 


?8 Dpr 1083 


y-X M>1V 1 0^4 


rvw. s 

Vj v vv y 


rv 41 

Vj V Trl 


A-(aF Rr KA-i^D 

rt VIE CX 1 \ V 1 1 J 


TO 

1U 


1 ^ Ort 1 084 

Ly WC I lyOT: 


1 ? Dr-r 1 0R4 

IZj 17CC 1 /Oi 


rvw. t 

Vj v w y 


rv 41 

Vj V Trl 


A-(aF Rr KA-^D 

VIE CX 1 \ V 1 1 J 


wciiir dv. 


01 Fr-h 108S 
ui ircu 1707 


?Q M'^r 1Q8S 
Z.O ivid.1 1 70 y 


rvw.s 

Vj v w y 


rv 41 

Vj V Trl 


A-(aF Rr KA-i^D 

rt VIE CX l\ r\ V 1 1 J 


WCiiLl dVj 


10 Tim 108=, 

IV J Ull I7O7 


4 Ort 10RS 

T V_/^L 1 70 _7 


rvw. s 

Vj v vv y 


rv 41 

Vj V T:l 


A-ftV Rr KA-^D 

n VIE CX l\ VII J 


TO/YY/r'^tP^r 

1V7/ VVCctiLjrdC 


1 S Nov 1 08^ 

17 i\uv 1 yoy 


1 ? Dr-r 1 0RS 
1Z. JJCt Lyoy 


rvw. t 

Vj v w y 


rv 41 

Vj V Trl 


A-(^F Rr KA-^D 

jTV VIE CX l\ VII J 


wciiir dv. 


17 Tan 1986 

1 / IC4.11 1 yVj\J 


30 Mar 1986 


CVW-5 


CV 41 


A-6E & KA-6D 


WestPac 

VWcJLl c4.Vj 


09 Jan 1987 


20 Mar 1987 


CVW-5 


CV 41 


A-6E & KA-6D 


WestPac 


23 Apr 1987 


13 Jul 1987 


CVW-5 


CV41 


A-6/E & KA-6D 


WestPac 


15 Oct 1987 


12 Apr 1988 


CVW-5 


CV41 


A-6E & KA-6D 


WestPac/IO 


18 Oct 1988 


09 Nov 1988 


CVW-5 


CV 41 


A-6E & KA-6D 


WestPac 


21 Jan 1989 


24 Feb 1989 


CVW-5 


CV41 


A-6E & KA-6D 


WestPac 


27 Feb 1989 


09 Apr 1989 


CVW-5 


CV41 


A-6E & KA-6D 


WestPac 


31 May 1989 


25 Jul 1989 


CVW-5 


CV41 


A-6E & KA-6D 


WestPac 



1 86 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



Major Overseas Deployments — Continued 



Date of 
Departure 

15 Aug 1989 

20 Feb 1990 
02 Oct 1990 



Date of 
Return 

11 Dec 1989 
06 Apr 1990 
17 Apr 1991 



Air 
Wing 

CVW-5 
CVW-5 
CVW-5 



Carrier 

CV41 
CV 41 
CV41 



Type of 
Aircraft 

A-6E & KA-6D 
A-6E & KA-6D 
A-6E & KA-6D 



Area of 
Operation 

WestPac/IO 
WestPac 
WestPac/IO/ 
Persian Gulf 



* The squadron was landbased during its operations in the South Pacific. 

t The squadron transferred to Kasaan Bay (CVE 69) on 1 February 1945 at Ulithi for transport back to Hawaii, it then boarded Curtiss (AV 4) for 
transporation to the States. 

% During October through December 1947 the squadron operated from NAS Barbers Point with occasional exercises aboard Valley Forge 
(CV 45). In January 1948 the squadron departed NAS Barbers Point, embarked in Valley Forge, continuing its world cruise. 

§ While docked at Yokosuka, Japan, the squadron transferred from Philippine Sea (CV 47) to Valley Forge (CV 45) on 29 March 1951 for its 
return trip to the U.S. Philippine Sea continued its tour of duty in Korea with another air group. 

++ The squadron operated from Kitty Hawk (CVA 63) during its home port change from the Atlantic to the Pacific. The transit to the Pacific, via 
Cape Horn, was part of a training cruise that included operations in the Caribbean, South Atlantic and eastern Pacific. 

** The squadron and Midway (CVA 41) arrived at their new home port, Naval Station Yokosuka, Japan. Since the squadron is permanently for- 
ward deployed all future deployments for the squadron will cover only those operations outside the home waters of Japan. 

ft The squadron exchanged its A-6A and B model Intruders for A-6Es while Midway was in port at NS Subic Bay. Transitional training in the 
A-6E was conducted from NAF Atsugi during May to August 1977. 



Squadron ADA Skyraiders prepare to launch a strike from Philippine Sea (CV 4 7) during their first combat deployment to Korea, circa September 1950. 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 187 



Air Wing Assignments 



Air Wing 

CVG-ll/CVAG-11/ 

CVG-ll/CVW-llt 
CVW-5 
VA-125* 
CVW-16 
CVW-5 



Tail Code 
V/NH* 

NF 

AH 
NF 



Assignment Date 

10 Oct 1942 

16 Jul 1966 
Aug 1967 
1970 
1971 



* The tail code V was assigned to CVG-11 on 7 November 1946. The 
tail code was changed from V to NH in 1957. The effective date for 
this change was most likely the beginning of FY 58 (1 July 1957). 

t CVG-11 was redesignated CVAG-11 on 15 November 1946. The 
CVAG-11 designation was changed back to CVG-11 on 1 
September 1948. CVG-11 was redesignated CVW-11 when Carrier 
Air Group (CVG) designations were redesignated Carrier Air Wings 
(CVW) on 20 December 1963. 

% Administratively assigned to VA-125 during the squadron's stand- 
down. 



Unit Awards Received 

Unit Award Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 

PUC 10 Oct 1944 22 Nov 1944 

14 Dec 1944 16 Dec 1944 

03 Jan 1945 22 Jan 1945 

30 Apr 1972 09 Feb 1973 




A flight of squadron A-1H Skyraiders, circa 1964. 



Unit Awards Received — Continued 



Unit Award 
Campaign Medal 
(Asiatic-Pacific) 



Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 



08 Feb 1943 
10 Oct 1944 
14 Dec 1944 

09 Jan 1945 



20 Jun 1943 
29 Nov 1944 



A flight of two squadron A-6E Intruders loaded with cluster bombs, 1991. 



1 88 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



Unit Awards Received — Continued 



Unit Awards Received — Continued 



Unit Award 

KPUC 
NUC 



SASM 

KLM 

NAVE 



AFEM 



HSM 
MUC 



NEM 



Inclusive Dates 

12 Jan 1945 

16 Jan 1945 

01 Aug 1950 
20 Jan 1952 

04 Aug 1950 
26 Nov 1965 
29 Apr 1975 
01 Jan 1978 

17 Jan 1991 

02 Nov 1990 
17 Jan 1991 
01 Jul 1959 
01 Jul 1961 

Nov 1962 
01 Jul 1977 
01 Jan 1978 
20 May 1964 
17 Oct 1971 
29 Apr 1975 
29 Apr 1975 
20 Jan 1967 
07 May 1971 
13 Nov 1979 
27 Jul 1982 
15 Oct 1989 
15 Apr 1979 



Covering Unit Award 



16 Mar 1951 
12 Jul 1952 
16 Mar 1951 
14 May 1966 
30 Apr 1975 
30 Jun 1979 

07 Feb 1991 
14 Mar 1991 
28 Feb 1991 

30 Jun I960 
Oct 1962 
Feb 1964 

31 Dec 1978 
30 Jun 1980 
10 Jun 1964 
19 Oct 1971 
30 Apr 1975 
30 Apr 1975 

14 Jul 1967 

28 Oct 1971 

08 Feb 1980 
01 May 1984 

29 Oct 1989 
06 Jun 1979 



Unit Award 



RVNGC 
VNSM 



Inclusive Dates 



21 Nov 1979 
19 Aug 1980 
12 Mar 1981 

30 Mar 1972 

25 Nov 1965 

15 Jan 1966 

18 Feb 1966 
01 Apr 1966 
08 May 1966 
05 Feb 1967 
15 Mar 1967 

28 Apr 1967 
12 Jun 1967 

17 May 1971 

29 Jun 1971 
31 Jul 1971 

26 Sep 1971 
01 May 1972 

11 Jun 1972 

16 Jul 1972 
23 Aug 1972 

19 Sep 1972 
23 Oct 1972 
03 Dec 1972 

31 Dec 1972 
04 Jan 1973 
03 Feb 1973 



Covering Unit Award 
07 Feb 1980 

13 Nov 1980 
19 May 1981 

15 Jul 1972 
23 Dec 1965 
04 Feb 1966 

14 Mar 1966 
29 Apr 1966 
23 May 1966 
25 Feb 1967 

12 Apr 1967 
04 Jun 1967 
27 Jun 1967 

09 Jun 1971 
20 Jul 1971 

17 Aug 1971 

11 Oct 1971 
01 Jun 1972 
07 Jul 1972 

13 Aug 1972 

10 Sep 1972 

12 Oct 1972 
23 Nov 1972 
22 Dec 1972 

24 Jan 1973 
09 Feb 1973 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 189 



VA-122 

Lineage 

Established as Composite Squadron THIRTY FIVE 
(VC-35) on 25 May 1950. 

Redesignated Attack Squadron (All Weather) THIRTY 
FIVE (VA(AW)-35) on 1 July 1956. 

Redesignated Attack Squadron ONE TWENTY TWO 
(VA-122) on 29 June 1959. 

Disestablished on 31 May 1991- The first squadron 
to be assigned the VA-122 designation. 

Squadron Insignia and Nickname 

The squadron's first insignia was approved by CNO 
on 13 September 1951. Colors for the owl insignia 

were: a red background 
with a blue and white 
owl, the eyes of the owl 
were gold. 

Following the redesig- 
nation to VA-122 the 
squadron requested 
approval for a new 
insignia. The new insignia 
was approved by CNO 
on 22 April I960. The col- 

The owl design was the ° rS ° f the ea S le and book 

squadron's first approved insignia were: a blue 

insignia. background for the 

insignia and scroll, out- 
lined in black; a white 
wreath; the book had 
black pages, edged in 
white with a red cover; 
brown eagle with black 
highlights, its head was 
white with black high- 
lights and a yellow beak 
and claws; a white bomb 
outlined in black with 
three red bands; and the 
scroll's lettering was 
white. 

Nickname: Flying 
Eagles, 1971-1991. 





The squadron 's second insignia 
highlights its mission as a fleet 
replacement training squadron. 



Chronology of Significant Events 

May 1950: The squadron was established with a mis- 
sion of all-weather attack and ASW. The squadron 
trained detachments for carrier deployments and also 
participated in various exercises held on the west coast. 

9 Nov 1950-9 Jun 1951: VC-35 Det 3 was the 
squadron's first detachment to deploy. It deployed to 
Korea and flew ASW patrols, night heckler missions, 
and other combat sorties. These became the standard 



missions for the squadron detachments that deployed 
to Korea. 

29 Jun 1959: The squadron's mission was changed 
from all-weather attack to fleet replacement training. It 
was responsible for instrument flight training for fleet 
prop pilots, including ground school; enlisted ground 
training for Skyraider maintenance personnel; and the 
training of fleet replacement pilots for the AD-6/7 
Skyraider. 

Jun-Aug I960: The squadron trained eight officers 
from the South Vietnamese Air Force in the operation 
of the AD Skyraider. 

Nov 1966: With the acceptance of the A-7A Corsair 
II, the squadron took on the additional mission of fleet 
replacement training in this new aircraft. 

1967: VA-147 was the first squadron to be trained in 
the A-7 by VA-122. 

Dec 1969: The squadron joined with VA-125 to inau- 
gurate a graduate level Light Attack Weapons School 
which involved three intensive weeks of classroom 
and flight syllabus training covering all phases of 
attack aviation. 

15 Oct 1973: VA-122's Weapons Training Center, 
which conducted the Light Attack Weapons School, 
became a separate command and was designated 
Light Attack Weapons School, Pacific. 

30 Jun 1988: With the disestablishment of VA-174 
the east coast Fleet Readiness Squadron for the A-7, 
VA-122 assumed the responsibility for A-7 training on 
both coasts. 

May 1991: Prior to VA-122's disestablishment, it had 
trained and graduated over 5,000 light attack pilots and 
over 55,000 highly skilled maintenance personnel dur- 
ing its career as a fleet replacement training squadron. 

Home Port Assignments 



NAS San Diego/North Island* 
NAS Moffett Field 
NAS Lemoore 



Location Assignment Date 

25 May 1950 
01 Jul 1961 
01 Jan 1963 



• NAS San Diego was redesignated NAS North Island in 1955. 




Squadron AD-4NL Sky- 
raiders inflight, 6 October 
1951 (Courtesy Robert 
Lawson Collection). 



1 90 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



Commanding Officers 





Date Assumed Command 


PT^T) 1-, ,-, ,-1 r -, f D Cf/lf.1rtf 

i^jjk (wiiaries k. otapier 


?S Mav 


1 QS0 


cjjk uavici a. MarKs 


ly iviciy 


1 0^1 


CDR William L. Conley (acting) 


9S Alio 
Z9 AUg 


1 0^1 


CDR David A. Marks 


Zy inov 


1 0^1 


CDR Louis E. Burke, Jr. 


31 Till 
31 JU1 


1 0=i9 


CDR Frank G. Edwards (acting) 


31 Orf 


1 0S9 


LjUR louis t. £5urKe, jr. 


liUV 


1 o=;9 


CDR John H. Pennoyer 


Apr 


Ty9D 


CDR Guiseppi Macri 


1fi Sen 


1 OSS 


CDR Donald B. Ingerslew 


Jan 




CAP1 Edward V. wedell 


HO Anrr 

yjy Aug 


1 QS7 

iyj 1 


CAPT L. E. Harris 


90 Tul 

zy jui 


1 QSQ 


CDR P. E. Payne 


Tul 

ZO J ui 


1 0(^0 


CDR J. A. Davenport 


93 Tun 




CDRjonn L. Lord 


1 0 Orf 


1 0^9 


CDR Joseph L. Coleman 


OS Mnv 

UO INOV 


1 01^3 
TyOD 


CDR M. C. Pmkepank 


If) Alio 


1 0^4 
17U4 


CDR Hugh A. Hoy 


UO vJCL 


1 Of^S 


CDR Melvin D. Blixt 


1 1 vJCL 


1 0^ 
lyOO 


CDR Carl Budwell, Jr. 


J ul 


lyD/ 


CDR Melvin M. Quaid, Jr. 


23 Aug 


I7D0 


CDR Walter S. Gray 111 


90 Ano 


1 060 


LjUR jonn l. iNicnoison, ji. 


07 Ano 
V / Aug 


1 070 

17 /U 


CDR Jesse R. Emerson 111 


in Ano 
1U AUg 


1 071 


CDR Cecil B. Hawkins, Jr. 


08 Ano 

WO AU^ 


1 079 
ly / z. 


CAPT Robert N. Livingston 


OVt INOV 


1 073 


CDR Richard L. Grant 


07 Feb 


1 07S 

iy / j 


CDR Kenneth A. Dickerson 


16 Apr 


1976 


CDR Meredith W. Patrick 


19 Aug 


1977 


CDR John A. Moriarty 


06 Dec 


1978 


CDR Lawrence H. Price 


20 May 


1980 


CDR Howard E. Koss 


09 Sep 


1981 


CDR John E. Vomastic 


05 Apr 


1983 


CDR William S. Orr, Jr. 


01 Jun 


1984 


CDR Thomas R. Mitchell III 


11 Sep 


1985 



Commanding Officers — Continued 

Date Assumed Command 

CDR Russell C. York 17 Dec 1986 

CDR George Crim 15 Mar 1988 

CAPT Jeffery Harrison 14 Jul 1989 



Aircraft Assignment 



Type of Aircraft Date Type First Received 


AD-4N 


Jun 1950 


AD-3Q 


Jun 1950 


AD-4Q 


Jul 1950 


AD-2Q 


Jul 1950 


AD-3 


Jul 1950 


TBM-3E/N 


Jul 1950 


AD-1Q 


Aug 1950 


AD-3N 


Dec 1950 


AD-4NL 


Aug 1951 


AD-4N 


Jan 1952 


AD-4B 


Feb 1952 


F3D-2 


Feb 1953 


AD-5N 


Mar 1954 


AD-5/A-1E* 


May 1954 


AD-6/A-1H* 


May 1954 


S2F-1 


Oct 1956 


TF-IO 


18 Jan 1957 


AD-5Q 


20 Nov 1957 


AD-7/A-1J* 


05 Dec 1958 


T-28B 


01 Mar 1959 


A-7A 


15 Nov 1966 


A-7B 


May 1968 


A-7E 


14 Jul 1969 


A-7C 


Jul 1971 


T-39D 


1971 


T-28C 


1973 


TA-7C 


1978 



* AD-5/6/7 designations were changed to A-1E/H/J in 1962. 



Major Overseas Deployments 



Date of 


Date of 


Ail- 






Type of 


Area of 


Departure 


Return 


Wing 


Carrier 


Det* 


Aircraft 


Operation 


09 Nov 1950 


09 Jun 1951 


CVG-19 


CV 37 


3 


AD-4N 


Korea 


06 Dec 1950 


09 Jun 1951 


CVG-2 


t 


4 


AD-4N 


Korea 


02 Mar 1951 


24 Oct 1951 


CVG-101 


CV 21 


5/A 


AD-2/4N & 4Q 


Korea 


10 May 1951 


17 Dec 1951 


CVG-102 


CV 31 


6/G 


AD-3/4N 


Korea 


May 1951 


29 Aug 1951 


CVG-19X 




7 


AD-4N 


Korea 


26 Jun 1951 


25 Mar 1952 


CVG-5 


CV 9 


8/B 


AD-2, 


Korea 












AD-3, N/Q, 














AD-4, L/Q 














& AD-4NL 




08 Sep 1951 


02 May 1952 


CVG-15 


CV36 


9/D 


AD-4NL/4Q 


Korea 


15 Oct 1951 


03 Jul 1952 


ATG-1 


CV45 


10/H 


AD-4NL & AD-2Q 


Korea 


31 Dec 1951 


08 Aug 1952 


CVG-11 


CV47 


C 


AD-4NL/Q & 2Q 


Korea 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 191 



Major Overseas Deployments — Continued 



Date of 


Date of 


Air 






Type of 


Area of 


Departure 


Return 


Wing 


Carrier 


Det* 


Aircraft 


Operation 


08 Feb 1952 


25 Sep 1952 


CVG-2 


CV 21 


A 


AD-4N/2Q/3N/4NL 


Korea 


21 Mar 1952 


03 Nov 1952 


CVG-19 


CV37 


E 


AD-4NL/4Q & 3Q 


Korea 


16 Jun 1952 


06 Feb 1953 


ATG-2 


CVA 9 


I 


AD-4N 


Korea/WestPac 


l6jun 1952 


Sep 1953 


§ 


§ 


W 


AD-4B/NL/N 


WestPac 


11 Aug 1952 


17 Mar 1953 


CVG-101 


CVA 33 


F 


AD-4N/NL 


Korea 


15 Sep 1952 


18 May 1953 


CVG-102 


CVA 34 


G 


AD-4N 


Korea 


20 Nov 1952 


25 Jun 1953 


CVG-5 


CVA 45 


B 


AD-4N 


Korea 


15 Dec 1952 


14 Aug 1953 


CVG-9 


CVA 47 


M 


AD-4N 


Korea 


24 Jan 1953 


21 Sep 1953 


CVG-15 


CVA 37 


D 


AD-4N 


Korea/WestPac 


30 Mar 1953 


28 Nov 1953 


ATG-1 


CVA 21 


II 


AD-4N 


Korea/WestPac 


01 Jul 1953 


18 Jan 1954 


CVG-11 


CVA 33 


C 


AD-4N 


Korea/WestPac 


03 Aug 1953 


03 Mar 1954 


CVG-2 


CVA 10 


A 


AD-4N 


WestPac 


14 Sep 1953 


22 Apr 1954 


CVG-19 


CVA 34 


E 


AD-4N 


WestPac 


01 Dec 1953 


12 Jul 1954 


ATG-2 


CVA 9 


I 


AD-4N 


WestPac 


03 Mar 1954 


11 Oct 1954 


CVG-12 


CVA 21 


G 


AD-4NL 


WestPac 


12 Mar 1954 


19 Nov 1954 


CVG-5 


CVA 47 


B 


AD-4NL 


WestPac 


11 May 1954 


12 Dec 1954 


CVG-9 


CVA 12 


M 


AD-4N 


World Cruise 


01 Jul 1954 


28 Feb 1955 


CVG-15 


CVA 10 


D 


AD-4N 


WestPac 


01 Sep 1954 


11 Apr 1955 


ATG-1 


CVA 18 


H 


AD-4N 


WestPac 


07 Oct 1954 


12 May 1955 


CVG-11 


CVA 33 


C 


AD-5N 


WestPac 


03 Nov 1954 


21 Jun 1955 


CVG-2 


CVA 9 


A 


AD-5N 


WestPac 


02 Mar 1955 


21 Sep 1955 


CVG-19 


CVA 34 


E 


AD-5N 


WestPac 


01 Apr 1955 


23 Nov 1955 


ATG-2 


CVA 47 


I 


AD-5N 


WestPac 


03 Jun 1955 


03 Feb 1956 


CVG-14 


CVA 21 


F 


AD-5N 


WestPac 


10 Aug 1955 


15 Mar 1956 


CVG-12 


CVA 19 


G 


AD-5N 


WestPac 


29 Oct 1955 


17 May 1956 


CVG-5 


CVA 33 


B 


AD-5N 


WestPac 


05 Jan 1956 


23 Jun 1956 


ATG-3 


CVA 38 


J 


AD-5N 


WestPac 


11 Feb 1956 


13 Jun 1956 


CVG-9 


CVA 34 


M 


AD-5N 


WestPac 


19 Mar 1956 


13 Sep 1956 


ATG-4 


CVA 10 


K 


AD-5N 


WestPac 


23 Apr 1956 


15 Oct 1956 


CVG-15 


CVA 18 


D 


AD-5N 


WestPac 


28 May 1956 


20 Dec 1956 


ATG-1 


CVA 16 


H 


AD-5N 


WestPac 


16 Jul 1956 


26 Jan 1957 


CVG-11 


CVA 9 


C 


AD-5N 


WestPac 


16 Aug 1956 


28 Feb 1957 


CVG-21 


CVA 31 


L 


AD-5N 


WestPac 


13 Nov 1956 


20 May 1957 


CVG-2 


CVA 38 


A 


AD-5N 


WestPac 


21 Jan 1957 


25 Jul 1957 


CVG-14 


CVA 12 


F 


AD-5N 


WestPac 


09 Mar 1957 


25 Aug 1957 


CVG-19 


CVA 10 


E 


AD-5N 


WestPac 


06 Apr 1967 


18 Sep 1957 


ATG-2 


CVA 19 


I 


AD-5N 


WestPac 


19 Apr 1957 


17 Oct 1957 


CVG-12 


CVA 16 


G 


AD-5N 


WestPac 


10 Jul 1957 


11 Dec 1957 


CVG-5 


CVA 31 


B 


AD-5N 


WestPac 


09 Aug 1957 


02 Apr 1958 


ATG-3 


CVA 33 


J 


AD-5N 


WestPac 


16 Sep 1957 


25 Apr 1958 


CVG-9 


CVA 14 


M 


AD-5N 


WestPac 


06 Jan 1958 


30 Jun 1958 


ATG-4 


CVA 12 


K 


AD-5N 


WestPac 


15 Feb 1958 


02 Oct 1958 


CVG-15 


CVA 19 


D 


AD-5N 


WestPac 


08 Mar 1958 


21 Nov 1958 


CVG-11 


CVA 38 


C 


AD-5N 


WestPac 


14 Jul 1958 


19 Dec 1958 


CVG-21 


CVA 16 


L 


AD-5N 


WestPac 


16 Aug 1958 


12 Mar 1959 


CVG-2 


CVA 41 


A 


AD-5N 


WestPac 


21 Aug 1958 


12 Jan 1959 


ATG-4 


CVA 20 


K 


AD-5N 


WestPac 


04 Oct 1958 


17 Feb 1959 


ATG-1 


CVA 14 


H 


AD-5N 


WestPac 


01 Nov 1958 


18 Jun 1959 


CVG-19 


CVA 31 


E 


AD-5N 


WestPac 



1 92 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



Major Overseas Deployments — Continued 



Date of 


Date of 


Air 






Type of 


Area of 


Departure 


Return 


Wing 


Carrier 


Det* 


Aircraft 


Operation 


03 Jan 1959 


27 Jul 1959 


CVG-14 


CVA61 


F 


AD-5N 


WestPac 


09 Mar 1959 


02 Oct 1959 


CVG-11 


CVA 38 


C 


AD-5N 


WestPac 


26 Apr 1959 


02 Dec 1959 


CVG-21 


CVA 16 


L** 


AD-5N 


WestPac 



* The squadron only deployed in detachments, usually four aircraft, and never as a complete squadron. In October 1951 the squadron's detach- 
ment designations were changed from numbers to letters. 

t Detachment 4 deployed to Korea embarked in Valley Forge (CV 45) and on 29 March 1951, as part of CVG-2, transferred to Philippine Sea (CV 
47). It returned to the States embarked in Philippine Sea. 

$ The detachment was sent to Japan, via air and ship transport, as part of Replacement Air Group 19X (CVG-19X). When it arrived in Japan it 
relieved CVG-19 in Princeton (CV 37). Upon completion of its combat tour in Korea it returned to the States embarked in Princeton. 

§ VC-35 Det W deployed to NAS Atsugi, Japan. The detachment departed for NAS Atsugi embarked in Essex (CV 9) and arrived there in the latter 
part of July 1952. While deployed to Japan, VC-35 Det W was under the operational control of COMFAIRJAPAN (Commander Fleet Air, Japan). 

** VA(AW)-35 Det L was the squadron's last detachment to deploy prior to the squadron's change of mission to training fleet replacement pilots 
and enlisted men and the phase out of its all-weather attack mission. 




A squadron TF-1, circa 1957 (Courtesy Duane Kasulka Collection). 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 193 



Air Wing Assignments 



Air Wing 

COMAIRPAC 

RCVG-12/RCVW-12:j: 

COMFAIRLEMOORE 

COMLATWINGPAC** 



Tail Code 

NRVWt 
NJ 
NJ§ 
NJ 



Assignment Date 

29Jun 1959 
01 Jul 1970 
30 Jun 1973 



* The tail code NR was assigned to VC-35 by Aviation Circular Letter 
No. 43-50 dated 19 July 1950. 

t The tail code was changed from NR to W in 1957. The effective 
date for this change was most likely the beginning of FY 58 (1 July 
1957). 

£ Replacement Air Group 12 (RCVG-12) was redesignated Combat 
Readiness Air Group 12 (RCVG-12) on 1 April 1963- Combat 



Readiness Air Group 12 was then redesignated Combat Readiness 
Air Wing 12 (RCVW-12) on 20 December 1963. 

§ RCVW-12 was disestablished on 1 July 1970 and the squadron was 
assigned to Commander Fleet Air Lemoore. However, the tail code 
NJ, which had been assigned to RCVW-12, was retained by VA-122 
and the other squadrons that had been assigned to RCVW-12. 

" COMFAIRLEMOORE was redesignated COMLATWINGPAC 
(Commander Light Attack Wing, Pacific) on 30 June 1973. 



Unit Awards Received 

Unit Award Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 

MUC 01 Jul 1970 31 Jul 1971 

01 Oct 1978 30 Sep 1980 




A formation of the squadron 's A- 7E Corsair II aircraft over the Sierras. 



1 94 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



VA-125 



Home Port Assignments 



Lineage 

Reserve Attack Squadron FIFTY FIVE E (VA-55E) 
was most likely established during the activation of 
the Naval Air Reserve in 1946 and remained in an 
inactive status. 

Redesignated Reserve Attack Squadron NINE HUN- 
DRED TWENTY THREE (VA-923) in January 1950. 

Reserve Attack Squadron NINE HUNDRED TWENTY 
THREE (VA-923) was called to active duty on 20 July 
1950. 

Redesignated Attack Squadron ONE HUNDRED 
TWENTY FIVE (VA-125) on 4 February 1953- 

Disestablished on 10 April 1958. The first squadron 
to be assigned the VA-125 designation. 



Squadron Insignia and 
Nickname 

There is no record for 
an approved squadron 
insignia. However, an 
insignia was used by the 
squadron during its 
deployment aboard 
Oriskany (CVA 34) in 
1952-1953. There are no 
colors available for this 
insignia. The Latin 
phrase Mors ab Alto 
means Death from 
Above. 

Nickname: Rough 
Raiders, 1952-1958. 




This insignia was used by the 
squadron during its deployment 
to Korea in 1952—1953 aboard 
Oriskany (CVA 34). 



Chronology of Significant Events 

1 Feb 1953: The squadron's commanding officer, 
Commander J. C. Micheel was killed in action in Korea. 



Location 

NAS St. Louis 
NAS San Diego 
NAS Miramar 



Assignment Date 
* 

02 Aug 1950 
Jan 1952 



* The squadron's home port was assigned prior to 1950, the exact 
date is unknown. 



Commanding Officers 



LCDR Herb W. Wiley 
CDRJohn C. Micheel 
LCDR Allan H. Gunderson 
LCDR John L. McMahon, Jr. 
LCDR Bernard E. Hackett 
CDR John H. Bahlman 
CDR A. J. Henry, Jr. 



Date Assumed Command 
* 

24 Mar 1952 
01 Feb 1953 

Jul 1953 
Oct 1954 
Apr 1956 

25 Oct 1957 



: Assumed command prior to 1950, date unknown. 



Aircraft Assignment 



Type of Aircraft 



TBM 



AM 



AD-2 

AD-4Q 

AD-4 

AD-3 

AD-4B 

AD-4NA 

AD-6 

AD-7 



Date Type First Received 
* 

1950 
Sep 1950 
Oct 1950 
Dec 1950 
Dec 1950 
Jun 1953 
Sep 1953 
Oct 1954 
Jan 1957 



: The squadron was assigned the TBM prior to 1950, date unknown. 




DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 1 95 



Major Overseas Deployments 



Date of 


Date of 


Air 




Type of 


Area of 


Departure 


Return 


Wing 


Carrier 


Aircraft 


Operation 


10 May 1951 


17 Dec 1951 


CVG-102 


CV 31 


AD-3/4Q 


Korea 


15 Sep 1952 


18 May 1953 


CVG-102 


CVA 34 


AD-3/4 


Korea 


03 Mar 1954 


11 Oct 1954 


CVG-12 


CVA 21 


AD-4B/NA 


WestPac 


10 Aug 1955 


15 Mar 1956 


CVG-12 


CVA 19 


AD-6 


WestPac 


19 Apr 1957 


17 Oct 1957 


CVG-12 


CVA 16 


AD-6/7 


WestPac 



A squadron AD-3 or 4 takes 
off from Bon Homme 
Richard (CV 3D during 
their combat deployment to 
Korea in 1951. 




Air Wing Assignments 



Air Wing Tail Code 

CVG-102/CVG-12f D/NJ+ 



Assignment Date 

1950* 



* VA-923's assignment to CVG-102 was in August or September 1950. 

t CVG-102 was redesignated CVG-12 on 4 February 1953. 

$ The tail code was changed from D to NJ in 1957. The effective date 
for this change was most likely the begnining of FY 58 (1 July 1957). 



Unit Award 
KSM 



Unit Awards Received 

Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 



30 May 1951 
17 Oct 1952 

31 Oct 1952 
27 Apr 1953 



06 Dec 1951 
29 Oct 1952 
29 Mar 1953 
02 May 1953 



A squadron AD Sky- 
raider prepares to launch 
from Hancock (CVA 19) 
during its cruise to 
WestPac in 1955-1956. 



1 96 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



SECOND VA-125 

Lineage 

Established as Attack Squadron TWENTY SIX (VA-26) 
on 30 June 1956. 

Redesignated Attack Squadron ONE HUNDRED 
TWENTY FIVE (VA-125) on 11 April 1958. 

Disestablished on 1 October 1977. The second 
squadron to be assigned the designation VA-125. 



V 



The tiger head was the squadron 's 
first insignia. 

was brown and white 
with black markings; the 
lightning bolt whiskers 
were yellow and out- 
lined in black; the 
tongue and inside of the 
mouth were red. 

When the squadron's 
mission was changed, a 
new insignia was 
approved by CNO on 13 
May 1959. Colors for the 
torch of learning 
insignia are unknown. 

Nickname: Skylanch- 
ers, 1956-1958 

Rough Raiders, 1958- 
1977. 



Squadron Insignia and 
Nickname 

The squadron's first 
insignia was approved 
by CNO on 18 
December 1956. Colors 
for the cougar insignia 
were: a dark blue back- 
ground outlined in 
black; white scroll out- 
lined in black with 
black lettering; white 
stars; the cougar's face 




When the squadron 's mission 
changed to fleet replacement 
training, this insignia was adopted 
and approved for used by the 
squadron. 



Chronology of Significant Events 

11 Apr 1958: The squadron's mission was changed 
from air-to-ground/surface attack to the indoctrination 
and training of pilots and enlisted personnel in attack 
aircraft for assignment to combat carrier squadrons. 

11 Dec 1958: The squadron's commanding officer, 
Commander J. E. Thomas, was killed in an aircraft 
accident. 

Mar I960: With the addition of the A4D-2N 
Skyhawk, the squadron added radar and inflight refu- 
eling training to its flight syllabus. 



19 May 1966: VA-125 was the first squadron in the 
Navy to receive the TA-4F Skyhawk. 

Jun 1966: The first of several groups of Australians 
arrived for training by the squadron on the A-4 
Skyhawk. The pilots were to form the nucleus of 
Australia's first A-4 squadron scheduled for assignment 
to HMAS Melborne (R-21). 

13 Mar 1967: The squadron's commanding officer, 
Commander J. D. Shaw, was killed in an aircraft acci- 
dent during a routine carrier qualification exercise on 
the Kearsarge (CVS 33). 

31 Mar 1969: The last A-4 Fleet Replacement Pilot 
class began. 

30 Jun 1969: The last A-4 Fleet Replacement 
Enlisted Maintenance training program was completed. 

Nov 1969: The squadron began to develop the 
required training program for the Light Attack 
Weapons School. In December 1969 the squadron, in 
conjunction with VA-122, inaugurated a graduate level 
course for the Light Attack Weapons School that 
involved all phases of attack aviation. 

Jan 1970: The first A-7 Fleet Replacement Enlisted 
Maintenance and Fleet Replacement Pilot classes began. 




A formation of squadron F9F-8 Cougars, circa 1957. 

Home Port Assignments 



Location 

NAS Miramar 
NAS Moffett Field 
NAS Lemoore 



Assignment Date 

30 Jun 1956 
Aug 1956 
24 Jul 1961 



Commanding Officers 



CDR Richard D. Greer, Jr. 
CDR C. H. Carr 
CDR J. E. Thomas 
CDR F. E. Ward, Jr. 



Date Assumed Command 
30 Jun 1956 
11 Apr 1958 
15 Jul 1958 
11 Dec 1958 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



197 



Commanding Officers — Continued 



Aircraft Assignment 



CDR P. H. Durand 
CDR O. L. Dauphin 
CDR James W. Porter 
CDR Earl F. Godfrey 
CDR William J. Forgy 
CDR Jack A. Endacott 
CDR John D. Shaw 
CDR Gary H. Palmer (acting) 
CDR Charles E. Hathaway 
CDR Otto E. Krueger 
CDR Ronald H. Caldwell 
CDR George E. LeBlanc, Jr. 
CDR James B. Busey IV 
CDR James M. Gleim 
CDR Charles R. Bowling 
CDR Robert C. Taylor 
CDR Denis R. Weichman 
CDR J. W. Keathley 



Date Assumed Command 

30 Nov 1959 
05 Apr 1961 

09 Apr 1962 
29 May 1963 
14 Sep 1964 

27 Aug 1965 
29 Jul 1966 

13 Mar 1967 
12 May 1967 
11 Jul 1968 
31 Jul 1969 
31 Jul 1970 

10 May 1971 

31 Mar 1972 
06 Jul 1973 

12 Sep 1974 
17 Dec 1975 

28 Mar 1977 



Type of Aircraft 



F9F-8B 
F9F-8 



A4D-1 

A4D-2/A-4B'" 
A4D-2N/A-4C* 



AD-5/A-1E* 



A-4E 

TA-4F 

A-4F 



A-7B 
A-7A 
A-7C 



Date Type First Received 

Jul 1956 
Oct 1956 

10 Jun 1958 
Aug 1958 

03 Mar I960 
Sep I960 
Dec 1962 

19 May 1966 
Feb 1968 

25 Sep 1969 
Oct 1969 
Aug 1975 



* The A4D-2, A4D-2N and AD-5 designations were changed to A-4B, 
A-4C and A-1E in 1962. 




A close up of an F9F-8 Cougar with squadron personnel, taken during the squadron s 1957-1958 deployment to WestPac aboard Kearsarge (CVA 



Major Overseas Deployments 

Date of Date of Air Type of Area of 

Departure Return Wing Carrier Aircraft Operation 

09 Aug 1957 02 Apr 1958 ATG-3 CVA 33* F9F-8 WestPac 

* During the deployment aboard Kearsarge (CVA 33) the squadron was based at NAS Agana, Guam, for a considerable part of the cruise. 



1 98 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



A formation of five different models oftheA-4 Skyhawk flown by the squadron in 1969; the A-4B, A-4C, A-4E, A-4F and TA-4F. 



Air Wing Assignments 



Air Wing Tail Code 

ATG-3 Y/NC* 

RCVG-12/RCVW-12t NJ 

COMFAIRLEMOORE NJ^ 

COMLATWINGPAC§ NJ 



Assignment Date 

30 Jun 1956 
11 Apr 1958 
01 Jul 1970 
30 Jun 1973 



• The tail code was changed from Y to NC in 1957. The effective date 
for this change was most likely the beginning of FY 58 (1 July 1957). 

t The Replacement Air Group designation (RCVG) was changed to 
Combat Readiness Air Group (RCVG) on 1 April 1963 and then to 
Combat Readiness Air Wing (RCVW) on 20 December 1963. 

i RCVW- 12 was disestablished on 1 July 1970 and the squadron was 
assigned to Commander Fleet Air Lemoore. However, the tailcode 
NJ, which had been assigned RCVW-12, was retained by VA-125 and 
the other squadrons that had been assigned to RCVW-12. 

§ COMFAIRLEMOORE was redesignated COMLATWINGPAC 
(Commander Light Attack Wing, Pacific) on 30 June 1973. 




A squadron A-1E Skyraider, 1965 or 1966. 



A formation of squadron A-7 
Corsair lis over NAS Lemoore, 
California, 1970. 




DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 199 



VA-128 

Lineage 

Established as Attack Squadron ONE HUNDRED 
TWENTY EIGHT (VA-128) on 1 September 1967. The 
first squadron to be assigned the VA-128 designation. 



Squadron Insignia and 
Nickname 

The squadron's 
insignia was approved 
by CNO on 9 August 
1967. Colors for the styl- 
ized Phoenix insignia 
are: white background 
for insignia and scroll, 
outlined in gold; the 
stylized Phoenix and the 
lettering are also gold. 

Nickname: Golden 
Intruders, 1967-present 




The stylized phoenix insignia used 
by the squadron. 



Chronology of Significant Events 

1 Sep 1967: The squadron was assigned the mission 
of training combat ready flight crews and replacement 
maintenance personnel for the A-6 Intruder. 

Oct 1968: Two U.S. Air Force exchange officers 
reported aboard for training in the A-6A. 

Jun 1973: A Naval Officer from the Federal Republic 
of Germany reported aboard for training in the A-6. 

Mar-May 1980: The squadron's TC-4C, Target 
Recognition Attack Multisensor (TRAM) equipped air- 
craft, was used to monitor the hot spots on Mt. St. 
Helens in Washington prior to a major eruption on 18 
May. The squadron's work with U.S. Geological Survey 



authorities provided the forewarning necessary to save 
hundreds of lives since the mountain was a popular 
place for campers, boaters and mountain climbers. 

Oct 1986: The squadron assumed the additional 
duty of training all Marine Corps personnel on the A-6 
following the disestablishment of VMAT(AW)-202. 

1990: The squadron received the first composite 
wing A-6E on the West Coast. 



Home Port Assignments 



Location 

NAS Whidbey Island 



Assignment Date 
01 Sep 1967 



Commanding Officers 



CDR W. B. Warwick 
CDR N. R. Gooding, Jr. 
CDR Leland S. Kollmorgen 
CDR Lester W. Berglund 
CDR Robert W. Miles 
CDR Richard M. Dunleavy 
CDR George E. Matt 
CDR Robert S. Owens 
CDR Van F. Westfall 
CDR Lyle F. Bull 
CDR Daryl L. Kerr 
CDR John M. McNabb 
CDR Rodney C. Franz 
CDR David D. Williams 
CDR Patrick C. Hauert 
CDR Robert R. Whittenburg 
CDR Bruce V. Wood 
CDR Kenneth G. Bixler 
CDR Gary W. Stubbs 
CDR Michael J. McCamish 



Date Assumed Command 
01 Sep 1967 

16 May 1969 
26 Jun 1970 

1971 
07 Jul 1972 
03 Aug 1973 

17 Oct 1974 
12 Dec 1975 
01 Nov 1976 
03 Feb 1978 

29 Jun 1979 
01 Aug 1980 

10 Jul 1981 
15 Oct 1982 
06 Jan 1984 
1985 
24 Oct 1986 
22 Jan 1988 

30 Jun 1989 
17 Aug 1990 




Squadron A-6E Intruders conducting aerial refueling, 1982. 



200 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



Aircraft Assignment 



Type of Aircraft 



A-6A 



TC-4C 



A-6E 



Date Type First Received 

01 Sep 1967 

15 Mar 1968 

16 Dec 1973 



* RCVW-12 was disestablished on 1 July 1970 and the squadron was 
assigned to Commander Fleet Air Whidbey. However, the tail code 
NJ, which had been assigned to RCVW-12, was retained by VA-128 
and the other squadrons that had been assigned to RCVW-12. 

t Commander Fleet Air Whidbey was redesignated Commander 
Medium Attack Tactical Electronic Warfare Wing Pacific (COMMAT- 
VAQWINGPAC) on 1 March 1973. 



Air Wing Assignments 



Unit Awards Received 



Air Wing Tail Code 

RCVW-12 NJ 
COMFAIRWHIDBEY NJ* 
COMMATVAQWINGPACf NJ 



Assignment Date 

01 Sep 1967 
01 Jul 1970 
01 Mar 1973 



Unit Award 

MUC 
SLOC 



Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 



15 Oct 1982 
01 Feb 1987 
01 Mar 1980 



06 Jan 1984 
01 Feb 1988 
31 Mar 1981 




A squadron TC-4C Academe at Eglin AFB, Florida, in 1993- 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 201 



VA-133 

Lineage 

Established as Attack Squadron ONE HUNDRED 
THIRTY THREE (VA-133) on 21 August 1961. 

Disestablished on 1 October 1962. The first 
squadron to be assigned the VA-133 designation. 

Squadron Insignia and Nickname 

The squadron's insignia was approved by CNO on 
13 February 1962. Colors for the blue knight 

insignia were: a 
blue background; 
a white shield 
outlined in black; 
a yellow lightning 
bolt outlined in 
black; a blue 
chess knight with 
white markings 
and outlined in 
black; and the 
scroll had a white 
background, out- 
lined in black and 
blue lettering. 

Nickname: Blue 
Knights, 1962. 




The short lived "Blue Knight" insignia. 



Chronology of Significant Events 

Aug 1961: The squadron was established as part of 
a new Air Group to increase the strength of the fleet 
as a result of the Berlin Crisis of 1961-1962. 

8-19 Feb 1962: A squadron detachment was aboard 
Constellation (CVA 64) for carrier trials and in a stand- 
by status for possible assistance during Project 
Mercury, the launching of Lieutenant Colonel John H. 
Glenn, USMC, in Mercury spacecraft Friendship 7. 

Mar-May 1962: The squadron participated in 
Constellation's shakedown cruise in the Caribbean. 



Home Port Assignments 



Location 

NAS Cecil Field 



Assignment Date 

21 Aug 1961 



Commanding Officers 

Date Assumed Command 

CDR M. A. Feher 21 Aug 1961 



Aircraft Assignment 



Type of Aircraft 



A4D-2 



Date Type First Received 

12 Sep 1961 



Air Wing 
CVG-13 



Air Wing Assignments 

Tail Code 
AE 



Assignment Date 

21 Aug 1961 



202 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



SECOND VA-134 

Lineage 

Established as Attack Squadron ONE HUNDRED 
THIRTY FOUR (VA-134) on 21 August 1961. 

Disestablished on 1 October 1962. The second 
squadron to be assigned the VA-134 designation. 



Feb 1962: The squadron was aboard Constellation 
(CVA 64) for carrier trials and in a stand-by status for 
possible assistance during Project Mercury, the launch- 
ing of Lieutenant Colonel John H. Glenn, USMC, in 
Mercury spacecraft Friendship 7. 

Mar-May 1962: The squadron participated in 
Constellation's shakedown cruise in the Caribbean. 



Squadron Insignia and Nickname 

The squadron's insignia was approved by CNO on 
15 February 1962. Colors for the scorpion insignia 
were: a burnt orange background and scroll, out- 
lined in black; a white 
star with black high- 
lights; the globe was 
outlined in black with a 
blue ocean and orange 
land mass, outlined in 
black; the scorpion was 
black with white high- 
lights; the lettering was 
orange outlined in 
black. 

Nickname: Scorpions, 
1962. 




The scorpion insignia for VA-134. 



Home Port Assignments 



Location 

NAS Cecil Field 



Assignment Date 

21 Aug 1961 



Commanding Officers 



CDR Kenneth B. Austin 



Date Assumed Command 

21 Aug 1961 



Aircraft Assignment 



Type of Aircraft 



A4D-2 



Date Type First Received 

Sep 1961 



Chronology of Significant Events 

Aug 1961: The squadron was established as part of 
a new Air Group to increase the strength of the fleet 
during the Berlin Crisis of 1961-1962. 



Air Wing Assignments 



Air Wing 
CVG-13 



Tail Code 
AE 



Assignment Date 

21 Aug 1961 




A squadron A4D-2 Skyhawk is prepared for launch from Constellation (CVA 64) in February 1962. This was the first aircraft launched from 
Constellation after her commissioning in October 1961 . 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 203 



VA-135 

Lineage 

Established as Torpedo Squadron EIGHTY ONE 
CVT-81) on 1 March 1944. 

Redesignated Attack Squadron FOURTEEN A (VA- 
14A) on 15 November 1946. 

Redesignated Attack Squadron ONE HUNDRED 
THIRTY FIVE (VA-135) on 2 August 1948. 

Disestablished on 30 November 1949- The first 
squadron to be assigned the VA-135 designation. 

Squadron Insignia and Nickname 

There is no record of official approval for the 
squadron insignia. Colors for the bird insignia, which 

is believed to have been 

used by VA-14A, were: a 
white background with 
a green border; the 
bird's body and wings 
were black with white 
markings, red head and 
neck, orange beak and 
black eyes with red 
streaks; the machine 
gun in the beak was 
black and white, the 
legs were brown and 
the tailhook had black 
and white strips with a gray hook; the torpedo had a 
yellow warhead streaked with orange, the body was 
pale blue, the detonator was green and the propeller 
was yellow; the bomb was black and the rocket was 
gray with blue shading and a red flame. 

Nickname: Uninvited, time frame unknown. 

Chronology of Significant Events 

14 Nov 1944: The squadron's first combat strike was 
conducted against Manila Harbor. 

9-20 Jan 1945: The squadron was part of a task 
force that entered the South China Sea and conducted 
combat operations against Cam Rahn Bay; Hong Kong 
and Takao Harbor, Formosa. 

16 Feb 1945: The squadron struck the home islands 
of Japan, flying a seven-plane attack against 
Hamamatuo Airfield on Honshu. 

21 Feb 1945: The squadron participated in its first 
ground support mission, flying sorties over Iwo Jima. 

1 Mar 1945: The squadron flew its last combat strike 
of the war. During the four months of combat opera- 
tions from Wasp (CV 18) it did not lose any personnel 




This insignia was used by VA-14A. 



due to enemy action (two personnel were lost due to 
operational accidents). 

15-29 Jun 1946: The squadron embarked in 
Princeton (CV 37) and transited from Norfolk to San 
Diego via the Panama Canal. 



Home Port Assignments 

Location Assignment Date 

NAS Quonset Point 01 Mar 1944 

NAAF Martha's Vineyard 01 Mar 1944* 

NAAF Boca Chica 20 Apr 1944* 

NAAF Otis Field, Camp Edwards 10 May 1944* 

NAS San Diego 10 Aug 1944* 

NAS Puunene 01 Sep 1944* 

NAS Pasco 13 May 1945* 

NAAF Sanford, Maine 31 Jul 1945* 

NAS Quonset Point 15 Sep 1945 

NAS San Diego Jun 1946 

NAS Jacksonville 01 Apr 1949 

* Temporary shore assignment while the squadron conducted train- 
ing in preparation for combat deployment. 



Commanding Officers 



LT George D. M. Cunha 

LT John A. McGlinn, Jr. 

LT Harold E. Brown, Jr. (acting) 

LT Humphrey L. Tallman 

LCDR Albert K. Earnest 

LCDR Robert P. Chase 

LCDR LeVern C. T. Niehaus 



Date Assumed Command 

01 Mar 1944 
13 May 1945 
Jul 1945 

20 Aug 1945 
Apr 1947 
Jun 1948 

21 Jun 1949 



Aircraft Assignment 



Type of Aircraft Date Type First Received 


TBM-1C 


Mar 1944 


TBM-1 


Mar 1944 


TBF-1 


Mar 1944 


TBF-1C 


Nov 1944 


TBM-1D 


Nov 1944 


TBM-3 


May 1945 


TBM-3E 


May 1945 


TBM-30 


1946 


AD-4 


Sep 1949 



204 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



Major Overseas Deployments 



Date of 
Departure 

10 Nov 1944 

03 Jul 1946 
01 Oct 1948 



Date of 
Return 

13 Mar 1945 

15 Apr 1947 

16 Dec 1948 



Air 
Wing 

CVG-81 
CVG-81 
CVG-13 



Carrier 

CV 18 
CV 37 

CV 37 



Type of 
Aircraft 

TBM-1C/D 
TBM-3E/Q 
TBM-3E/Q 



Area of 
Operation 

Pacific 

WestPac 

WestPac 



Air Wing Assignments 



Unit Awards Received 



Air Wing Tail Code 

CVG-81/CVAG-13/ Pt 
CVG-13* 



Assignment Date 

01 Mar 1944 



* CVG-81 was redesignated CVAG-13 on 15 November 1946. CVAG- 
13 was redesignated CVG-13 on 1 September 1948. CVG-13 was dis- 
established on 30 November 1949. 

t The tail code P was assigned to the carrier Princeton (CV 37) in 
November 1946 and then reassigned to CVAG-13 in December 1946. 



Unit Award 
NUC 



Campaign Medal 
(Asiatic-Pacific) 



Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 



14 Nov 1944 
14 Dec 1944 
03 Jan 1945 
16 Feb 1945 

14 Nov 1944 
14 Dec 1944 
03 Jan 1945 
16 Feb 1945 



19 Nov 1944 
16 Dec 1944 
22 Jan 1945 
01 Mar 1945 

19 Nov 1944 
16 Dec 1944 
22 Jan 1945 
01 Mar 1945 



r 



A squadron TBM-3E in flight, March 1946 (Courtesy Robert Lawson Collection). 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 205 



SECOND VA-135 

Lineage 

Established as Attack Squadron ONE HUNDRED 
THIRTY FIVE (VA-135) on 21 August 1961. 

Disestablished on 1 October 1962. The second 
squadron to be assigned the VA-135 designation. 

Squadron Insignia and Nickname 

The squadron's insignia was approved by CNO on 
15 February 1962. This insignia was similar to the 

insignia that had been 
used by the first VA-135. 
Colors for the insignia 
were: upper back- 
ground light blue, lower 
background dark blue; 
insignia outlined in 
green with a green 
scroll and white letter- 
ing; silver bird with 
white highlights and 
black outlines; the head 
and neck were red with 
a white star burst at the 
neck outlined in black; 
olive green beak and 
legs outlined in black; white eye with a black pupil; 
white tailhook with black stripes; silver rocket and tor- 




The Second VA-135 adopted the 
same insignia used by the first 
VA-135. 



pedo with black markings and outlines; yellow bomb 
with black markings and outlines. 
Nickname: Thunderbirds, 1962. 

Chronology of Significant Events 

Aug 1961: The squadron was established as part of 
a new Air Group to increase the strength of the fleet 
during the Berlin Crisis of 1961-1962. 

Mar-May 1962: The squadron participated in 
Constellation's shakedown cruise in the Caribbean. 



Home Port Assignments 



Location 



NAS Jacksonville 
NAS Cecil Field 



Assignment Date 

21 Aug 1961 
07 Aug 1962 



Commanding Officers 



CDR Barclay W. Smith 

Aircraft Assignment 



Date Assumed Command 

21 Aug 1961 



Type of Aircraft 



AD-6 



Date Type First Received 

21 Aug 1961 



Air Wing Assignments 



Air Wing 
CVG-13 



Tail Code 
AE 



Assignment Date 

21 Aug 1961 




A squadron AD-6 Skyraider, August 1961. Commander G. C. Watkins, left, congratulates squadron CO Commander B. W. Smith on having the 
first plane in CVG-13 to fly operationally following the air group's establishment in 1961. 



206 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



VA-144 

Lineage 

Established as Attack Squadron ONE HUNDRED 
SIXTEEN (VA-116) on 1 December 1955. 

Redesignated Attack Squadron ONE HUNDRED 
FORTY FOUR (VA-144) on 23 February 1959. 

Disestablished on 29 January 1971. The first 
squadron to be assigned the VA-144 designation. 



Squadron 
Insignia and 
Nickname 

The squadron's 
insignia was 
approved by CNO 
on 23 February 
1956. Colors for 
the lightning bolt 
and electron ring 
insignia were: a 
black background 




The insignia used by VA-116. 



outlined in white 
with a white scroll 
and black lettering; 
red lightning bolt; 
yellow electron 
rings and white 
stars. This insignia 
was retained by 
the squadron fol- 
lowing its redesig- 
nation. 

Nickname: 
Roadrunners, 
1960s-1971. 




When the squadron was redesignated 
VA-144, it continued to use the old 
insignia and changed only the lower 
banner designation. 



Chronology of Significant Events 

Sep 1957: The squadron, embarked in Hancock 
(CVA 19), was on station off the coast of Taiwan due 
to a build-up of Chinese Communist forces on the 
mainland opposite Taiwan. 

26 May- 18 Aug 1958: The squadron was embarked in 
Ranger (CVA 61) during its transit from the east coast, 
via South America, to its new home port at Alameda. 

Jul 1959: The squadron, embarked in Ranger (CVA 
6l), maintained station off the coast of Taiwan due to 
increased tension between Taiwan and Communist 
China. 

Jun-Nov 1964: The squadron participated in Yankee 
Team Operations. These operations involved support 
for photo reconnaissance missions over Laos. During 
these operations, the squadron was the first opera- 
tional unit to fly with and drop the Snakeye weapon. 

4 Aug 1964: The squadron flew night sorties in 
support of the American destroyers, Turner Joy (DD 
951) and Maddox (DD 731), following their harass- 
ment by North Vietnamese Motor Torpedo Boats in 
the Gulf of Tonkin. 

5 Aug 1964: VA-144 participated in Operation Pierce 
Arrow, air strikes against North Vietnamese torpedo 
boats, their bases and supporting facilities in retalia- 
tion for the attacks on the American destroyers the 
previous day. Strikes were flown against the North 
Vietnamese home port of Hon Gay and the naval craft 
located there. During this engagement Lieutenant (jg) 
Everett Alvarez's A-4C was hit by antiaircraft fire and 
he was forced to eject. A rescue attempt failed and he 
was captured. He became the first American naval 
prisoner-of-war during the Vietnam Conflict and was 
held by the North Vietnamese until 1973. 

20 Dec 1967: Commanders J. R. Powell, Jr. and R. C. 
Bos were awarded the Silver Star for planning and 
leading a successful strike against the heavily defend- 
ed Haiphong Thermal Power Plant (west). 

24 Apr 1967: VA-l44's aircraft participated in a strike 
against the Kep Airfield, the first time the airfield was 
hit during the air war over North Vietnam. 



A squadron F7U-3M 
with squadron person- 
nel information dur- 
ing the establishment 
ceremony for VA-116 
at NAS Miramar, 
California, in 
December 1955. 




DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 207 



Home Port Assignments 



Commanding Officers — Continued 



Location 

NAS Miramar 
NAS Lemoore 



Assignment Date 

01 Dec 1955 
May 1962 






Date Assumed Command 


CDR Robert P. Nottingham 


02 Jan 


1965 


CDR David B. Miller 


04 Nov 


1965 


CDR J. Richard Powell, Jr. 


14 Sep 


1966 


CDR Gary H. Palmer 


28 Jul 


1967 


CDR William H. Robinson, Jr. 


26 Jul 


1968 


CDR Donald Hull-Ryde 


17 Jul 


1969 


CDR Galen B. Allen 


01 Jul 


1970 



A squadron F7U-3M Cutlass prepares to launch from Hancock (CVA 
19) during their 1957 cruise to WestPac. 




Commanding Officers 



CDR J. L. Callis 

CDR Ralph H. Beatle 

CDR James Ritchie 

CDR Carl B. Tanner, Jr. 

CDR Rowland G. Freeman III 

CDR Jerome S. Roth 

CDR Harry S. Sellers 

CDR Donald B. Bolstad 



Two squadron FJ-4B Furys on the deck of Ranger (CVA 61) during 
their 1959 deployment to WestPac. 



Date Assumed Command 




01 Dec 1955 




10 Oct 1957 




29 Aug 1958 


Type of Aircraft 


12 Aug 1959 


F7U-3M 


10 Dec I960 


FJ-4B 


12 Oct 1961 


A-4C 


02 Jan 1963 


A-4E 


06 Dec 1963 


A-4F 



Aircraft Assignment 



Date Type First Received 

Dec 1955 
15 Oct 1957 
04 Jun 1962 
Jul 1967 
12 Nov 1969 



Major Overseas Deployments 



Date of 


Date of 


Air 




Type of 


Area of 


Departure 


Return 


Wing 


Carrier 


Aircraft 


Operation 


06 Apr 1957 


18 Sep 1957 


ATG-2 


CVA 19 


F7U-3M 


WestPac 


03 Jan 1959 


7 Jul 1959 


CVG-14 


CVA 61 


FJ-4B 


WestPac 


14 May I960 


15 Dec I960 


CVG-14 


CVA 34 


FJ-4B 


WestPac 


09 Nov 1961 


12 May 1962 


CVG-14 


CVA 16 


FJ-4B 


WestPac 


21 Feb 1963 


10 Sep 1963 


CVG-14 


CVA 64 


A-4C 


WestPac 


05 May 1964 


01 Feb 1965 


CVW-14 


CVA 64 


A-4C 


WestPac/Vietnam 


28 Sep 1965 


13 May 1966 


CVW-5 


CVA 14 


A-4C 


WestPac/Vietnam 


05 Nov 1966 


19 Jun 1967 


CVW-11 


CVA 63 


A-4C 


WestPac/Vietnam 


18 Nov 1967 


28 Jun 1968 


CVW-11 


CVA 63 


A-4E 


WestPac/Vietnam 


18 Mar 1969 


29 Oct 1969 


CVW-5 


CVA 31 


A-4E 


WestPac/Vietnam 


02 Apr 1970 


12 Nov 1970 


CVW-5 


CVA 31 


A-4F 


WestPac/Vietnam 



208 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



Air Wing Assignments 



Unit Awards Received — Continued 



Air Wing Tail Code 

ATG-2 W/NB* 

CVG-14/CVW-14 T NK 

CVW-5 NF 

CVW-11 NH 

CVW-5 NF 



Assignment Date 

01 Dec 1955 
01 Apr 1958 
01 Jun 1965 
15 Sep 1966 
01 Nov 1968 



* The tail code W was assigned to ATG-2 on 24 July 1956. It was 
changed to NB in 1957. The effective date for this change was most 
likely the beginning of FY 58 (1 July 1957). 

t CVG-14 was redesignated CVW-14 when Carrier Air Group (CVG) 
designations were redesignated Carrier Air Wings (CVW) on 20 
December 1963. 



Unit Award 
NAVE 
PUC 
MUC 

NUC 
AFEM 



Unit Awards Received 



Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 



01 Jul I960 
23 Dec 1967 
18 Apr 1969 
02 May 1970 
02 Aug 1964 
29 Jun 1969 
07 Jul 1969 
24 Jul 1969 



30 Jun 1961 
01 Jun 1968 
08 Oct 1969 
20 Oct 1970 
05 Aug 1964 

13 Jul 1969 



Unit Award 



VNSM 



Inclusive Dates 

03 Sep 1969 
13 Sep 1969 

04 Nov 1965 

03 Dec 1966 
02 Mar 1967 
12 Apr 1967 
08 May 1967 

04 Mar 1968 

12 Apr 1968 

13 May 1968 
27 Jan 1969 
12 Mar 1969 
17 Apr 1969 
04 Jun 1969 
31 Jul 1969 

23 Sep 1969 
02 May 1970 
01 Jun 1970 
10 Jul 1970 
17 Aug 1970 
11 Sep 1970 
26 Sep 1970 



Covering Unit Award 

14 Sep 1969 

22 Apr 1966 
03 Jan 1967 
28 Mar 1967 
28 Apr 1967 

23 May 1967 
27 Mar 1968 
01 May 1968 

01 Jun 1968 
01 Mar 1969 
05 Apr 1969 
18 May 1969 

26 Jul 1969 
01 Sep 1969 
09 Oct 1969 
26 May 1970 
14 Jun 1970 

29 Jul 1970 
03 Sep 1970 
12 Sep 1970 
21 Oct 1970 




A squadron A-4F Skyhawk comes in for a landing on Bon Homme Richard (CVA 31) during deployment to Vietnam, circa 1969 or 1970. 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 209 




VA-145 

Lineage 

Established as Reserve Attack Squadron SEVEN 
HUNDRED TWO (VA-702) on 1 December 1949. 

Reserve Attack Squadron SEVEN HUNDRED TWO 
(VA-702) called to active duty on 20 July 1950. 

Redesignated Attack Squadron ONE HUNDRED 
FORTY FIVE (VA-145) on 4 February 1953. 

Disestablished on 1 October 1993. The first 
squadron to be assigned the VA-145 designation. 

Squadron Insignia 
and Nickname 

The squadron's 
insignia was approved 
by CNO on 8 March 
1951. There is no 
record of the color 
scheme for the insignia. 
The "Rustlers" insignia 
denotes the squadron's 
Texas origins and 
attack mission. 

Following the redesig- 
nation of the squadron, a new insignia was approved 
by CNO on 7 April 1954. Colors for the sword and lion 
insignia are: a background of black, yellow and blue 
with a red border; the scroll is outlined in red with a 

yellow background and 
black lettering; the 
sword is silver and blue 
with a blue hilt, a yellow 
and black handle out- 
lined in black; the light- 
ning bolts are yellow; 
the lion is black with 
white markings and a 
red tongue and claws. 

Nickname: Rustlers, 
1951-1954. 

Swordsmen, 1954- 
1993. 



The first insignia used by the 
squadron. 




The squadron 's second insignia 
was a more stylized design used hy 
the squadron for almost 40 years. 



Chronology of Significant Events 

27 Mar 1951: The squadron conducted its first com- 
bat sortie, flying close air support missions in Korea. 

Apr 1951: The squadron, embarked in Boxer (CV 9), 
operated in the Formosa Straits. 

20 Sep 1951: VA-702 flew its last close air support 
sortie in Korea and thereafter, concentrated its strikes 
on enemy facilities and targets of opportunity as part 
of the interdiction program. This policy, the result of 



fairly stable front lines, was effective 21 September 
and applied to all units of the Fast Carrier Task Force. 
Close air support missions were now flown only by 
the Marine Corps and Air Force. This policy was modi- 
fied later in the war and Fast Carrier Task Force 
squadrons again flew close air support missions. 

16 Oct 1952: Commander B. T. Simonds, the 
squadron's commanding officer, was lost when his 
plane crashed into the water immediately following its 
launch from Kearsarge (CVA 33). 

Jun-Aug 1958: The squadron was embarked in 
Ranger (CVA 61) for her transit from Norfolk, via Cape 
Horn, to her new home port at Alameda. 

5-8 Jul 1959: The squadron, embarked in Ranger, 
flew sorties from the carrier while it operated off 
Taiwan due to increasing tensions between the 
Chinese Nationalists and Chinese Communists. 

Jun 1964-Jan 1965: The squadron participated in 
Yankee Team Operations, flying Rescue Combat Air 
Patrols in South Vietnam and Laos. 

5 Aug 1964: VA-145 participated in Operation Pierce 
Arrow, air strikes against North Vietnam in retaliation 
for the attacks on the American destroyers Turner Joy 
(DD 951) and Maddox (DD 73D in the Gulf of Tonkin 
on 4 August. The squadron's Skyraiders, along with 
other aircraft from the air wing, struck torpedo boats 
and other targets at Hon Gay, North Vietnam. A sec- 
ond sortie of squadron aircraft, along with Skyhawks 
from VA-144, attacked five enemy naval vessels that 
were at sea, near the Lach Chao Estuary and Hon Me 
Island. The two vessels attacked by VA-145 were left 
dead in the water and smoking. During this attack 
Lieutenant (jg) Richard C. Sather was shot down. He 
was the first naval aviator lost in the Vietnam Conflict. 

31 Jan 1966: The squadron's commanding officer, 
Commander H. F. Griffith, was awarded the Silver Star 
for his actions as a flight leader directing and coordi- 
nating simultaneous attacks, under extremely adverse 
weather conditons, against a heavily defended primary 
enemy line of communications and for his participation 
in the successful rescue of a downed naval aviator. 

1 Feb 1966: During one of the squadron's combat 
missions over North Vietnam, Lieutenant (jg) Dieter 
Dengler was shot down. He was captured in Laos and 
imprisoned. On 30 June 1966 he escaped from a pris- 
oner-of-war stockade, was rescued and returned to the 
squadron on 21 July. For his daring escape he was 
awarded the Navy Cross. 

Jun-Nov 1967: During 120 days on Yankee Station, 
the squadron assisted in the recovery of 14 downed 
airmen, both Navy and Air Force. 

16 Apr 1969: Enterprise, with VA-145 embarked, 
departed Yankee Station enroute to Korean waters in 
response to the downing of a VQ-1 EC-121 aircraft by 
the North Koreans on 15 April. The squadron operated 
in the Sea of Japan and the Yellow Sea until 11 May. 

Dec 1972: The squadron participated in Linebacker 



2 1 0 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



II Operations, heavy air strikes against targets primari- 
ly around Hanoi and Haiphong. 

15 Jan 1973: The squadron led the first massive laser 
bombing attack against targets in North Vietnam. A 
coordinated strike was launched involving squadron 
A-6s, which used their Pave Knife Laser Designation 
System, and A-7s from VA-113 and VA-25. These 
strikes suceeded in destroying 14 bridges in North 
Vietnam. 

Jan-Feb 1973: Following the cease-fire with North 
Vietnam on 27 January, the squadron concentrated its 
attention on strikes against lines-of-communication tar- 
gets in Laos until an agreement was reached with that 
country. 

Feb-Mar 1973: The squadron flew limited sorties in 
support of Operation Endsweep, minesweeping oper- 
ations in North Vietnamese waters. 

Jul 1976: Following the Israeli raid on Entebbe and 
the threatened military operations against Kenya by 
Uganda, the Ranger (CV 6l), with VA-145 embarked, 
was ordered to transit from the South China Sea to the 
western Indian Ocean and operate off the coast of 
Kenya. 

Aug-Nov 1987: The squadron provided support for 
Operation Earnest Will, the escorting of reflagged 
Kuwaiti oil tankers through the Persian Gulf. 

Oct 1987: VA-145 and other assets from CVW-2 pro- 
vided support for Operation Nimble Archer, retaliatory 
strikes by surface forces against an Iranian oil platform 
used as a base by Iranian small boats that were attack- 
ing oil tankers. 

Aug 1989: During a routine mission, a squadron air- 
craft sighted a foundering Vietnamese refugee boat 
leading to the rescue of 39 refugees by HS-14 and 
Ranger. 

15 Jan 1991: Ranger (CV 6l), with VA-145 
embarked, transited to station in the Persian Gulf. 

16 Jan- 28 Feb 1991: The squadron participated in 
Desert Storm, flying combat missions against targets in 
Iraq and Kuwait. VA-145 flew 621 combat sorties, strik- 
ing land based and sea based targets. Squadron strikes 
resulted in the destruction of 33 tanks, 1 bridge, 48 
artillery pieces, 41 Iraqi naval vessels, 20 ammunition 
storage bunkers, 3 chemical weapon storage facilities, 
and 7 command and control sites. All of this was 
accomplished by the squadron without the loss of a 
single person or damage to its aircraft. 

17 Sep-3 Dec 1992: Squadron aircraft flew missions 
in support of Operation Southern Watch. This opera- 
tion was in support of UN Resolution 688, which 
demanded that Iraqi government stop the repression 
of its Shi'ite population in southern Iraq and banned 
Iraqi planes from flying south of the 32nd parallel. 

7-18 Dec 1992: Squadron aircraft flew missions in 
support of Operation Restore Hope, a UN authorized 
effort to relieve mass starvation amid factional fighting 
in Somalia. 




A squadron AD-2 Skyraider prepares for launch from Boxer (CV 21) 
during their 1951 combat deployment to Korea. 



Home Port Assignments 

Location Assignment Date 



NAS Dallas 


01 Dec 1949 


NAS San Diego 


28 Jul 1950 


NAS Miramar 


Mar 1953 


NAS Moffett Field 


May 1962 


NAS Alameda 


Sep 1963 


NAS Whidbey Island 


28 Jan 1968 


Commanding Officers 




Date Assumed Command 


LCDR S. C. Seagraves 


01 Dec 1949 


CDR Bruce T. Simonds 


06 Dec 1951 


LCDR Harry C. McClaugherty (acting) 


16 Oct 1952 


LCDR Harry C. McClaugherty 


28 Oct 1952 


CDR John A. Duncan 


May 1953 


LCDR Gale L. Bergey 


Jul 1954 


CDR W. P. Blackwell 


Feb 1956 


CDR Charles S. Brooks 


Jul 1957 


CDR W. H. Alexander II 


15 Sep 1958 


CDR Harvey S. Herrick 


Aug 1959 


CDR Warren H. Ireland 


11 May I960 


CDR Harvey S. Herrick 


17 Aug I960 


CDR E. B. Berger 


28 Dec I960 


LCDR B. L. Blackwelder (acting) 


12 Sep 1961 


CDR R. A. Norin 


12 Oct 1961 


CDR B. L. Blackwelder 


14 Aug 1962 


CDR H. A. Hoy 


31 Jul 1963 


CDR Melvin D. Blixt 


03 Aug 1964 


CDR H. F. Griffith 


06 Aug 1965 


CDR D. E. Sparks 


03 Aug 1966 


CDR W. J. Schultz 


20 Jul 1967 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 211 



Commanding Officers — Continued 



Aircraft Assignment 





Date Assumed Command 


CDR N. R. Gooding, Jr. 


02 Feb 1968 


CDRJ. S. Holland 


27 Apr 1969 


CDR W. A. Rubey 


29 Apr 1970 


CDR G. E. Matt 


23 Apr 1971 


CDR R. S. Owens 


29 Feb 1972 


CDR F. J. Metz 


01 Jun 1973 


CDR R. W. McFerren 


15 Jul 1974 


CDR R. A. Powell 


07 Nov 1975 


CDR V. J. Huth 


18 Feb 1977 


CDRJ. Juan 


20 Jun 1978 


CDR D. D. Williams 


28 Sep 1979 


CDR F. D. Litvin 


08 Dec 1980 


CDR M. J Reilly 


12 Mar 1982 


CDR C. G. Overton 


29 Jul 1983 


CDR A. N. Langston III 


07 Dec 1984 


CDR K. G. Bixler 


21 Feb 1986 


CDR S. A. Hazelrigg 


02 Nov 1987 


CDR Russell T. Palsgrove 


30 Nov 1988 


CDR H. Denby Starling II 


1990 


CDR Richard J. Cassara 


29 Jul 1991 


CDR David A. Rogers 


27 Nov 1992 



Type of Aircraft 



TBM 



AD-2 

AD-4Q 

AD-1 

AD-4L 

AD-3Q 

AD-4B 

AD-4NA 

AD-5 

AD-6/A-1H* 



A-6A 

A-6B 

A-6C 

KA-6D 

A-6E 

A-6E TRAMf 



Date Type First Received 

1949 
Aug 1950 
Sep 1950 
Dec 1951 
Apr 1952 
Apr 1953 
Apr 1953 
Aug 1954 
Oct 1954 
Feb 1956 
04 Jun 1968 
06 Aug 1968 
11 May 1970 
1972 
22 Sep 1976 
30 Nov 1981 



* The AD-6 designation was changed to A-1H in 1962. 

t The A-6E TRAM version was capable of carrying and firing the 
Harpoon missile (an antiship missile). 



A squadron A-1H Skyraider at NAS Alameda, California, in 1967. Note the unofficial Tonkin Gulf Yacht Club insignia on the fuselage (Courtesy 
Duane Kasulka Collection). 



2 1 2 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



Major Overseas Deployments 



Date of 


Dcite of 


Air 




Type of 


Area of 


Departure 


Return 


Wing 


Carrier 


Aircraft 


Operation 


ao a /T^. *• 1 1 
Uz Mar 1931 


Z4 Oct iyjl 


r^\jr^ 1 A1 
CVlor-lUl 


r*\7 01 
v-V zl 


AT\ O 7 Ar\ 
AU-Z/40 


Korea/WestPac 


11 A i i 1 nco 

11 Aug l;OZ 


1 / Mar lyjj 


r^\jr^ 1 A1 
\j V(j-1U1 


r'"' \ 7 A 2 2 

CVA 53 


AU-4/4L 


Korea/WestPac 


U3 Jun 1933 


U3 reD iyjO 


r*\rr > 1 / 
CjV(j-14 


i^A 7 A 0 1 
l^VA Zl 


AU-4/4rS 


westrac 


21 Jan 1957 


25 Jul 1957 


CVG-14 


CVA 12 


AD-6 


WestPac 


U3 Jan 1939 


0~7 Tnl 1 OsO 

z/ Jul 1939 


C V(j-14 


r*\7\ /Ci 
LVA 01 


AJJ-0 


westrac 


14 May tyou 


1 C "P\^^ 1 OA A 

13 uec tyou 




r*\7\ 2/i 

LjVA 34 


AJJ-0 


westrac 


uy inov tyoi 


1 O T\ 1 C\K O 

iz May tyoz 


C V(j-14 


CjVA 10 


AJJ-0 


westrac 


zl reu iyoo 


1 A Con 1 A/^2 

iu sep lyoD 


r^\7t^ 1 /i 

V(or-14 


CjVA 04 


A 1 I— I 

A-1J i 


westrac 


U3 May iyo4 


ui reu iyo3 


LVW-14 


CjVA 04 


A 1 I— I /T 

A-1H/J 


WestPac/Vietnam 


1 A T\*i^ 1 

iu uec iyo3 


Z3 AUg lyOD 


CjV W-14 


r*\7A /^1 
LjVA 01 


A 1 U /T 

A-lrl/J 


WestPac/Vietnam 


ii May iyo/ 


3U uec iyo/ 


7~*\ 7\V7 1 A 

CjV W-1U 


/^\7C 1 1 

LVS 11 


A 1 HJ 

A-lli 


Meci/io/ west 
Pac/Vietnam 


uo jan tyoy 


AO Tnl 1 A/in 

uz jui tyoy 


7~*\ 7\V7 A 

Cj v w-y 


LVA1N 03 


A A /Vt 

A-OA/rS 


WestPac/Vietnam 


0*7 (''A , -r 1 A - 7 A 

z/ Oct iy/0 


n T nl „ 1 a~7i 

1 / Jun 19/1 




LVA 01 


A-0 A/ C 


WestPac/Vietnam 


1 ^ \T^T7 1 A~70 

lo inov ly/z 


02 Tn.t 1072 

zo Jun iy /3 


LVW-Z 


r*\7A /^1 
CVA 01 


A-OA/rS (X KA-0U 


WestPac/Vietnam 


A~7 A/T^ixr 1 A"7/i 

u/ May iy/4 


lo oct iy/4 


Cj V W-Z 


r*\7A /^1 
CVA 01 


A-0A OL KA-0U 


westrac 


2 A 1 C\17^ 

3U Jan ly /o 


A~7 Cn»-* 1 A"7/C 

u/ sep ty/o 


I"" 1 \ 7\V7 O 


CV 01 


A A i?, A 7^.T\ 

A-0A <X KA-0U 


westrac/io 


01 T7<=>K 1 0~70 

zl reu ly/y 


OO 1 0~70 

zz sep iy/y 


LVW-Z 


i^A^ ^1 

CV 01 


A-Or, & KA-0U 


westrac 


10 Sep 1980 


05 May 1981 


CVW-2 


CV61 


A-6E & KA-6D 


WestPac/IO 


A"7 A ^ 1 AQO 

0/ Apr 19oz 


1 A /'"A^*- 1 AOO 

19 Oct 1982 


LVW-Z 


01 


A-Or, ol KA-oU 


westrac/ lO 


13 Jan 1984 


01 Aug 1984 


CVW-2 


CV 63 


A-6E & KA-6D 


WestPac/IO 


18 Aug 1986 


20 Oct 1986 


CVW-2 


CV 61 


A-6E & KA-6D 


NorPac/WestPac 


02 Mar 1987 


29 Apr 1987 


CVW-2 


CV 61 


A-6E & KA-6D 


NorPac 


14 Jul 1987 


29 Dec 1987 


CVW-2 


CV61 


A-6E 


WestPac/IO 


24 Feb 1989 


24 Aug 1989 


CVW-2 


CV61 


A-6E 


WestPac/IO 


08 Dec 1990 


08 Jun 1991 


CVW-2 


CV61 


A-6E 


WestPac/IO/ 
Persian Gulf 


01 Aug 1992 


31 Jan 1993 


CVW-2 


CV61 


A-6E 


WestPac/IO/ 
Persian Gulf 



* The squadron was temporarily shore based at NAS Barbers Point from January to March 1969 following a fire on Enterprise (CVAN 65) on 14 
January 1969- The carrier was repaired at Pearl Harbor and was enroute to WestPac on 11 March with VA-145 embarked. 



Air Wing Assignments 



Unit Awards Received 



Air Wing 

CVG-101/CVG-14/ 

CVW-14* 
COMFAIRALAMEDA 
CVW-10 

COMFAIRWHIDBEY/ 

VA-128+- 
CVW-9 

COMFAIRWHIDBEY 
CVW-2 



Tail Code 
A/NKf 

AK 

NG 
NE 



Assignment Date 

01 Aug 1950 

Oct 1966 
1967 
Jan 1968 

Sep 1968 
02 Jul 1969 
01 Jun 1970 



Unit Award 
KSM 



* CVG-101 was redesignated CVG-14 on 4 February 1953. CVG-14 
was redesignated CVW-14 when Carrier Air Groups (CVG) were 
redesignated Carrier Air Wings (CVW) on 20 December 1963. 

t The tail code was changed from A to NK in 1957. The effective 
date for this change was most likely the beginning of FY 58 (1 July 
1957). 

£ The squadron was assigned to VA-128 during its transition from 
the A-l to the A-6. 



NAVE 
AFEM 



HSM 
MUC 
NEM 
NUC 



Inclusive 
26 Mar 1951 
16 Apr 1951 

08 Sep 1952 
31 Oct 1952 

19 Jan 1953 
01 Jan 1973 

09 Oct I960 
06 Jun 1964 
04 Aug 1964 

29 Oct 1964 

20 Apr 1969 
20 Mar 1981 
18 Nov 1970 

30 Oct 1980 
02 Aug 1964 

10 Jan 1966 
12 Jun 1967 



Dates Covering Unit Award 

09 Apr 1951 
08 Oct 1951 

29 Oct 1952 
05 Jan 1953 
28 Feb 1953 

30 Jun 1974 
12 Oct I960 

13 Jul 1964 
21 Sep 1964 
23 Nov 1964 

11 May 1969 

10 Jun 1971 

12 Mar 1981 

05 Aug 1964 

06 Aug 1966 
08 Dec 1967 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 213 



Unit Awards Received — Continued 



Unit Awards Received — Continued 



Unit Award 



SASM 

KLM 

VNSM 



Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 


18 Jul 1988 


24 Aug 1989 


17 Jan 1991 


07 Feb 1991 


13 Jan 1991 


19 Apr 1991 


17 Jan 1991 


28 Feb 1991 


15 Jan 1966 


12 Feb 1966 


23 Feb 1966 


22 Mar 1966 


12 Apr 1966 


09 May 1966 


30 May 1966 


30 Jun 1966 


13 Jul 1966 


06 Aug 1966 


21 Jun 1967 


13 Jul 1967 


29 Jul 1967 


27 Aug 1967 


14 Sep 1967 


12 Oct 1967 


31 Oct 1967 


24 Nov 1967 


30 Mar 1969 


17 Apr 1969 


22 May 1969 


23 May 1969 


29 May 1969 


16 Jun 1969 


18 Nov 1970 


19 Dec 1970 


27 Dec 1970 


13 Jan 1971 


02 Feb 1971 


17 Mar 1971 


31 Mar 1971 


18 Apr 1971 


25 Apr 1971 


18 May 1971 



Unit Award 



RVNGC 



Inclusive Dates 

09 Dec 1972 

14 Jan 1973 
01 Feb 1973 

24 Jan 1966 

26 Jan 1966 

30 Jan 1966 
04 Feb 1966 
06 Feb 1966 
24 Feb 1966 

26 Feb 1966 

04 Mar 1966 
06 Mar 1966 

20 Mar 1966 

27 Apr 1966 

21 Jun 1967 
29 Jul 1967 

14 Sep 1967 

31 Oct 1967 
31 Mar 1969 

05 Apr 1969 
31 May 1969 



Covering Unit Award 

03 Jan 1973 
30 Jan 1973 
06 Feb 1973 

27 Jan 1966 



28 Feb 1966 

12 Mar 1966 

28 Apr 1966 
13 Jul 1967 
27 Aug 1967 
12 Oct 1967 
24 Nov 1967 
03 Apr 1969 

16 Jun 1969 




A couple of squadron A-6E Intruders fly over Ranger (CV 61) in 1992 during the squadron 's last deployment prior to its 1993 disestablishment. 



2 1 4 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



VA-152 

Lineage 

Established as Reserve Fighter Squadron SEVEN 
HUNDRED THIRTEEN (VF-713) sometime in the late 
1940s. 

Called to active duty on 1 February 1951. 

Redesignated Fighter Squadron ONE HUNDRED 
FIFTY TWO (VF-152) on 4 February 1953. 

Redesignated Attack Squadron ONE HUNDRED 
FIFTY TWO (VA-152) on 1 August 1958. 

Disestablished on 29 January 1971. The first 
squadron to be assigned the VA-152 designation. 

Squadron Insignia and Nickname 

The squadron's first insignia was approved by CNO 
on 15 April 1952. Colors for the hooded falcon 

insignia were: the 
shield had a white and 
black background out- 
lined in gold; brown 
falcon with white and 
light brown shadings; 
yellow feet and beak; 
the hood was crimson 
with a gold edge and a 
white plume; and the 
gauntlet was silver 
edged in blue with gray 
shadings. 

A new insignia was approved by the CNO on 11 
March 1953- Colors for the vulture insignia were: 
background of light blue, yellow and dark blue, out- 
lined in yellow; gray vulture with black and white 
markings and wings, outlined in yellow; red neck and 
feet; a yellow head with black markings and a white 
beak; black bomb with 
white highlights and 
outlined in yellow. 

There is no record of 
approval for the ace of 
spades insignia. Colors 
for the flying ace of 
spades insignia were: a 
black background for 
the insignia and scroll, 
outlined in red; the ace 

of Spades was white The squadron's second insignia, 
, . . a vulture carrying a bomb, was 

with black markings; approved in 1953. 




The hooded falcon was the squad- 
ron's first insignia. 





The squadron's third insignia 
was the flying ace of spades. 



the wings were gold with 
black markings; the 
arrow was gold with 
white streaks; and gold 
lettering on the scroll. 

Nickname: Fighting 
Aces, 1953-1956. 

The Friendly Squadron 
(Friendlies), 1957-1968. 

Mavericks, 1968-1971. 



Chronology of Significant Events 

15 Oct 1951: The squadron participated in its first 
combat operations. 

31 Dec 1951: Squadron aircraft were used for 
Operation Pin Wheel. The aircraft were secured to the 
flight deck, with engines running, and the thrust pro- 
vided by the aircraft was used to assist in the docking 
of Antietam (CV 36). 

Feb 1955: Squadron aircraft flew night surveillance 
operations supporting the evacuation of Chinese 
Nationalists from the Tachen Islands. 

Mar 1958: Due to revolts and unsettled conditions in 
Indonesia and the concern for the safety of Americans 
in the country, Hornet (CVA 12), with VF-152 
embarked, departed Hong Kong to operate in the 
South China Sea. 

Sep-Oct 1958: Due to the crisis between the 
Chinese Nationalists and Communists surrounding the 
Quemoy Islands, and the bombardment of these 
islands by the Chinese Communists, Bennington (CVA 
20), with VF-152 embarked, operated in the area of 
Taiwan. 

Jan 1961: Due to the crisis in Laos and the capture 
of strategic postions in the country by the Pathet Lao 
force, Coral Sea (CVA 43), with VA-152 embarked, was 
directed to operate in the South China Sea. 

11-12 Jul 1962: The squadron participated in the 
first carrier flight operations in the Bering Sea since 
the end of World War II. 

Apr-Dec 1964: Squadron personnel, while based at 
Bien Hoa Air Force Base, South Vietnam, trained 
South Vietnamese pilots to fly the A-l. 

6 and 7 Nov 1965: Commander Gordon H. Smith 
was awarded the Silver Star for his participation as 
Flight Leader in directing and assisting in the first 
night rescue of a downed aviator in enemy territory 
on 6 November. This was followed by an attempt to 
rescue another aviator the following day in the 
same area. 

7 Nov 1965: Lieutenant Gordon C. "Wileen was 
awarded the Silver Star for his participation in an 
attempted air rescue of a downed aviator deep in 
enemy territory. 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 215 



13 Nov 1965: Commander Albert E. Knutson was 
awarded the Silver Star for his attempt to locate and 
rescue a downed pilot in enemy territory. During the 
rescue attempt his aircraft sustained 26 hits. 

26 Oct 1966: While on Yankee Station and preparing 



to launch her first strike of the day, Oriskany (CVA 34) 
suffered a disasterous fire on the starboard side of the 
ship's forward hangar bay. The squadron lost two per- 
sonnel in the fire and the damage to the carrier was so 
extensive that it returned to the States for repairs. 




A squadron F4U-4 Corsair launches from Princeton (CVA 3 7) during their 1953 combat deployment to Korea. 



Home Port Assignments 



Location 

NAS Denver 
NAS Alameda 
NAS Moffett Field 
NAS Alameda 



Assignment Date 
* 

11 Apr 1951 
05 Jun 1952 
Nov 1963 



* Assigned to NAS Denver prior to 1951, exact date unknown. 



A formation of squadron F2H-3 
Banshees stationed aboard Yorktown 
(CVA 10), November 1954. 



2 1 6 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



Commanding Officers 



Aircraft Assignment 



LCDR Robert L. Doering 
LCDR B. M. Richards 
LT W. M. Doss (acting) 
LCDR Robert Stanek 
CDR Frank G. Edwards 
LCDR F. X. Bushner (acting) 
LCDR Robert G. Nester 
CDR Robert M. Soule 
CDR Royce A. Singleton 
LCDR V. E. Sanderson 
LCDR R. M. Sullivan (acting) 
CDR John A. Davenport 
CDR John R. Bicknell 
CDR Isaac N. Pell, Jr. 
CDR R. B. Bergner 
CDR H. F. Gernert 
CRR Albert E. Knutson 
CDR Gordon H. Smith 
CDR Donald M. Willson 
CDR Philip E. Johnson 
CDR Elmer E. Sheeley, Jr. 
CDR Gerard M. Sturm 



Date Assumed Command 

02 May 1952 
04 Jul 1952 

05 Aug 1952 
Sep 1953 
t 

Apr 1955 

27 Sep 1956 
23 Jul 1958 

16 Feb 1959 
08 Feb I960 
04 Mar I960 
21 Jun 1961 

17 Apr 1962 
01 Apr 1963 

03 Mar 1964 
19 Mar 1965 
25 Feb 1966 

16 Mar 1967 
14 Feb 1968 

17 Jan 1969 

28 Jan 1970 



Type of Aircraft 



* LCDR Doering was commanding officer of the reserve squadron 
prior to its activation. 

t LCDR Bushner became acting commanding officer in late 1954 or 
early 1955. 



F4U-4 
FG-1D 



F2H-3 



AD-6/A-1H* 
A-1.T 



A-4B 
A-4C 
A-4E 



Date Type First Received 

16 Apr 1951 
12 Jun 1952 
Oct 1953 
05 Feb 1959 
Dec 1962 
Feb 1968 
Feb 1968 
May 1969 



* The AD-6 designation was changed to A-1H in 1962. 




A loaded squadron AD-6 Skyraider on the deck of Coral Sea (CVA 
43), 1960. 



Major Overseas Deployments 



Date of 


Date of 


Ail- 




Type of 


Area of 


Departure 


Return 


Wing 


Carrier 


Aircraft 


Operation 


08 Sep 1951 


02 May 1952 


CVG-15 


CV 36 


F4U-4 


Korea 


24 Jan 1953 


21 Sep 1953 


CVG-15 


CVA 37 


F4U-4 


Korea/WestPac 


01 Jul 1954 


28 Feb 1955 


CVG-15 


CVA 10 


F2H-3 


WestPac 


23 Apr 1956 


15 Oct 1956 


CVG-15 


CVA 18 


F2H-3 


WestPac 


06 Jan 1958 


30 Jun 1958 


ATG-4 


CVA 12 


F2H-3 


WestPac 


21 Aug 1958 


12 Jan 1959 


ATG-4 


CVA 20 


F2H-3 


WestPac 


01 Aug 1959 


18 Jan I960 


CVG-15 


CVA 19 


AD-6 


WestPac 


19 Sep I960 


27 May 1961 


CVG-15 


CVA 43 


AD-6 


WestPac 


12 Dec 1961 


17 Jul 1962 


CVG-15 


CVA 43 


AD-6 


WestPac 


03 Apr 1963 


25 Nov 1963 


CVG-15 


CVA 43 


A-1H/J 


WestPac 


22 Apr 1964 


01 Aug 1964 


* 


* 


A-1H/J 


South Vietnam 


05 Apr 1965 


16 Dec 1965 


CVW-16 


CVA 34 


A-1H/J 


WestPac/Vietnam 


26 May 1966 


16 Nov 1966 


CVW-16 


CVA 34 


A-1H 


WestPac/Vietnam 


16 Jun 1967 


31 Jan 1968 


CVW-16 


CVA 34 


A-1H/J 


WestPac/Vietnam 


22 Jul 1968 


29 Apr 1969 


CVW-17 


CVA 59 


A-4B 


Med 


05 Mar 1970 


17 Dec 1970 


CVW-8 


CVS 38 


A-4E 


SoLant/IO/West 
Pac/Vietnam 



* The squadron, along with 20 of its A-ls, was sent to Bien Hoa Air Force Base, South Vietnam, to train South Vietnamese pilots to fly the A-l. A 
detachment, VA-152 Det Zulu, was left at NAS Alameda. While operating in South Vietnam the squadron came under the control of Chief, Air 
Force Advisory Group, Saigon. On 1 August 1964 the squadron (VA-152) based at Bien Hoa was redesignated VA-152 Det Zulu and the detach- 
ment at NAS Alameda was designated VA-152. VA-152 Det Zulu continued to train South Vietnamese pilots until 1 December 1964. 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 217 



Unit Awards Received — Continued 




A couple of squadron AD-6 Skymiders in flight, circa 1960-1961. 

Air Wing Assignments 

Tail Code Assignment Date 



Air Wing 

CVG-15 H 

ATG-4 ND 

CVG-15/CVW-15* NL 

CVW-16 AH 

CVW-17 AA 
COMFAIRALAMEDA 

CVW-8 AJ 



11 Apr 1951 
14 Oct 1957 
Feb 1959 
01 Oct 1964 
Feb 1968 
Apr 1969 
Dec 1969 



* CVG-15 was redesignated CVW-15 when Carrier Air Groups (CVG) 
were redesignated Carrier Air Wings (CVW) on 20 December 1963. 



Unit Award 
KSM 

NUC 



Unit Awards Received 



Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 



04 Oct 1951 
27 Feb 1953 
29 May 1953 
13 Mar 1953 
11 Jun 1953 



15 Apr 1952 

16 May 1953 
07 Sep 1953 
15 May 1953 

27 Jul 1953 



Unit Award 



AFEM 



AFEM 

(VA-152 Det Z) 
MUC 
VNSM 



RVNGC 



Inclusive 

10 May 1965 
12 Jun 1966 
14 Jul 1967 

24 Nov 1958 
14 Sep 1959 

25 Apr 1961 
30 Apr 1961 
04 May 1961 

12 Jan 1962 
24 Jan 1962 
22 Apr 1964 
07 May 1965 

10 Jun 1965 
17 Sep 1965 

31 Jul 1964 

11 Apr 1970 
04 Jul 1965 

09 Aug 1965 
28 Oct 1965 

06 Jul 1966 
07 Aug 1966 
24 Sep 1966 

10 Apr 1970 

12 May 1970 

13 Jun 1970 
28 Jul 1970 

30 Aug 1970 
20 Oct 1970 

02 Oct 1965 
30 Oct 1965 
01 Nov 1965 

03 Nov 1965 

11 Nov 1965 
06 Jul 1966 



Dates Covering Unit Award 

06 Dec 1965 

01 Nov 1966 
12 Jan 1968 

03 Dec 1958 

17 Sep 1959 

28 Apr 1961 
01 May 1961 
09 May 1961 

19 Jan 1962 
27 Jan 1962 
31 Jul 1964 

02 Jun 1965 

03 Jul 1965 

18 Sep 1965 

01 Sep 1964 

06 Nov 1970 
18 Jul 1965 

11 Sep 1965 
27 Nov 1965 

08 Sep 1966 
26 Oct 1966 

02 May 1970 

29 May 1970 

04 Jul 1970 

19 Aug 1970 

30 Sep 1970 

07 Nov 1970 



12 Nov 1965 
07 Jul 1966 




2 1 8 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



VA-153 

Lineage 

During a reorganization of the Naval Air Reserve, a 
Fighter Squadron at NAS New York (believed to have 
been VF-718) was redesignated Fighter Squadron 
EIGHT HUNDRED THIRTY ONE (VF-83D in 
September 1949- 

Reserve Fighter Squadron EIGHT HUNDRED THIRTY 
ONE (VF-831) was called to active duty on 1 February 
1951. 

Redesignated Fighter Squadron ONE HUNDRED 
FIFTY THREE (VF-153) on 4 February 1953. 

Redesignated Attack Squadron ONE HUNDRED 
FIFTY THREE (VA-153) on 15 December 1956. 

Disestablished on 30 September 1977. The first 
squadron to be assigned the VA-153 designation. 

Squadron Insignia 
and Nickname 

The squadron's 
insignia was approved 
by CNO on 17 May 
1951. Colors for the 
griffin insignia were: 
light blue background 
outlined in orange; the 
griffin's body was black 
with white highlights, 
its beak and claws were 
orange and yellow, and 
the eagle head was 
white. Following the 
squadron's two designation changes the basic insignia 
continued in use with minor modifications. 
Nickname: Blue Tail Flies, 1953-1977. 

Chronology of Significant Events 

Feb 1955: Squadron aircraft flew sorties in support 
of the evacuation of Chinese Nationalists from the 
Tachen Islands. 




The squadron 's only insignia 
sported the mythical griffin. 



23 Aug-9 Sep 1958: The squadron flew sorties in the 
Taiwan Straits after the Chinese Communists bombard- 
ed Quemoy Island. 

Jan 1961: Coral Sea (CVA 43), with VA-153 
embarked, operated in the South China Sea after 
Pathet Lao forces captured strategic positions in Laos. 

2 Feb 1965: The squadron began participating in 
operations in Laos. These operations involved Yankee 
Team, Barrel Roll and Steel Tiger missions. 

7 and 11 Feb 1965: The squadron participated in 
Flaming Dart I and II, reprisal strikes against targets in 
North Vietnam following a Viet Cong attack on the 
American advisors compound at Pleiku and the 
American billet in Qui Nhon, South Vietnam. 

Mar 1965: The squadron participated in Rolling 
Thunder operations, the bombing of military targets in 
North Vietnam. 

13 Aug 1965: The squadron's commanding officer, 
Commander H. E. Thomas, was killed in action over 
North Vietnam. 

Mar 1968: Coral Sea (CVA 43), with VA-153 
embarked, operated on station off the coast of Korea 
following the capture of Pueblo (AGER 2) in January 
by North Korea. 

21 Nov 1970: The squadron flew missions in sup- 
port of an attempt to rescue American prisoners-of- 
war at the Son Tay prisoner compound, 20 miles west 
of Hanoi. 

11-22 Feb 1973: Following the cease fire with North 
Vietnam the squadron flew combat missions in Laos 
until a cease fire was signed with that country on 22 
February 1973- 

Feb 1973: Commander D. R. Weichman, the 
squadron's executive officer, completed his 625th 
combat mission of the Vietnam Conflict. He maintains 
the record for the highest number of combat missions 
for a Navy fixed-wing pilot during this conflict. 

Nov 1973: Oriskany (CVA 34), with VA-153 
embarked, departed from operations in the South 
China Sea to relieve Hancock (CVA 19) on station in 
the Arabian Sea due to the unsettled conditions fol- 
lowing the Yom Kippur War in the Middle East. 



A VF-831 F9F-2 Panther on the 
deck of Antietam (CV 36) in 
fanuary 1952 during combat 
operations off the coast of Korea. 




DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 219 



Home Port Assignments 

Location Assignment Date 

NAS New York, Floyd Bennett Field * 

NAS Alameda 01 Apr 1951 

NAS Moffett Field 05 May 1952 

NAS Lemoore 21 Aug 1961 

* Assigned to NAS New York prior to the squadron's recall to active 
duty on 1 February 1951. 

Commanding Officers 



Date Assumed Command 



LCDR A. J. Denman 






LCDR G. E. Miller 


05 May 


1952 


LCDR Loys M. Satterfield 


Sep 


1953 


CDR W. L. Abbott 


Mar 


1955 


CDR Alexander D. C. Byers 




1956 


LCDR Hildry L. Nelson 


27 Feb 


1957 


CDR John F. Bauman 


17 Oct 


1958 


CDR Vernon R. Fierce, Jr. 


08 Feb 


I960 


CDR W. C. May 


21 Jun 


1961 


CDR Zeb V. Knott 


30 Jul 


1962 


CDR William C. Raposa 


10 Jul 


1963 


CDR Peter Mongilardi, Jr. 


26 May 


1964 


CDR Harry E. Thomas 


Apr 


1965 


(acting commanding officer) 


13 Aug 


1965 


CDR K. V. McArthur 


15 Sep 


1965 


CDR D. E. Leue 


25 Jul 


1966 


CDR T. E. Woolcock 




1967 


CDR R. J. Dapogny 


08 May 


1968 


CDR Olaf M. Carlson, Jr. 


23 May 


1969 


CDR Peter G. Frederick 


20 Aug 


1970 


CDR William J. M. O'Connor 


11 Jun 


1971 


CDR Paul D. Stephenson 


01 Jun 


1972 


CDR Denis R. Weichman 


27 Jul 


1973 


LCDR Keith S. Jones 


20 Sep 


1974 


LCDR Robert F. Hofford 


12 Sep 


1975 


CDR Lawrence H. Price 


15 Dec 


1976 


* LCDR Denman was commanding officer of the reserve squadron 


prior to its activation on 1 February 1951. 








Squadron F9F-6 Cougars flying over Mount Fuji, Japan, in 
December 1954 while the squadron was deployed aboard Yorktoum 
(CVA 10) (USN, Courtesy Duane Kasulka Collection) . 



Aircraft Assignment 



Type of Aircraft 


Date Type First Received 


F6F 




F9F-2 


06 Feb 1951 


F9F-5 


Aug 1952 


F9F-6 


Oct 1953 


FJ-3 


Mar 1955 


F9F-8 


Nov 1955 


F9F-8B 


Apr 1956 


A4D-1 


12 Feb 1957 


A4D-2 


27 Oct 1958 


A4D-2N/A-4Cf 


20 Jun 1961 


A-4E 


Jan 1967 


A-4F 


Apr 1968 


A-7A 


14 Sep 1969 


A-7B 


May 1973 



* While in a reserve status from September 1949 to January 1951, the 
squadron was most likely utilizing F6F pool aircraft assigned to NAS 
New York. 

t The A4D-2N designation was changed to A-4C in 1962. 

Major Overseas Deployments 



Date of 


Date of 


Air 




Type of 


Area of 


Departure 


Return 


Wing 


Carrier 


Aircraft 


Operation 


08 Sep 1951 


02 May 1952 


CVG-15 


CV 36 


F9F-2 


Korea 


24 Jan 1953 


21 Sep 1953 


CVG-15 


CVA 37 


F9F-5 


Korea/WestPac 


01 Jul 1954 


28 Feb 1955 


CVG-15 


CVA 10 


F9F-6 


WestPac 


23 Apr 1956 


15 Oct 1956 


CVG-15 


CVA 18 


F9F-8/8B 


WestPac 


15 Feb 1958 


02 Oct 1958 


CVG-15 


CVA 19 


A4D-1 


WestPac 


01 Aug 1959 


18 Jan I960 


CVG-15 


CVA 19 


A4D-2 


WestPac 


19 Sep I960 


27 May 1961 


CVG-15 


CVA 43 


A4D-2 


WestPac 


12 Dec 1961 


17 Jul 1962 


CVG-15 


CVA 43 


A4D-2N 


WestPac 


03 Apr 1963 


25 Nov 1963 


CVG-15 


CVA 43 


A-4C 


WestPac 


07 Dec 1964 


01 Nov 1965 


CVW-15 


CVA 43 


A-4C 


WestPac/Vietnam 



220 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



Major Overseas Deployments — Continued 



Date of 


Date of 


Air 




Type of 


Area of 


Departure 


Return 


Wing 


Carrier 


Aircraft 


Operation 


iz May lyoo 


vj dcc lyoo 


tVW-l) 


<^VA 04 


a An 


WestPac/Vietnani 


?ft Till 1 0^7 


06 Anr 1Q^R 


\> V W -L ^ 


rvA 4^ 


A-4F 


Wr/f^ctT^d c l\J\ *->1~ti a m 
WCoUT clL./ V lCLIld.111 


07 Sep 1968 


18 Apr 1969 


CVW-15 


CVA43 


A-4F 


WestPac/Vietnam 


14 May 1970 


10 Dec 1970 


CVW-19 


CVA 34 


A-7A 


WestPac/Vietnam 


14 May 1971 


18 Dec 1971 


CVW-19 


CVA 34 


A-7A 


WestPac/Vietnam 


05 Jun 1972 


30 Mar 1973 


CVW-19 


CVA 34 


A-7A 


WestPac/Vietnam 


18 Oct 1973 


05 Jun 1974 


CVW-19 


CVA 34 


A-7B 


WestPac/IO 


16 Sep 1975 


03 Mar 1976 


CVW-19 


CV 34 


A-7B 


WestPac 


04 Oct 1976 


21 Apr 1977 


CVW-19 


CV 42 


A-7B 


Med 



Air Wing Assignments 



Unit Awards Received 



Air Wing Tail Code 

CVG-15/CVW-15t H/NL* 

COMFAIRLEMOORE 

CVW-19 NM 



Assignment Date 

Apr 1951 
1969 
22 Nov 1969 



* The tail code was changed from H to NL in 1957. The effective 
date for this change was most likely the beginning of FY 58 (1 July 
1957). 

t CVG-15 was redesignated CVW-15 when Carrier Air Groups (CVG) 
were redesignated Carrier Air Wings (CVW) on 20 December 1963. 



Unit Award 
KSM 



NAVE 



AFEM 



Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 

04 Oct 1951 15 Apr 1952 

27 Feb 1953 16 May 1953 

29 May 1953 07 Sep 1953 

01 Jan 1973 30 Jun 1974 
01 Jul 1974 01 Apr 1976 

02 Apr 1976 30 Jun 1977 
26 Aug 1958 07 Sep 1958 
14 Sep 1959 17 Sep 1959 




DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 22 1 



Unit Awards Received — Continued 



Unit Awards Received — Continued 



Unit Award 



NUC 



MUC 
RVNGC 



Inclusive 
25 Apr 1961 
30 Apr 1961 
04 May 1961 

12 Jan 1962 

24 Jan 1962 
02 Feb 1965 

16 Mar 1965 
02 May 1965 

23 Jun 1965 
23 Jan 1968 

13 Mar 1953 
11 Jun 1953 
07 Feb 1965 

29 May 1966 

13 Aug 1967 
10 Oct 1968 

01 Jun 1970 

28 Jun 1972 
12 Oct 1965 
21 Jun 1966 

23 Nov 1967 

02 Dec 1967 
04 Dec 1967 
20 Dec 1967 

20 Jan 1968 
23 Jan 1968 

29 Jan 1968 
15 Oct 1968 

17 Oct 1968 

21 Oct 1968 

25 Oct 1968 

14 Nov 1968 
23 Nov 1968 
25 Nov 1968 
01 Dec 1968 
04 Dec 1968 

30 Dec 1968 
01 Jan 1969 
05 Jan 1969 
07 Jan 1969 



Dates Covering Unit Award 
28 Apr 1961 
01 May 1961 
09 May 1961 
19 Jan 1962 
27 Jan 1962 

05 Mar 1965 

17 Apr 1965 
28 May 1965 

03 Jul 1965 
22 Mar 1968 
15 May 1953 

27 Jul 1953 

18 Oct 1965 
24 Nov 1966 

19 Feb 1968 
31 Mar 1969 
09 Dec 1970 

06 Mar 1973 

22 Jun 1966 



22 Dec 1967 

27 Jan 1968 
19 Feb 1968 

18 Oct 1968 

27 Oct 1968 
16 Nov 1968 



02 Dec 1968 
05 Dec 1968 

03 Jan 1969 

10 Jan 1969 



Unit Award 



VNSM 



Inclusive 
14 Jan 1969 
22 Jan 1969 
24 Jan 1969 

26 Jan 1969 

09 Feb 1969 
22 Feb 1969 
19 Mar 1969 

04 Jul 1965 

11 Aug 1965 
21 Sep 1965 

14 Jun 1966 

27 Jul 1966 
08 Sep 1966 
19 Oct 1966 
26 Aug 1967 

12 Oct 1967 
04 Nov 1967 
11 Nov 1967 

16 Dec 1967 

15 Jan 1968 
29 Dec 1968 
08 Feb 1969 
19 Mar 1969 

13 Jun 1970 
12 Jul 1970 

02 Aug 1970 

17 Sep 1970 
06 Nov 1970 

15 Jun 1971 
24 Jul 1971 

03 Sep 1971 
29 Oct 1971 

26 Jun 1972 

16 Aug 1972 
11 Sep 1972 
08 Oct 1972 
24 Nov 1972 

27 Dec 1972 

10 Feb 1973 



Dates Covering Unit Award 
19 Jan 1969 



20 Feb 1969 
03 Mar 1969 
31 Mar 1969 

24 Jul 1965 
11 Sep 1965 
15 Oct 1965 

13 Jul 1966 
31 Aug 1966 
01 Oct 1966 
09 Nov 1966 
01 Oct 1967 

28 Oct 1967 

05 Nov 1967 
08 Dec 1967 

07 Jan 1968 

21 Feb 1968 
30 Jan 1969 
03 Mar 1969 

30 Mar 1969 

29 Jun 1970 

22 Jul 1970 

26 Aug 1970 
13 Oct 1970 
23 Nov 1970 

10 Jul 1971 
07 Aug 1971 

27 Sep 1971 
21 Nov 1971 

23 Jul 1972 
01 Sep 1972 

28 Sep 1972 

31 Oct 1972 
18 Dec 1972 
31 Jan 1973 

06 Mar 1973 




A squadron A- 7B 
Corsair II at 
NAS Glenview, 
Illinois, August 
1973 (Courtesy 
Fred Roos 
Collection). 



222 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



VA-154 

Lineage 

Established as Bombing Squadron ONE HUNDRED 
FIFTY THREE (VB-153) on 26 March 1945. 

Redesignated Attack Squadron FIFTEEN A (VA-15A) 
on 15 November 1946. 

Redesignated Attack Squadron ONE HUNDRED 
FIFTY FOUR (VA-154) on 15 July 1948. 

Disestablished on 1 December 1949. The first 
squadron to be designated VA-154. 



Squadron Insignia and Nickname 

The first squadron insignia, a Walt Disney design, 
was approved by CNO on 10 August 1945. Colors for 





A modification to the squadron 's first insignia was approved for use 
in 1946. 

highlights and black outlines and the nose of the 
rockets were yellow with green highlights and black 
outlines; the streaks were yellow with black markings. 

Chronology of Significant Events 

Oct 1945: The squadron participated in a 1200 
plane fly over of New York City in honor of Navy Day. 

Home Port Assignments 



Location 

NAAS Manteo 
NAS Wildwood 
NAAS Oceana 
NAS Norfolk 
NAS Alameda 



Assignment Date 

26 Mar 1945 
07 Apr 1945 
31 May 1945 
Jul 1946 
07 Aug 1946 



The squadron s first insignia was a Walt Disney design. 



the flying cannon were: a maroon background out- 
lined in yellow; black cannon with blue and white 
highlights; silver wings and neck with white highlights 
and black markings; the bomb head was black with 
blue highlights and a yellow and orange eye and 
white teeth; the rocket legs were yellow, the body of 
the rockets were orange with white highlights and the 
nose of the rocket was yellow with white higlights, 
outlined in black; and the streaks were silver with 
black markings. 

A modification to the insignia was approved by 
CNO on 10 April 1946. Colors for this insignia were: a 
shield with a white background outlined in black and 
red; the cannon and bomb were black with green 
highlights; the eye and teeth were yellow; the neck 
and wings were red with yellow highlights and black 
markings; the legs and rocket were red with yellow 



Commanding Officers 



LT J. W. Aulson 
LT Leonard Robinson 
LCDR Francis D. McGaffigan 
LCDR Robert J. Celustka 
LCDR Philip W. Cobb 
LCDR John B. Howland 
LCDR Charles N. Conatser 



Date Assumed Command 

26 Mar 1945 
16 Apr 1945 
26 Nov 1945 
06 Sep 1946 
15 Nov 1946 
10 Jan 1948 
19 Nov 1948 



Aircraft Assignments 



Type of Aircraft 



SB2C-4E 
SB2C-5 



AD-2 



Date Type First Received 

Apr 1945 
Jun 1945 
08 Jul 1948 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 223 



Major Overseas Deployments 



Date of 
Departure 

31 Mar 1947 



Date of 
Return 

08 Oct 1947 



Air 
Wing 

CVAG-15 



Carrier 

CV 36 



Type of 
Aircraft 

SB2C-5 



Area of 
Operation 

WestPac 



Air Wing 

CVG-153/CVAG-15/CVG-15* 



Air Wing Assignments 

Tail Code 
B/Af 



Assignment Date 

26 Mar 1945 



• CVG-153 was redesignated CVAG-15 on 15 November 1946. CVAG-15 was redesignated CVG-15 on 1 September 1948. 
t The tail code B was assigned to CVAG-15 on 12 December 1946 and changed to A on 4 August 1948. 




Squadron personnel in November 1949 with an AD-2 in the background; CO was Lieutenant Commander Charles N. Conatser. 



224 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



VA-155 

Lineage 

Established as Torpedo Squadron ONE HUNDRED 
FIFTY THREE (VT-153) on 26 March 1945. 

Redesignated Attack Squadron SIXTEEN A (VA-16A) 
on 15 November 1946. 

Redesignated Attack Squadron ONE HUNDRED 
FIFTY FIVE (VA-155) on 15 July 1948. 

Disestablished on 30 November 1949- The first 
squadron to be assigned the VA-155 designation. 

Squadron Insignia and Nickname 

The squadron's first insignia was approved by CNO 
on 11 February 1946. Colors for the gremlin riding a 

torpedo were: a 
light green 
background 
encircled by 
yellow stars 
outlined in 
black; the grem- 
lin's hat was red 
with black top 
and yellow cen- 
ter; his face was 
shaded green, 
red and orange 
with pale blue 
eyes and black 

pupils, he had tan ears and a red tongue, pale blue 
wings and light orange arms; lavender jacket with yel- 
low stripes and red buttons, black belt with a red and 
black buckle, green trousers with light purple stock- 
ings and brown shoes with purple pompons; yellow 
torpedo with brown highlights, a blue nose and red 
snout, a green eyeball and black pupil, the teeth and 

lips were red, 
the tail was yel- 
low and white 
with a black 
propeller; the 
reins were 
black and yel- 
low and the let- 
tering was 
black, outlined 
in yellow. 

Following the 
squadron's 
redesignation, a 

This insignia was approved for the squad- 
ron following its redesignation to VA-16A. new insignia 




00 



The gremlin was the squadron 's first insignia. 





Tlje skull and cobra was the third 
insignia used by the squadron. 



was approved by CNO 
on 12 June 1947. Colors 
for the caricature of the 
two TBFs was: a yellow 
sky and light green 
ocean background; blue 
TBFs with yellow letter- 
ing; red was used for 
the rockets, lightning 
bolts, and the mouth 
and eyes of the TBFs, 
the radome was light 
green; the cloud and 
hands of the TBFs were white; all other details were 
black, such as the prop hubs, music notes and ship 
silhouettes. 

The squadron's next insignia was approved by CNO 
on 18 February 1949- Colors for the skull and cobra 
design were: a red background, white skull, and yel- 
low cobra. 

Nickname: unknown. 

Chronology of Significant Events 

Mar-Oct 1947: During the squadron's deployment 
to the western Pacific, three of its aircraft were 
equipped as ASW planes, giving the squadron an ASW 
mission as well as attack. 



Home Port Assignments 



Location 

NAAF Lewiston 
NAAS Oceana 
NAS Norfolk 
NAS Alameda 



Assignment Date 

26 Mar 1945 

01 Jun 1945 

02 Jul 1946 
08 Aug 1946 



Commanding Officers 



Date Assumed Command 

LT Harlan C. McFadden, Jr. (acting) 26 Mar 1945 

LCDR Frederick G. Lewis 06 Apr 1945 

LCDR Richard D. King (acting) 26 Jun 1946 

LCDR Gaylord T. Forrest 03 Jul 1946 

LCDR Gerald R. Stablein 10 Jan 1948 

LCDR Don L. Ely Jan 1949 



Aircraft Assignment 



Type of Aircraft 



TBM-3E 
TBM-3Q 
TBM-3W 



AD-2 



Date Type First Received 

30 Mar 1945 
Apr 1946 
Apr 1947 
19 Jul 1948 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 225 



Major Overseas Deployments 



Date of 
Departure 

31 Mar 1947 



Date of 
Return 

08 Oct 1947 



Air 
Wing 

CVAG-15 



Carrier 

CV 36 



Type of Area of 

Aircraft Operation 

TBM-3E/3Q/3W WestPac 



Air Wing 

CVG-153/CVAG-15/CVG-15* 



Air Wing Assignments 

Tail Code 
B/Af 



Assignment Date 

26 Mar 1945 



* CVG-153 was redesignated CVAG-15 on 15 November 1946. CVAG-15 was redesignated CVG-15 on 1 September 1948. 
t The tail code B was assigned to CVAG-15 on 12 December 1946 and changed to A on 4 August 1948. 





Squadron personnel with TBM-3E in the background, circa 1945. CO was Lieutenant Commander Frederick G. Lewis. 



226 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



SECOND VA-155 

Lineage 

Established as Reserve Attack Squadron SEVENTY 
ONE E (VA-71E) in 1946. 

Redesignated Reserve Attack Squadron FIFTY 
EIGHT A (VA-58A) on 1 October 1948. 

Redesignated Reserve Composite Squadron SEVEN 
HUNDRED TWENTY TWO (VC-722) on 1 November 
1949. 

Redesignated Reserve Attack Squadron SEVEN HUN- 
DRED TWENTY EIGHT (VA-728) on 1 April 1950. 

Called to active duty as Attack Squadron SEVEN 
HUNDRED TWENTY EIGHT (VA-728) on 1 February 
1951. 

Redesignated Attack Squadron ONE HUNDRED 
FIFTY FIVE (VA-155) on 4 February 1953. 

Disestablished on 30 September 1977. The second 
squadron to be assigned the VA-155 designation. 

Squadron Insignia and Nickname 

The squadron's first insignia was approved by CNO 
on 23 September 1952. A photograph of the approved 




An artist's rendition of the The squadron 's second insignia 

squadron 's first insignia adopted the skull and cobra 

design. design used by the first VA-155. 

design was not available. Colors and description of the 
insignia were: a silver-gray disk with a red border; a 
yellow-winged white and red lightening flash in front 
of a black cloud. 

A new insignia was adopted by the squadron in 
1953 following its redesignation. There is no official 
approval date for this insignia. The insignia adopted 
was the skull and snake design used by the first VA- 
155. On 8 July 1959, CNO approved a modification to 
the skull and snake insignia that included the addition 
of two diagonal stripes. Colors for this insignia were: a 
red background outlined in green; a white banner, 
outlined in green with black lettering; the skull was 
white with black markings; the snake's upper body 
was a salmon color with black lines, its head was 
green with white eyes and black pupils, the coiled 




A modification was 
made to the skull and 
cobra design in 1959, 
adding diagonal 
stripes. 



part of the snake was greenish black; and the two 
diagonal lines were green. 

Sometime in the 1960s the squadron used an unoffi- 
cial insignia with the head of a fox as its design. 

Nickname: Silver Fox, early 1960s-1977. 

Chronology of Significant Events 

Oct 1951: The squadron engaged in combat opera- 
tions, flying its first sorties over Korea. 

Feb 1955: Squadron aircraft flew sorties in support 
of the evacuation of Chinese Nationalists from the 
Tachen Islands. 

21 Aug-11 Sep 1958: The squadron flew sorties in 
the Taiwan Straits after the Chinese Communists bom- 
barded Quemoy Island. 

Jan 1961: Coral Sea (CVA 43), with VA-155 
embarked, operated in the South China Sea after 
Pathet Lao forces captured strategic positions in Laos. 

7 and 11 Feb 1965: The squadron participated in 
Flaming Dart I and II, reprisal strikes against targets in 
North Vietnam following a Viet Cong attack on the 
American advisors compound at Pleiku and the 
American billet in Qui Nhon, South Vietnam. 

Mar 1965: The squadron began participation in 
Rolling Thunder operations, the bombing of military 
targets in North Vietnam. 

May 1966: VA-155 was the first A-4 squadron 
deploying to Vietnam using a new camouflage paint 
scheme nicknamed the "Flying Mulberrybushes." The 
new paint scheme and colors were expected to reduce 
battle damage by making the aircraft more difficult to 
detect visually. 

1 Jul 1966: The squadron's commanding officer, 
Commander C. H. Peters, was killed in action while 
leading an attack on petroleum facilities at Duong 
Nham, North Vietnam. 

20 Oct 1967: Squadron aircraft sighted six North 
Vietnamese PT boats near Thanh Hoa and engaged 
the boats. Four of the PT boats were sunk, one was 
damaged and the sixth escaped, seeking refuge in the 
mouth of the river near Thanh Hoa. 

25 Nov 1967: Commander W. H. Searfus, the 
squadron's commanding officer, was lost at sea follow- 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 227 



ing a flight deck accident in which his aircraft was lost 
over the side of the carrier. 

Mar 1968: Coral Sea (CVA 43), with VA-155 
embarked, operated on station off the coast of Korea 
following the capture of Pueblo (AGER 2) in January 
by North Korea. 

Apr 1969: Following the shoot down of a Navy EC- 
121 aircraft by the North Koreans on 15 April, Ranger 
(CVA 61), with VA-155 embarked, left Yankee Station 
and proceeded to the Sea of Japan for operations off 
the coast of Korea. 

21 Nov 1970: The squadron flew missions in sup- 
port of an attempt to rescue American prisoners-of- 
war at the Son Tay prisoner compound, 20 miles west 
of Hanoi. 

Feb 1973: Following the cease fire with North 
Vietnam, the squadron flew combat missions in Laos 
until a cease fire was signed with that country on 22 
February 1973- 

Nov 1973: Oriskany (CVA 34), with VA-155 
embarked, departed from operations in the South 
China Sea to relieve Hancock (CVA 19) on station in 
the Arabian Sea due to the unsettled conditions fol- 
lowing the Yom Kippur War in the Middle East. 



Commanding Officers 




A squadron AD-4 launches from Antietam (CV 36) during their 
1951-1952 combat cruise to Korea. 



Home Port Assignments 



Location 

NAS Glenview 
NAS Alameda 
NALF Santa Rosa 
NAS Moffett Field 
NAS Lemoore 



Assignment Date 

1946 
1951 
May 1952* 
25 Aug 1952 
21 Aug 1961 





Date Assumed Command 


LCDR Soule T. Bitting 


29 Aug 1946 


LCDR B. K. Harrison (acting) 


May 1952 


LCDR Raymond S. Osterhoudt 


08 Aug 1952 


LCDR Frank R. West 


Oct 1953 


LCDR Jack B. Jones 


21 Mar 1955 


CDR Henry E. Clark 


10 Dec 1956 


CDR Deforest Q. Joralmon 


29 Oct 1958 


CDR Robert E. McElwee 


Feb I960 


CDR Ira K. Kruger 


04 Aug 1961 


CDR Patrick F. Cunningham 


31 Jul 1962 


CDR T. B. Russell, Jr. 


27 Jun 1963 


CDR J. H. Harris 


17 Jul 1964 


CDR J. B. Morin 


1965 


CDR Charles H. Peters 


1966 


CDR E. W. Ingley 


11 Jul 1966 


CDR William H. Searfus 


Jun 1967 


CDR David J. Sperling 


Dec 1967 


CDR Robert F. Reynolds, Jr. 


07 Dec 1968 


CDR Edwin C. Adamson, Jr. 


24 Oct 1969 


CDR James H. Mauldin 


28 Aug 1970 


CDR Markley R. Seibert 


1971 


CDR Dean E. Cramer 


02 Jun 1972 


CDR Robert L. Leuschner, Jr. 


07 Jun 1973 


CDR Larry E. Kaufman 


17 Jul 1974 


CDR Robert D. Miller 


24 Oct 1975 


CDR Robert C. Kaup 


05 Jan 1977 



Aircraft Assignment 



Type of Aircraft 


Date Type First Received 


SB?chTlMfAM 


* 


AD-1 


1951 


AD-2 


1951 


AD-4 


1951 


AD-4L 


1951 


AD-4Q 


1951 


AD-4NA 


26 Jul 1952 


AD-6 


Nov 1953 


AD-7 


Nov 1956 


A4D-2/A-4Bf 


08 Oct 1958 


A-4E 


Dec 1963 


A-4F 


10 Apr 1968 


A-7B 


29 Sep 1969 



* Temporary assignment for training and reforming following its 
return from a combat tour in Korea. 



* During the squadron's Reserve duty between 1946 and its activa- 
tion in February 1951, it most likely flew SB2Cs, TBMs and/or AMs. 

t The A4D-2 designation was changed to A-4B in 1962. 



228 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 




Two squadron A-4E Skyhawks return to Coral Sea (CVA 43) following a mission over Vietnam, 1965. 



Major Overseas Deployments 



Date of 


Date of 


Air 




Type of 


Area of 


Departure 


Return 


Wing 


Carrier 


Aircraft 


Operation 


08 Sep 1951 


02 May 1952 


CVG-15 


CV 36 


AD-4/L/Q & AD-2 


Korea 


24 Jan 1953 


21 Sep 1953 


CVG-15 


CVA 37 


AD-4NA 


Korea/WestPac 


01 Jul 1954 


28 Feb 1955 


CVG-15 


CVA 10 


AD-6 


WestPac 


23 Apr 1956 


15 Oct 1956 


CVG-15 


CVA 18 


AD-6 


WestPac 


15 Feb 1958 


02 Oct 1958 


CVG-15 


CVA 19 


AD-7 


WestPac 


01 Aug 1959 


18 Jan I960 


CVG-15 


CVA 19 


A4D-2 


WestPac 


19 Sep I960 


27 May 1961 


CVG-15 


CVA 43 


A4D-2 


WestPac 


12 Dec 1961 


17 Jul 1962 


CVG-15 


CVA 43 


A4D-2 


WestPac 


03 Apr 1963 


25 Nov 1963 


CVG-15 


CVA 43 


A-4B 


WestPac 


07 Dec 1964 


01 Nov 1965 


CVW-15 


CVA 43 


A-4E 


WestPac/Vietnam 


12 May 1966 


03 Dec 1966 


CVW-15 


CVA 64 


A-4E 


WestPac/Vietnam 


26 Jul 1967 


06 Apr 1968 


CVW-15 


CVA 43 


A-4E 


WestPac/Vietnam 


26 Oct 1968 


17 May 1969 


CVW-2 


CVA 61 


A-4F 


WestPac/Vietnam 


14 May 1970 


10 Dec 1970 


CVW-19 


CVA 34 


A-7B 


WestPac/Vietnam 


14 May 1971 


18 Dec 1971 


CVW-19 


CVA 34 


A-7B 


WestPac/Vietnam 


05 Jun 1972 


30 Mar 1973 


CVW-19 


CVA 34 


A-7B 


WestPac/Vietnam 


18 Oct 1973 


05 Jun 1974 


CVW-19 


CVA 34 


A-7B 


WestPac/IO 


16 Sep 1975 


03 Mar 1976 


CVW-19 


CV 34 


A-7B 


WestPac 


04 Oct 1976 


21 Apr 1977 


CVW-19 


CV 42 


A-7B 


Med 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 229 



A formation of squadron 
A-4F Skyhawks, circa 
1968. 




Air Wing Assignments 



Unit Awards Received — Continued 



Air Wing 


Tail Code 


Assignment Date 


Unit Award 


Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 


CVG-15/CVW-15t H/NL* 


01 Apr 1951 




07 Feb 1965 


18 Oct 1965 


CVW-16 


AH 


Apr 1968 




29 May 1966 


24 Nov 1966 


CVW-2 


NE 


12 Sep 1968 




13 Aug 1967 


19 Feb 1968 


CVW-12i: 




24 Jun 1969 




29 Nov 1968 


10 May 1969 


CVW-19 


NM 


22 Nov 1969 


MUC 


01 Jun 1970 


09 Dec 1970 










28 Jun 1972 


06 Mar 1973 


* The tail code was changed from H to NL in 


1957. The effective 


RVNGC 


12 Oct 1965 


date for this chang 


;e was most likely the beginning of FY 58 (1 July 




1957). 








21 Jun 1966 


22 Jun 1966 


t CVG-15 was redesignated CVW-15 when Carrier Air Groups (CVG) 




23 Nov 1967 




were redesignated Carrier Air Wings (CVW) on 


20 December 1963. 




02 Dec 1967 




$ When the squad 


ron was assigned to CVW-12, it operated under 




04 Dec 1967 




the control of VA-122 while undergoing training for the transition to 




20 Dec 1967 


22 Dec 1967 


rir 1 K^VJL^cXLL 11. 








20 Jan 1968 
23 Jan 1968 


27 Jan 1968 




Unit Awards Received 




29 Jan 1968 


19 Feb 1968 










07 Jan 1969 


30 Jan 1969 


Unit Award 


Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 




15 Feb 1969 


16 Mar 1969 


KSM 


04 Oct 1951 


15 Apr 1952 




04 Apr 1969 


14 Apr 1969 




27 Feb 1953 


16 May 1953 


VNSM 


04 Jul 1965 


24 Jul 1965 




29 May 1953 


07 Sep 1953 




11 Aug 1965 


11 Sep 1965 


AFEM 


26 Aug 1958 


07 Sep 1958 




21 Sep 1965 


15 Oct 1965 




14 Sep 1959 


17 Sep 1959 




14 Jun 1966 


13 Jul 1966 




25 Apr 1961 


28 Apr 1961 




27 Jul 1966 


31 Aug 1966 




30 Apr 1961 


01 May 1961 




08 Sep 1966 


01 Oct 1966 




04 May 1961 


09 May 1961 




19 Oct 1966 


09 Nov 1966 




12 Jan 1962 


19 Jan 1962 




26 Aug 1967 


01 Oct 1967 




24 Jan 1962 


27 Jan 1962 




12 Oct 1967 


28 Oct 1967 




02 Feb 1965 


05 Mar 1965 




04 Nov 1967 


05 Nov 1967 




16 Mar 1965 


17 Apr 1965 




11 Nov 1967 


08 Dec 1967 




02 May 1965 


28 May 1965 




16 Dec 1967 


07 Jan 1968 




23 Jun 1965 


03 Jul 1965 




15 Jan 1968 


21 Feb 1968 




23 Jan 1968 


22 Mar 1968 




07 Jan 1969 


30 Jan 1969 




20 Mar 1969 


22 Mar 1969 




15 Feb 1969 


16 Mar 1969 




20 Apr 1969 


27 Apr 1969 




04 Apr 1969 


17 Apr 1969 


NUC 


13 Mar 1953 


15 May 1953 




13 Jun 1970 


29 Jun 1970 




11 Jun 1953 


27 Jul 1953 




12 Jul 1970 


22 Jul 1970 



230 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



Unit Awards Received — Continued 



Unit Awards Received — Continued 



Unit Award Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 

02 Aug 1970 26 Aug 1970 
17 Sep 1970 13 Oct 1970 
06 Nov 1970 23 Nov 1970 

15Junl971 10 Jul 1971 

24 Jul 1971 07 Aug 1971 

03 Sep 1971 27 Sep 1971 
29 Oct 1971 21 Nov 1971 



Unit Award Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 

26 Jun 1972 23 Jul 1972 
16 Aug 1972 01 Sep 1972 
11 Sep 1972 28 Sep 1972 
08 Oct 1972 31 Oct 1972 
24 Nov 1972 18 Dec 1972 

27 Dec 1972 31 Jan 1973 
10 Feb 1973 06 Mar 1973 




A formation of squadron A-7B Corsair lis in late 1969. 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 23 1 



THIRD VA-155 

Lineage 

Established as Attack Squadron ONE HUNDRED 
FIFTY FIVE (VA-155) on 1 September 1987. 

Disestablished on 30 April 1993- The third squadron 
to be assigned the VA-155 designation. 

Squadron Insignia and Nickname 

The squadron's insignia was approved by CNO on 
24 July 1987. Colors for the Silver Fox insignia are as 




The fox insignia used by the squadron. 

follows: the circular design is outlined in silver with the 
upper background black and lower background blue 
with light blue highlights; yellow star, lightning bolt, 
moon, and wolfs pupils; silver wolf with black mark- 
ings and outlined in white; and a silver scroll, outlined 
in black with black lettering. 

Nickname: Silver Foxes, 1987-1993. 



Chronology of Significant Events 

15 August-8 October 1988: Independence (CV 62), 
with VA-155 embarked, conducted a change of home 
port transit from Norfolk to San Diego via Cape Horn. 
During the transit numerous air power demonstrations 
were conducted for dignitaries from various South 
American countries. 

17 Jan 1991: The squadron conducted its first com- 
bat operations. VA-155's commanding officer, 
Commander Sweigart, led Air Wing Two's aircraft in its 
first strike against Iraq. 

18 Jan 1991: The squadron suffered its first and only 
loss during the war with Iraq when one of its A-6E 
Intruders was shot down while on a mining sortie by 
the Um Qasr Naval Base in Iraq. 

28 Feb 1991: Ranger's last combat strike of the Gulf 
War was launched and led by a VA-155 aircraft. During 
the 43 day Gulf War the squadron flew 1,388.4 hours, 
a total of 635 sorties, and delivered 2,289,940 pounds 
of ordnance on Iraqi military targets. 

Sep-Dec 1992: Squadron aircraft flew sorties in sup- 
port of Operation Southern Watch, flights over south- 
ern Iraq south of the 32nd parallel to ensure Iraq was 
adhering to United Nations sanctions. 

Dec 1992: The squadron participated in Operation 
Restore Hope, flying sorties in support of the humani- 
tarian relief effort in Somalia. 



Home Port Assignments 



Location 

NAS Whidbey Island 



Assignment Date 

01 Sep 1987 



Commanding Officers 



CDR Jack J. Samar 

CDR Kenneth R. Zimmerman 

CDR Frank Sweigart 

CDR Larry J. Munns 



Date Assumed Command 

01 Sep 1987 
12 Jan 1989 
29 Jun 1990 

12 Sep 1991 



Aircraft Assignment 



Type of Aircraft 



KA-6D 
A-6E 



Date Type First Received 

16 Nov 1987 
Dec 1987 



Major Overseas Deployments 



Date of 
Departure 

08 Dec 1990 



01 Aug 1992 



Date of 
Return 

09 Jun 1991 
31 Jan 1993 



Air 
Wing 

CVW-2 



CVW-2 



Carrier 



CV 61 



CV 61 



Type of 
Aircraft 

A-6E 



A-6E 



Area of 
Operation 

WestPac/IO/ 
Persian Gulf 
WestPac/IO/ 
Persian Gulf 



232 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



Air Wing Assignments 

Air Wing Tail Code 

CVW-10 NM 
CVW-17 AA 
CVW-2 NE 



Assignment Date 

01 Dec 1987 
01 May 1988 
01 Oct 1989 



Unit Award 

MUC 

NUC 

SASM 

KLM 

NAVE 



Unit Awards Received 

Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 



04 Sep 1987 
17 Jan 1991 
13 Jan 1991 
17 Jan 1991 
01 Jan 1992 



03 Sep 1988 
07 Feb 1991 
19 Apr 1991 
07 Feb 1991 
31 Dec 1992 



A squadron A-6E Intruder loaded with weapons, 



1990. 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 233 



VA-163 

Lineage 

Established as Attack Squadron ONE HUNDRED 
SIXTY THREE (VA-163) on 1 September I960. 

Placed on inactive status on 1 April 1969 but main- 
tained on the Naval Aeronautical Organization's list of 
designated squadrons. While inactive, no aircraft and 
only 1 administrative person was assigned to the 
squadron. VA-163 was removed from the Naval 
Aeronautical Organization list on 1 July 1971. The 
squadron probably was placed in an inactive status 
due to manpower and aircraft availability while await- 
ing transition to the A-6 Intruder. 

Disestablished on 1 July 1971. The first squadron to 
be assigned the VA-163 designation. 

Squadron Insignia and Nickname 

The squadron's insignia was approved by CNO on 
31 January 1961. Colors for the insignia were: a light 

blue background with a 
white border outlined in 
black; the shield had a 
yellow border outlined 
in black; the back- 
ground in the upper left 
quarter of the shield 
was dark blue with a 
yellow crescent moon 
and white star; the 
upper right quarter had 
a light blue background 
with a yellow moon and 
white cloud, outlined in 
black; the lower left 
quarter had a light blue background and the waves 
were a medium blue with white caps, outlined in 
black; the lower right quarter had a light blue back- 
ground with snow capped dark blue mountains; the 
center of the shield had a square yellow box with 
black electron rings; the scroll was light blue outlined 
in black and had white lettering. 
Nickname: Saints, 1960-1971. 

Chronology of Significant Events 

Nov 1963: Oriskany (CVA 34), with VA-163 
embarked, operated in the South China Sea during a 
crisis in South Vietnam and the coup that overthrew 
President Diem. 

Jun 1965: The squadron's commanding officer, 
Commander Jenkins, led the first major POL 
(petroleum, oil, lubricants) strike of the war against 
the Dam Dinh, North Vietnam storage facility. 

7 Nov 1965: Lieutenant Commander Charles G. 




Tide squadron 's one and only 
insignia. 



Wack was awarded the Silver Star for his action in 
leading a sortie against SAM sites south of Nam Dinh, 
North Vietnam. He pressed his attack even though his 
aircraft was badly damaged by antiaircraft fire and suc- 
cessfully completed his mission before being forced to 
eject from the aircraft when it caught fire. 

13 Nov 1965: Commander H. T. Jenkins, the 
squadron's commanding officer, was shot down while 
conducting an armed reconnaissance mission a few 
miles north of the DMZ and was captured. He 
remained a POW until his release in February 1973. 

23 Jul 1966: During a successful POL mission over 
Vinh, North Vietnam, Commander W. F. Foster's air- 
craft was hit by antiaircraft fire and he suffered the 
loss of his right arm. Using only his left hand, he pilot- 
ed his crippled aircraft out to sea and ejected over the 
Gulf of Tonkin, where he was rescued. He was award- 
ed the Silver Star for his actions. 

26 Oct 1966: A major fire broke out in Oriskany on 
Yankee Station. The squadron lost four officers in the 
fire. Several squadron personnel received awards for 
their heroic actions during the fire. 

21 Aug 1967: Commander B. W. Compton, Jr., the 
squadron's commanding officer, was awarded the 
Navy Cross for his actions as a strike leader of a major 
coordinated air attack against the Hanoi Thermal 
Power Plant. 

Home Port Assignments 

Location Assignment Date 

NAS Cecil Field 01 Sep I960 

NAS Lemoore 26 Sep 1961 

Commanding Officers 



CDR Jack M. Manherz 
CDR D. V. Marshall, Jr. 
CDR M. D. Short 
CDRJarlJ. Diffendorfer 
CDR Harry T. Jenkins, Jr. 
CDR Wynn F. Foster 
CDR Ronald H. Caldwell 
CDR Bryan W. Compton, Jr. 
CDR Elbert D. Lighter 



Date Assumed Command 

01 Sep I960 
01 Sep 1961 
14 Oct 1962 
05 Feb 1964 
30 Dec 1964 
13 Nov 1965 
30 Jul 1966 
10 Jul 1967 
10 Jul 1968 



Aircraft Assignment 



Type of Aircraft 



A4D-2/A-4B* 
A-4E 



Date Type First Received 

03 Oct I960 
Mar 1964 



1 The A4D-2 designation was changed to A-4B in 1962. 



234 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 







Major Overseas Deployments 






Date of 


Date of 


Air 




Type of 


Area of 


Departure 


Return 


Wing 


Carrier 


Aircraft 


Operation 


07 Jun 1962 


17 Dec 1962 


CVG-16 


CVA 34 


A4D-2 


WestPac 


01 Aug 1963 


10 Mar 1964 


CVW-16 


CVA 34 


A-4B 


WestPac 


fl^ Anr 1Q<^ 

\) J -TVLJl Ly\)J 


16 Dec 1965 


CVW-16 


CVA 34 


A-4E 


WestPac/Vietnam 


2o may Lybb 


16 Nov 1966 


CVW-16 


CVA 34 


A-4E 


WestPac/Vietnam 


16 Jun 1967 


31 Jan 1968 


CVW-16 


CVA 34 


A-4E 


WestPac/Vietnam 


18 Jul 1968 


03 Mar 1969 


CVW-21 


CVA 19 


A-4E 


WestPac/Vietnam 




Air Wing Assignments 


Unit Awards Received — Continued 


Air Wins 


Tail Code 


Assignment Date 








CVG-16/CVW-16* AH 


01 Sep I960 


Unit Award 


Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 


CVW-21 


NP 


01 Mar 1968 




13 Oct 1968 










02 Nov 1968 




* CVG-16 was redesignated CVW-16 when Carrier Air Groups (CVG) 




07 Nov 1968 


08 Nov 1968 


were redesignated Carrier Air Wings (CVW) 


on 20 December 1963. 




10 Nov 1968 


11 Nov 1968 










13 Nov 1968 


19 Nov 1968 




Unit Awards Received 




21 Nov 1968 


26 Nov 1968 










21 Dec 1968 


24 Dec 1968 


Unit Award 


Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 




26 Dec 1968 


28 Dec 1968 


AFEM 


05 Sep 1963 


13 Sep 1963 




30 Dec 1968 






03 Nov 1963 


08 Nov 1963 




01 Jan 1969 


03 Jan 1969 




07 May 1965 


02 Jun 1965 




07 Jan 1969 


14 Jan 1969 




10 Jun 1965 


03 Jul 1965 




31 Jan 1969 


08 Feb 1969 




17 Sep 1965 


18 Sep 1965 


VNSM 


04 Jul 1965 


18 Jul 1965 




02 Dec 1968 


04 Dec 1968 




09 Aug 1965 


11 Sep 1965 


NUC 


10 May 1965 


06 Dec 1965 




30 Sep 1965 


19 Oct 1965 




12 Jun 1966 


01 Nov 1966 




28 Oct 1965 


27 Nov 1965 




14 Jul 1967 


12 Jan 1968 




29 Jun 1966 


29 Jul 1966 




01 Aug 1968 


22 Feb 1969 




06 Aug 1966 


08 Sep 1966 


RVNGC 


02 Oct 1965 






23 Sep 1966 


26 Oct 1966 




30 Oct 1965 






13 Jul 1967 


08 Aug 1967 




01 Nov 1965 






17 Aug 1967 


30 Sep 1967 




03 Nov 1965 






04 Oct 1967 


03 Nov 1967 




07 Nov 1965 






19 Nov 1967 


17 Dec 1967 




11 Nov 1965 


12 Nov 1965 




30 Dec 1967 


13 Jan 1968 




06 Jul 1966 


07 Jul 1966 




21 Aug 1968 


04 Sep 1968 




26 Sep 1968 




13 Sep 1968 


15 Oct 1968 




29 Sep 1968 






23 Oct 1968 


28 Nov 1968 




09 Oct 1968 


11 Oct 1968 




20 Dec 1968 


15 Jan 1969 










29 Jan 1969 


10 Feb 1969 




A formation of squadron A-4 Skyhawks. 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 235 



VA-164 

Lineage 

Established as Attack Squadron ONE HUNDRED 
SIXTY FOUR (VA-164) on 1 September I960. 

Disestablished on 12 December 1975. The first 
squadron to be assigned the VA-164 designation. 

Squadron Insignia and Nickname 

The squadron's insignia was approved by CNO on 
24 May 1961. Colors for the Ghostrider insignia were: 
a black background outlined in black and white; the 
ghost rider was gold with black markings; the winged 

horse, diamond and 
scrolls were silver with 
black markings or letter- 
ing; the smoke/cloud 
was white with black 
markings; the flames 
were red, yellow, 
orange, blue, and green; 
and the aerodynamic 
(triangular) design was 
orange. 

Nickname: Ghost- 
riders, 1961-1975. 




The squadron 's ghost rider insignia. 



Chronology of Significant Events 

Nov 1963: Oriskany (CVA 34), with VA-164 
embarked, operated in the South China Sea during a 
crisis in South Vietnam and the coup that overthrew 
President Diem. 

5 May 1965: The squadron flew its first combat sor- 
tie. From May through July 1965, it flew close air sup- 
port missions in South Vietnam. 

7 Nov 1965: The squadron's commanding officer, 
Commander J. D. Shaw, was awarded the Silver Star 
for successfully leading a strike against a SAM site in 
North Vietnam. 

26 Oct 1966: A major fire broke out in Oriskany on 
Yankee Station. The squadron lost four officers in the 
fire. Several squadron personnel received awards for 
their heroic actions during the fire. 

Oct 1967: Commander D. F. Mow, the squadron's 
commanding officer, was awarded the Silver Star for 
his actions during a combat mission over North 
Vietnam. 

Mar 1970: The squadron completed the last line 
period of its fifth combat deployment to Vietnam. This 
was the squadron's first combat deployment without 
losing a pilot. 

Apr 1972: The squadron participated in Operation 
Freedom Train, tactical air sorties against military and 
logistic targets in the southern part of North Vietnam. 



It also provided close air support for forces in South 
Vietnam following a massive invasion by North 
Vietnam. 

May 1972: Squadron aircraft participated in the early 
phase of operation Linebacker I, heavy air strikes 
against targets in North Vietnam. 

Aug 1972: TA-4s acquired by VA-164 from the 
Marine Corps at MCAS Iwakuni were used for the first 
time operationally in a combat role off a carrier. 

Jun 1973: Missions were flown in support of 
Operation End Sweep, the clearing of mines in the ter- 
ritorial waters of North Vietnam. 

Oct 1974: With the outbreak of war between Israel 
and Egypt and Syria the Hancock (CVA 19), with VA- 
164 embarked, was directed to leave Yankee Station 
and operate in the Arabian Sea and Gulf of Aden. 



Home Port Assignments 



Location 

NAS Cecil Field 
NAS Lemoore 



Assignment Date 

01 Sep I960 
26 Sep 1961 



Commanding Officers 





Date Assumed Command 


CDR Harlan D. Williams 


01 Sep I960 


CDR Lloyd W. Moffit 


05 Sep 1961 


CDR C. A. Banks, Jr. 


Oct 1962 


CDR R. M. Netherland 


21 Sep 1963 


CDR J. W. Roberts 


28 Aug 1964 


CDR John D. Shaw 


24 Jul 1965 


CDR Paul H. Engel 


26 Jun 1966 


CDR Douglas F. Mow 


31 May 1967 


CDR William F. Span 


04 Jul 1968 


CDR Roy V. Hagberg 


18 Jul 1969 


CDR George L. Boaz 


24 Jul 1970 


CDR Ramsay (N) Lawson 


08 Jul 1971 


CDR Stanley R. Arthur 


01 Jul 1972 


CDR Fred J. Gosebrink 


15 Jun 1973 


CDR Frederick P. Meyers 


30 May 1974 



Aircraft Assignment 



Type of Aircraft 



A4D-2/A-4B* 
A-4E 
A-4F 
TA-4F 



Date Type First Received 

07 Oct I960 
13 Mar 1964 
06 Apr 1969 

08 Aug 1972 



: The A4D-2 designation was changed to A-4B in 1962. 



236 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



Major Overseas Deployments 



Date of 


Date of 


Air 




Type of 


Area of 


Departure 


Return 


Wing 


Carrier 


Aircraft 


Operation 


u/ jun tyoz 


1 "7 T\^^ 1 O^O 

i / uec tyoz 


L, Vlj-10 


<^VA 54 


A41J-Z 


westrac 


ui Aug iyo5 


1 fl A/Tot- 1 O^/i 

1U Mar ly04 


ay/ 1 
C^ V W-10 


r*\r\ 2/1 
C^VA ^4 


A ATI 
A-4r> 


westrac 


ID Apr lyoj 


10 uec lyoj 


Cj V W-10 


(^\/A 2/1 


A /lp 

A-4J1 


WestPac/Vietnam 


ZO May 1900 


10 1NOV 1900 


CjV W-10 


7" A 2/1 

LVA 54 


A-4F 


WestPac/Vietnam 


16 Jun 1967 


31 Jan 1968 


CVW-16 


CVA 34 


A-4E 


WestPac/Vietnam 


18 Jul 1968 


03 Mar 1969 


CVW-21 


CVA 19 


A-4E 


WestPac/Vietnam 


02 Aug 1969 


15 Apr 1970 


CVW-21 


CVA 19 


A-4F 


WestPac/Vietnam 


22 Oct 1970 


03 Jun 1971 


CVW-21 


CVA 19 


A-4F 


WestPac/Vietnam 


07 Jan 1972 


03 Oct 1972 


CVW-21 


CVA 19 


A-4F & TA-4F 


WestPac/Vietnam 


08 May 1973 


08 Jan 1974 


CVW-21 


CVA 19 


A-4F & TA-4F 


WestPac/IO 


18 Mar 1975 


20 Oct 1975 


CVW-21 


CV 19 


A-4F & TA-4F 


WestPac 




Two squadron A-4F Skybawks in flight, 1973- 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 237 



Air Wing Assignments 



Unit Awards Received — Continued 



Air Wing 

CVG-16/CVW-16* 
CVW-21 



Tail Code 
AH 
NP 



Assignment Date 

01 Sep I960 
01 Mar 1968 



Unit Award 



* CVG-16 was redesignated CVW-16 when Carrier Air Groups (CVG) 
were redesignated Carrier Air Wings (CVW) on 20 December 1963. 



Unit Award 
NUC 



NAVE 
AFEM 



MUC 
RVNGC 



Unit Awards Received 



Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 



10 May 


1965 


06 Dec 


1965 


12 Jun 


1966 


01 Nov 


1966 


14 Jul 


1967 


12 Jan 


1968 


01 Aug 


1968 


22 Feb 


1969 


08 Feb 


1972 


14 Sep 


1972 


01 Jul 


1971 


31 Dec 


1972 


05 Sep 


1963 


13 Sep 


1963 


03 Nov 


1963 


08 Nov 


1963 


07 May 


1965 


02 Jun 


1965 


10 Jun 


1965 


03 Jul 


1965 


17 Sep 


1965 


18 Sep 


1965 


02 Dec 


1968 


04 Dec 


1968 


30 Oct 


1969 






03 Jan 


1970 


08 Jan 


1970 


22 Feb 


1970 


25 Feb 


1970 


21 Aug 


1969 


31 Mar 


1970 


20 Nov 


1970 


07 May 


1971 


02 Oct 


1965 






30 Oct 


1965 






01 Nov 


1965 






03 Nov 


1965 






07 Nov 


1965 






11 Nov 


1965 


12 Nov 


1965 


06 Jul 


1966 


07 Jul 


1966 


26 Sep 


1968 






29 Sep 


1968 






09 Oct 


1968 


11 Oct 


1968 


13 Oct 


1968 






02 Nov 


1968 






07 Nov 


1968 


08 Nov 


1968 


10 Nov 


1968 


11 Nov 


1968 


13 Nov 


1968 


19 Nov 


1968 



VNSM 



Inclusive 
21 Nov 1968 
21 Dec 1968 

26 Dec 1968 
30 Dec 1968 

01 Jan 1969 
07 Jan 1969 
31 Jan 1969 
01 Aug 1969 
30 Mar 1972 
04 Jul 1965 
09 Aug 1965 
30 Sep 1965 

28 Oct 1965 

29 Jun 1966 

06 Aug 1966 
23 Sep 1966 

13 Jul 1967 
17 Aug 1967 
04 Oct 1967 

19 Nov 1967 

30 Dec 1967 
21 Aug 1968 
13 Sep 1968 

23 Oct 1968 

20 Dec 1968 
29 Jan 1969 

31 Aug 1969 
03 Oct 1969 

24 Nov 1969 
18 Jan 1970 
09 Mar 1970 
19 Nov 1970 
29 Dec 1970 

23 Jan 1971 
09 Mar 1971 
17 Apr 1971 

07 Feb 1972 

25 Mar 1972 
11 May 1972 

12 Jun 1972 

24 Jul 1972 

27 Aug 1972 



Dates Covering Unit Award 

26 Nov 1968 
24 Dec 1968 
28 Dec 1968 

03 Jan 1969 

14 Jan 1969 
08 Feb 1969 

01 Sep 1969 

15 Jul 1972 
18 Jul 1965 

11 Sep 1965 

19 Oct 1965 

27 Nov 1965 
29 Jul 1966 

08 Sep 1966 

26 Oct 1966 
08 Aug 1967 
30 Sep 1967 

03 Nov 1967 
17 Dec 1967 

13 Jan 1968 

04 Sep 1968 
15 Oct 1968 

28 Nov 1968 
15 Jan 1969 

10 Feb 1969 
24 Sep 1969 

27 Oct 1969 
17 Dec 1969 

11 Feb 1970 
26 Mar 1970 

08 Dec 1970 
15 Jan 1971 

20 Feb 1971 
10 Apr 1971 
04 May 1971 

09 Mar 1972 

02 May 1972 
01 Jun 1972 

14 Jul 1972 
17 Aug 1972 
14 Sep 1972 



238 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



VA-165 

Lineage 

Established as Attack Squadron ONE HUNDRED 
SIXTY FIVE (VA-165) on 1 September I960. 

The first squadron to be assigned the VA-165 
designation. 



The squadron's first insignia. 



Squadron Insignia and 
Nickname 

The squadron's first 
insignia was approved 
by CNO on 24 May 
1961. Colors for this 
insignia were: a silver 
background with a 
white scroll outlined in 
black, lettering on the 
scroll was green; brown 
map outlined in black; 
black and white tail- 
hook with a red triangu- 
lar device at one end; red electron rings circled the 
tailhook and the boomerang or wedge shaped device 
was green, outlined in black. 

Sometime in the early 1960s, following the 
squadrons transfer to the west coast, a new insignia 

was adopted. There is 
no record of an 
approval date for this 
insignia. Colors for the 
insignia are: a silver 
background with green 
scrolls and outlined in 
black; gold lettering and 
compass star with black 
markings on the star; 
green boomerang out- 
lined in black; and a 
white knight chessman 
with black markings. 

Nickname: Boomers, 
mid 1960s to present. 




The squadron's second insignia 
had a more stylized design adopt- 
ed sometime in the early 1960s. 



Chronology of Significant Events 

Nov 1963: Oriskany (CVA 34), with VA-165 
embarked, operated in the South China Sea during a 
crisis in South Vietnam and the coup that overthrew 
President Diem. 

Feb 1965: The squadron began participation in com- 
bat operations over Laos. 

4 Apr 1966: VA-165 deployed to Vietnam as a com- 
ponent of CVW-10 embarked in Intrepid (CVS 11). 
This was the first all attack air wing and the first to 



deploy. Two squadrons flew the A-l Skyraider and the 
other two squadrons flew the A-4 Skyhawk. 

26 Jan 1968: The Ranger (CVA 62), with VA-165 
embarked, while operating on Yankee Station, was 
ordered to the Sea of Japan following the capture of 
Pueblo (AGER 2) on 23 January by the North Koreans. 
Ranger and VA-165 operated in the area until relieved 
on 5 March 1968. 

Apr 1969: Following the shoot down of a Navy EC- 
121 aircraft by the North Koreans on 15 April, Ranger 
(CVA 61), with VA-165 embarked, left Yankee Station 
and proceeded to the Sea of Japan for operations off 
the coast of Korea. 

26 May 1970: The squadron's commanding officer, 
Commander F. M. Backman, flew the newest update 
version of the A-6 Intruder, the A-6C, into combat for 
the first time. 

Apr 1972: The squadron participated in Operation 
Freedom Train, tactical air sorties against military and 
logistic targets in the southern part of North Vietnam. 
It also provided support for forces in South Vietnam 
following a massive invasion by North Vietnam on 1 
April 1972. 

May 1972: The squadron participated in the early 
phase of Operation Linebacker I, heavy air strikes 
against targets in North Vietnam above 20 degrees 
north latitude. 

Nov 1974: VA-165, part of the CVW-9 team 
embarked on Constellation (CV 64), operated in the 
Persian Gulf. This was the first time in 26 years that an 
American carrier had entered and operated in the 
Persian Gulf. 

Mar 1979: Constellation (CV 64), with VA-165 
embarked, was ordered to make a high speed transit 
to the Indian Ocean from the Philippines in response 
to the conflict between North and South Yemen. 

Oct 1981: The squadron was the first operational A- 
6 unit to deploy with a Harpoon missile capability. 

Jul-Aug 1983: Ranger, with VA-165 embarked, was 
ordered to operate off the coast of Nicaragua in 
response to an unstable situation in Central America 
and the possible invasion of Honduras by Nicaragua. 

Oct 1983-Jan 1984: Ranger, with VA-165 embarked, 
was extended on station in the Arabian Sea due to the 
Iranian threat to block oil exports from the Persian 
Gulf. 

Sep 1988: Nimitz (CVN 68), with VA-165 embarked, 
operated in the Sea of Japan in support of the Summer 
Olympic Games in Seoul, Republic of Korea. 

Nov 1988: Squadron aircraft participated in Earnest 
Will Operations, the escorting of reflagged Kuwaiti 
tankers through the Persian Gulf. 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 239 




A squadron AD-5 Skyraider at NAS Glenvieiv, Illinois (Courtesy Fred Dickey Collection). 



Home Port Assignments 



Commanding Officers 



Location 



NAS Jacksonville 
NAS Moffett Field 
NAS Alameda 
NAS Whidbey Island 



Assignment Date 

01 Sep I960 
07 Sep 1961 
10 Mar 1964 
01 Jan 1967 



Commanding Officers 





Date Assumed Command 


CDR Carl H. Yeagle 


01 Sep I960 


CDRJohn E. Ford 


25 Aug 1961 


CDR R. Houck 


1962 


CDR L. L. Andrews, Jr. 


02 Sep 1963 


CDR R. E. Chamblerlain, Jr. 


10 Apr 1964 


CDR A. K. Knoizen 


1965 


CDR Harry D. Parode 


1966 


CDR William S. Jett III 


22 Dec 1966 


CDR Leland S. Kollmorgen 


11 Jun 1968 


CDR Fred M. Backman 


27 Jun 1969 


CDR Richard A. Zick 


09 Jun 1970 


CDR Thomas W. Conboy 


17 Jun 1971 


CDR James M. Seely 


13 Jul 1972 


CDR George C. Crater 


21 Jun 1973 


CDR Gary C. Caron 


14 Jun 1974 


CDR Samuel A. Belcher III 


29 Aug 1975 



CDR Robert M. Proshek 
CDR H. G. Sprouse 
CDR Ian K. Graham 
CDR Michael C. Scully 
CDR Paul S. Bloch 
CDR Gaiy C. Wasson 
CDR Robert T. Knowles 
CDRJohn C. Scrapper 
CDR Donald C. Brown 
CDR William H. Shurtleff IV 
CDRJohn W. Indorf, Jr. 



Date Assumed Command 

05 Nov 1976 
Feb 1978 

22 Apr 1979 
25 Jul 1980 

02 Oct 1981 

14 Jan 1983 

15 Jun 1984 
31 Jan 1986 

01 Aug 1987 
10 Dec 1988 

23 May 1990 



Aircraft Assignment 



Type of Aircraft 




Date Type First Received 

04 Oct I960 
Jun 1963 
May 1967 
Nov 1969 

27 Feb 1970 

28 Mar 1971 
20 Jan 1975 



: The AD-6 designation was changed to A-1H in 1962. 



Date of 
Departure 

07 Jun 1962 
01 Aug 1963 



Date of 
Return 

17 Dec 1962 
10 Mar 1964 



Major Overseas Deployments 



Ail- 
Wing 

CVG-16 
CVW-16 



Carrier 

CVA 34 
CVA 34 



Type of 
Aircraft 

AD-6 
A-1H/J 



Area of 
Operation 

WestPac 
WestPac 



240 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



Major Overseas Deployments 



Date of 


Date of 


Air 




Type of 


Area of 


Departure 


Return 


Wing 


Carrier 


Aircraft 


Operation 


u/ uec iyo4 


Ul INOV lyvj 


LVW-1) 


L- VA 43 


A 1U/T 

A-1H/J 


WestPac/Vietnam 


C\/l A rsi- 1 ClA/^ 

U4 Apr lyoo 


zi inov iyoo 


V W-1U 




A 1U 

A- 11 1 


WestPac/Vietnam 


U4 inov iyo/ 


Z9 May lyoo 


LVW-Z 


L- VA 01 


A ^ A 

A-OA 


WestPac/Vietnam 


ZO OCt IVDo 


1 "7 A/Tnr 1 n/^o 

i / May iyoy 


7TV7 O 

LVW-Z 


UVA 01 


A A A 

A-OA 


WestPac/Vietnam 


iu Apr ly/u 


zi uec ly/u 


v w-y 


L- VA 00 


A /< A /R /r* 
A-OA/ 15/ 


WestPac/Vietnam 


f\1 /"V-t- 10~71 

Ul UCt IV /l 


3U Jun ly /Z 


ivw-y 


UVA 04 


A-OA & KA-Ol) 


WestPac/Vietnam 


Tin 1072 

jan Ly/D 


I 1 O^t 1 G"72 

II CJCt iy/5 


v w-y 


L- VA 04 


A-OA cl rsA-01> 


WestPac/Vietnam 


01 Tnn 1 0~7/i 

zi jun ly /4 


99 r^/- 1 o~7/ 
zz uec iy/4 


v w-y 


LWA 04 


A-OA & ixA-01> 


westr ac/ iu 


1 9 A i-M- 1 0"7~7 

iz Apr ly / / 


ZI INOV Ly / / 


ivw-y 


04 


A-O-t, ex i\A-OD 


westrac 


O/^ Cor, 1 0"7Q 

ZD oGp ly/o 


1 "7 A/Toir 1 0~70 

1 / May ly ly 


v w-y 


i^V 04 


A Ap A AT "1 


\Y/^irtT)i ^ /TO 

westrac/ iu 


zo reo iyou 


19 (JCt lyoU 


v W-y 


v,V 04 


A-0-b cx JxA-OlJ 


W7£}ctT)i ^ /TO 

westrac/ iu 


20 Oct 1981 


23 May 1982 


CVW-9 


CV 64 


A-6E & KA-6D 


WestPac/IO 


15 Jul 1983 


29 Feb 1984 


CVW-9 


CV61 


A-6E & KA-6D 


CentralAmerica/ 












WestPac/IO 


24 Jul 1985 


21 Dec 1985 


CVW-9 


CV 63 


A-6E & KA-6D 


WestPac/IO 


03 Jan 1987 


29 Jun 1987 


CVW-9 


CV 63 


A-6E & KA-6D 


World Cruise 


02 Sep 1988 


27 Feb 1989 


CVW-9 


CVN 68 


A-6E & KA-6D 


WestPac/IO 


15 Jun 1989 


09 Jul 1989 


CVW-9 


CVN 68 


A-6E & KA-6D 


NorPac 


12 Feb 1990 


07 Apr 1990 


CVW-9* 


CV 64 


A-6E & KA-6D 


* 



* VA-165 was part of a composite CVW-9 that was embarked in Constellation (CV 64) for her home port change and transit from the east coast 
to the west coast via Cape Horn. 




A squadron KA-6D Intruder 
refuels an F-14 Tomcat from 
VF-211. 



Air Wing Assignments 



Unit Awards Received 



Air Wing 

CVG-16/CVW-16* 

CVW-15 

CVW-10 

COMFAIRALAMEDA/ 

CVW-15t 
COMFAIRWHIDBEY 
CVW-2 
CVW-9 



7a!'/ Code 
AH 
NL 
AK 



NE 
NG 



Assignment Date 

01 Sep I960 
22 Jun 1964 
14 Mar 1966 
Nov 1966 

01 Jan 1967 
16 Jun 1967 

02 Jul 1969 



* CVG-16 was redesignated CVW-16 when Carrier Air Groups (CVG) 
were redesignated Carrier Air Wings (CVW) on 20 December 1963. 

t When VA-165 returned from its deployment to WestPac on 21 
November 1966 it was assigned to CVW-15. However, CVW-15 was 
still on a WestPac cmise and did not return until 3 December 1966. 



Unit Award 


Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 


NAVE 


01 Jul 1968 


31 Dec 1969 




01 Jan 1970 


30 Jun 1971 




01 Jul 1974 


31 Dec 1975 




01 Jan 1976 


30 Jun 1977 




01 Jan 1985 


30 Jun 1986 




01 Jul 1986 


31 Dec 1987 


MUC 


03 Dec 1967 


09 May 1968 




26 May 1970 


08 Nov 1970 




12 Mar 1979 


19 Apr 1979 




15 Jun 1984 


27 Feb 1986 




Jan 1987 


May 1987 


AFEM 


05 Sep 1963 


13 Sep 1963 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 241 



Unit Awards Received 



Unit Awards Received 



Unit Award 



NEM 



NUC 

PUC 
RVNGC 

VNSM 



Inclusive 

03 Nov 1963 
02 Feb 1965 
16 Mar 1965 
02 May 1965 
23 Jun 1965 

23 Jan 1968 
20 Mar 1969 

20 Apr 1969 

24 Sep 1970 
02 Nov 1988 
12 Mar 1979 
26 Apr 1980 
12 Aug 1980 
07 Feb 1965 

29 Nov 1968 
22 Oct 1971 
12 Oct 1965 

30 Mar 1972 
04 Jul 1965 

11 Aug 1965 

21 Sep 1965 
15 May 1966 

08 Jul 1966 
01 Sep 1966 



Dates Covering Unit Award 
08 Nov 1963 
05 Mar 1965 
11 Apr 1965 
28 May 1965 
03 Jul 1965 
22 Mar 1968 

22 Mar 1969 
27 Apr 1969 
26 Sep 1970 
05 Dec 1988 
19 Apr 1979 
04 Aug 1980 
19 Aug 1980 
18 Oct 1965 

10 May 1969 
13 Jun 1972 

01 Jun 1972 
24 Jul 1965 

11 Sep 1965 
15 Oct 1965 
15 Jun 1966 
10 Aug 1966 

23 Sep 1966 



Unit Award 



Inclusive 

02 Oct 1966 

03 Dec 1967 

06 Jan 1968 

18 Mar 1968 
21 Apr 1968 

07 Jan 1969 
15 Feb 1969 

04 Apr 1969 
17 May 1970 

19 May 1970 
24 May 1970 

28 Jun 1970 
20 Jul 1970 
24 Aug 1970 

13 Oct 1970 
02 Nov 1971 
29 Nov 1971 

09 Jan 1972 
09 Feb 1972 
13 Mar 1972 
07 Apr 1972 
24 May 1972 
31 May 1972 



Dates Covering Unit Award 
18 Oct 1966 
29 Dec 1967 
28 Jan 1968 
12 Apr 1968 
09 May 1968 
30 Jan 1969 

16 Mar 1969 

17 Apr 1969 



16 Jun 1970 
13 Jul 1970 
04 Aug 1970 

18 Sep 1970 
08 Nov 1970 

22 Nov 1971 
31 Dec 1971 
03 Feb 1972 
02 Mar 1972 

23 Mar 1972 
18 May 1972 
25 May 1972 

13 Jun 1972 





A squadron A-6E Intruder in flight, 1978. 



242 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



VA-172 

Lineage 

Established as Bomber Fighter Squadron EIGHTY 
TWO (VBF-82) on 20 August 1945. 

Redesignated Fighter Squadron EIGHTEEN A (VF- 
18 A) on 15 November 1946. 

Redesignated Fighter Squadron ONE HUNDRED 
SEVENTY TWO (VF-172) on 11 August 1948. 

Redesignated Attack Squadron ONE HUNDRED 
SEVENTY TWO (VA-172) on 1 November 1955. 

Disestablished on 15 January 1971. The first 
squadron to be assigned the VA-172 designation. 

Squadron Insignia and 
Nickname 

The squadron's first 
insignia was approved 
by CNO on 12 June 
1946. Colors for insignia 
were: a gold background 
outlined in grey with 
blue triangles; the knight 
and queen chess pieces 
were red with white 
highlights and the pawn 
and king were grey with 
white highlights. 
The chess piece insignia was used by the squadron 
until 19 October 1950 when CNO approved a new 

insignia. Colors for the 
new insignia were: a 
blue border outlined a 
red and white shield; 
gold naval aviator wings 
with black markings; 
blue lightning bolt; and 
the lettering Blue Bolts 
was black. 

Nickname: Check- 
mates, 1946-1950. 

Blue Blots, 1950- 
1971. 




The design using the chess pieces 
was the squadron 's first insignia. 




The squadron adopted the blue 
holts design as its second insignia. 



Chronology of Significant Events 

28 Jan 1949: Squadron aircraft, while secured to the 
flight deck and engines running, were used to assist in 
berthing Midway (CVB 41) in Augusta, Sicily. This pro- 
cedure is known as operation Pin wheel. 

23 Aug 1951: The squadron participated in its first 
combat sortie. This also marked the first use of the 
F2H-2 in combat. 

25 Aug 1951: The squadron's F2H-2 aircraft, along 



with F9Fs from VF-51, provided escort for 30 U.S. Air 
Force B-29 bombers raiding the marshalling yards at 
Rashin, North Korea. 

Nov-Dec 1956: Franklin D. Roosevelt (CVA 42), with 
VA-172 embarked, was ordered to deploy and operate 
off the coast of Spain as a result of the Suez Canal crisis. 

Sep-Oct 1957: A detachment of squadron's F2H-2 
aircraft were embarked in Tarawa (CVS 40) to provide 
fighter support for the ASW carrier during a NATO 
exercise in the North Atlantic. 

Nov 1961 : VA-172, embarked in Roosevelt, operated 
off the coast of the Dominican Republic to support the 
newly established democratic government. 

May 1963: Roosevelt, with VA-172 embarked, 
deployed to the Caribbean and operated off the coast 
of Haiti in response to a rebel attempt to overthrow 
the Haitian government. 

Jul-Sep 1963: A detachment from the squadron was 
deployed aboard Randolph (CVS 15) to provide fighter 
coverage for the ASW Task Group during operations 
in the Caribbean Sea. 

8-29 Aug 1964: Roosevelt, with VA-172 embarked, 
was ordered to operate in the vicinity of Cyrpus after 
fighting escalated between Turkish and Greek forces 
on the island. 

Aug 1966: The squadron commenced combat opera- 
tions in Vietnam. These were its first combat sorties 
since the Korean War in 1952. 

2 Dec 1966: The squadron's commanding officer, 
Commander Bruce A. Nystrom, was lost in a night 
reconnaissance mission over the Red River delta area 
in North Vietnam. 




A squadron F4U-4 Corsair traps aboard Coral Sea (CVB 43), 1948 
(Courtesy Robert Lawson Collection). 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 243 



Home Port Assignments Commanding Officers 



Location Assignment Date Date Assumed Command 



NAS Alameda 


20 Aug 1945 


CDR William S 


Stewart 


19 Dec 1961 


NAS Quonset Point 
NAAS Cecil Field 
NAS Jacksonville 
NAS Cecil Field 


15 Jan 1946 
04 Mar 1949 
24 Mar 1950 
22 Feb 1958 


CDR M. Blaylock 
CDR E. D. Herbert 
CDR K. A. Burrows 
CDR Bruce A. Nystrom 
CDR Robert D. Harris, Jr. 
CDR Thomas A. Francis 


19 Dec 1962 
09 Dec 1963 
08 Dec 1964 

23 Dec 1965 
03 Dec 1966 

24 Nov 1967 


Commanding Officers 




CDR John D. Yamnicky 


27 Nov 1968 


Date Assumed Command 


CDR Conrad B. Olson 


31 Oct 1969 


LT Benjamin T. Pugh (acting) 
LCDR Jacob W. Onstott 


20 Aug 1945 
10 Sep 1945 




Aircraft Assignment 


LCDR Pierre N. Charbonnet, Jr. 


28 May 1946 


Type of Aircraft 




Date Type First Received 


LCDR V. P. de Poix 


12 Feb 1948 


F6F 




Aug 1945 


LCDR C. A. Blouin 


19 Apr 1950 


F4U 




06 Sep 1945 


LCDR Marvin E. Barnett 


15 Mar 1951 


F8F 




1946 


LCDR James B. Cain 


17 Jun 1952 


FH-1 




Mar 1949 


LT R. P. McCloskey (acting) 


04 Aug 1954 


F2H-1 




May 1949 


CDR Glenn G. Estes, Jr. 


26 Aug 1954 


F2H-2 




21 Jun 1950 


CDR Robert M. McConnell, Jr. 
LCDR F. A. Fox (acting) 
CDR Robert J. Robison 
LCDR H. O. Cutler 
CDR Arthur Barker, Jr. 


31 Oct 1955 
25 Apr 1957 
10 Jun 1957 
25 Jul 1958 
21 Sep 1959 


F2H-4 
F2H-2B 




13 Jan 1956 
Sep 1956 


A4D-1 
A4D-2 

A4D-2N/A-4C* 




16 Dec 1957 
May 1958 
06 Sep 1961 








CDR John D. Kidd 


19 Dec I960 


* The A4D-2N designation was 


changed to A-4C in 1962. 



Major Overseas Deployments 



Date of 


Date of 


Air 




Type of 


Area of 


Departure 


Return 


Wing 


Carrier 


Aircraft 


Operation 


22 Oct 1946 


21 Dec 1946 


CVG-82* 


CV 15 


F4U-4 


Med 


02 Feb 1947 


19 Mar 1947 


CVAG-17 


CV 15 


F4U-4 


EasternLant/Carib 


07 Jun 1948 


06 Aug 1948 


CVG-17 


CVB 43 


F4U-4 


Med/Carib 


04 Jan 1949 


05 Mar 1949 


CVG-17 


CVB 41 


F4U-4 


Med 


09 Sep 1950 


01 Feb 1951 


CVG-17 


CVB 43 


F2H-2 


Med 


21 Jul 1951 


25 Mar 1952 


CVG-5 


CV9t 


F2H-2 


WestPac/Korea 


26 Aug 1952 


19 Dec 1952 


CVG-17 


CVA 42 


F2H-2 


NorLant/Med 


16 Sep 1953 


01 May 1954 


CVG-17 


CVA 18 


F2H-2 


World Cruise 


05 Apr 1955 


29 Sep 1955 


CVG-17 


CVA 43 


F2H-2 


Med 


13 Feb 1959 


01 Sep 1959 


CVG-1 


CVA 42 


A4D-2 


Med 


28 Jan I960 


24 Aug I960 


CVG-1 


CVA 42 


A4D-2 


Med 


15 Feb 1961 


28 Aug 1961 


CVG-1 


CVA 42 


A4D-2 


Med 


19 Nov 1961 


30 Nov 1961 


CVG-1 


CVA 42 


A4D-2N 


Carib 


14 Sep 1962 


22 Apr 1963 


CVG-1 


CVA 42 


A-4C 


Med 


28 Apr 1964 


22 Dec 1964 


CVW-1 


CVA A2\ 


A-4C 


Med 


28 Jun 1965 


17 Dec 1965 


CVW-1 


CVA 42 


A-4C 


Med 


21 Jun 1966 


21 Feb 1967 


CVW-1 


CVA 42 


A-4C 


SoLant/IO/West 












Pac/Vietnam 


24 Aug 1967 


19 May 1968 


CVW-1 


CVA 42 


A-4C 


Med 



244 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



Major Overseas Deployments — Continued 



Date of 
Departure 

07 Jan 1969 
05 Mar 1970 



Date of 
Return 

29 Jul 1969 
17 Dec 1970 



Air 
Wing 

CVW-8 
CVW-8 



Carrier 

CVA 38 
CVS 38 



Type of 
Aircraft 

A-4C 

A-4C 



Area of 
Operation 

Med 

SoLant/IO/West 
Pac/Vietnam 



* CVG-82 was redesignated CVAG-17 during the deployment. 

t The squadron departed NAS San Diego on 16 July 1951 embarked in Antietam (CV 36) and arrived in Hawaii on 20 July. On 21 July it 
embarked in Essex (CV 9) and departed for a combat cruise to Korea on 9 August. 

% In October 1964 Franklin D. Roosevelt (CVA 42) returned to the States for an emergency dry docking to repair a propeller. The squadron was 
based ashore at NAS Cecil Field during that time frame. Following the repair, the carrier and squadron returned to the Mediterranean. 




A squadron F2H-2 Banshee in flight during its combat deployment to Korea aboard Essex (CV 9), 1951. 



Air Wing Assignments 



Air Wing Tail Code 

CVG-82/CVAG-17/ Rf 

CVG-17* 

CVG-5 S 

CVG-17 R 
COMFAIRJACKSONVILLE 

CVG-1/CVW-1§ AB 

CVW-8 AJ 



Assignment Date 

20 Aug 1945 

21 Jul 1951 
25 Mar 1952 
1957+ 
15 Mar 1958 
25 Aug 1968 



* CVG-82 was redesignated CVAG-17 on 15 November 1946. CVAG- 
17 was redesignated CVG-17 on 1 September 1948. 

t The tail code R was assigned to CVAG-17 on 12 December 1946. 

% The squadron was transferred from CVG-17 and operational con- 
trol was assigned to COMFAIRJACKSONVILLE some time in early 
1957. 

§ CVG-1 was redesignated CVW-1 when Carrier Air Groups (CVG) 
were redesignated Carrier Air Wings (CVW) on 20 December 1963. 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS — Volume I 245 



Unit Awards Received 



Unit Awards Received 



Unit Award 

NUC 

KSM 

NEM 

MUC 

RVNGC 

VNSM 



Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 



Unit Award 



Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 



21 Aug 1951 
13 Aug 1951 

20 Nov 1961 
11 Apr 1970 

21 Oct 1966 
30 Jul 1966 

09 Aug 1966 
01 Oct 1966 
19 Oct 1966 



05 Mar 1952 

05 Mar 1952 
29 Nov 1961 

06 Nov 1970 



12 Sep 1966 
03 Oct 1966 
14 Nov 1966 



24 Nov 1966 
20 Jan 1967 
10 Apr 1970 

12 May 1970 
13Jun 1970 
28 Jul 1970 

30 Aug 1970 
20 Oct 1970 



28 Dec 1966 
21 Jan 1967 

02 May 1970 

29 May 1970 
04 Jul 1970 

19 Aug 1970 

30 Sep 1970 
07 Nov 1970 





A flight of squadron A-4C Skyhawks with tail hooks down preparing for a landing on Shangri-la (CVS 38) during her deployment in 1970. 



246 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



VA-174 

Lineage 

Established as Bombing Squadron EIGHTY TWO 
(VB-82) on 1 April 1944. 

Redesignated Attack Squadron SEVENTEEN A (VA- 
17 A) on 15 November 1946. 

Redesignated Attack Squadron ONE HUNDRED 
SEVENTY FOUR (VA-174) on 11 August 1948. 

Disestablished on 25 January 1950. The first 
squadron to be assigned the VA-174 designation. 

Squadron Insignia and Nickname 

The squadron's insig- 
nia was approved by 
CNO on 21 January 
1946. Colors for the 
insignia were: a dark 
blue background with a 
yellow border; the star 
had alternating shades 
of yellow and light mus- 
tard; the goat and bomb 
were shaded light gray 
to dark gray. 

Nickname: Battering 
Rams, 1946-1950. 




The squadron 's battering ram 
insignia. 



Chronology of Significant Events 

15 Dec 1944: The squadron embarked in 
Bennington (CV 20), along with other units of CVG- 
82, and departed for Pearl Harbor, arriving there on 7 
January 1945, following a stop over at NAS San Diego. 

16 Feb 1945: VB-82 participated in the first carrier- 
based air strikes on Tokyo, flying sorties against instal- 
lations at Mitsune and Mikatagahara Airfields on 
Hachijo Jima, Nanpo Shoto. 

20-22 Feb 1945: Squadron aircraft provided air sup- 
port for the landings on Iwo Jima. 

19 Mar 1945: Japanese naval vessels in the Inland 
Sea were attacked by VB-82 aircraft and other aircraft 
assigned to Task Group 58.1. 

7 Apr 1945: Squadron aircraft participated in Task 
Force 58's attacks on the Japanese super battleship 
Yamato and her escorts in the East China Sea. The 



attacks resulted in the sinking of the Yamato, one 
cruiser and four destroyers. 

Mar-May 1945: The squadron participated in prein- 
vasion strikes on Okinawa and provided air support 
during the invasion of the island. 

17 Jun-9 Jul 1945: The squadron was embarked in 
White Plains (CVE 66) for transit back to the States. 



Home Port Assignments 



Location 

NAS Wildwood 
NAAS Oceana 
NAS Norfolk, East Field 
NAS Quonset Point 
NAS Kahului 
NAS Alameda 
NAS Quonset Point 
NAAS Cecil Field 



Assignment Date 

01 Apr 1944* 
15 Jun 1944* 
17 Sep 1944* 
13 Nov 1944* 
08 Jan 1945* 
09 Jul 1945 
01 Feb 1946 
01 Feb 1949 



* Temporary shore assignment while the squadron conducted train- 
ing in preparation for combat deployment. 



Commanding Officers 

Date Assumed Command 

01 Apr 1944 



LCDR Samuel R. Brown, Jr. 
LCDR Hugh Wood, Jr. (acting) 
LCDR Hugh Wood, Jr. 
LT J. A. Derby (acting) 
LT Harry R. McRae, Jr. (acting) 
LCDR Hugh Wood, Jr. 
LCDR Robert E. Farkas 
LCDR William R. Pittman 
LCDR Harold E. Vita 



31 Dec 1944 
11 Jan 1945 
11 Jul 1945 
04 Sep 1945 

13 Oct 1945 
02 Apr 1948 
10 Jun 1949 

14 Dec 1949 



Aircraft Assignment 



Type of Aircraft 



SB2C-1C 

SB2C-3 

SB2C-4E 

SBW-4E 

SB2C-5 

SBW-5 



AM-1 



AD-3 



Date Type First Received 

01 Apr 1944 
22 May 1944 
17 Nov 1944 
Feb 1946 
01 Jul 1946 
Jul 1946 
01 Mar 1948 
Apr 1949 



Date of 
Departure 

29 Jan 1945 
22 Oct 1946 



Date of 
Return 

17 Jun 1945 
21 Dec 1946 



Major Overseas Deployments 



Ail- 
Wing 

CVG-82 
CVG-82* 



Carrier 

CV 20 
CV 15 



Type of 
Aircraft 

SB2C-4E 
SB2C-5 



Area of 
Operation 

Pacific 
Med 



CVG-82 was redesignated CVAG-17 during the deployment. 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS — Volume I 247 



Air Wing Assignments Unit Awards Received 

Air Wing Tail Code Assignment Date 

CVG-82/CVAG-17/ Rf 01 Apr 1944 

CVG-17* 

* CVG-82 was redesignated CVAG-17 on 15 November 1946. CVAG- 
17 was redesignated CVG-17 on 1 September 1948. 

t The tail code R was assigned to CVAG-17 on 12 December 1946. 




A squadron SB2C-4E Helldiver launches from Bennington (CV 20), 1945 (Courtesy Robert Lawson Collection). 



Unit Award Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 

NAVE 01 Jul 1947 30 Jun 1948 
Campaign Medal 

(Asiatic Pacific) 15 Feb 1945 04 Mar 1945 

17 Mar 1945 11 Jun 1945 



248 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



SECOND VA-174 

Lineage 

Established as Bombing Squadron EIGHTY ONE 
(VB-81) on 1 March 1944. 

Redesignated Attack Squadron THIRTEEN A (VA- 
13 A) on 15 November 1946. 

Redesignated Attack Squadron ONE HUNDRED 
THIRTY FOUR (VA-134) on 2 August 1948. 

Redesignated Fighter Squadron ONE HUNDRED 
SEVENTY FOUR (VF-174) on 15 February 1950. 

Redesignated Attack Squadron ONE HUNDRED 
SEVENTY FOUR (VA-174) on 1 July 1966. 

Disestablished on 30 June 1988. The second 
squadron to be assigned the VA-174 designation. 

Squadron Insignia 
and Nickname 

The squadron's 
Walt Disney designed 
insignia was ap- 
proved by CNO on 
23 May 1944. Colors 
for the bat insignia 
were: a lemon yellow 
background; the 
underside of the bat's 
wings were reddish 
brown and the upper 
side orange; the bat's face, neck, feet and lower part of 
the razor were orange; the upper part of the razor was 
light blue with white markings; the bat's eye was 
white, pupil black and horns white outlined in black; 
white machine gun with 
black markings and red 
flame from the gun; 
black bombs with white 
markings and the letter- 
ing "Hell Razors" was 
red. The red color was 
not authorized for use 
during World War II. 
The insignia re-mained 
in use throughout out 
the squadron's numer- 
ous redesignations. 

Nickname: Hell 
Razors, 1944-1988. 




This Walt Disney design was the 
squadron 's first insignia. 




The squadron added the scroll at the 
bottom of the original insignia fol- 
lowing its redesignation to VA-1 74. 



Chronology of Significant Events 

23-31 Aug 1944: The squadron, along with other 
units of CVG-81, embarked in Hancock (CV 19) for 
transportation to Hawaii. 

28 Oct-7 Nov 1944: Embarked in Copahee (CVE 12) 



for transportation to Guam. 

14 Nov 1944: CVG-81 aircraft engaged in their first 
combat sorties, flying missions against Luzon from 
Wasp (CV 18). 

27 Dec 1944: The squadron was detached from 
CVG-81, embarked in Wasp (CV 18), and flew to 
Guam. This was done to accommodate an increase in 
the fighter strength aboard the carrier. 

Mar 1945: VB-81 rejoined CVG-81 aboard Copahee 
for the transit back to the States. 

Aug 1948-Apr 1949: Even though the squadron's 
designation was attack (VA) its mission during this 
period, with the assigned F4U-4 Corsairs, was high 
altitude intercept. 

Oct 1948-Feb 1949: VA-134, assigned to CVG-1, 
embarked in Tarawa (CV 40), was part of an all-fight- 
er aircraft air group deployed on a world cruise. 

Jan 1949: The squadron operated in the Persian Gulf 
while embarked in Tarawa. 

Feb 1955: While deployed aboard Midway (CVA 
43), the squadron supported the evacuation of 
Chinese Nationalist civilians and military personnel 
from the Tachen Islands which were being bombarded 
by the People's Republic of China. 

28 Apr 1958: The squadron's mission was changed 
to the training of pilots and enlisted men for F8U 
Crusader fleet squadrons on the east coast. 

10-17 May 1958: Four squadron Crusaders partici- 
pated in Operation Pipeline, the transAtlantic flight of 
carrier jet aircraft for the resupply of deployed 
squadrons in the Sixth Fleet. 

14 Oct 1966: VA-174 was the first Navy squadron to 
receive the A-7A Corsair II aircraft. 

Jan 1967: VA-86 was the first squadron to undergo 
training with VA-174 in the A-7A. 

9 Dec 1976: Lieutenant Junior Grade Rosemary 
Conatser, while undergoing pilot training with VA-174, 
became the first woman to fly the A-7 Corsair II. 




A squadron SB2C-3 Helldiver coming in for a landing, 1945 
(Courtesy Robert Lawson Collection). 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 249 



Home Port Assignments 



Commanding Officers 



Location 

NAS Wildwood 
NAAF Otis Field 
NAS San Diego 
NAS Puunene 
NAS Guam 
NAS San Diego 
NAS Pasco 
NAS Wildwood 
NAS Quonset Point 
NAS San Diego 
NAS Sand Point 
NAS San Diego 
NAS Jacksonville 
NAS Cecil Field 



Assignment Date 

01 Mar 1944* 
08 May 1944* 
10 Aug 1944* 
01 Sep 1944* 

27 Dec 1944 
31 Mar 1945 
13 May 1945 
05 Aug 1945 
19 Sep 1945 

Jul 1946 

28 Jun 1947 
02 Sep 1947 
11 Apr 1949 

Apr 1954 



CDR Jerry L. Terrell 
CDRJohn S. McCain III 
CDR John F. Calhoun 
CDR John D. Rasmussen 
CDR Robert J. Naughton 
CDR Robert S. Smith 
CAPT D. B. Hunt 
CAPT Robert L. Kiem 
CDR Michael B. Nordeen 
CDR Charles A. Cook 
CDR E. Evan Shipe III 
CDR Dean M. Hendrickson 



Date Assumed Command 

16 May 1975 
01 Jul 1976 
28 Jul 1977 
26 Oct 1978 
17 Jan 1980 
12 Mar 1981 
Jul 1982 
31 Aug 1983 
06 Sep 1984 
06 Sep 1985 
29 Apr 1986 
16 Apr 1987 



* Temporary shore assignment while the squadron conducted train- 
ing in preparation for combat deployment. 



* Commander H. P. Lanham was detached as Commanding Officer 
of VB-81 and assigned as Commanding Officer of VF-81. There is no 
record of who assumed the position as acting commanding officer 
of VB-81 while it was shore based at Guam. 



Commanding Officers 





Date Assumed Command 


LCDR Harvey P. Lannam 


01 Mar 1944 




Feb 1945* 


LT Hugh Burns (acting) 


13 May 


1945 


LT Hugh Burns 


04 Jun 


1945 


L1JG w. D. Page (acting) 


09 Sep 


1945 


LCDR William E. Rouse 


21 Sep 


1945 


LT Loren E. Nelson (acting) 


07 Nov 


1946 


LCDR Gene C. Anderson 


13 Jan 


1947 


LT Martin G. O'Neill (acting) 


06 Jun 


1948 


LCDR S. C. Walls 


06 Jul 


1948 


CDR John C. Kelly 


20 Jun 


1949 


LCDR Ralph E. Elliott, Jr. 


25 May 


1950 


LCDR Paul B. Garrison 


14 Aug 


1951 


LCDR John H. Iarrobino 


20 Jun 


1952 


CDR George H. Suit 


Mar 


1953 


CDR J. C. Schroeder 


Sep 


1955 


LCDR John F. Davis 


Aug 


1957 


CDR W. S. Miller 


09 Jan 


1959 


CDR R. T. Hoppe 


01 Jul 


I960 


CDR Carl C. Dace 


09 Jun 


1961 


CDR Edward Iglesias 


Feb 


1962 


CDR Homer A. Winter 


Jul 


1963 


CDR Wiley A. Scott 


28 Aug 


1964 


CDR G. L. Gray, Jr. 


11 Aug 


1965 


CDR Donald S. Ross 


12 Aug 


1966 


CDR William F. Sallada 


16 Jun 


1967 


CDR Edwin M. Crow 


09 Aug 


1968 


CDR J. E. Russ 


03 Jul 


1969 


CDR Roger C. Bos 


04 Sep 


1970 


CDRJohn J. Lahr 


06 Aug 


1971 


CDR Rolland K. Shea 


07 Jul 


1972 


CDR Michael G. Basford 


01 Jun 


1973 


CDR Donald B. Gilbert 


27 Jun 


1974 




A squadron F4U-4 Corsair launching from the deck, of Tarawa (CV 
40) during her world cruise in 1948-1949. 



Aircraft Assignment 



Type of Aircraft 


Date Type First Received 


SB2C-3 


Mar 1944 


SB2C-1C 


Mar 1944 


SB2C-4E 


May 1945 


SB2C-5 


Dec 1945 


SBW-5 


Jan 1946 


F4U-4 


04 Mar 1948 


F4U-5 


Jun 1950 


F9F-6 


Jan 1953 


FT-3 


Sep 1955 


F9F-8 


Mar 1956 


F8U-1/F-8A* 


30 Oct 1957 


TV-2 


17 Sep 1958 


F9F-8T 


08 Jul 1959 


F8U-1P/RF-8A* 


Oct 1959 


F8U-2/F-8C* 


Oct 1959 


F8U-1E/F-8B* 


Jul 1959 



250 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



Aircraft Assignment 



Type of Aircraft 



F8U-2N/F-8D* 

F8U-2NE/F-8E" 

A-7A 

A-7B 

A-7E 



T-39D 



TA-7C 



Date Type First Received 

Nov I960 
Apr 1962 
14 Oct 1966 
09 Jul 1968 
18 Dec 1969 
1975 
09 Jun 1978 




1 The F8U Crusader designations were changed in 1962 to F-8. 

Major Overseas Deployments 



A flight of squadron F9F-8 Cougars during their deployment aboard 
Bennington (CVA 20) in 1956-1957. 



Date of 


Date of 


Air 




Type of 


Area of 


Departure 


Return 


Wing 


Carrier 


Aircraft 


Operation 


10 Nov 1944 


27 Dec 1944 


CVG-81 


CV 18 


SB2C-3 


Pacific 


03 Jul 1946 


15 Apr 1947 


CVG-81* 


CV 37 


SB2C-5/SBW-5 


WestPac 


01 Oct 1948 


21 Feb 1949 


CVG-1 


CV40 


F4U-4 


World Cruise 


09 Sep 1950 


01 Feb 1951 


CVG-17 


CVB 43 


F4U-5 


Med 


03 Sep 1952 


18 Dec 1952 


CVG-17 


CVA 42 


F4U-4 


NorLant/Med 


27 Dec 1954 


14 Jul 1955 


CVG-1 


CVA 41 


F9F-6 


World Cruise 


15 Oct 1956 


22 May 1957 


ATG-181 


CVA 20 


F9F-8 


WestPac 



During the deployment CVG-81 was redesignated CVAG-13- 



Air Wing Assignments 



Air Wing Tail Code 

CVG-81/CVAG-13/ Pt 

CVG-13* 

CVG-1 T 

CVG-13 P 
COMFAIRJACKSONVILLE 

CVG-17 R 

CVG-1 T 

ATG-181 I 
COMFAIRJACKSONVILLE 

CVG-1 AB 

RCVG-4/RCVW-4§ AD 

COMLATWING-1 AD" 



Assignment Date 

01 Mar 1944 

22 Sep 1948 
25 Feb 1949 
30 Nov 1949 
14 Feb 1950 
Apr 1954 
Oct 1956 
May 
01 Nov 1957 
16 Mar 1958 
01 Jun 1970 



* CVG-81 was redesignated CVAG-13 on 15 November 1946 and 
then redesignated CVG-13 on 1 September 1948. 

t The tail code P was assigned to CVAG-13 on 12 December 1946. 

£ The squadron left ATG-181 upon its return from the WestPac 
deployment in May 1957. VF-174 probably remained under 
Commander Fleet Air Jacksonville until its assignment to CVG-1. 
However, no records are available to confirm this supposition. 

§ RCVG-4 was redesignated RCVW-4 when Carrier Air Groups 
(CVG/RCVG) were redesignated Carrier Air Wings (CVW/RCVW) on 
20 Degmber 1963. 

" RCVW-4 was disestablished on 1 June 1970. However, the 
squadrons that had been assigned to RCVW-4, such as VA-174, con- 
tinued to use RCVW-4's AD tail code. 



A squadron F-8E 
Crusader at MCAAS 
Yuma, 1963 
(Courtesy William 
Swisher Collection). 




DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 251 



Unit Awards Received 



Unit Awards Received — Continued 



Unit Award Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 

Campaign Medal 

(Asiatic Pacific) 12 Dec 1944 27 Dec 1944 

NUC 14 Nov 1944 19 Nov 1944 

14 Dec 1944 16 Dec 1944 

01 Jul 1950 30 Jun 1951 



Unit Award 



MUC 



Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 
01 Jul 1953 30 Jun 1954 

10 Jun 1976 26 Apr 1977 

05 Feb 1979 03 Sep 1980 

01 Jan 1984 01 Apr 1985 

01 Apr 1985 31 Dec 1986 




A squadron A-7 Corsair II loaded with weapons. 



252 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



VA-175 

Lineage 

Established as Torpedo Squadron EIGHTY TWO 
(VT-82) on 1 April 1944. 

Redesignated Attack Squadron EIGHTEEN A (VA-18A) 
on 15 November 1946. 

Redesignated Attack Squadron ONE HUNDRED 
SEVENTY FIVE (VA-175) on 11 August 1948. 

Disestablished on 15 March 1958. The first squadron 
to be assigned the VA-175 designation. 

Squadron Insignia and Nickname 

The squadron's first 
insignia was approved 
by CNO on 4 December 
1945. Colors for the 
devil insignia were: a 
hyacinth blue back- 
ground; a white hypo- 
dermic needle with a 
black tip; the devil was 
red with yellow eyes 
and black pupils; yel- 
low horns and teeth; 
and black wings with 
white ribs. 

A new insignia was approved by CNO on 18 
October 1951. Colors for the winged figure were: a 
black background with a yellow border; red winged 
figure with black mark- 
ings, white skull with 
black markings and the 
wings were black with 
red markings; white 
cloud with black mark- 
ings; yellow bomb with 
black markings and a 
green nose; green rock- 
et with black markings, 
a red nose and yellow 
and red flames coming 
from the tail. 

Nickname: Devil's 
Diplomats, time frame 
unknown. 




The first squadron insignia was 
the devil design. 




During Korea the winged skull 
man was approved for used by the 
squadron. 



Chronology of Significant Events 

15 Dec 1944-7 Jan 1945: The squadron, embarked 
in Bennington (CV 20), was in transit from Norfolk to 
Hawaii, with a two day stop over at San Diego. 

7 Jan 1945: The squadron's commanding officer, 
Lieutenant Commander W. F. Eadie, was killed in an 
automobile accident. 



16 Feb 1945: The squadron participated in its first 
combat operations, flying sorties against the air strip at 
Hachijo Jima and against airfields in the Tokyo area. 
The squadron's commanding officer, Lieutenant 
Commander E. D. DeGarmo, was awarded the Silver 
Star for his actions during the missions against the 
Japanese airfields. 

20-22 Feb 1945: The squadron provided close air 
support for operations on Iwo Jima. 

19 Mar 1945: Squadron aircraft participated in 
strikes against the Japanese Fleet, which included the 
battleship Yamato, located near Kure and Hiroshima 
in the Inland Sea. 

7 Apr 1945: Squadron aircraft were the first to attack 
a powerful Japanese Task Force that had sortied from 
the Inland Sea and were operating west of Kyushu. 
This force included the battleship Yamato and her 
escorts. The squadron achieved hits on two destroyers 
and one light cruiser, sinking one of the destroyers. 
Attacks from other task force aircraft resulted in the 
sinking of the Yamato, a cruiser and three other 
destroyers. Seven squadron pilots were awarded the 
Navy Cross for their actions during this engagement. 
They were: Lieutenant Commander Edward E. 
DeGarmo; Lieutenants Jesse W. Naul, Jr. and Norman 
A. Wiese; and Lieutenant (jg)s John F. Gilbreath, Jr., 
Wilfred O. McDowell, Donald B. Barber and Charles 
R. Walton. 

Mar-May 1945: The squadron was involved in 
preinvasion strikes on Okinawa and provided support 
following the invasion of the island. 

17 Jun 1945: VT-82 completed its tour of combat 
duty and embarked in White Plains (CVE 66) for its 
transit back to the States, arriving at NAS Alameda on 
9 July. 

Nov-Dec 1956: Franklin D. Roosevelt (CVA 42), with 
VA-175 embarked, was ordered to deploy and operate 
off the coast of Spain as a result of the Suez Canal crisis. 




A squadron flak-damaged TBM-3 Avenger returning from a combat 
mission in February 1945. 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 253 



Home Port Assignments Commanding Officers 



Location 


Assignment Date 




Date Assumed Command 


NAS Quonset Point 


01 Apr 1944 


LCDR Malcolm E. Wolfe 19 Mar 1951 


NAAF New Bedford 


13 Apr 1944* 


LCDR Ross A. Knight 29 May 1952 




-if. T,, n 1 QAA* 


LCDR P. P. Hambsch (acting) 01 Aug 1953 


NAS Quonset Point 


13 Nov 1944* 


CDR M. J. Hanley Aug 1953 


NAS Kahului 


08 Jan 1945* 


LCDR J. M. Nifong 10 Oct 1953 


NAS Alameda 


Jul 1945 


CDR W. L. Nyburg Oct 1954 


NAF Newport 


Mar 1946 


CDR E. F. Gallagher 28 Oct 1955 


NAS Quonset Point 


Apr 1946 


CDR E. H. Potter, Jr. Dec 1955 


NAAS Cecil Field 


11 Jan 1949 






NAS Jacksonville 


09 Jan 1950 




Aircraft Assignment 


* Temporary shore assignment while the squadron 


conducted train- 


Type of Aircraft 


Date Type First Received 


ing in preparation for combat deployment. 




TMF-l/TBM-1 


Apr 1944 








TBM-1C 


Apr 1944 


Commanding Officers 




TBM-3 


06 Aug 1944 






TBM-3E 


Sep 1945 


Date Assumed Command 


TBM-3Q 


May 1946 


LCDR William F. Eadie 


01 Apr 1944 


TBM-3J 


Mar 1947 


LCDR Edward E. DeGarmo 


09 Jan 1945 


AD-3 


16 Feb 1949 


LT Norman A. Wiese (acting) 


03 Jim 1945 


AD-4 


04 Apr 1950 


LCDR William I. McGowan 


Aug 1945 


AD-4L 


Feb 1951 


LCDR Guiseppi Macri 


11 Feb 1948 


AD-4B 


Feb 1953 


LCDR John E. Kennedy 


15 Jul 1949 


AD-6 


Aug 1954 



Major Overseas Deployments 



Date of 


Date of 


Air 




Type of 


Area of 


Departure 


Return 


Wing 


Carrier 


Aircraft 


Operation 


29 Jan 1945 


17 Jun 1945 


CVG-82 


CV 20 


TBM-3 


Pacific 


22 Oct 1946 


21 Dec 1946 


CVAG-17 


CV 15 


TBM-3E/Q 


Med 


20 May 1947 


11 Aug 1947 


CVAG-17 


CV 15 


TBM-3E/Q/J 


NorLant/ Carib 


07 Jun 1948 


06 Aug 1948 


CVG-17 


CVB 43 


TBM-3E/Q/J 


Med/Carib 


09 Sep 1950 


01 Feb 1951 


CVG-17 


CVB 43 


AD-4 


Med 


03 Sep 1951 


04 Feb 1952 


CVG-17 


CVB 42 


AD-4/4L 


Med 


26 Aug 1952 


19 Dec 1952 


CVG-17 


CVB 42 


AD-4/4L 


NorLant/Med 


16 Sep 1953 


01 May 1954 


CVG-17 


CVA 18 


AD-4/B/L 


World Cruise 


05 Apr 1955 


29 Sep 1955 


CVG-17 


CVA 43 


AD-6 


Med 


12 Jul 1957 


05 Mar 1958 


CVG-17 


CVA 42 


AD-6 


Med 




A flight of squadron TBM-3E Avengers in fuly 
1948 (Courtesy Duane Kasulka Collection). 



254 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



Air Wing Assignments 

Air Wing Tail Code Assignment Date 

CVG-82/CVAG-17/ Rf/AI4 01 Apr 1944 

CVG-17* 



* CVG-82 was redesignated CVAG-17 on 15 November 1946 and 
then redesignated CVG-17 on 1 September 1948. 

t The tail code R was assigned to CVAG-17 on 12 December 1946. 



% The tail code was changed from R to AL in 1957. The effective date 
for this change was most likely the beginning of FY 58 (1 July 1957). 

Unit Awards Received 

Unit Award Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 

NAVE 01 Jul 1948 30 Jun 1949 

Campaign Medal 

(Asiatic Pacific) 15 Feb 1945 04 Mar 1945 

17 Mar 1945 11 Jun 1945 




A squadron AD-3 or 4 Skyraider, circa 1948 or 1949- Notice the Battle E on the fuselage (Courtesy Duane Kasulka Collection). 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 255 




VA-176 

Lineage 

Established as Attack Squadron ONE HUNDRED 
SEVENTY SIX (VA-176) on 1 June 1955. 

Disestablished 30 October 1992. The first squadron 
to be assigned the VA-176 designation. 

Squadron Insignia and 
Nickname 

The squadron's first 
insignia was approved 
by CNO on 16 July 
1956. Colors for torch 
insignia were: a light 
blue background out- 
lined in dark blue; the 
shield was outlined in 
white with white stars 
on a dark blue field; the 
outer thunderbolt was 
international orange and 
the inner one was light blue; white mailed fist with 
black markings; yellow torch with black markings and 
a bright red flame; white atomic clouds with blue bor- 
ders and markings. The scroll had a white background 
outlined in dark blue with dark blue lettering. 

The squadron's sec- 
ond insignia was 
approved by CNO on 3 
January 1974. Colors for 
this insignia were: a 
dark blue background 
and scroll outlined in 
black and white; white 
stars and lettering; blue 
mailed fist is outlined in 
white; and an orange 
lightning bolt. 

Nickname: Thunder- 
bolts, 1955-1992. 



The torch design was the squad- 
ron 's first insignia. 




The squadron 's second insignia 
adopted the mailed fist. 



Chronology of Significant Events 

Oct-Dec 1956: Randolph (CVA 15), with VA-176 
embarked, was ordered to operate off the coast of 
Egypt in response to the Suez War. 

14 Nov-8 Dec I960: Following a request from 
Guatemala and Nicaragua, a Navy patrol was estab- 
lished off the coast of these Central American coun- 
tries to prevent infiltration by communists from Cuba. 
The squadron operated from Shangri-La (CVA 38) 
until 25 November when it conducted a complete 
transfer of aircraft and personnel from Shangri-La to 
Wasp (CVA 18) while underway. It remained on station 
aboard Wasp until 8 December. 



2-19 Jun 1961: Following the assassination of the 
Dominican Republic's dictator, General Rafael Trujillo, 
the squadron operated from Shangri-La off the coast 
of that country until the domestic situation began to 
stabilize. 

May 1963: The squadron operated from Shangri-La 
in the Caribbean during the period of unrest in Haiti 
and the civil strife with the Dominican Republic. 

Aug 1965: Squadron aircraft were used in Operation 
Pinwheel on several occasions while Shangri-La was 
moored at Naples, Italy. The aircraft were secured to 
the deck of the carrier and the thrust from their pro- 
pellers were used to help prevent the ship, which was 
undergoing repairs, from breaking out of her mooring 
during bad weather and high winds. 

4 Apr 1966: VA-176 deployed to Vietnam as a com- 
ponent of CVW-10 embarked in Intrepid (CVS 11). 
This was the first all attack air wing formed and the 
first to deploy. Two squadron were flying the A-l 
Skyraider and two the A-4 Skyhawk. 

15 May 1966: Flying from Dixie Station, the 
squadron conducted its first combat sorties, flying 
strikes against insurgent forces in the Republic of 
Vietnam. 

9 Oct 1966: While flying a rescue combat air patrol 
mission, four squadron aircraft engaged four North 
Vietnamese MiGs. Lieutenant (jg) William T. Patton 
shot down one of the MiG-17s during the engagement. 
This was the first and only shoot down of an enemy 
jet aircraft by a propeller driven plane during the 
Vietnam Conflict. For this action, Lieutenant (jg) Patton 
was awarded the Silver Star. 

8 Jun 1967: "When Israeli forces attacked Liberty 
(AGTR 5), four squadron aircraft were launched from 
Saratoga (CVA 60) and ordered to proceed to the ship 
and defend it. Shortly after their launch the aircraft 
were recalled when Israel apologized for the attack. 

Aug 1969: Squadron A-6A Intruders were used in 
operation Storm Fury 1969- The aircraft were used to 
seed Hurrican Debbie by flying sorties that penetrated 
the wall of the hurricane, flew through the eye and 
exited the wall again, at which time seeding chemicals 
were dispensed. 

25 Sep 1970: VA-176 became the first fleet squadron 
to operate the KA-6D tanker aircraft. 

Oct-Nov 1973: The squadron, embarked in Franklin 
D. Roosevelt (CVA 42), operated in the vicinity of Crete 
in response to the Arab-Israeli war. 

Jun 1976: The American Ambassador to Lebanon was 
assassinated on 13 June and America (CV 66), with VA- 
176 embarked, operated in the vicinity of Lebanon. 
Squadron aircraft flew support missions during the 
evacuation of noncombatants from that country. 

May 1981: Independence (CV 62), with VA-176 
embarked, following its transit of the Suez Canal, 
remained on station in the eastern Mediterranean due 
to the crisis between Israel and Syria following Israeli 



256 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



raids against Syrian surface-to-air missile sites in 
Lebanon. 

25 Oct-1 Nov 1983: In response to continued politi- 
cal strife and the need to protect and evacuate 
Americans from the island country of Granada, VA-176 
aircraft flew combat close air support and reconnais- 
sance sorties in support of operation Urgent Fury, the 
landing of U.S. Marines and Army rangers on the 
island. 

4 Dec 1983: In response to hostile fire against U.S. 
reconnaissance aircraft from Syrian positions in 
Lebanon, VA-176 aircraft participated in a coordinated 



strike against Syrian radar, communications and artillery 
positions overlooking the Multi-National Peacekeeping 
Forces. All five of the squadron aircraft completed their 
mission and returned safely to the carrier. 

Jun-Jul 1988: The squadron flew support for Earnest 
Will Missions, escort operations for reflagged Kuwaiti 
oil tankers during the Iraq-Iranian War in the Persian 
Gulf. 

Jun-Sep 1991: The squadron flew missions in sup- 
port of Operation Provide Comfort, supporting the 
24th Marine Expeditionary Unit's mission to aid the 
Kurdish refugees in Iraq following the Gulf War. 




A squadron A-1H Skyraider launching from the deck of Intrepid (CVS 11) during their combat deployment to Vietnam in 1966. Note the sortie 
mission marks and the aircraft symbol for a MiG shoot down on the fuselage just below the canopy. 



Home Port Assignments 



Commanding Officers 



Location 

NAS Cecil Field 
NAS Jacksonville 
NAS Oceana 



Assignment Date 

01 Jun 1955 
Feb 1955 
May 1968 



Commanding Officers 



CDR James M. O'Brien 
CDR L. W. S. Cummins 
CDR D. C. Standley 
CDR U. W. Patrick 
CDR Robert J. Stegg 



Date Assumed Command 

01 Jun 1955 
10 Apr 1957 
17 Mar 1958 
27 Feb 1959 
30 Mar I960 



CDR B. B. Forbes, Jr. 

CDR H. P. Maulden 

CDR R. Brooke 

CDR George D. Edwards, Jr. 

CDR Robert J. Martin 

CDR A. R. Ashworth 

CDR J. T. French 

CDR Charles L. Cook 

CDR John B. Davis 

CDR Howard W. Alexander 

CDR Samson Mikitarian 

CDR Richard M. Dunleavy 



Date Assumed Command 

11 Sep 1961 
1962 
27 Sep 1963 
09 Oct 1964 
08 Oct 1965 
27 Sep 1966 
01 Aug 1967 
25 Apr 1968 
30 Aug 1969 
11 Aug 1970 
24 Aug 1971 
31 Jul 1972 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 257 



Commanding Officers 





Date Assumed Command 


CDR John H. McKenzie 


18Jun 


1973 


CDR Raymond P. Ilg 


27 Jun 


1974 


CDR Robert H. Ferguson 


10 Oct 


1975 


CDR Marshall A. Howard 


06 Feb 


1977 


CDR Manuel Oretega 


23 Mar 


1978 


CDR Frank L. Stauts 


15 Jun 


1979 


CDR Douglas K. Griffith 


02 Sep 


1980 


CDR Timothy R. Beard 


19 Nov 


1981 


CDR Michael P. Currie 


11 Feb 


1983 


CDR James E. Hurston 


26 Jul 


1984 


CDR Gary W. Stubbs 


23 Jan 


1986 


CDR Ross A. Word 


04 Jun 


1987 


CDR Frank W. Montesano 


08 Dec 


1988 


CDR William G. Ballard 


01 Jun 


1990 


CDR Lee A. Hawks 


31 Jul 


1991 



Aircraft Assignment 



Type of Aircraft 




Date Type First Received 

Jun 1955 
05 Feb 1969 
25 Sep 1970 
1971 
Jul 1975 




: The AD-6 designation was changed to A-1H in 1962. 



Lieutenant (jg) William T. Patton standing alongside the A-1H 
Skyraider that he was flying when he shot down a North Vietnamese 
MiG-1 7 on 9 October 1966. 



Major Overseas Deployments 



Date of 


Date of 


Air 




Type of 


Area of 


Departure 


Return 


Wing 


Carrier 


Aircraft 


Operation 


14 Jul 1956 


19 Feb 1957 


ATG-202 


CVA 15 


AD-6 


Med 


07 Aug 1959 


26 Feb I960 


CVG-10 


CVA 9 


AD-6 


Med 


06 Sep I960 


20 Oct I960 


CVG-10 


CVA 38 


AD-6 


NorLant 


02 Feb 1961 


15 May 1961 


CVG-10 


CVA 38 


AD-6 


Med 


07 Feb 1962 


28 Aug 1962 


CVG-10 


CVA 38 


AD-6 


Med 


01 Oct 1963 


23 May 1964 


CVW-10 


CVA 38 


A-1H 


Med 


15 Feb 1965 


20 Sep 1965 


CVW-10 


CVA 38 


A-1H 


Med 


04 Apr 1966 


21 Nov 1966 


CVW-10 


CVS 11 


A-1H 


Med/IO/West 
Pac/Vietnam 


02 May 1967 


06 Dec 1967 


CVW-3 


CVA 60 


A-1H 


Med 


02 Jan 1970 


27 Jul 1970 


CVW-6 


CVA 42 


A-6A 


Med 


29 Jan 1971 


23 Jul 1971 


CVW-6 


CVA 42 


A-6A & KA-6D 


Med 


15 Feb 1972 


08 Dec 1972 


CVW-6 


CVA 42 


A-6A/C & KA-6D 


Med 


14 Sep 1973 


17 Mar 1974 


CVW-6 


CVA 42 


A-6A/C & KA-6D 


Med 


03 Jan 1975 


16 Jul 1975 


CVW-6 


CV 42 


A-6A/C & KA-6D 


Med 


15 Apr 1976 


25 Oct 1976 


CVW-6 


CV66 


A-6E & KA-6D 


Med 


10 Jun 1977 


19 Jul 1977 


CVW-6 


CV66 


A-6E & KA-6D 


SoLant 


29 Sep 1977 


25 Apr 1978 


CVW-6 


CV66 


A-6E & KA-6D 


Med 


28 Jun 1979 


14 Dec 1979 


CVW-6 


CV62 


A-6E & KA-6D 


Med 


19 Nov 1980 


10 Jun 1981 


CVW-6 


CV62 


A-6E & KA-6D 


SoLant/IO/Med 


07 Jun 1982 


22 Dec 1982 


CVW-6 


CV62 


A-6E & KA-6D 


Med 


18 Oct 1983 


11 Apr 1984 


CVW-6 


CV62 


A-6E & KA-6D 


Carib/Med/ 
NorLant 



258 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



Major Overseas Deployments — Continued 



Date of 


Date of 


Air 




Type of 


Area of 


Departure 


Return 


Wing 


Carrier 


Aircraft 


Operation 


16 Oct 1984 


19 Feb 1985 


CVW-6 


CV 62 


A-6E & KA-6D 


Med/IO 


02 Jun 1986 


10 Nov 1986 


CVW-6 


CV 59 


A-6E & KA-6D 


Med 


28 Aug 1987 


08 Oct 1987 


CVW-6 


CV59 


A-6E & KA-6D 


NorLant 


25 Apr 1988 


07 Oct 1988 


CVW-6 


CV59 


A-6E & KA-6D 


Med/IO/NorLant 


03 Nov 1989 


12 Apr 1990 


CVW-6 


CV 59 


A-6E & KA-6D 


Med 


30 May 1991 


21 Dec 1991 


CVW-6 


CV59 


A-6E & KA-6D 


Med 



Air Wing Assignments 



Unit Awards Received 



Air Wing 

ATG-202 
CVG-17 

COMFAIRJACKSON- 

VILLE 
CVG-lO/CVW-10^ 
CVW-3 

COMFAIRJACKSON- 

VILLE 
COMFAIRNORFOLK 
CVW-6 



Tail Code 

XVAQf 
AL 



AK 
AC 



AE 



Assignment Date 

01 Jun 1955 

15 Mar 1958 

13 Sep 1958 

16 Apr 1959 
01 Mar 1967 

06 Dec 1967§ 
May 1968 
01 Apr 1969 



Unit Award 
NAVE 



* The tail code X was not assigned to ATG-202 until 1956. 

t The tail code was changed from X to AQ in 1957. The effective date 
for this change was most likely the beginning of FY 58 (1 July 1957). 

% CVG-10 was redesignated CVW-10 when Carrier Air Groups (CVG) 
were redesignated Carrier Air Wings (CVW) on 20 December 1963. 

§ VA-176 was tansferred from CVW-3 when it returned from its Med 
deployment on 6 December 1967. It is believed the squadron came 
under the control of Commander Fleet Air Jacksonville until its 
transfer to Commander Fleet Air Norfolk, when it began transition 
training for the A-6 Intruder. 



NEM 



AFEM 



HSM 
MUC 

NUC 

JMUA 

VNSM 



RVNGC 



01 Jul 
01 Jul 
01 Jul 

01 Jan 

01 Jan 

01 Jan 
07 Dec 
20 Aug 
01 Oct 
16 Nov 

24 Oct 
16 Nov 
28 Dec 

15 Jan 
09 Feb 

20 Jun 
09 Mar 
01 May 

20 Oct 
Jun 
05 May 
14 May 

08 Jul 

01 Sep 

02 Oct 
01 May 



Inclusive Dates 
1962 

1964 
1974 
1988 
1989 
1990 
1980 
1982 
1982 
1983 
1983 
1983 
1983 
1984 
1984 
1976 
1972 
1987 
1983 
1991 
1966 
1966 
1966 
1966 
1966 
1966 




Covering Unit Award 
30 Jun 1963 
30 Jun 1965 

30 Jun 1975 

31 Dec 1988 
31 Dec 1989 
31 Dec 1990 
11 May 1981 

05 Sep 1982 

06 Dec 1982 
30 Nov 1983 

02 Nov 1983 

22 Dec 1983 
03 Jan 1984 

03 Feb 1984 

02 Mar 1984 
27 Jul 1976 

01 Dec 1972 
08 Oct 1988 

03 Mar 1984 
Sep 1991 

06 May 1966 

17 Jun 1966 
10 Aug 1966 

23 Sep 1966 

18 Oct 1966 
01 Oct 1966 




A squadron A-6E Intruder in 
if, 1976. 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 259 



VA-185 

Lineage 

Established as Attack Squadron ONE HUNDRED 
EIGHTY FIVE (VA-185) on 1 December 1986 

Disestablished on 30 August 1991. The first 
squadron to be assigned the VA-185 designation. 

Squadron Insignia and Nickname 

The squadron's insignia was approved by CNO on 8 
September 1986. Colors for the hawk insignia were: a 

black background; a 
blue sea and white sky 
with black markings; 
white hawk with black 
markings, red eyes and 
claws; gold star; blue 
upper scroll outlined in 
black with gold letter- 
ing; gold lower scroll 
outlined in black with 
blue lettering. 

Nickname: Night- 
hawks, 1986-1991. 




The squadron !s Nighthawks 
insignia. 



Chronology of Significant Events 

Sep 1987: The squadron was forward deployed to 
NAS Atsugi, Japan, and assigned to Midway (CV 41), 
home ported at Naval Station Yokosuka, Japan. 

Nov 1987-Jan 1988: The squadron flew support for 
Earnest Will Missions, escort operations for reflagged 
Kuwaiti oil tankers during the Iraq-Iranian War in the 
Persian Gulf. 

Sep 1988: VA-185, embarked in Midway, operated in 
the Sea of Japan during the summer Olympics being 
held in Seoul, Korea, to demonstrate U.S. support for a 
peaceful Olympics. 



Dec 1989: Midway, with VA-185 embarked, main- 
tained station off the coast of Philippines during an 
attempted coup in that country. 

Nov 1990-Jan 1991: The squadron flew missions in 
support of Operation Desert Shield, the build-up of 
American and Allied forces to counter a threatened 
invasion of Saudi Arabia by Iraq and were part of an 
economic blockade of Iraq to force its withdrawal 
from Kuwait. 

Jan-Feb 1991: The squadron participated in 
Operation Desert Storm. VA-185 led the first air strikes 
from naval elements operating in the Persian Gulf. 
During the Gulf War, squadron aircraft struck Iraqi 
naval targets and bases, airfields and bridges, and pro- 
vided close air support for Allied ground forces. The 
squadron flew a total of 457 combat missions, com- 
prising 940 combat flight hours and delivered 720,000 
pounds of ordnance on enemy targets. 

6 Aug 1991: The squadron held a disestablishment 
ceremony at NAF Atsugi, Japan. It was officially dises- 
tablished on 30 August 1991. 



Home Port Assignments 



Location 

NAS Whidbey Island 
NAF Atsugi, Japan* 



Assignment Date 

01 Dec 1986 
13 Sep 1987 



VA-185 was forward deployed and based aboard Midway (CV 41). 



Commanding Officers 



CDR William J. Magnan 
CDR Michael J. McCamish 
CDR Bernard M. Satterwhite, Jr. 



Date Assumed Command 

01 Dec 1986 
18 Nov 1988 
01 Jun 1990 



Aircraft Assignment 



Type of Aircraft 



A-6E 
KA-6D 



Date Type First Received 

18 Feb 1987 

19 Sep 1987 



Major Overseas Deployments 



Date of 


Date of 


Air 




Type of 


Area of 


Departure 


Return 


Wing 


Carrier 


Aircraft 


Operation 


15 Oct 1987 


12 Apr 1988 


CVW-5 


CV 41 


A-6E & KA-6D 


WestPac/IO 


18 Oct 1988 


09 Nov 1988 


CVW-5 


CV 41 


A-6E & KA-6D 


WestPac 


21 Jan 1989 


24 Feb 1989 


CVW-5 


CV 41 


A-6E & KA-6D 


WestPac 


27 Feb 1989 


09 Apr 1989 


CVW-5 


CV 41 


A-6E & KA-6D 


WestPac 


31 May 1989 


25 Jul 1989 


CVW-5 


CV 41 


A-6E & KA-6D 


WestPac 


15 Aug 1989 


11 Dec 1989 


CVW-5 


CV 41 


A-6E & KA-6D 


WestPac/IO 


25 Jan 1990 


06 Apr 1990 


CVW-5 


CV 41 


A-6E & KA-6D 


WestPac 


02 Oct 1990 


17 Apr 1991 


CVW-5 


CV 41 


A-6E & KA-6D 


WestPac/IO/ 



Persian Gulf 



Note: Deployments will cover only those operations which take the carrier outside the home waters of Japan. It does not include squadron 
shore-based operations in Korea or the Philippines. 



260 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



Air Wing Assignments 



Air Wing 


Tail Code 


Assignment Date 


COMMATVAQ- 






WINGPAC 




01 Dec 1986 


CVW-5 


NF 


13 Sep 1987 




Unit Awards Received 




Unit Award 


Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 


MUC 


01 Dec 1986 


15 Oct 1987 




15 Oct 1989 


29 Oct 1989 


KLM 


17 Jan 1991 


28 Feb 1991 


SASM 


02 Nov 1990 


14 Mar 1991 


NAVE 


01 Jan 1989 


31 Dec 1989 




01 Jan 1990 


31 Dec 1990 


NUC 


17 Jan 1991 


07 Feb 1991 




A flight of squadron A-6E Intruders, July 1987 (Courtesy Robert Lawson). 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 261 



The squadron's first insig. 



VA-194 

Lineage 

Established as Bombing Squadron NINETEEN (VB- 
19) on 15 August 1943. 

Redesignated Attack Squadron NINETEEN A (VA- 
19 A) on 15 November 1946. 

Redesignated Attack Squadron ONE HUNDRED 
NINTY FOUR (VA-194) on 24 August 1948. 

Disestablished on 1 December 1949- The first 
squadron to be assigned the VA-194 designation. 

Squadron Insignia and Nickname 

nia was approved by CNO 
on 26 May 1944. Colors 
for the winged lion ram- 
pant and bomb were: 
yellow shield outlined 
in black; black bomb; 
and a green winged lion 
rampant with black 
markings on the wings 
and a red eye and 
tongue. 

A new insignia was 
approved by CNO on 9 
July 1945. Colors for this 
insignia were: a medium 
blue background; a yel- 
low flying bomb with 




The rampant winged lion was the 
squadron 's first insignia. 

black markings, its wings 
were chartreuse with a 
white star on a circular 
blue background; yellow 
rockets and chartreuse 
machine guns with black 
markings; white bulldogs 
with orange collars; the 
bulldog in front had a 
black face with yellow 
eyes, black pupils, and an 
orange snout, tongue and 
lips and white teeth. 

A new squadron 
insignia was approved by 




The dogs riding a winged bomb 
was the second insignia used by 
the squadron. 



This insignia was tentatively 
approved for the squadron. 
However, the squadron was dis- 
established three months after- 
wards and it most likely was not 
implemented for use by the 
squadron. 



CNO on 11 March 1948 pending the removal of the 
squadron designation. Colors for the winged lightning 
bolt were: a blue background with a white inner bor- 
der ringed by a yellow rope; maroon lightning bolt; 
and the wings were yellow with black markings. 
Nickname: unknown. 

Chronology of Significant Events 

18-21 Jul 1944: The squadron's first combat sorties 
involved preinvasion strikes on Guam. It also provided 
support for the initial landings on the island. 

Jul-Oct 1944: Squadron aircraft flew sorties against 
targets on Palau, Bonin Islands, the Philippines, 
including Mindanao and Luzon, Okinawa, Formosa 
and the Pescadores. 

24 Oct 1944: Squadron aircraft participated in several 
major engagements during the Battle for Leyte Gulf. VB- 
19 aircraft flew search missions from north of Lingayen 
Gulf to the northern tip of Mindoro to locate the 
Japanese Task Force. It struck the Japanese Central 
Force in the Sibuyan Sea, which included the super bat- 
tleship Musashi. However, only limited damage was 
caused by the squadron's attack since its aircraft were 
armed only with general purpose bombs instead of 
armor piercing bombs. For his actions during this 
engagement Lieutenant Leonard R. Swanson was award- 
ed the Navy Cross and Lieutenant (jg)s Stuart E. Crapser 
and Herbert N. Walters were awarded Silver Stars. 

24 Oct 1944: The squadron's commanding officer, 
Commander R. S. McGowan, failed to return from a 
combat mission and was declared missing in action. 

25 Oct 1944: The squadron participated in coordi- 
nated attacks against the Japanese Carrier Task Force 
in the Battle Off Cape Engano. VB-19 aircraft claimed 
they either sunk or assisted in the sinking of three 
Japanese carriers. Four Japanese carriers were sunk 
during the battle. Thirty-two squadron pilots were 
awarded the Navy Cross for their actions in this battle. 
They were: Lieutenants Price R. Stradley, Robert D. 
Niemeyer, John B. Gunter, William E. McBride, Emil B. 
Stella, Jack Meeker, John L. Butts, Jr., Donald F. Helm, 
Norman E. Thurmon, Donald F. Banker, Robert B. 
Parker, Joe W. Williams, Jr., William A. Wright and 
Raymond G. Wicklander; Lieutenant (jg)s George H. 
Bowen, Melvin L. Chapman, Robert E. Lee Duncan, Jr., 
Donald D. Engen, Arnost Jancar, Jerry B. Wilton, 
Webster P. Wodell, Daniel Sadler, Jr., Louis A. 
Heilmann, George W. Peck, Jack Scott, Stuart E. 
Crapser, John H. Crocker, William T. Good and Robert 
G. Smith; and Ensigns Leon F. Kinard, Robert W. 
Doyle and William H. Wagner, Jr. Two squadron per- 
sonnel were awarded the Silver Star for their actions; 
they were: Lieutenants Donald F. Banker and Leonard 
R. Swanson. 

5-6 Nov 1944: The squadron's final sorties involved 
attacks on Manila Bay and the successfull sinking of a 




262 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



Japanese Heavy Cruiser on 5 November. For their 
actions in the sinking of the cruiser, Lieutenants 
Donald F. Banker and Price R. Stradley were awarded 
Gold Stars in lieu of their second Navy Cross. 

26 Nov- 14 Dec 1944: The squadron and air group 
were relieved by CVG-20 and were enroute from 
Ulithi Atoll, via Hawaii, to the States. 



Commanding Officers 



Home Port Assignments 



Location 

NAAS Los Alamitos 
NAS Kahului 
NAS Alameda 
NAAS Santa Rosa 
NAS Kahului 
NAS Barbers Point 
NAB Marpi Pt. and 

NAB Kobler, Saipan 
NAS Alameda 



Assignment Date 

15 Aug 1943 
29 Feb 1944* 

20 Jan 1945* 
06 Feb 1945* 

09 Aug 1945 

04 Nov 1945 

01 Apr 1946f 
19 Aug 1946 



* Temporary shore assignment while the squadron conducted train- 
ing in preparation for combat deployment. 

t Temporary shore assignment while the squadron was deployed to 
WestPac. 



LCDR Richard S. McGowan 
LT Donald F. Banker (acting) 
LT Price R. Stradley (acting) 
LT Robert D. Niemeyer 
LCDR William H. Craven, Jr. 
LCDR M. D. Norton, Jr. 
LCDR W. Denton, Jr. 
CDR Edwin J. Kroeger 



Date Assumed Command 

15 Aug 1943 
24 Oct 1944 

05 Nov 1944 
20 Jan 1945 
Aug 1945 
06 Jun 1947 
13 Sep 1947 

24 Aug 1948 



Aircraft Assignment 



Type of Aircraft Date Type First Received 


SBD-5 


Sep 1943 


SB2C-1 


01 Apr 1944 


SB2C-1C 


May 1944 


SB2C-3 


Jun 1944 


SB2C-4 


Feb 1945 


SB2C-4E 


Feb 1945 


SB2C-5 


Aug 1945 


AD-1 


06 Dec 1946 


AD-2 


Sep 1948 


AD-3 


10 Jan 1949 




A squadron SB2C-5 Helldiver in flight, circa mid 1946 (Courtesy Robert Lawson Collection). 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS — Volume I 263 



Major Overseas Deployments 



Date of 
Departure 

10 Jul 1944 
20 Apr 1946 



Date of 
Return 

23 Nov 1944 
09 Aug 1946 



Air 
Wing 

CVG-19 
CVG-19 



Carrier 

CV 16 
CV 36* 



Type of 
Aircraft 

SB2C-3 
SB2C-5 



Area of 
Operation 

Pacific 
WestPac 



* During the squadron deployment to WestPac aboard Antietam (CV 36) it was temporarily shore based at Saipan on several occasions. 



Air Wing Assignments 



Unit Awards Received 



Air Wing Tail Code 

CVG-19/CVAG-19* A/Bf 



Assignment Date 

15 Aug 1943 



* CVG-19 was redesignated CVAG-19 on 15 November 1946. 

t The tail code A was assigned to CVAG-19 on 12 December 1946. 
On 4 August 1948 CVG-19's tail code was changed to B. 



Unit Award Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 

PUC 18 Jul 1944 05 Aug 1944 

06 Sep 1944 06 Nov 1944 

Campaign Medal 

(Asiatic Pacific) 18 Jul 1944 27 Aug 1944 

31 Aug 1944 14 Oct 1944 

10 Oct 1944 23 Nov 1944 




264 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



VA-196 

Lineage 

Established as Fighter Squadron ONE HUNDRED 
FIFTY THREE (VF-153) on 15 July 1948. 

Redesignated Fighter Squadron ONE HUNDRED 
NINETY FOUR (VF-194) on 15 February 1950. 

Redesignated Attack Squadron ONE HUNDRED 
NINETY SIX (VA-196) on 4 May 1955. The first 
squadron to be assigned the VA-196 designation. 

Squadron Insignia 
and Nickname 

There is no record 
of approval by CNO 

efor the squadron's first 
Ajt, I insignia. The colors for 
the winged tiger prob- 
ably were: a white 
background outlined 
in red; gold wings with 
black markings; blue 
waves with black 
markings; the clouds 
shaded gray with 
black outlines; yellow claws and tiger head, with black 
markings; and red lightning bolts with black markings. 

A new insignia was approved by CNO on 5 October 
1950. Colors for the devil and ace of spades insignia 
were: a white background with a black border; the 
devil was yellow with black markings; the machine 
gun, rocket and ammo belt were red with black mark- 
ings; the ace of spades was black; and the lightning 
bolt was orange outlined in black. 

Following the squadron's redesignation to VA-196, it 
continued to use the devil and ace of spades insignia 
until 14 September 1967 when CNO approved a new 
insignia. Colors for the ace of spades with the devil 
face is: an orange background with a black border; the 




The winged tiger, the squadron 's 
first insignia, is not recorded as 
officially approved. 




The devil and ace of spades 
insignia was the squadron s sec- 
ond insignia and was used for 
1 7 years. 



The squadron modified its devil 
insignia in 1967 and adopted 
the devil face superimposed on 
the ace of spades. 



ace of spades is black; the devil's face is superimposed 
on the ace of spades and outlined in yellow, the teeth, 
eyes and horns are white with black pupils and black 
markings on the horns; the scroll has a white back- 
ground outlined in black, with black lettering. 
Nicknames: Thundercats, 1948-1950s. 

The Main Battery, 1950s-present. 

Beginning in 1979 the squadron used 

Milestones interchangeably with its 

nickname Main Battery. 

Chronology of Significant Events 

11 Dec 1951: The squadron flew its first combat sor- 
ties, flying interdiction missions in Korea against 
enemy lines of communications, transportation, indus- 
trial and supply facilities. 

22 Mar 1952: During a bombing run on a rail line 
north of Kowon, Korea, Ensign K. A. Schechter was 
wounded when an enemy shell struck the canopy of 
his AD Skyraider and exploded. He was blinded by 
the blood from the wound causing him to maneuver 
erractically. Lieutenant (jg) J. H. Thayer, heard Ensign 
Schechter's call for assistance and observing his erratic 
maneuvering, flew alongside and began giving radio 
instructions to the blinded pilot. Using Lieutenant 
Thayer's radio guidance, Ensign Schechter flew his 
plane to an emergency air strip and successfully land- 
ed the aircraft. 

Feb 1955: In January 1955, the People's Republic of 
China began bombardment of the Tachen Islands held 
by Nationalist China. In February squadron aircraft 
provided air cover during the evacuation of Chinese 
Nationalist military and civilian personnel from the 
islands. 

Aug- Oct 1964: The squadron was involved in oper- 
ations off the coast of Vietnam following the Tonkin 
Gulf Incident. 

21 Aug 1967: The squadron's commanding officer, 
Commander L. T. Profilet and his NFO Lieutenant 
Commander W. M. Hardman, were shot down and 
taken prisoner during a mission over North Vietnam. 
They were released by North Vietnam and returned to 
the U.S. on 29 March 1973. 

Dec 1971: Following the outbreak of war between 
India and Pakistan over East Pakistan (Bangladesh), 
Enterprise (CVAN 65) was ordered to leave Yankee 
Station for operations in the Indian Ocean. The carrier, 
with VA-196 embarked, operated in the Bay of Bengal 
until the early part of January 1972 and cessation of 
hostilities. 

Oct 1972: The squadron participated in Linebacker I 
operations, heavy air strikes against targets in North 
Vietnam to interdict the flow of supplies into South 
Vietnam. 

Dec 1972: Squadron aircraft participated in 
Linebacker II operations, an intensified version of 
Linebacker I. 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS — Volume I 265 



Feb-May 1973: Squadron aircraft flew air support 
for Operation End Sweep, the clearing of mines from 
North Vietnamese waters. 

Apr 1975: The squadron, along with other CVW-14 
units, provided air cover support during the evacua- 
tion of personnel from Saigon as it fell to the commu- 
nists. 

Feb 1977: During the crisis in Uganda and threats 
against Americans in that country, Enterprise, with VA- 
196 embarked, operated off the coast of Kenya ready 
to evacuate Americans from Uganda. 

Dec 1979: Coral Sea (CV 43), with VA-196 
embarked, operated off the coast of South Korea fol- 
lowing the assassination of South Korea's President 
Park Chung-Hee in late October. 

Apr 1980: Coral Sea, with the squadron embarked, 
was part of the task force involved in supporting the 
Iranian hostage rescue attempt. 

May 1980: Following civil unrest in South Korea, the 
squadron, embarked in Coral Sea, operated off the 
coast of that country. 

Aug 1983: Due to the unsettled conditions in Central 
America, Coral Sea, with VA-196 embarked, operated 



off the coast of Nicaragua and also participated in 
surveillance for illegal drug traffic. 

Jul 1987: Due to the increased attacks on merchant 
and tanker shipping in the Persian Gulf during the 
Iran/Iraqi War, the United States began to escort 
reflagged Kuwaiti oil tankers. During operation 
Earnest Will, VA-196 provided air support for the first 
convoy of reflagged tankers passing through the Strait 
of Hormuz. 

Aug 1990: Due to the invasion of Kuwait by Iraq, 
Independence (CV 62), with VA-196 embarked, was 
ordered to the North Arabian Sea. 

Aug-2 Oct 1990: VA-196 flew sorties from 
Independence in support of Operation Desert Shield, 
the build up of American and Allied forces to counter 
a threatened invasion of Saudi Arabia by Iraq. 

2 Oct-2 Nov 1990: On 2 October, Independence 
entered the Persian Gulf and operated in those waters 
for two days before returning to the Northern Arabian 
Sea. VA-196 continued flying sorties for operation 
Desert Shield until Independence was relieved on 2 
November and departed for its return trip to the States. 




A squadron F8F-2 Bearcat on the elevator being brought up to the flight deck, 1950 (Courtesy Robert Lawson Collection). 



266 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



Home Port Assignments 




Commanding Officers- 


— Continued 


Location 


Assignment Date 




Date Assumed Command 


NAS Alameda 


15 Jul 1948 


CDR Gordon R. Nakagawa 


12 Jul 1974 


NAS Moffett Field 


23 Feb 1959 


CDR Lyle F. Bull 


23Jun 1975 


NAS Lemoore 


Feb 1963 


CDR John K. Peiguss 


10 Sep 1976 


NAS Oceana 


01 May 1966 


CDR Gerald L. Smith 


23 Nov 1977 


NAS Whidbey Island 


15 Nov 1966 


CDR Thomas K. Woodka 
CDR David L. Russell 


18 Jan 1979 
18 Jan 1980 


Commanding Officers 




CDR Robert E. Wilks 
LJJK Kennetn L. Fyle 


07 Aug 1981 

1 / Dec lyoz. 


Date Assumed Command 

LCDR Eugene W. Krebsbach (acting) 15 Jul 1948 
CDR Thomas D. Harris 26 Jul 1948 
LCDR Theodore C. Schaible 05 Dec 1949 
LCDR Robert S. Schreiber 06 Dec 1950 


CDR Harry A. Juplin 
CDR Thomas F. Cleverdon 
CDR Tom S. Fellin 
CDR Bruce T. Stuckert 
CDR David C. Nichols 


08 Jun 1984 
06 Dec 1985 
16 May 1987 
12 Aug 1988 

09 Feb 1990 



LCDR Arthur N. Melhuse 


19 Aug 1952 






LCDR B. R. Trexler 


Dec 1953 




Aircraft Assignment 


CDR R. B. Giblin 


Jun 1955 






LCDR Robert T. Lynn 


Jan 1957 


Type of Aircraft 


Date Type First Received 


LCDR Dicky Wieland 


18 Apr 1958 


F8F-1 


Jul 1948 


CDR R. R. Newman 


01 Jul 1959 


F8F-2 


11 May 1949 


CDR G. R Powers 


01 Jun I960 


F4U-4 


Aug 1950 


CDR J. L. Delaware 


17 Mar 1961 


AD-3 


Dec 1950 


CDR W. E. Edwards 


09 Feb 1962 


AD-1 


Jan 1951 


CDR W. P. Robinson 


Dec 1962 


AD-2 


Sep 1951 


CDR J. R. Driscoll 


Jan 1964 


AD-4NA 


Aug 1952 


CDR Joseph Gallagher 


04 Jan 1965 


AD-4Q 


Aug 1952 


CDR James A. Donovan 


25 Jan 1966 


AD-6/A-1H* 


Dec 1953 


CDR Leo T. Profilet 


22 Dec 1966 


AD-7/A-1J* 


Mar 1962 


CDR Edward C. Bauer 


28 Aug 1967 


A-6A 


01 Oct 1966 


CDR L. C. Dittmar 


07 Feb 1969 


A-6B 


Jun 1968 


CDR John R. Wunsch 


12 Jun 1970 


KA-6D 


Mar 1971 


CDR Lloyd W. Richards 


04 Jun 1971 


A-6E 


02 Jul 1975 


CDR Howard I. Young 
CDR Jackson E. Cartwright 


30 May 1972 
26 Jul 1973 




* The AD-6 and AD-7 designations were changed to A-1H and A-1J 
in 1962. 



Major Overseas Deployments 



Date of 


Date of 


Air 




Type of 


Area of 


Departure 


Return 


Wing 


Carrier 


Aircraft 


Operation 


11 Jan 1950 


13 Jun 1950 


CVG-19 


CV 21 


F8F-2 


WestPac 


15 Oct 1951 


03 Jul 1952 


ATG-1 


CV45 


AD-2/3 


Korea 


30 Mar 1953 


28 Nov 1953 


ATG-1 


CVA 21 


AD-4NA/Q 


Korea/WestPac 


01 Sep 1954 


09 Apr 1955 


ATG-1 


CVA 18 


AD-6 


WestPac 


28 May 1956 


20 Dec 1956 


ATG-1 


CVA 16 


AD-6 


WestPac 


04 Oct 1958 


17 Feb 1959 


ATG-1 


CVA 14 


AD-6 


WestPac 


21 Nov 1959 


14 May I960 


CVG-19 


CVA 31 


AD-6 


WestPac 


26 Apr 1961 


13 Dec 1961 


CVG-19 


CVA 31 


AD-6 


WestPac 


12 Jul 1962 


11 Feb 1963 


CVG-19 


CVA 31 


A-1H/J 


WestPac 


28 Jan 1964 


21 Nov 1964 


CVW-19 


CVA 31 


A-1H/J 


WestPac/IO/Vietnam 


21 Apr 1965 


13 Jan 1966 


CVW-19 


CVA 31 


A-1H/J 


WestPac/Vietnam 


29 Apr 1967 


04 Dec 1967 


CVW-14 


CVA 64 


A-6A 


WestPac/Vietnam 


29 May 1968 


31 Jan 1969 


CVW-14 


CVA 64 


A-6A/B 


WestPac/Vietnam 


14 Oct 1969 


01 Jun 1970 


CVW-2 


CVA 61 


A-6A 


WestPac/Vietnam 


11 Jun 1971 


12 Feb 1972 


CVW-14 


CVAN 65 


A-6A/B & KA-6D 


WestPac/Vietnam/IO 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS — Volume I 267 



Major Overseas Deployments — Continued 



Date of 


Date of 


Air 




Tvt>e of 


Area of 


Departure 


Return 


Wing 


Carrier 


Aircraft 


Operation 


1 O 1 OTO 

i/ i>ep 


1 O Ti 1 0"72 

1Z Jun 19/3 


aw 1 A 


UVAlN 03 


A A A /XX £, ~\Z A /^T^ 

A-OA/rS ex JSA-OD 


WestPac/Vietnam 


1 1 c^.*-^ 1 0.-7/1 
1 / 5>ep ly /4 


OA A/loo 1 A7C 

zu May iy/j 


AW 1 A 

lj V W-14 


/"A f A 1\T t^Z. 


A ^ A Q , XT A AT~\ 

A- DA cx JSA-OJJ 


westrac/i<J 


3u Jul ly/o 


oo AT*!,, inn 

/o Mar ly / / 


aw 1 /i 


l^VlN 03 


A A 17 O, FA /, r~v 

A-Db (X iSA-OlJ 


westrac/iu 


U4 Apr ly/o 


2A t~\, -t 1 0~7Q 


AW 1 


/^wi\t ^c: 
(^VlN 03 


A-Db & iSA-OlJ 


westrac/iu 


1 2 TvT#--.tt 1 0.-70, 

13 inov iy/y 


11 Ti 1 OQA 

1 1 Jun lyoU 


aw 1 /i 


CV 43 


A-Ob cx: ivA-olJ 


westrac/iu 


20 Aug 1981 


23 Mar 1982 


CVW-14 


CV43 


A-6E & KA-6D 


WestPac/IO 


21 Mar 1983 


12 Sep 1983 


CVW-14 


CV 43 


A-6E & KA-6D 


World Cruise 


21 Feb 1985 


24 Aug 1985 


CVW-14 


CV64 


A-6E & KA-6D 


WestPac/IO 


04 Sep 1986 


20 Oct 1986 


CVW-14 


CV64 


A-6E & KA-6D 


NorPac 


11 Apr 1987 


13 Oct 1987 


CVW-14 


CV 64 


A-6E & KA-6D 


WestPac/IO 


01 Dec 1988 


01 Jun 1989 


CVW-14 


CV64 


A-6E & KA-6D 


WestPac/IO 


16 Sep 1989 


19 Oct 1989 


CVW-14 


CV64 


A-6E & KA-6D 


NorPac 


23 Jun 1990 


20 Dec 1990 


CVW-14 


CV62 


A-6E 


WestPac/IO/ 
Persian Gulf 




Air Wing Assignments 



Air Wing 


Tail Code 


Assignment Date 


CVG-15 


A 


15 Jul 1948 


CVG-19 


B 


01 Dec 1949 


ATG-1 


U/NA* 


01 Jul 1951 


COMFAIRALAMEDA 




23 Feb 1959 


CVG-19/CVW-19t 


NM 


22 Jun 1959 


CVW-14 


NK 


15 Oct 1966 


CVW-2 


NE 


02 Aug 1969 


CVW-14 


NK 


01 Jun 1970 



• ATG-1 was not assigned a tail code designation until 1956 when it 
received the letter "U." Before then the squadron was using the tail 
code assigned to CVG-19- The tail code was changed from U to NA 
in 1957. The effective date for this change was most likely the 
beginning of FY 58 (1 July 1957). 

t CVG-19 was redesignated CVW-19 when Carrier Air Groups (CVG) 
were redesignated Carrier Air Wings (CVW) on 20 December 1963. 



Unit Awards Received 



Unit Award 



Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 



A squadron AD-6 Skyraider on the deck of Lexington (CVA 16) dur- 
ing deployment to WestPac in 1956. 



KSM 


04 Dec 1951 


19 Jun 1952 




30 Apr 1953 


10 Nov 1953 


KPUC 


07 Dec 1951 


20 Jun 1952 




12 May 1953 


27 Jul 1953 


NAVE 


01 Jan 1982 


30 Jun 1983 


AFEM 


12 Nov 1958 


15 Nov 1958 




20 Nov 1958 


22 Nov 1958 




05 Dec 1958 


08 Dec 1958 




29 Dec 1958 


01 Jan 1959 




03 Apr I960 


04 Apr I960 




26 Apr I960 


27 Apr I960 




22 May 1961 


27 May 1961 




05 Mar 1964 


13 Mar 1964 




12 May 1964 


14 May 1964 




05 Jun 1964 


10 Jun 1964 




13 Jun 1964 


17 Jun 1964 



268 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



Unit Awards Received — Continued 



Unit Awards Received — Continued 



Unit Award 



Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 



Unit Award 



RVNGC 



VNSM 



31 Aug 1964 


06 Nov 1964 


26 May 1965 


03 Jul 1965 


10 Jan 1970 


13 Jan 1970 


12 Apr 1970 


13 Apr 1970 


29 Apr 1975 


30 Apr 1975 


19 Oct 1965 


20 Oct 1965 


23 Oct 1965 


28 Oct 1965 


22 Nov 1965 




24 Nov 1965 




06 Dec 1965 




18 Jul 1965 


13 Aug 1965 


10 Sep 1965 


01 Oct 1965 


08 Oct 1965 


29 Oct 1965 


13 Nov 1965 


17 Dec 1965 


08 Jun 1967 


11 Jun 1967 


18 Jul 1967 


25 Jul 1967 


01 Aug 1967 


03 Sep 1967 


25 Sep 1967 


15 Oct 1967 


24 Oct 1967 


12 Nov 1967 


27 Jun 1968 


22 Jul 1968 


02 Aug 1968 


28 Aug 1968 


11 Sep 1968 


09 Oct 1968 


26 Oct 1968 


29 Nov 1968 


09 Dec 1968 


21 Dec 1968 


01 Jan 1969 


07 Jan 1969 


16 Nov 1969 


07 Dec 1969 


17 Dec 1969 


06 Jan 1970 



MUC 



NUC 



HSM 
NEM 

SASM 



Inclusive Dates 

29 Jan 1970 
27 Feb 1970 
16 Apr 1970 

14 Jul 1971 
15 Aug 1971 
12 Sep 1971 
25 Sep 1971 

19 Jan 1972 

02 Oct 1972 
01 Nov 1972 
18 Dec 1972 
24 Jan 1973 

01 Mar 1973 
11 Mar 1973 
14 Jun 1968 
27 Oct 1969 

02 Jul 1971 
22 Apr 1975 
07 Mar 1978 
01 Jan 1984 
18 May 1967 

03 Oct 1972 
01 Jan 1982 

02 Aug 1990 
29 Apr 1975 
01 Feb 1980 
11 Oct 1981 
05 Aug 1990 



Covering Unit Award 
18 Feb 1970 
20 Mar 1970 
13 May 1970 
31 Jul 1971 

04 Sep 1971 

26 Sep 1971 
24 Jan 1972 
23 Oct 1972 

11 Dec 1972 
13 Jan 1973 

23 Feb 1973 

02 Mar 1973 
28 Mar 1973 
23 Jan 1969 

12 May 1970 

03 Feb 1972 
30 Apr 1975 
01 May 1980 

24 Aug 1985 
26 Nov 1967 
22 Feb 1973 
30 Aug 1983 
01 Nov 1990 
30 Apr 1975 

05 May 1980 
20 Oct 1981 

04 Nov 1990 




A squadron A-6E Intruder on an exercise mission dropping snake eye bombs in 1988; Constellation (CV64) is in tbe background. 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS — Volume I 269 



VA-205 

Lineage 

Established as Attack Squadron TWO HUNDRED 
FIVE (VA-205) on 1 July 1970. 

Disestablished on 31 December 1994. The first 
squadron to be assigned the VA-205 designation. 



Squadron Insignia and 
Nickname 

The squadron's insig- 
nia was approved by 
CNO on 15 October 
1971. Colors for the in- 
signia are white and 
green: a white back- 
ground and scroll out- 
lined in green; green 
lettering; and green 
bomb and falcon with 
white markings. 

Nickname: Green 
Falcons, 1971-1994. 




The squadron 's one and only 
insignia. 



Chronology of Significant Events 

1 Jul 1970: VA-205, a reserve squadron, was estab- 
lished as part of a reorganization intended to increase 
the combat readiness of the Naval Air Reserve Force. 

Aug 1971: The squadron conducted its two weeks 
of active duty training embarked on John F. Kennedy 
(CVA 67) as part of CVWR-20. This was the first com- 
plete Reserve Carrier Air Wing deployment aboard a 
carrier. 

May 1972: The squadron participated in exercise 
Exotic Dancer V, designed to test multi-service opera- 
tions under a unified command organization. 

4 Sep 1975: Squadron pilots began transition train- 
ing with VA-125 in preparation for receiving the A-7 
Corsair II. 

6- 16 Jul 1982: The squadron, along with other units 
of CVWR-20, participated in operations on Carl Vinson 
(CVN 70), with the emphasis on coordinated air wing 
operations. 

10-23 May 1986: During an annual active duty 
deployment to NAS Fallon, the squadron participated 
in close air support training, air wing strike evolutions, 
and an excellent simulated two day war exercise con- 
ducted by Strike University. 

1 Oct 1993: The squadron assumed the additional 
mission (Fleet Support Readiness Group, FTRG) of 
providing electronic support to simulate missile attacks 
on surface ships for training purposes. This mission 
had previously been performed by VAQ-33 (Carrier 
Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron-33). 




A squadron A-4L Skyhawk at NAS Atlanta, Georgia, 1973. 

Home Port Assignments 



Location 

NAS Atlanta 



Assignment Date 

01 Jul 1970 



Commanding Officers 



CDRJohn B. Barnes 
CDR Virgil R. Tedder 
CDRJack S. Smith 
LCDR David K. Maskell 
CDR Robert D. Sibold 
CDR James G. Bailey 
CDR Gadsden S. Gause 
CDR Gary C. Ayers 
CDRJohn D. Kish 
CDR Robert T. Golden 
CDR Michael C. Crabtree 
CDR Dana F. Miller 
CDR Daniel E. Caldwell 
CDR Randall C. Schultz 
CDR M. Kent Home 
CDR Thomas R. Mclnvale 
CDR Kent D. White 



Date Assumed Command 

01 Jul 1970 
12 Feb 1972 
21 Jul 1973 
19 Jul 1975 
16 Jan 1977 

20 Aug 1978 

24 Feb 1980 

25 Oct 1981 

24 Apr 1983 

21 Oct 1984 

27 Apr 1986 

25 Oct 1987 
23 Oct 1988 

28 Apr 1990 
19 Oct 1991 
15 Aug 1992 
06 Nov 1993 




A squadron A-7B Corsair II in flight, circa late 1970s or early 1980s. 



270 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



Aircraft Assignment 



Air Wing Assingments 



Type of Aircraft 



A-4L 



A-7B 
A-7E 



KA-6D 
A-6E 



Date Type First Received 

01 Oct 1970 
26 Sep 1975 
20 Jun 1984 
22 Aug 1990 
17 Nov 1990 



Air Wing 

CVWR-20 



Unit Award 

MUC 

NAVE 



Tail Code 
AF 

Unit Awards Received 



Assignment Date 

01 Jul 1970 



Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 

01 Jul 1977 31 Dec 1978 

01 Oct 1981 31 Dec 1982 





A squadron A-6E Intruder at NAS Fallon, Nevada, 1992 (Courtesy Robert Lawson Collection). 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 271 



VA-209 



Home Port Assignments 



Lineage 

Established as Reserve Attack Squadron TWO HUN- 
DRED NINE (VA-209) on 1 July 1970. 

Disestablished on 15 August 1971. The first 
squadron to be assigned the VA-209 designation. 

Squadron Insignia and Nickname 

There is no record of an officially approved insignia 
for the squadron. 

Nickname: unknown. 

Chronology of Significant Events 

1 Jul 1970: VA-209 was a reserve squadron estab- 
lished as part of a reorganization intended to increase 
the combat readiness of the Naval Air Reserve Force. 

15 Aug 1971: The squadron was disestablished due 
to its replacement by the addition of two fighter 
squadrons to Reserve Air Wing 20. 



Location 

NAS Glenview 



Assignment Date 

01 Jul 1970 



Commanding Officers 



CDR William J. Miller 



Date Assumed Command 

01 Jul 1970 



Aircraft Assignment 



Type of Aircraft 



A-4L 



Date Type First Received 

01 Jul 1970 



Air Wing 

CVWR-20 



Air Wing Assignments 

Tail Code 
AF 



Assignment Date 

01 Jul 1970 




Squadron A-4L Skyhawks in flight over Chicago, Illinois, circa 1971. 



272 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



VA-210 

Lineage 

Established as Reserve Attack Squadron TWO HUN- 
DRED TEN (VA-210) on 1 July 1970. 

Disestablished on 30 June 1971. The first squadron 
to be assigned the VA-210 designation. 

Squadron Insignia and Nickname 

The squadron's insignia was approved by CNO on 
15 April 1970. Colors for the insignia were: sky blue 
background with three concentric rings of yellow, 




The squadron 's one and only insignia. 

dark blue and yellow, all outlined in black; yellow 
lightning bolt; black aircraft and flag staff; red pen- 
nants; dark blue waves; and a white scroll outlined in 
black with black lettering. 
Nickname: Unknown. 



Chronology of Significant Events 

1 Jul 1970: VA-210 was a reserve squadron estab- 
lished as part of a reorganization intended to increase 
the combat readiness of the Naval Air Reserve Force. 
Assets from reserve squadron VA-2Z1 were utilized to 
form VA-210. 

14 Dec 1970: The squadron conducted its last oper- 
ational flight. 

30 Jun 1971: The squadron was disestablished due 
to its replacement by the addition of two fighter 
squadrons to Reserve Air Wing 20. 

Home Port Assignments 



NAS South Weymouth 



Location Assignment Date 

01 Jul 1970 



Commanding Officers 



CDR W. M. Hollister 



Date Assumed Command 

01 Jul 1970 



Aircraft Assignment 



Type of Aircraft 



TA-4B 
A-4C 



Date Type First Received 

1970* 
1970* 



* These aircraft were operated by VA-210 but may not have been 
permanently assigned to the squadron. 



Air Wing Assingments 



Air Wing 

CVWR-20 



Tail Code 

AF 



Assignment Date 

01 Jul 1970 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 273 



VA-212 

Lineage 

Established as Fighter Squadron TWO HUNDRED 
TWELVE (VF-212) on 20 June 1955. 

Redesignated Attack Squadron TWO HUNDRED 
TWELVE (VA-212) on 1 April 1956. 

Disestablished on 12 December 1975. The first to be 
assigned the VA-212 designation. 



Squadron Insignia and 
Nickname 

The squadron's 
insignia was approved 
by CNO on 4 September 
1956. Colors for the 
insignia were: a black 
background outlined in 
yellow; yellow rampant 
lion; black scrolls out- 
lined in yellow with yel- 
low lettering. 

Nickname: Rampant 
Raiders, 1956-1975. 




The squadron's rampant lion 
insignia. 



Chronology of Significant Events 

6 Jun 1958: The squadron's commanding officer, 
Commander G. W. Staeheli, was killed in an aircraft 
accident. 

Aug-Sep 1958: VA-212, embarked on Lexington 
(CVA 16), operated in the Formosa Straits due to the 
tension surrounding the Chinese Communist shelling 
of the Quemoy Islands. 

Apr 1959: VA-212 became the first operational 
squadron to deploy with the Bullpup air-to-ground 
missile. 

Mar 1961: Lexington (CVA 16), with VA-212 
embarked, was ordered to operate off the coast of 
Thailand as a result of the deteriorating position of 
Laotian government forces against the Communists. 
Units of Lexington's air group flew reconnaissance 
missions over Laos while on station. 

15 Apr 1962: VA-212, embarked in Hancock (CVA 
19), operated off the coast of South Vietnam during 
the arrival of the first USMC advisory unit in the 
Republic of Vietnam. 

16-20 May 1962: Following the continued successes 
of the Pathet Lao forces against Laotian government 
forces, particularly along the border with Thailand, the 
Thai government requested U.S. support. A unit of U.S 
Marines landed in Bangkok and moved by air to 
Udorn. VA-212, along with other units of CVG-21, 
embarked in Hancock, operated in the area and were 
available to provide air support for the Marines if 
required. 



Sep 1963: VA-212, embarked in Hancock, operated 
off the coast of Taiwan due to increased tensions 
between the People's Republic of China and the 
Republic of China. 

Nov 1963: Hancock, with VA-212 embarked, operat- 
ed off the coast of South Vietnam following the coup 
that overthrew President Diem. 

7 Feb 1965: Following the shelling of an American 
advisors' compound at Pleiku by the Viet Cong, VA-212 
participated in reprisal attacks against targets in North 
Vietnam. During the strikes, named Flaming Dart I, VA- 
212's Skyhawks struck the Dong Hoi Barracks. 

11 Feb 1965: VA-212's Skyhawks participated in 
Flaming Dart II operations, reprisal attacks against the 
barracks at Chanh Hoa. 

Mar- May 1965: The squadron's Skyhawks participat- 
ed in special operations in Southeast Asia, including 
the Rolling Thunder campaign, strikes against desig- 
nated military targets in North Vietnam. 

Mar 1966: Squadron aircraft participated in 
Operation Jackstay, providing combat air support for 
amphibious operations that cleared the Rung Sat zone 
southeast of Saigon. 

30 Jun 1966: Commander H. L. Smith, the 
squadron's commanding officer, was awarded the 
Silver Star for leading an air strike against the Bac 
Giang POL facility. 

Oct-Nov 1966: During the squadron's training cycle, 
its aircraft were modified to incorporate the Walleye 
weapons system, becoming the first fleet unit 
equipped with the new system. 

11 Mar 1967: The squadron's commanding officer, 
Commander H. L. Smith, conducted the first combat 
Walleye attack, striking the Sam Son Army Barracks. 

20 May 1967: Commander H. L. Smith was awarded 
the Navy Cross for his action during strikes on the Bac 
Giang Thermal Power Plant on 19 and 20 May. He 
was killed in action during the mission on 20 May. 

Feb-Mar 1968: Squadron aircraft flew combat air sup- 
port missions for the Marines under seige at Khe Sahn. 

Apr 1972: With the North Vietnamese invasion of 
South Vietnam, the Easter Offensive, the squadron 
concentrated its strikes in the area of An Loc, South 
Vietnam. It provided combat air support for U.S. and 
South Vietnamese ground forces defending the city. 

May 1972: VA-212 participated in Operation 
Linebacker I, heavy air strikes against targets in North 
Vietnam. 

25 May 1972: The squadron's commanding officer, 
Commander H. H. Strong, was killed in action when 
his aircraft was hit by antiaircraft fire during a strike 
near Vinh, North Vietnam. 

Oct-Dec 1973: With the outbreak of war in the 
Middle East between Israel, Syria and Egypt and the 
initiation of the Arab oil embargo, Hancock, with VA- 
212 embarked, was ordered to enter the Indian Ocean 
and operate in the Arabian Sea. 



274 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 




A squadron F7U-3 Cutlass catching the wire aboard Bon Homme Richard (CVA 3D in July 1956 (Courtesy Duane Kasulka Collection). 



Home Port Assignments 



Commanding Officers — Continued 



Location 

NAS Moffett Field 
NAS Lemoore 



Assignment Date 

20 Jun 1955 
15 Sep 1961 



Commanding Officers 





Date Assumed Command 


LCDR D. R. Hagood 


20 Jun 


1955 


LCDR T. H. Cooper 


Feb 


1957 


CDR G. W. Staeheli 


23 Apr 


1958 


LCDR L. Krupp (acting) 


06 Jun 


1958 


CDR Jack C. Stuart 


13 Jun 


1958 


CDR Meryl A. Iiams 


30 Dec 


1959 


CDR Emmett B. Boutwell 


05 Jul 


1961 


CDR N. J. Gambrill 


11 Jun 


1962 


CDR Frank T. Hemler 


22 Jun 


1963 


CDR W. B. Muncie 


09 Jul 


1964 


CDR K. L. Shugart 


01 Jun 


1965 


CDR Holmer L. Smith 


01 Jun 


1966 


CDR Marvin M. Quaid 


May 


1967 





Date Assumed Command 


CDR Richard R. Allmann 


09 Jul 


1968 


CDR David C. Coe, Jr. 


21 Feb 


1969 


CDR Edwin D. Shropshire 


22 Dec 


1969 


CDR Thomas M. Corkhill 


13 Nov 


1970 


CDR Henry H. Strong, Jr. 


17 Dec 


1971 


CDR Robert W. Peacher 


25 May 


1972 


CDR Milton R. Gorham 


02 May 


1973 


CDR James M. Curtin 


31 May 


1974 



Aircraft Assignment 



Type of Aircraft 



F7U-3M 



F9F-8B 



FJ-4B 



A4D-2/A-4B* 
A-4E 

A-4F 



Date Type First Received 

Jul 1955 
Aug 1955 
Apr 1957 
19 Jul 1957 
20 Jun 1961 
02 Jan 1964 
Oct 1967 



: The A4D-2 designation was changed to A-4B in 1962. 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 275 



Major Overseas Deployments 



Date of 


Date of 


Air 




Tvfre of 


Area of 


Departure 


Return 


Wing 


Carrier 


Aircraft 


Operation 


10 Aug LyjO 


Zo reu iyj/ 


VCjr-Zl 




r / U-j 


westrac 


1 A Ti il 1 ACQ 

14 Jul lyjo 


iy uec lyjo 


tr* o 1 
VCj-Zl 


UVA 10 


rj-413 


westrac 


0/< a 1 oc o 
ZO Apr iyjy 


no t\^^ 1 acq 
uz uec iy>y 


<^\ir^ 01 
lj VCjr-Zl 


l^VA 10 


rj-4rj 


westrac 


zy uct lyou 


uo jun lyoi 


^\7Y^ 01 
Cj VCj-Zl 


<^VA 10 


rj-4rj 


westrac 


no 1 oxo 
uz reu tyoz 


O/i Aim 10^0 

Z4 Aug lyoz 


/^\7Y^ 01 
VCjr-Zl 


l>va iy 


A Ar\ 0 
A4U-Z 


westrac 


u / jun iyo5 


id uec iyo5 




i^va iy 


A /itl 
A-4rj 


westrac 


zi uct iyo4 


zy May iyoo 


V W-Zl 


c\i& 1 o 
va iy 


A AT! 


WestPac/Vietnam 


lu inov 1905 


A 1 A . . ^ 1 A/^/i 

oi Aug iyoo 


CjV w-zl 


7 A 1 A 

cva iy 


A-4b 


WestPac/Vietnam 


26 Jan 1967 


25 Aug 1967 


CVW-21 


CVA 31 


A-4E 


WestPac/Vietnam 


27 Jan 1968 


10 Oct 1968 


CVW-5 


CVA 31 


A-4F 


WestPac/Vietnam 


02 Aug 1969 


15 Apr 1970 


CVW-21 


CVA 19 


A-4F 


WestPac/Vietnam 


22 Oct 1970 


03 Jun 1971 


CVW-21 


CVA 19 


A-4F 


WestPac/Vietnam 


07 Jan 1972 


03 Oct 1972 


CVW-21 


CVA 19 


A-4F 


WestPac/Vietnam 


08 May 1973 


08 Jan 1974 


CVW-21 


CVA 19 


A-4F 


WestPac/IO 


18 Mar 1975 


20 Oct 1975 


CVW-21 


CV 19 


A-4F 


WestPac 




Unit Awards Received — Continued 



A squadron FJ-4B Fury preparing for launch from Lexington (CVA 
16) during her 1959 deployment to WestPac. 



Air Wing Assignments 



Air Wing Tail Code 

CVG-21/CVW-21f G/NP* 

CVW-5 NF 

CVW-21 NP 



Assignment Date 

01 Jul 1955 
01 Oct 1967 
01 Nov 1968 



* The tail code was changed from G to NP in 1957. The effective 
date for this change was most likely the beginning of FY 58 (1 July 
1957). 

t CVG-21 was redesignated CVW-21 when Carrier Air Groups (CVG) 
were redesignated Carrier Air Wings (CVW) on 20 December 1963. 



Unit Awards Received 

Unit Award Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 

AFEM 15 Aug 1958 17 Aug 1958 

27 Aug 1958 16 Sep 1958 

14 Sep 1958 

26 Sep 1958 15 Oct 1958 



Unit Award 



NUC 

MUC 
RVNGC 



Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 



02 Oct 


1958 






06 Oct 


1958 






10 Nov 


1958 


15 Nov 


1958 


27 Nov 


1958 


28 Nov 


1958 


28 Jun 


1959 


02 Jul 


1959 


11 Jul 


1959 


16 Jul 


1959 


17 Oct 


1959 


19 Oct 


1959 


15 Dec 


I960 


24 Dec 


I960 


01 Jan 


1961 


08 Jan 


1961 


10 Mar 


1962 


14 Mar 


1962 


14 Apr 


1962 


16 Apr 


1962 


16 May 


1962 


18 May 


1962 


04 Nov 


1963 


10 Nov 


1963 


07 Dec 


1964 


04 May 


1965 


04 May 


1968 


07 May 


1968 


30 Oct 


1969 






03 Jan 


1970 


08 Jan 


1970 


22 Feb 


1970 


25 Feb 


1970 


06 Dec 


1965 


25 Jul 


1966 


21 Feb 


1968 


13 Sep 


1968 


08 Feb 


1972 


14 Sep 


1972 


21 Aug 


1969 


31 Mar 


1970 


20 Nov 


1970 


07 May 


1971 


26 Dec 


1965 






28 Dec 


1965 


31 Dec 


1965 


02 Jan 


1966 


04 Jan 


1966 


09 Jan 


1966 






15 Jan 


1966 


19 Jan 


1966 


25 Feb 


1966 


26 Feb 


1966 


28 Feb 


1966 


05 Mar 


1966 


01 Apr 


1966 


02 Apr 


1966 


25 May 


1966 






24 Jun 


1966 






27 Jun 


1966 


29 Jun 


1966 



276 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



Unit Awards Received — Continued 



Unit Awards Received — Continued 



Unit Award 



VNSM 



Inclusive Dates 

28 Feb 1967 
07 Mar 1967 

11 Mar 1967 
13 Mar 1967 
16 Mar 1967 

20 Mar 1967 

29 Apr 1967 

16 May 1967 

21 Feb 1968 
27 Feb 1968 

12 Mar 1968 

22 Mar 1968 

25 Mar 1968 
06 Apr 1968 

13 Apr 1968 

17 Apr 1968 
13 May 1968 

26 May 1968 
04 Jul 1968 

02 Aug 1968 

27 Aug 1968 

30 Mar 1972 
17 Dec 1965 
11 Feb 1966 
21 Mar 1966 
27 Apr 1966 
25 Feb 1967 
17 Apr 1967 



Covering Unit Award 



Unit Award 



21 Mar 1967 
01 May 1967 
18 May 1967 
25 Feb 1968 
07 Mar 1968 
18 Mar 1968 
23 Mar 1968 

11 Apr 1968 
14 Apr 1968 

20 Apr 1968 
14 May 1968 
27 May 1968 

18 Aug 1968 
14 Sep 1968 
15 Jul 1972 
23 Jan 1966 

06 Mar 1966 
10 Apr 1966 

09 Jul 1966 

21 Mar 1967 

07 May 1967 



PUC 



Inclusive Dates 

01 Jun 1967 
27 Jun 1967 
20 Feb 1968 

06 Apr 1968 
09 May 1968 

04 Jun 1968 

13 Jun 1968 
21 Jul 1968 
27 Aug 1968 
31 Aug 1969 

03 Oct 1969 
23 Nov 1969 

17 Jan 1970 

07 Mar 1970 
18 Nov 1970 
29 Dec 1970 

23 Jan 1971 
09 Mar 1971 
17 Mar 1971 
17 Apr 1971 
07 Feb 1972 

25 Mar 1972 
11 May 1972 

12 Jun 1972 

24 Jul 1972 
27 Aug 1972 

26 Feb 1967 



Covering Unit Award 
18 Jun 1967 
31 Jul 1967 
25 Mar 1968 
20 Apr 1968 
30 May 1968 
05 Jun 1968 
07 Jul 1968 
18 Aug 1968 

14 Sep 1968 
25 Sep 1969 
28 Oct 1969 
18 Dec 1969 
12 Feb 1970 
27 Mar 1970 

08 Dec 1970 

15 Jan 1971 
20 Feb 1971 
15 Mar 1971 
10 Apr 1971 
04 May 1971 

09 Mar 1972 
02 May 1972 

01 Jun 1972 
14 Jul 1972 
17 Aug 1972 
14 Sep 1972 
30 Jul 1967 





A squadron A-4E Skyhawk preparing to launch on a combat mission from Bon Homme Richard (CVA 31) during her deployment to Vietnam in 1967. 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 277 



VA-213 



Home Port Assignments 



Lineage 

Established as Attack Squadron TWO HUNDRED 
THIRTEEN (VA-213) on 15 September 1948. 

It is believed the squadron was disestablished some- 
time in May 1949- It was the first squadron to be 
assigned the VA-213 designation. 

Squadron Insignia and Nickname 

There is no record of an officially approved insignia 
for the squadron. 

Nickname: unknown. 

Chronology of Significant Events 

Sep 1948: The squadron was established with the 
mission of being an all-weather attack unit and part of 
a carrier air group that was to be all-weather capable. 
Squadron personnel attended instrument training at 
the Fleet All- Weather Training Unit, Pacific. 



Location 

NAS Seattle 



Assignment Date 

15 Sep 1948 



Commanding Officers 



LCDR H. Suerstedt, Jr. 

Aircraft Assignment 



Date Assumed Command 

15 Sep 1948 



Type of Aircraft 



TBM-3E 



Date Type First Received 

Jan 1949 



Air Wing Assignments 



Air Wing 

CVG-21 



Tail Code 



Assignment Date 

15 Sep 1948 



* There is no record of a tail code being assigned to CVG-21 for the 
period of its existence from 15 September 1948 to 15 March 1949- 



278 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



VA-214 



Home Port Assignments 



Lineage 

Established as Attack Squadron TWO HUNDRED 
FOURTEEN (VA-214) on 15 September 1948. 

Disestablished on 16 May 1949. The first squadron 
to be assigned the VA-214 designation. 

Squadron Insignia and Nickname 

There is no record of an officially approved insignia 
for the squadron. 

Nickname: unknown. 

Chronology of Significant Events 

Sep 1948: The squadron was established with the 
mission of being an all-weather attack unit and part of 
a carrier air group that was to be all-weather capable. 
Squadron personnel attended instrument training at 
the Fleet All- Weather Training Unit, Pacific. 



Location 

NAS Seattle 



Assignment Date 

15 Sep 1948 



Commanding Officers 



LT William H. Bartles (acting) 
LCDR Joseph A. Riley 



Date Assumed Command 

15 Sep 1948 
Nov 1948 



Aircraft Assignment 



Type of Aircraft 



TBM-3E 



Date Type First Received 

Jan 1949 



Air Wing 

CVG-21 



Air Wing Assignments 

Tail Code 



Assignment Date 

15 Sep 1948 



* There is no record of a tail code being assigned to CVG-21 for the 
period of its existence from 15 September 1948 to 15 March 1949- 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 279 



SECOND VA-214 

Lineage 

Established as Fighter Squadron TWO HUNDRED 
FOURTEEN (VF-214) on 30 March 1955. 

Redesignated Attack Squadron TWO HUNDRED 
FOURTEEN (VA-214) on 11 October 1956. 

Disestablished on 1 August 1958. The second 
squadron to be assigned the VA-214 designation. 

Squadron Insignia and Nickname 

. - The squadron's 

insignia was approved 
by CNO on 5 December 
1955. Colors for the 
thunderbird insignia 
were: a light blue back- 
ground with a yellow 
border; black stylized 
thunderbird; yellow and 
red flame; and white 
double arrow shafts. 

Nickname: Volun- 
teers, 1957-1958. 




Tloe squadron 's thunderbird 
insignia. 



Chronology of Significant Events 

6 Jan 1958: VA-214 was the first squadron on the 
west coast to make an extended deployment to the 
western Pacific with the new FJ-4B Fury. 



Home Port Assignment 



Location 

NAS Moffett Field 



Assignment Date 

30 Mar 1955 




The squadron's acting commanding officer, Lieutenant Commander 
R. M. Soule, delivering the squadron 's first aircraft, an FJ-3 Fury, at 
NAS Moffett Field, California, March 1955. 



Commanding Officers 



LCDR R. M. Soule (acting) 
CDR L. T. Raynor 
CDR R. D. King 



Date Assumed Command 

30 Mar 1955 
07 Jun 1955 
21 Sep 1956 



Aircraft Assignment 



Type of Aircraft 



FT-3 



F9F- 



F1-4B 



Date Type First Received 

31 Mar 1955 
Nov 1955 
18 Jun 1957 



A squadron F9F-8 Cougar aboard Yorktown (CVA-10), circa 1956 (Courtesy Robert Lawson Collection). 



280 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



Major Overseas Deployments 



Date of 
Departure 

19 Mar 1956 
06 Jan 1958 



Date of 
Return 

13 Sep 1956 
02 Jul 1958 



Air 
Wing 

ATG-4 

ATG-4 



Carrier 
CVA 10 

CVA 12 



Type of 
Aircraft 

F9F-8 
FJ-4B 



Area of 
Operation 

WestPac 
WestPac 



Air Wing 

ATG-4 



Air Wing Assignments 

Tail Code 
ZVNDf 



Assignment Date 

30 Mar 1955 



* The tail code Z for ATG-4 was assigned on 24 July 1956. 

t The tail code was changed from Z to ND in 1957. The effective date for this change was most likely the beginning of FY 58 (1 July 1957). 





A flight of squadron Ff-4Bs, circa 1957 or 1958. 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 281 



VA-215 

Lineage 

Established as Attack Squadron TWO HUNDRED 
FIFTEEN (VA-215) on 22 June 1955. 

Disestablished on 31 August 1967. The first 
squadron to be assigned the VA-215 designation. 




The barn owl insignia used by the squadron. 

Squadron Insignia and Nickname 

The squadron's insignia was approved by CNO on 
20 August 1956. The insignia colors are not on record. 
Nickname: Barn Owls, early 1960's-1967. 

Chronology of Significant Events 

Aug-Nov 1958: VA-215, operating from Lexington 
(CVA 16), conducted flight operations in the Formosa 
Straits due to the tension surrounding the Chinese 
Communist shelling of the Quemoy Islands. 

24 Mar 1959: The squadron's commanding officer, 
Commander P. Rippa, was killed on a training flight in 
Yosemite Valley. 

Mar 1961: Lexington, with VA-215 embarked, oper- 
ated off the coast of Thailand as a result of the deteri- 
orating position of Laotian government forces against 
the Pathet Lao. Units of Lexington's air group flew 
reconnaissance missions over Laos. 

15 Apr 1962: Embarked in Hancock (CVA 19), the 
squadron operated off the coast of South Vietnam dur- 
ing the arrival of the first USMC advisor unit in the 
Republic of Vietnam. 

May 1962: VA-215 and other CVG-21 squadrons 
from Hancock were prepared to support a U.S. Marine 
Corps unit that landed in Bangkok and moved by air 
to Udorn. The Marine landing was at the request of 
the Thai goverment because of its concerns surround- 



ing the success of Pathet Lao forces along the Thai- 
Laotian border. 

Sep 1963: VA-215, embarked in Hancock, operated 
off the coast of Taiwan due to increased tensions 
between the People's Republic of China and the 
Republic of China. 

Nov 1963: VA-215, embarked in Hancock, operated 
off the coast of South Vietnam following the coup that 
overthrew President Diem. 

Dec 1964: Squadron aircraft participated in its first 
Barrell Roll operations, armed reconnaissance and 
strike missions along infiltration routes in Laos. 

Feb 1965: Skyraiders from the squadron participated 
in Flaming Dart operations, reprisal attacks against 
military targets in North Vietnam. 

Mar-May 1965: The squadron's Skyraiders participat- 
ed in special operations in Southeast Asia, including 
the Rolling Thunder campaign, strikes against desig- 
nated military targets in North Vietnam. 

5 Mar 1966: The squadron's commanding officer, 
Commander R. C. Hessom, was killed in action during 
a mission over North Vietnam. 

Mar 1966: Squadron aircraft participated in 
Operation Jackstay, providing close air support for 
amphibious operations that cleared the Rung Sat zone, 
the river channels, southeast of Saigon. 

Home Port Assignments 



Location 


Assignment Date 


NAS Moffett Field 


Jun 1955 


NAS Alameda 


Dec 1963 


Commanding Officers 




Date Assumed Command 


CDR E. E. Kerr 


Jun 1955 


LCDR W. A. Skon 


Mar 1957 


CDR O. N. Ford 


Apr 1958 


LCDR Peter Rippa 


Jan 1959 


LCDR J. L. Morrison, Jr. (acting) 


24 Mar 1959 


CDR H. Broadbent, Jr. 


03 Apr 1959 


CDR G. A. Buckowski 


04 Apr I960 


CDR L. A. Dewing 


12 Jun 1961 


CDR F. W. Brown, Jr. 


12 Jun 1962 


CDR Richard J. Licko 


22 Jun 1963 


CDR Donald E. Brubaker 


03 Jun 1964 


CDR Robert C. Hessom 


01 Mar 1965 


CDR Frederick L. Nelson 


05 Mar 1966 


CDR George A. Carlton 


Jan 1967 



Aircraft Assignment 



Type of Aircraft 



AD-6* 
AD-7* 



Date Type First Received 

Aug 1955 
Jun 1961 



* The AD-6 and AD-7 designations were changed to A-1H and A-1J 
in 1962. 



282 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



Major Overseas Deployments 



Date of 


Date of 


Air 




Type of 


^4ra3 q/~ 


Departure 


Return 


Wing 


Carrier 


Aircraft 


Operation 


10 Aug lyjO 


Zo reD lyj I 


^ Vtor-Zl 


C\ 7\ 21 


AJJ-0 


we sir a c 


.It: J Ul I J JO 


1 / JJCt l/JO 


fVfr-91 
V_> V v_T Z. _L 








26 Apr 1959 


02 Dec 1959 


CVG-21 


CVA 16 


AD-6 


WestPac 


29 Oct I960 


06 Jun 1961 


CVG-21 


CVA 16 


AD-6 


WestPac 


02 Feb 1962 


24 Aug 1962 


CVG-21 


CVA 19 


AD-6/7 


WestPac 


07 Jun 1963 


16 Dec 1963 


CVG-21 


CVA 19 


A-1H/J 


WestPac 


21 Oct 1964 


29 May 1965 


CVW-21 


CVA 19 


A-1H/J 


WestPac/Vietnam 


10 Nov 1965 


01 Aug 1966 


CVW-21 


CVA 19 


A-1H/J 


WestPac/Vietnam 


26 Jan 1967 


25 Aug 1967 


CVW-21 


CVA 31 


A-1H/J 


WestPac/Vietnam 



Air Wing Assingments 

Air Wing Tail Code Assignment Date 

CVG-21/CVW-21I G/NP* 01 Jul 1955 

* The tail code was changed from G to NP in 1957. The effective 
date for this change was most likely the beginning of FY 58 (1 July 
1957). 

t CVG-21 was redesignated CVW-21 when Carrier Air Groups (CVG) 
were redesignated Carrier Air Wings (CVW) on 20 December 1963. 



Unit Awards Received 



Unit Awards Received — Continued 



Unit Award Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 



Unit Award 
AFEM 



NUC 
RVNGC 



Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 



15 Aug 


1958 


17 Aug 


1958 


27 Aug 


1958 


16 Sep 


1958 


14 Sep 


1958 






26 Sep 


1958 


15 Oct 


1958 


02 Oct 


1958 






06 Oct 


1958 






10 Nov 


1958 


15 Nov 


1958 


27 Nov 


1958 


28 Nov 


1958 


28 Jun 


1959 


02 Jul 


1959 


11 Jul 


1959 


16 Jul 


1959 


17 Oct 


1959 


19 Oct 


1959 


15 Dec 


I960 


24 Dec 


I960 


01 Jan 


1961 


08 Jan 


1961 


10 Mar 


1962 


14 Mar 


1962 


14 Apr 


1962 


16 Apr 


1962 


16 May 


1962 


18 May 


1962 


04 Nov 


1963 


10 Nov 


1963 


07 Dec 


1964 


04 May 


1965 


06 Dec 


1965 


25 Jul 


1966 


26 Dec 


1965 






28 Dec 


1965 


31 Dec 


1965 


02 Jan 


1966 


04 Jan 


1966 


09 Jan 


1966 






15 Jan 


1966 


19 Jan 


1966 


25 Feb 


1966 


26 Feb 


1966 


28 Feb 


1966 


05 Mar 


1966 


01 Apr 


1966 


02 Apr 


1966 


25 May 


1966 






24 Jun 


1966 






27 Jun 


1966 


29 Jun 


1966 


28 Feb 


1967 






07 Mar 


1967 






11 Mar 


1967 









13 Mar 1967 






16 Mar 1967 






20 Mar 1967 


21 Mar 1967 




29 Apr 1967 


01 May 1967 




16 May 1967 


18 May 1967 


VNSM 


17 Dec 1965 


23 Jan 1966 




11 Feb 1966 


06 Mar 1966 




21 Mar 1966 


10 Apr 1966 




27 Apr 1966 


09 Jul 1966 




25 Feb 1967 


21 Mar 1967 




17 Apr 1967 


07 May 1967 




01 Jun 1967 


18 Jun 1967 




27 Jun 1967 


31 Jul 1967 


PUC 


26 Feb 1967 


30 Jul 1967 


NAVE 


01 Jul 1965 


31 Dec 1966 




A flight of squadron A-1H Skyraiders during their deployment 
aboard Hancock (CVA 19) in 1965. 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 283 



SECOND VA-215 

Lineage 

Established as Attack Squadron TWO HUNDRED 
FIFTEEN (VA-215) on 1 March 1968. 

Disestablished on 30 September 1977. The second 
squadron to be assigned the VA-215 designation. 

Squadron Insignia and Nickname 

The squadron's insignia was not submitted to CNO 
for approval. The insignia used by VA-215 incorporat- 
ed a section of the first 
VA-215's insignia. Colors 
for this insignia were: a 
white background out- 
lined by two rows of 
alternating green and 
white squares outlined 
in black; the stylized 
owl's head was silver 
with black markings, 
green eyes, and green 
plumage and wings, 
outlined in black; white 
scroll outlined in black 
with green lettering and 
the nickname, Barn 
Owls, in black. 




The squadron 's insignia used ele- 
ments from the first VA-215 
insignia and also used the name 
Barn Owls. 



Nickname: Barn Owls, 1968-1977 

Chronology of Significant Events 

1 Mar 1968: Following establishment, the squadron 
remained under the operational control of VA-122 dur- 
ing its training in the A-7 Corsair II. 

14 Jan 1969: The squadron was embarked in 
Enterprise (CVAN 65), conducting operational training 
in Hawaiian waters prior to deployment when a major 
fire occurred on the flight deck of the carrier. Several 
squadron personnel were presented with citations 
from the Secretaiy of the Navy and the Commanding 
Officer of Enterprise for heroism during the fire. 



16 Apr 1969: Enterprise, with VA-215 embarked, 
departed Yankee Station enroute to Korean waters in 
response to the downing of a Navy EC-121 aircraft by 
the North Koreans on 15 April. The squadron operated 
in the Sea of Japan and the Yellow Sea until 11 May. 

Dec 1972: The squadron participated in Linebacker 
II operations, concentrated air strikes against North 
Vietnam. 

Feb 1973: Following the cease fire with North 
Vietnam, the squadron flew combat missions in Laos 
until a cease fire was signed with that country on 22 
February 1973. 

Nov 1973: Oriskany (CVA 34), with VA-215 
embarked, departed from operations in the South 
China Sea to relieve Hancock (CVA 19) on station in 
the Arabian Sea due to the unsettled conditons follow- 
ing the Yom Kippur War in the Middle East. 

Oct 1976-Apr 1977: This was the twilight cruise of 
the Roosevelt, CVW-19 and VA-215. 



Home Port Assignments 



Location 

NAS Lemoore 



Assignment Date 

01 Mar 1968 



Commanding Officers 



CDR George E. LeBlanc, Jr. 
CDR D. L. McConnell 
CDR W. H. Beck 
CDR Paul E. Phillips 
CDR James F. Crammer 
CDR Douglas E. French 
CDR Riley D. Mixson 
CDR John J. Schultz 
CDR Gary L. Harter 



Date Assumed Command 

01 Mar 1968 
08 May 1969 
Apr 1970 

19 Mar 1971 

20 Mar 1972 
04 May 1973 

26 Jul 1974 
31 Oct 1975 
01 Dec 1976 



Aircraft Assignment 



Type of Aircraft 



A-7B 



Date Type First Received 
Jul 1968 



Major Overseas Deployments 



Date of 


Date of 


Air 




Type of 


Area of 


Departure 


Return 


Wing 


Carrier 


Aircraft 


Operation 


06 Jan 1969 


02 Jul 1969 


CVW-9 


CVAN 65 


A-7B 


WestPac/Vietnam 


02 Jan 1970 


27 Jul 1970 


cvw-6 


CVA 42 


A-7B 


Med 


14 May 1971 


18 Dec 1971 


CVW-19 


CVA 34 


A-7B 


WestPac/Vietnam 


05 Jun 1972 


30 Mar 1973 


CVW-19 


CVA 34 


A-7B 


WestPac/Vietnam 


18 Oct 1973 


05 Jun 1974 


CVW-19 


CVA 34 


A-7B 


WestPac/IO 


16 Sep 1975 


03 Mar 1976 


CVW-19 


CV 34 


A-7B 


WestPac 


04 Oct 1976 


21 Apr 1977 


CVW-19 


CV 42 


A-7B 


Med 



284 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



Air Wing Assingments 



Unit Awards Received — Continued 



Air Wing 

CVW-9 
CVW-6 

CVW-19 



Unit Award 

AFEM 

VNSM 



Tail Code 

NG 
AE 
NM 

Unit Awards Received 



Assignment Date 

Sep 1968 
Jul 1969 
10 Dec 1970 



Unit Award 



Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 

20 Apr 1969 11 May 1969 

30 Mar 1969 18 Apr 1969 

22 May 1969 24 May 1969 

29 May 1969 17 Jun 1969 



MUC 



Inclusive 

15 Jun 1971 
24 Jul 1971 

03 Sep 1971 
29 Oct 1971 

26 Jun 1972 

16 Aug 1972 
11 Sep 1972 
08 Oct 1972 
24 Nov 1972 

27 Dec 1972 
10 Feb 1973 

28 Jun 1972 



Dates Covering Unit Award 
10 Jul 1971 
07 Aug 1971 

27 Sep 1971 
21 Nov 1971 

23 Jul 1972 
01 Sep 1972 

28 Sep 1972 
31 Oct 1972 
18 Dec 1972 
31 Jan 1973 
06 Mar 1973 
06 Mar 1973 




A formation of squadron A-7B Corsair lis in 1972. 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 285 




The Black Diamond insignia. 



VA-216 

Lineage 

Established as Attack Squadron TWO HUNDRED 
SIXTEEN (VA-216) on 30 March 1955. 

Disestablished on 1 August 1970. The first squadron 
to be assigned the VA-216 designation. 

Squadron Insignia 
and Nickname 

The squadron's 
insignia was ap- 
proved by CNO on 
28 March 1956. 
Colors for the insig- 
nia were black and 
white. The back- 
ground was black 
with a white and 
black border; the 
shield and weapons 
were white with 
black markings; the scroll was white outlined in black 
with black lettering. 

Nickname: Black Diamonds, 1956-1970. 

Chronology of Significant Events 

Sep 1958: VA-216, embarked in Bennington (CVA 
20), operated in the Formosa Straits during the 
Chinese Communist shelling of Quemoy and Matsu. 

1 Jul 1959: A reorganization by the Commander 
Naval Air Force, Pacific directed VA-216 and VA-192 to 
swap aircraft and all personnel. Commander 
Baumgaertel, the commanding officer of VA-192, 
became the commanding officer of VA-216 and all 
other personnel assigned to VA-192 were reassigned to 
VA-216. The FJ-4Bs that had been assigned to VA-192 
were transferred to VA-216. This exchange was similar 
to a redesignation, but for reasons that are not on 
record, it was officially directed as an "exchange" 
rather than as a "redesignation." 

Mar 1961 : VA-216, embarked in Lexington (CVA 16), 
was ordered to operate off the coast of Thailand as a 
result of the deteriorating position of Laotian govern- 
ment forces against the Pathet Lao. Units of 
Lexington's air group flew reconnaissance missions 
over Laos. 

Apr 1962: VA-216, embarked in Hancock (CVA 19), 
operated off the coast of South Vietnam during the 
arrival of the first USMC advisor unit in the Republic of 
Vietnam. 



May 1962: The squadron, along with other CVG-21 
units embarked in Hancock, were prepared to support 
a U.S. Marine Corps unit that landed in Bangkok and 
moved by air to Udorn. The Marine landing was at the 
request of the Thai government because of its con- 
cerns surrounding the success of Pathet Lao forces 
along the Thai-Laotian border. 

Sep 1963: VA-216, embarked in Hancock, operated 
off the coast of Taiwan due to increased tensions 
between the People's Republic of China and the 
Republic of China. 

Nov 1963: Embarked in Hancock, the squadron 
operated off the coast of South Vietnam following the 
coup that overthrew President Diem. 

29 Dec 1964-May 1965: VA-216 participated in 
Yankee Team operations, armed reconnaissance flights 
over Laos, and Barrel Roll operations, armed recon- 
naissance and strike missions in eastern Laos covering 
the infiltration routes used by the Communists. 

7 Feb 1965: VA-216 participated in Flaming Dart I 
operations, striking the Dong Hoi Barracks. These 
reprisal attacks against targets in North Vietnam were 
in response to the shelling of an American advisors 
compound at Pleiku by the Viet Cong. 

11 Feb 1965: The squadron participated in Flaming 
Dart II operations, reprisal attacks against the barracks 
at Chanh Hoa, North Vietnam. 

Mar-May 1965: VA-2l6's Skyhawks participated in 
the Rolling Thunder campaign, strikes against desig- 
nated military targets in North Vietnam. 

Mar 1966: Squadron aircraft participated in 
Operation Jackstay, providing close air support for the 
amphibious operations that cleared the Rung Sat zone, 
the river channels, southeast of Saigon. 

1 May 1966: Lieutenant C. O. Tolbert was awarded 
the Silver Star for his actions during a combat mission 
over North Vietnam involving the Xom Dom Dien sup- 
ply area and the sighting of a SAM missile battery 
which was destroyed in a later mission. 

7 Jul 1966: The squadron's commanding officer, 
Commander C. Birdwell, was awarded the Silver Star 
for his actions in a strike against the Haiphong POL 
storage area. 

Jun 1970: VA-216, embarked in Forrestal (CVA 59), 
operated in the Eastern Mediterranean after American 
hostages were taken by the Popular Front for the 
Liberation of Palestine in Amman, Jordon. The 
squadron, along with other units of CVW-17, were 
available also for air support during the evacuation of 
Americans from Jordon. 



286 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 




Home Port Assingments 



Commanding Officers — Continue 



Location 

NAS Moffett Field 
NAS Lemoore 
NAS Alameda 



Assignment Date 

30 Mar 1955 
Sep 1961 
01 Aug 1968 



Commanding Officers 



CDR Frank W. Ault 
CDR Hope Strong, Jr. 
CDR W. E. Payne, Jr. 
CDR L. F. Baumgaertel 
CDR M. E. Stewart 
CDR T. M. Smyer 
CDR R. W. Gait (acting) 
CDR G. W. Bailey 
CDR J. R. Anderson 
CDR J. W. Miller 
CDR R. E. Schwoeffermann 
CDR Carl Birdwell, Jr. 
CDR Robert S. Moore 



Date Assumed Command 

30 Mar 1955 
Sep 1956 

13 Feb 1959 
01 Jul 1959 

09 Oct 1959 

05 Jul 1961 
02 Dec 1961 

06 Jan 1962 

31 Dec 1962 

10 Nov 1963 
07 Nov 1964 

1965 
21 Oct 1966 



CDR James J. Tyson 
CDR James B. Busey IV 
CDR Roger A. Massey, Jr. 



Date Assumed Command 

10 Oct 1967 
17 Dec 1968 
19 Sep 1969 



Aircraft Assignment 



Type of Aircraft 


Date Type First Received 


AD-4 


Apr 1955 


AD-4NA 


Apr 1955 


AD-5 


May 1955 


AD-4B 


Jul 1955 


AD-7 


Oct 1956 


AD-6 


Jul 1958 


A4D-2 


16 Feb 1959 


FT-4B 


01 Jul 1959 


A4D-2N/A-4C" 


04 Sep 1962 


A-4B 


Aug 1966 


A-4C 


1968 


A-4E 


13 Jun 1969 





: The A4D-2N designation was changed to A-4C in 1962. 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 287 



Major Overseas Deployments 



Date of 


Date of 


Air 




Type of 


Area of 


Departure 


Return 


Wing 


Carrier 


Aircraft 


Operation 


1 O A/Tot- 1 A 

ly Mar iyjO 


1 2 Car* 1 gc:^ 


Al (or-4 


C^VA 1U 


An AT) /AT A 

AD-4r>/ IN A 


we sir a c 


uo Jan Yyjo 


UZ Jul lyoo 


Al Cjr-4 


CjVA 1/ 


A 1 \ 1 

AL)-/ 


westrac 


01 Aim 1 O^Q 

Zl Aug lyoo 


10 Ton 1 O^O 

1Z Jan lyjy 


Al (or-4 


LVA /U 


A r\ 
AJJ-0 


westrac 


z.y wCL lyw 


C\f. T nnn 1 Q/^1 


V_> V v_T Z 1 


rvA 1 6 


FT 4R 


wesLrac 


02 Feb 1962 


24 Aug 1962 


CVG-21 


CVA 19 


FJ-4B 


WestPac 


07 Jun 1963 


16 Dec 1963 


CVG-21 


CVA 19 


A-4C 


WestPac 


21 Oct 1964 


29 May 1965 


CVW-21 


CVA 19 


A-4C 


WestPac/Vietnam 


10 Nov 1965 


01 Aug 1966 


CVW-21 


CVA 19 


A-4C 


WestPac/Vietnam 


02 May 1967 


06 Dec 1967 


CVW-3 


CVA 60 


A-4B 


Med 


07 Sep 1968 


18 Apr 1969 


CVW-15 


CVA 43 


A-4C 


WestPac/Vietnam 


02 Dec 1969 


08 Jul 1970 


CVW-17 


CVA 59 


A-4E 


Med 




Air Wing Assignments 



Air Wing 

ATG-4 
CVG-21 

COMFAIRALAMEDA 
CVW-3 

COMFAIRALAMEDA 

CVW-15 

CVW-17 



Tail Code 

ZVNDf 
NP 

AC 

NL 
AA 



Assignment Date 

30 Mar 1955 
01 Jul 1959* 
01 Sep 1966 
01 Feb 1967 
09 Dec 1967 
1968§ 
1969 



* The tail code Z for Air Task Group 4 (ATG-4) was assigned on 24 
July 1956. 

t The tail code was changed from Z to ND in 1957. The effective 
date for this change was most likely the beginning of FY 58 (1 July 
1957). 

if ATG-4 was disestablished on 19 January 1959. VA-216 was 
assigned to CVG-21 on 1 July 1959 but was not an active part of the 
Air Group until its return from deployment in December 1959- 

§ VA-216 probably joined CVW-15 upon the air wing's return from 
its deployment in April 1968. 



Two squadron FJ-4B Fury aircraft on Hancock's (CVA 19) 
flight deck during her deployment to WestPac in 1962. 



Unit Awards Received 



Unit Award 


Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 


NAVE 


01 Jul 1957 


30 Jun 1958 


AFEM 


15 Dec I960 


24 Dec I960 




01 Jan 1961 


08 Jan 1961 




10 Mar 1962 


14 Mar 1962 




14 Apr 1962 


16 Apr 1962 




16 May 1962 


18 May 1962 




04 Nov 1963 


10 Nov 1963 




07 Dec 1964 


04 May 1965 


NUC 


06 Dec 1965 


25 Jul 1966 




10 Oct 1968 


31 Mar 1969 


RVNGC 


26 Dec 1965 






28 Dec 1965 


31 Dec 1965 




02 Jan 1966 


04 Jan 1966 




09 Jan 1966 






15 Jan 1966 


19 Jan 1966 




25 Feb 1966 


26 Feb 1966 




28 Feb 1966 


05 Mar 1966 




01 Apr 1966 


02 Apr 1966 



288 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



Unit Awards Received — Continued 



Unit Awards Received — Continued 



Unit Award 



Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 



Unit Award 



25 May 1966 

24 Jun 1966 
27 Jun 1966 
15 Oct 1968 
17 Oct 1968 
21 Oct 1968 

25 Oct 1968 
14 Nov 1968 
23 Nov 1968 
25 Nov 1968 
01 Dec 1968 
04 Dec 1968 
30 Dec 1968 

01 Jan 1969 
05 Jan 1969 



29 Jun 1966 

18 Oct 1968 

27 Oct 1968 
16 Nov 1968 



02 Dec 1968 
05 Dec 1968 

03 Jan 1969 



VNSM 



Inclusive 

07 Jan 1969 
14 Jan 1969 
22 Jan 1969 
24 Jan 1969 

26 Jan 1969 
09 Feb 1969 
22 Feb 1969 
19 Mar 1969 
17 Dec 1965 
11 Feb 1966 
21 Mar 1966 

27 Apr 1966 
29 Dec 1968 

08 Feb 1969 
19 Mar 1969 



Dates Covering Unit Award 
10 Jan 1969 
19 Jan 1969 



20 Feb 1969 
03 Mar 1969 
31 Mar 1969 
23 Jan 1966 
06 Mar 1966 
10 Apr 1966 
09 Jul 1966 
30 Jan 1969 
03 Mar 1969 
30 Mar 1969 




Two squadron A-4C Skyhawks in flight, circa 1964—1965. 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 289 



VA-304 

Lineage 

Established as Attack Squadron THREE HUNDRED 
FOUR (VA-304) on 1 July 1970. 

Disestablished on 31 December 1994. The first 
squadron to be assigned the VA-304 designation. 



Squadron Insignia and 
Nickname 

The squadron's insig- 
nia was approved by 
CNO on 21 January 
1971. Colors for the 
insignia were: a black 
background with a 
white border; the out- 
line of the phoenix is 
red and the claws are 
black; white skull with 
shades of gray; and a 




The squadron 's skull and phoenix 
insignia. 



black scroll with red lettering. 
Nickname: Firebirds, 1970-1994. 



Chronology of Significant Events 

1 Jul 1970: VA-304, a reserve squadron, established 
as part of a reorganization intended to increase the 
combat readiness of the Naval Air Reserve Force. 
Elements of reserve unit, VA-20G3, were used to form 
the newly established VA-304. 

May 1987: VA-304 operated from the Canadian 
Forces Base at Edmonton, Alberta, while participating 
in exercise Rendezvous 87-Bold Warrior. The exercise 
was a mock full-scale battle between elements of the 
Canadian Armed Forces with VA-304 acting as an 
aggressor force. 

Aug 1988: VA-304 was the first reserve squadron to 
receive and operate the A-6E Intruder. 




A squadron A-4C Skyhawk, circa 1970 or 1971. 



Home Port Assignments 



Location 

NAS Alameda 



Assignment Date 
01 Jul 1970 



Commanding Officers 





Date Assumed Command 


CDRJohn H. Thompson 


01 Jul 1970 


CDR Peter L. Hammes 


01 Jul 1971 


CDR Jerry V. Kirk 


21 Jan 1973 


CDR Raymond G. Blake 


20 Jul 1974 


CDR David M. Boaz 


17 Jan 1976 


CDR Matthew A. McCarthy 


Jan 1978 


CDR Frank J. Bender 


20 Oct 1979 


CDR R. F. Bush 


Jun 1981 


CDR D. B. Ashworth 


Mar 1983 


CDR Thomas W. Hearn 


Sep 1984 


CDR Donald K. Simmons 


20 Apr 1986 


CDR Daniel R. Kestly 


26 Apr 1987 


CDR Michael F. Dibello 


16 Oct 1988 


CDRJohn R. Hines, Jr. 


20 May 1990 


CDR Robert S. Mull, Jr. 


16 Nov 1991 


CDR William A. Roig 


22 May 1993 


CDR Craig C. Groom 


25 Jun 1994 




A squadron A-7A 
Corsair II at NAS 
Alameda, 

California, in 1975. 



290 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



Aircraft Assignment 



Air Wing Assignments 



Type of Aircraft 



A-4C 



A-7A 
A-7B 
A-7E 



KA-6D 
A-6E 



Date Type First Received 

Jul 1970 
06 Aug 1971 
Sep 1977 
Sep 1986 
22 Jul 1988 
05 Aug 1988 



Air Wing 

CVWR-30 



Unit Award 

MUC 
NAVE 



Tail Code 

ND 

Unit Awards Received 



Assignment Date 
01 Jul 1970 



Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 

01 Nov 1973 30 Nov 1975 

01 Jul 1974 30 Sep 1976 




Two squadron A-6 Intruders over the Golden Gate Bridge. 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 291 



VA-776 

Lineage 

Reserve Attack Squadron SEVEN HUNDRED SEVEN- 
TY SIX (VA-776) called to active duty on 27 January 
1968*. 

Deactivated and returned to reserve status on 18 
October 1968. 

Squadron Insignia and Nickname 

The squadron's insignia was approved by CNO on 

21 November 1963. 
Colors for the insignia 
were: a blue back- 
ground outlined in gold; 
white cloud outlined in 
black; gold eagle with 
black markings; gray lib- 
erty bell with black 
markings and the cross 
bar holding the bell was 
brown with black mark- 
ings; orange bombs and 
the scroll was gold with 
black lettering. 

Nickname: unknown. 




The squadron 's liberty bell 
insignia. 



* Few records exist for reserve squadrons prior to 1970. They did 
not submit history reports until 1970. 



Chronology of Significant Events 

27 Jan 1968: The President directed the activation of 
VA-776 following the capture of Pueblo (AGER 2) by a 
North Korean patrol boat on 23 January 1968. 



Home Port Assignments 



Location 

NAS Los Alamitos 
NAS Lemoore 



Assignment Date 

27 Jan 1968 
13 Jun 1968 



Commanding Officers 



CDR Milton E. Johnson, Jr. 



Date Assumed Command 

27 Jan 1968 



Aircraft Assignment 



Type of Aircraft 



A-4B 

TA-4F 

A-4E 



Date Type First Received 

Feb 1968 
Jun 1968 
Jun 1968 



Air Wing Assignments 



Air Wing Tail Code 

COMFAIRALAMEDA NR* 



Assignment Date 

27 Jan 1968 



• This tail code was also assigned two other activated reserve 
squadrons, VA-873 and VF-703- 





A squadron A-4B Skyhawk (Courtesy Robert Lawson Collection). 



292 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



VA-831 



Home Port Assignments 



Lineage 

Reserve Attack Squadron EIGHT HUNDRED THIR- 
TY ONE (VA-83D called to active duty on 27 January 
1968*. 

Deactivated and returned to reserve status on 18 
October 1968. 

Squadron Insignia and Nickname 

There is no record of an officially approved insignia. 
Nickname: unknown. 

Chronology of Significant Events 

27 Jan 1968: The President directed the activation of 
VA-831 following the capture of Pueblo (ACER 2) by a 
North Korean patrol boat on 23 January 1968. 

1 Jul 1968: The squadron was the first activated 
reserve unit on the east coast to be assigned to an 
operational air wing. 

* Few records exist for reserve squadrons prior to 1970. They did 
not submit history reports until 1970. 



Location 

NAS New York 
NAS Cecil Field 



Assignment Date 

27 Jan 1968 
30 May 1968 



Commanding Officers 



CDR Raymond Ketcham 



Date Assumed Command 

27 Jan 1968 



Aircraft Assignment 



Type of Aircraft 



A-4B 



Date Type First Received 

Jan 1968 



Air Wing Assignments 



Air Wing Tail Code 

COMFAIRJACKSONVILLE MA* 
CVW-1 AB 



Assignment Date 
1968 

01 Jul 1968 



* This tail code was also assigned two other activated reserve 
squadrons, VF-661 and VF-93L 




A squadron A-4 Skyhawk, circa 1968 (Courtesy Duane Kasulka Collection). 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 293 



VA-873 

Lineage 

Reserve Attack Squadron EIGHT HUNDRED SEV- 
ENTH THREE (VA-873) called to active duty on 27 
January 1968*. 

Deactivated and returned to reserve status on 12 
October 1968. 

Squadron Insignia and Nickname 

The squadron's insignia was approved by CNO on 16 
March 1964. Colors for the insignia were: a white and 

blue background out- 
lined in black; the blue 
background section had 
five white stars and the 
white section had a gold 
outline of San Francisco's 
Golden Gate with two 
blue rows of waves 
beneath the bridge; sepa- 
rating the two sections 
was a stylized aircraft in 
black with a red flame 
coming from the tail; the 
scroll was white out- 
lined in black with black 
lettering. 

Nickname: unknown. 




The squadron 's insignia used a 
stylized aircraft design with stars 
in the upper half and the Golden 
Gate Bridge in the lower part. 



Chronology of Significant Events 

27 Jan 1968: The President directed the activation of 
VA-873 following the capture of Pueblo (AGER 2) by a 
North Korean patrol boat on 23 January 1968. 



Home Port Assignments 



Location 

NAS Alameda 



Assignment Date 

27 Jan 1968 



Commanding Officers 



CDR Glen W. Stinnett, Jr. 



Date Assumed Command 

27 Jan 1968 



Aircraft Assignment 



Type of Aircraft Date 



A-4B 
A-4C 



Type First Received 

27 Jan 1968 
May 1968 



Air Wing Assignments 



Air Wing Tail Code 

COMFAIRALAMEDA NR* 

CVW-2 NE 
COMFAIRALAMEDA 



Assignment date 

27 Jan 1968 
01 Jul 1968 
01 Oct 1968 



* Few records exist for reserve squadrons prior to 1970. They did 
not submit history reports until 1970. 



* This tail code was also assigned to two other activated reserve 
squadrons, VA-776 and VF-703- 



II HT ~* *V 



>*<" „ -i.hIhMi-i-I mmZt 




A squadron A-4 Skyhawk, circa 1968 (Courtesy Doug Olson Collection). 



CHAPTER 3 

Heavy Attack Squadron Histories (VAH) 

VAH-8 to VAH-123 



VAH-8 

Lineage 

Established as Heavy Attack Squadron EIGHT (VAH- 
8) on 1 May 1957. 

Disestablished on 17 January 1968. The first 
squadron to be assigned the VAH-8 designation. 



Squadron 
Insignia and 
Nickname 

The squadron's 
insignia was ap- 
proved by CNO on 
29 April 1958. 
Colors for the in- 
signia were not 
available. 

Nickname: 
Fireballers, 
1959-1968. 




The squadron's approved insignia. 



accident. His aircraft, while returning to NAS Cubi 
Point from a training flight, crashed into Mount 
Silanguin. The crewmembers, Lieutenant Ray G. 
English and ATCS Russell J. Marshall were also killed 
in the accident. 

Apr 1965: The squadron participated in its first com- 
bat operations. Bombing missions were performed 
against targets such as army camps and marshalling 
yards during the combat deployment. Air-to-air refuel- 
ing sorties for attack and fighter aircraft were also 
flown. 

May-Jun 1966: The squadron's A-3B aircraft left 
Constellation (CVA 64), in late May while in Hawaii, 
and flew to Cubi Point to await the arrival of 
Constellation. During the period prior to the carriers 
arrival in the Philippines, the squadron's aircraft flew 
operations in support of Yankee Team from Ranger 
(CVA 61) and Enterprise (CVAN 65). During the 
deployment, the squadron's primary mission was com- 
bat aerial refuelling in support of CVW-15 and other 
units flying missions in North Vietnam. 



Home Port Assignments 



Chronology of Significant Events 

13 Mar 1960: All nine of the squadron's A3D-2 
Skywarriors were launched from the deck of Midway 
(CVA 41), while deployed to WestPac, and flew a for- 
mation trans-Pacific flight of 4,800 miles to their home 
port of NAS Whidbey Island. Refueling stops were 
made at NAS Barbers Point and Alameda. The total 
flight time was 10.9 hours and the aircraft arrived at 
NAS Whidbey Island on 15 March. 

Mar-Apr 1961: The squadron, while deployed 
aboard Midway, operated in the South China Sea due 
to the deteriorating position of Laotian government 
forces. 

13 Mar 1962: During exercise Potshot, squadron 
A3Ds were launched from Midway carrying Marine 
paratroopers who were dropped on a target site at 
Camp Pendleton. 

12 Dec 1963: The squadron's commanding officer, 
Commander C. E. Guthrie, was killed in an aircraft 



Location 

NAS North Island 
NAS Whidbey Island 



Assignment Date 
01 May 1957 
01 Jul 1957 



Commanding Officers 



CDR Halford Woodson (acting) 
CDR LeRoy B. Fraser 
CDR Halford Woodson 
CDR Frederick R. Fearnow 
CDR Cyrus F. Fitton 
CDR James T. Cockrill 
CDR Frank S. Haak 
CDR C. E. Guthrie 
CDR Archie B. Treadwell 
CDR Charles W. Cates 
CDR Ralph E. Neiger 
CDR Thomas P. Stewart 



Date Assumed Command 

01 May 1957 
28 Jun 1957 
21 Jun 1958 

29 J an 1959 
05 Feb 1960 

1961 

30 Mar 1962 
01 Mar 1963 
12 Dec 1963 
04 Dec 1964 
03 Dec 1965 
14 Dec 1966 



295 



296 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



Aircraft Assignment 



Type of Aircraft 



A3D-2/A-3Bt 



F9F-8B* 



F3D-2* 



D a te Type F i rst Recei ved 

12 Aug 1957 
28 Aug 1957 
01 Sep 1957 



Aircraft Assignment— Continued 

Type of Aircraft 



KA-3B 



D a te Type F i rst Recei ved 
May 1967 



* These aircraft were used for training flights during the latter part of 
1957. 

t The A3D-2 designation was changed to A-3B in 1962. 



Major Overseas Deployments 



Date of 


Date of 


Air 




Type of 


Area of 


Departure 


Return 


Wing 


Carrier 


Aircraft 


Operation 


14 Jul 1958 


19 Dec 1958 


CVG-21 


CVA 16* 


A3D-2 


WestPac 


16 Aug 1958 


12 Mar 1959 


CVG-2 


CVA 41 


A3D-2 


WestPac 


15 Aug 1959 


25 Mar 1960 


CVG-2 


CVA 41 


A3D-2 


WestPac 


16 Feb 1961 


28 Sep 1961 


CVG-2 


CVA 41 


A3D-2 


WestPac 


06 Apr 1962 


20 Oct 1962 


CVG-2 


CVA 41 


A3D-2 


WestPac 


08 Nov 1963 


26 May 1964 


CVW-2 


CVA 41 


A-3B 


WestPac 


06 Mar 1965 


23 Nov 1965 


CVW-2 


CVA 41 


A-3B 


WestPac/Vietnam 


12 May 1966 


03 Dec 1966 


CVW-15 


CVA 64 


A-3B 


WestPac/Vietnam 


29 Apr 1967 


04 Dec 1967 


CVW-14 


CVA 64 


KA-3B 


WestPac/Vietnam 



*VAH-8 Det L was embarked in Lexington (CVA 16) during its deployment to WestPac, operating with four squadron aircraft. 




Two squadron A3D-2 Skywarriorsfly over Midway (CVA 41) in 1959. 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 297 



Air Wing Assignments 



Unit Awards Received— Continued 



Air Wing Tail Code 

COMHATWING-2* NL/ZDt 
COMFAIRWHIDBEY 

CVG-2t/CVW-2§ NE 

CVW-15 NL 

CVW-14 NK 



Assignment Date 
01 May 1957 

01 Jul 1959 

02 Jul 1959 
15 Jan 1966 
01 Jan 1967 



Unit Award 



* VAH-8 was assigned to Commander Heavy Attack Wing 2 and tem- 
porarily assigned to a Carrier Air Group during deployment. 

t Each heavy attack squadron was assigned its own tail code. These 
tail codes were different from the ones assigned to the carrier air 
groups. VAH-8's tail code was changed from NL to ZD in 1957. The 
effective date for this change was most likely the beginning of FY 
58 (1 July 1957). 

t- On 30 June 1959 COMHATWING-2 was disestablished and VAH-8 
was administratively assigned to COMFAIRWHIDBEY. On 2 July 
1959, CVG-2 was assigned as VAH-8's operational senior command. 
CVG-2 became VAH-8's administrative senior on 15 August 1959. 

§ CVG-2 was redesignated CVW-2 when Carrier Air Groups (CVG) 
were redesignated Carrier Air Wings (CVW) on 20 December 1963. 



Unit Awards Received 

UnitAward Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 

NAVE Mar 1964 30 J un 1965 

AFEM 06 Sep 1958 10 Sep 1958 

12 Sep 1958 29 Sep 1958 

12 Oct 1958 30 Oct 1958 



NUC 



RVNGC 



VNSM 



Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 


1 1 m^w inco 
11 NOV lyjo 


1 C Mrti, 1 ACQ 

Id Nov lyjo 


■Dfl Mnu 1 (ICQ 

3v NOV iy5o 


Iz Dec lybo 


M -tr 1 OCT 

Z4 Mar lyoi 


zd Mar iybi 


")Q M -ir 1 fiCI 

Zo Mar lyoi 


U/ Apr lybl 


fiQ Anr 1 Q£C 

Uo Apr lyto 


ii May lyoj 


iy May iyto 


OQ Inn 1 G£R 

zo jun iyt)j 


lb Apr iyto 


fi/l M r\\i 1 Q£R 

U4 NOV lyco 


zy May iybb 


Z4 NOV lyoo 


ib May iyb/ 


")C M r\\i 1 

zb Nov iyt>/ 


u_> uct iybj 




uy uct lybj 




")1 1 i i « 1 ACC 

zi jun lybb 


">"> 1 1 1 « i ncc 

zz jun iybo 


fil M n\i 1 fiC~7 

ui May iyb/ 


ui Nov iyb/ 


")") 1 1 il 1 Q£C 

zz j ui iybj 


")C Aim 1 G£R 

zb Aug iybo 


1 fi Cr\r* 1 Q£C 

iu bep iybj 


uy uct iybj 


18 Oct 1965 


04 Nov 1965 


14 Jun 1966 


13 Jul 1966 


27 Jul 1966 


31 Aug 1966 


08 Sep 1966 


01 Oct 1966 


08 Jun 1967 


11 Jun 1967 


18 Jun 1967 


25 Jul 1967 


01 Aug 1967 


03 Sep 1967 


25 Sep 1967 


15 Oct 1967 


24 Oct 1967 


12 Nov 1967 



298 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



VAH-15 



Home Port Assignments 



Lineage 

Established Heavy Attack Squadron FIFTEEN (VAH- 
15) on 15 January 1958. 

Disestablished on 15 February 1959. The first 
squadron to be assigned the VAH-15 designation. 



Squadron Insignia and 
Nickname 

There is no record of 
the squadron receiving 
CNO approval for its 
insignia. Colors for the 
insignia are unknown. 

Nickname: unknown. 



Chronology of 
Significant Events 

Jan 1958: VAH-15 was 
established with the des- 
ignation heavy attack 
but its primary mission was to provide aerial refueling 
to the Naval Air Force, Atlantic Fleet. 



Location Assignment Date 

NAS Norfolk 15 Jan 1958 

Commanding Officers 

Date Assumed Command 




LCDR Alfred G.Trube, Jr. (acting) 
CDR Trazewell T. Shepard, Jr. 



Jan 1958 
13 Jun 1958 



Aircraft Assignment 



Type of Aircraft 



AJ-2 



TV-2 



D a te Type F i rst Recei ved 
Apr 1958 
Jul 1958 



Thesquadron'sstylized aircraft 
insignia. Note the refueling line 
connecting the two aircraft. 



Air Wing Assignments 



AirWing Tail Code 

NALCOLANTUNIT GP 



Assignment Date 
1958 





A squadron AJ-2 Savage at NAS Glenview, Illinois, circa 1958. 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 299 



VAH-16 

Lineage 

Established as Heavy Attack Squadron SIXTEEN 
(VAH-16) on 15 January 1958. 

Disestablished on 30 January 1959. The first 
squadron to be assigned the VAH-16 designation. 



Chronology of Significant Events 

ljul 1958: The squadron's primary heavy attack 
high altitude bombing mission was changed to aerial 
refueling. 

13 Jun 1958: The squadron established Detachment 
A in Hawaii and then relocated it to Agana, Guam, 
with four AJ-2 aircraft. 



Squadron Insignia and Nickname 

The squadron's insignia was approved by CNO on 
25 July 1958. Colors for the insignia were: a back- 
ground of alter- 
nating white and 
blue quadrants 
outlined in blue; 
light blue light- 
ning bolt outlined 
in gold; white 
sword blade with 
a gold handle; 
and a blue scroll 
outlined in gold 
with red lettering. 

Nickname: un- 
known. 




The squadron's one and only insignia. 



Home Port Assignments 



Location 

NAS North Island 



Assignment Date 
15 Jan 1958 



Commanding Officers 



CDR R. L. Ashcraft 



Date Assumed Command 
1958 



Type of Aircraft 



AJi_ 



Aircraft Assignment 



D a te Type F i rst Recei ved 
15 Jan 1958 



Date of 
Departure 

09 Aug 1957 
06 Jan 1958 



Date of 
Return 

02 Apr 1958 
30 Jun 1958 



Air 
Wing 

ATG-3 
ATG-4 



Major Overseas Deployments 



Carrier 

CVA 33 
CVA 12 



Det* 

J* 
K* 



Type of 
Aircraft 

AJ-2 
AJ-2 



Area of 
Operation 

WestPac 
WestPac 



* The squadron only deployed detachments. The departure dates listed above are for the carrier and do not apply to VAH-16's detachments. 
VAH-16's detachments were not established until after 15 January 1958 and their departure dates are not known. 



Air Wing 

COMHATWING-2 



Air Wing Assignments 

Tail code 
ZH 



Assignment Date 
15 Jan 1958 




A squadron AJ-2 Savage refueling 
an F3H-2M Demon from VF-64, 
circa 1958. 



300 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



VAH-21 

Lineage 

Established as Heavy Attack Squadron TWENTY 
ONE (VAH-21) on 1 September 1968. 

Disestablished on 16 June 1969. The first squadron 
to be assigned the VAH-21 designation. 

Squadron Insignia and Nickname 

The squadron's insignia request was disapproved by 
CNO because the insignia instruction restricted the use 
of cartoon designs. A new insignia request was not 
submitted prior to the squadron's disestablishment. 

Nickname: unknown. 




1 Sep 1968: A detachment of VAH-21 was estab- 
lished at NAF Cam Ranh Bay, South Vietnam. The 
detachment at NAF Cam Ranh Bay had been a Naval 
Air Test Center Project TRIM Detachment (TRIM: Trails 
Roads Interdiction Multi-sensor) prior to becoming a 
VAH-21 detachment. 

16 Jun 1969: With the disestablishment of VAH-21, 
its record included no loss of aircraft or any wounds 
suffered by its personnel during operations in 
Southeast Asia. 



Home Port Assignments 



Location 

NS Sangley Point, Philippines 



Assignment Date 
01 Sep 1968 



Commanding Officers 



CDR A. E. Forsman 
CDR N. D. Dunnan 



Date Assumed Command 
01 Sep 1968 
1968 



Aircraft Assignment 



Type of Aircraft 
AP-2H 



D a te Type First Recei ved 
Sep 1968 



Squadron personnel standing atattention during the establishment 
ceremony at NS Sangley Point, Philippines, in September 1968. 

Chronology of Significant Events 

1 Sep 1968: Heavy Attack Squadron 21 became the 
first squadron in the Navy with a night interdiction 
mission using new electronic surveillance equipment 
(multi-sensors). Its mission was to interdict logistics 
moving over land or sea. 



Air Wing Assignments 

AirWing Tail Code Assignment Date 

COMFAIRWESTPAC SL 01 Sep 1968 

Unit Awards Received 

Unit Award Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 

MUC 14 J an 1968 01 Dec 1968 




A squadron AP-2H 
Neptune at NAS 
Patuxent River, 1969 
(Courtesy Robert Lawson 
Collection). 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 301 



VAH-123 

Lineage 

Established as Heavy Attack Training Unit, Pacific 
(HATUPAC) on 15 June 1957. 

Redesignated Heavy Attack Squadron ONE HUN- 
DRED TWENTY THREE (VAH-123) on 29June 1959. 

Disestablished on 1 February 1971. The first 
squadron to be assigned the VAH-123 designation. 

Squadron Insignia and Nickname 

The unit's insignia 
was approved by CNO 
on 12 August 1959. 
Colors for the insignia 
are unknown. Following 
the unit's redesignation 
to VAH-123 the HATU- 
PAC designation was 
removed from the scroll 
and replaced with VAH- 
123. In 1961 the design 
was modified to include 
an upper scroll with the 
motto Professionalism is 
Our Business. 

Nickname: Profes- 
sionals, 1961-1971. 




Thesquadron'sinsignia following 
its modification in 1961 which 
added the motto Professionalism 
isour Business. 



Chronology of Significant Events 

Jun 1957: The unit was established to train person- 
nel for the heavy attack mission, including the pilots, 
bombardier/navigators and aircrewmen. 

25 Nov 1958: Lieutenant Commander C. L. Chute 
became the first student to complete the unit's heavy 
attack training syllabus, through the solo stage, for the 
A3D-2 Sky warrior. 

Jan-Mar 1959: The unit incorporated the maintenance 
training program into its syllabus, thereby providing a 
complete training program for all aspects of the heavy 
attack community's operational requirements. 

Aug 1966: The squadron received its first A-6A 
Intruder in preparation for fleet replacement training 
in the new attack aircraft. 

1 Sep 1967: VAH-123 was relieved of its mission of 
replacement training in the A-6 Intruder when VA-128 
was established as a separate squadron from VAH-123 
and assumed that mission. 

1 Feb 1971: VAH-123 was disestablished and the 
mission of replacement training for the A-3/KA-3B was 
transferred to VAQ-130. Elements of VAH-123 were 
transferred to VAQ-130. 




A squadron P2V-3B at NAF Litchfield following its retirement from 
service (Courtesy Robert Lawson Collection). 



Home Port Assignments 



Location 

NAS North Island 
NAS Whidbey Island 



Assignment Date 
15 Jun 1957 
01 Jul 1957 



Commanding Officers 



LCDR R. H. Grant (acting) 
CDR Donald A. Miller 
CDR Frank J. Shaw 
CDR Norman K. Mclnnis 
CDR C. F. Fitton 
CDR R. E. Osterholm 
CDR L. E. Kirkemo 
CDR Edward C. Fritsch 
CDR John L. Underwood 
CDR John P. Sundberg 
CDR Horace B. Chambers 
CDR Donald K. Forbes 
CDR James E. Service 



Date Assumed Command 
15 Jun 1957 
16 Jul 1957 
18 Jul 1958 
29 Dec 1959 
20 Jun 1961 
15 Jan 1963 
20 Feb 1964 
05 Jan 1965 
14 J an 1966 
20 J an 1967 
01 Dec 1967 
07 Jan 1969 
1970 




A squadron A-3 Skywarrior preparing to launch from Constellation 
(CVA 64) in March 1968. 



302 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



Aircraft Assignment 



Aircraft Assignment— Continued 



Type of Aircraft 
P2V-3B 
F3D-2 
F9F-8B 
A3D-2/A-3B* 
F9F-8T 
A3D-1/A-3A* 
A3D-2P 



D a te Type F i rst Recei ved 
Jul 1957 
Jul 1957 
01 May 1958 
01 Aug 1958 
11 Feb 1958 
Jul 1959 
04 Dec 1959 



Type of Aircraft 



D a te Type F i rst Recei ved 
21 Dec 1959 
04 Aug 1960 
12 Aug 1960 
17 Aug 1966 
May 1967 



* The A3D-2, A3D-1 and A3D-2T designations were changed to A- 
3B, A-3A and TA-3B in 1962. 





A squadron A-6A Intruder, 
most likely at NASWhidbey 
Island, Washington. 



Air Wing Assignments 

AirWing Tail Code Assignment Date 

HATWING-2 ZG* 15jun 1957 

RCVG-12/RCVW-12t NJt 29Jun 1958 

* The tail code ZG was assigned to Heavy Attack Training Unit, Pacific. 

t Replacement Carrier Air Group 12 (RCVG-12) was redesignated RCVW-12 when Carrier Air Groups (CVG) were redesignated Carrier Air Wings 
(CVW) on 20 December 1963. 

t RCVW-12 was disestablished on 1 June 1970 but VAH-123 continued to use the NJ tail code that had been assigned to RCVW-12. 




A squadron A-3 Skywarrior being placed on display for the squadron's disestablishment ceremony at NASWhidbey Island, Washington, 1971. 



CHAPTER 4 

Tactical Aerial Refueling Squadron 

Histories (VAK) 

VAK-208 to VAK-308 



VAK- 208 

Lineage 

Established as Tactical Electronic Warfare Squadron 
TWO HUNDRED EIGHT (VAQ-208) on 31 July 1970. 

Redesignated Aerial Refueling Squadron TWO HUN- 
DRED EIGHT (VAK-208) on 1 October 1979. 

Disestablished 30 September 1989. The first and only 
squadron to be assigned the VAK-208 designation. 

Squadron Insignia and Nickname 

The squadron's first insignia was approved by CNO 
on 6 May 1971. Colors for the insignia were: a yellow 

background outlined in 

red with a red scroll and 
black lettering; blue styl- 
ized tail code letters; 
brown eagle with white 
markings, orange beak 
and claws outlined in 
black, and a red eye; 
and red lightning bolts. 

Following the squad- 
ron's redesignation a 
new insignia was ap- 
proved by CNO on 10 
October 1980. Colors 
for this insignia were: a 
yellow background out- 
lined in black; red scroll 
with white lettering; 
black latitude and longi- 
tudinal lines; alternating 
white and red compass 
star outlined in black; 
red directional letters; 
and a blue whale with 
black markings and a 

Thesecond insignia used bythe wnit e eye and teeth, 
squadron depicted thewhale, re- Nickname: Jockeys, 

flectingthenicknameof theaircraft i cnri- 1 QRQ 

flown by the squadron, the A-3. iy/u i303. 




The squadron 's fi rst i nsignia used 
the eagle and a stylized AF tail 
code in its design. 




Chronology of Significant Events 

31 Jul 1970: The squadron was established as part of 
a reorganization intended to increase the combat readi- 
ness of the Naval Air Reserve Force. It was to provide 
tanking, pathfinding and COD service to the Atlantic 
and Pacific Fleets and other units around the world. 

Mar 1971: The squadron's first operational mission 
was conducted when it provided tanker support for 
CVWR-20 aircraft embarked in Independence (CVA 62) 
for a training exercise. 

Aug 1971: The squadron conducted its two weeks of 
active duty training embarked in John F. Kennedy (CVA 
67) as part of CVWR-20. This was the first complete 
Reserve Carrier Air Wing deployment aboard a carrier. 

Oct 1971: The squadron conducted its first overseas 
operational assignment by providing tanker service 
across the Atlantic for RA-5C Vigilantes returning from 
a Mediterranean cruise. 

Jan 1972: Squadron aircraft provided COD services 
for Constellation (CVA 64) on Yankee Station and 
Enterprise (CVAN 65) in the Indian Ocean. 

Sep 1972: Squadron aircaft provided COD services 
for Kennedy while she was operating in the North Sea. 
The squadron aircraft operated out of NAF Mildenhall, 
England, during this evolution. 

Apr 1973: Squadron aircraft provided support for 
Yellow Aspirin, a CNO mission to Kuwait to review 
the defense capabilities of that country. 

Oct 1973: Squadron aircraft provide COD and refu- 
eling support during NATO Operation Swift Move for 
the air wing embarked in Kennedy, operating in the 
North Atlantic. 

16-30 Oct 1973: During the Yon Kippur War in the 
Middle East, squadron aircraft provided support for 
Operation Nickle Grass, the transatlantic flight of A-4 
Sky hawks to Israel. 

Jul-Aug 1974: During civil unrest and the Turkish 
invasion of Cyprus, squadron aircraft provided tanker 
and logistic support for Forrestal (CVA 59) and 
Independence (CV 62) operating in the area of Cyprus 
during the crisis. 

Sep 1976: Squadron aircraft provided support for 
the NATO Exercise Teamwork conducted in the North 
Atlantic. 



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304 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



Sep 1978: Squadron aircraft provided support for 
the NATO Exercise Northern Wedding conducted in 
the North Atlantic. Squadron aircraft operated out of 
NAF Mildenhall during this exercise. 

1 Oct 1979: The squadron was redesignated Aerial 
Refueling Squadron 208 (VAK-208) and the mission 
of the squadron changed to primarily tanker service. 
The electronic warfare capability was removed from 
its mission. 

May-Jun 1980: Squadron aircraft provided support 
for the French naval Exercise Suroit-80 in Landivisiau, 
France. 

Sep 1980: Squadron aircraft provided support for the 
NATO Exercise Teamwork 80 held in the North Atlantic. 

Sep 1982: Squadron aircraft provided support for 
Exercise Agile Falcon held in the North Atlantic. 

Sep-Oct 1984: Squadron aircraft provided 
tanker/pathfinding support for NATO Exercise Display 
Determination-84. 



Commanding Officers— Continued 



Home Port Assignments 



Location 

NAS Alameda 



Assignment Date 
31 Jul 1970 



Commanding Officers 



Date Assumed Command 
AMSC L.V. Lambert (Petty Officer in Charge) 31 Jul 1970 
LCDR J. F. Jefferson (Officer in Charge) 20 Nov 1970 
CDR Thomas E. Frey 02 Jul 1971 

CDR Tad H. Bingham 08 Jul 1973 



CDR Earl B. Wynn, Jr. 
LCDR Phillip L. Middleton 
CDR B. A. Dempsey 
CDR Howard W. Goodroe 
CDR David O. Mason 
CDR Donald L. Dostal 
CDR David E. Boyd 
CDR Alden F. Mullins, Jr. 
CDR Andrew J. Kisela, Jr. 



Date Assumed Command 

06 Dec 1975 
14 Oct 1978 
04 Oct 1980 

07 Nov 1981 
13 Nov 1982 

06 May 1984 
03 May 1986 

07 Nov 1987 

1989 



Aircraft Assignment 



Type of Airc raft 
KA-3B 



Air Wing 
CVWR-20 



Unit Award 
MUC 

SLOC 
NAVE 



D a te Type F i rst Recei ved 
20 Nov 1970 



Air Wing Assignments 

Tail Code 
AF 



Assignment Date 
31 Jul 1970 



Unit Awards Received 

Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 



21 Dec 1971 
01 Oct 1986 
28 Mar 1983 
01 Jul 1974 
01 Oct 1976 



30 Sep 1974 
30 Sep 1989 
18 Apr 1983 
30 Sep 1976 
30 Sep 1978 




A squadron KA-3B aboard 
Eisenhower (CVN 69) in 
September 1985. 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 305 



VAK-308 

Lineage 

Established as Tactical Electronic Warfare Squadron 
THREE HUNDRED EIGHT (VAQ-308) on 2 May 1970. 

Redesignated Aerial Refueling Squadron THREE 
HUNDRED EIGHT (VAK-308) on 1 October 1979. 

Disestablished on 30 September 1988. The first 
squadron to be assigned the VAK-308 designation. 

Squadron Insignia and Nickname 

The squadron's insignia was approved by CNO on 
28 December 1971. Colors for the Griffin insignia 

were: a blue back- 
ground outlined in gold, 
blue scroll outlined in 
gold with gold lettering; 
gold lightning bolt; the 
griffin had markings of 
different shades of 
brown, its head was 
white with shades of 
gray and its left wing 
had different shades of 
gray, the beak and eye 
were yellow with black 
markings, the tongue 
and claws were red outlined in black; red diamond 
designs outlined in white. 

On 6 October 1981 CNO approved a modification to 
the squadron's insignia that changed the designation 
on the scroll from VAQ-308 to VAK-308. 
Nickname: Griffins, 1971-1988. 

Chronology of Significant Events 

2 May 1970: The squadron was established as part 
of a reorganization intended to increase the combat 
readiness of the Naval Air Reserve Force. It was to 
provide tanking, pathfinding and logistic support ser- 
vices to the Atlantic and Pacific Fleets and other units 
around the world. 




Thesquadron'sGriffin insignia. 



23 Sep 1971: The squadron conducted its first 
tanker/pathfinder service across the Atlantic. 

29 Nov-4 Dec 1971: The squadron conducted its 
first tanker/pathfinder service across the Pacific. 

Dec 1971-J an 1972: Squadron aircraft provided COD 
service to the Enterprise (CVAN 65) while operating in 
the Bay of Bengal during the Indo-Pakistani War. 

Sep 1972: Squadron aircraft provided COD services 
for Kennedy (CVA 67) while she was operating in the 
North Sea. 

Apr-May 1973: Squadron aircraft provided 
tanker/pathfinder services for two Reserve F-8 
squadrons enroute to operations in the Middle East. 

Sep-Oct 1973: Squadron aircraft provided COD and 
tanker service to Kennedy operating in the North 
Atlantic during NATO exercise Operation Magic 
Sword/Swift Move. 

October 1973: During the Yon Kippur War in the 
Middle East squadron aircraft provided 
tanker/pathfinder service for Operation Nickle Grass, 
the transatlantic flight of A-4 Skyhawks enroute to 
Israel. 

Jul-Aug 1974: During civil unrest and the Turkish 
invasion of Cyprus squadron aircraft provided tanker 
and logistic support for Forrestal (CVA 59) and 
Independence (CV 62) operating in the area of Cyprus 
during the crisis. 

Sep 1974: Squadron aircraft provided COD and 
tanker service to Kennedy operating in the North 
Atlantic during NATO exercise Operation Northern 
Merger. 

Sep-Oct 1984: Squadron aircraft provided 
tanker/pathfinder service to squadrons involved in 
exercise Display Determination held in the 
Mediterranean. 

Apr-May 1987: Squadron aircraft provided tanker 
service to units involved in exercise Dragon Hammer. 
The squadron's aircraft operated out of NAS Sigonella 
during this evolution. 

Apr 1988: Squadron aircraft provided tanker service 
to units involved in exercise Dragon Hammer. The 
squadron's aircraft operated out of NAS Sigonella dur- 
ing this evolution. 




A squadron KA-3B Skywarrior at NAS 
Alameda, California, in 1973. Noticethe 
squadron designation VAQ-308 on the 
extended speed brake. 



306 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



Home Port Assignments 



Location 

NAS Alameda 



Assignment Date 
02 May 1970 



Commanding Officers 



CDR Gregory B. Bambo, Jr. 
CDR Charlesjacob 
CDR Gregory L. Davison 
CDR Tad H. Bingham 
CDR Gerald F. Hicks 
CDR George L. Green 
CDR James T. Edwards 
CDR DennisJ. Kowalzyk 
CDR William C. Burgess 
CDR Daniel Kalashian 
CDR David D. Abelson 



Date Assumed Command 
02 May 1970 
16 Jul 1972 
16 Jun 1974 
06 Dec 1975 
17 Dec 1977 
Jan 1980 
16 J an 1982 
24 Jul 1983 

19 J an 1985 

20 Jul 1986 
28 J an 1988 



Aircraft Assignment 

Ty pe of A i rc ra ft D a te Type F i rst Recei ved 

Sep 1970 



KA-3B 



Air Wing Assignments 

AirWing Tail Code Assignment Date 

CVWR-30 ND 02 May 1970 

Unit Awards Received 

Unit Award Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 

MUC 21 Dec 1971 30 Sep 1974 





A squadron KA-3B in flight, 1984. 



CHAPTER 5 

Light Attack Squadron History (VAL) 



VAL-4 

Lineage 

Established as Light Attack Squadron FOUR (VAL-4) 
on 3 January 1969. 

Disestablished on 10 April 1972. The first squadron 
to be assigned the VAL-4 designation. 

Squadron Insignia and Nickname 

The squadron's first insignia was approved by CNO 
on 7 March 1969. Colors for the Yellow Jacket 

insignia were: a red 
background outlined 
in black; a white 
scroll outlined in 
black with black let- 
tering; black stylized 
aircraft with yellow 
contrails; the yellow 
jacket had silver 
wings with black 
markings, a brown 
body outlined in 
black, the head and 
stinger tail were yel- 
low with black mark- 
ings; the lightning 
bolt from the tail was black and the explosion was 
yellow outlined in black. 

On 14 July 1971 
CNO approved a 
modification to the 
squadron's insignia. 
Colors for the Pony 
insignia were: a red 
background outlined 
in black; a white 
scroll outlined in 
black with black let- 
tering; the stylized 
aircraft were black 
with yellow contrails; 
the pony was black. 

Nickname: Black 
Ponies, 1971-1972. 




The yellow jacket wasp was the 
squadron's first insignia design. 




Chronology of Significant Events 

Sep 1968: VS-41 was assigned the responsiblity of 
training personnel scheduled for assignment to VAL-4. 

Oct 1968: VS-41 received its first OV-10A Broncos 
for training VAL-4 personnel. 

Jan 1969: VAL-4 was established with the mission of 
conducting surveillance and offensive operations in 
support of river patrol craft, as well as providing air 
support for SEALS and combined U.S. Army, Navy and 
South Vietnamese operations. 

Mar 1969: VAL-4 was permanently based at the 
Naval Support Activity Detachment Airfield, Binh 
Thuy, South Vietnam, for combat operations. The 
squadron had two detachments, Det A assigned to 
Vietnamese Air Force Base, Binh Thuy and Det B at 
the Vung Tau, Army Airfield. 

19 Apr 1969: The squadron began its first combat 
operations, flying air support of the Naval River Forces 
in the Mekong Delta of South Vietnam. The missions 
included normal patrol, overhead air cover, scramble 
alert and gunfire/artillery spotting. 

Apr-May 1970: VAL-4's OV-10A Broncos participated 
in combined South Vietnamese and U.S. Riverine 
Force operations designed to neutralize sanctuary 
bases in the Mekong River Corridor in support of U.S. 
and South Vietnamese strikes against enemy sanctuar- 
ies in Cambodia. 




The squadron's second insignia, the 
Black Ponies, is the one that is best 
known. 



A OV-10A Bronco taking off from Vung Tau, Republic of Vietnam, 
on a combat mission, June 1969. 



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308 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



1 Jul 1970: With the completion of new facilities for 
VAL-4 on Vietnamese Air Force Base Binh Thuy and 
the consolidation of VAL-4's operating units, the 
squadron's Detachment B was disestablished. 

31 Mar 1972: The squadron conducted its last combat 
mission prior to its disestablishment on 10 April 1972. 

Home Port Assignments 

Location Assignment Date 

NAS North Island 03 J an 1969 

NSA Binh Thuy, South Vietnam 23 Mar 1969 

Commanding Officers 



CDR Gilbert L. Winans 
CDR Martin S. Schuman 
CDR Verle W. Klein 
CDR Leonard M. Rausch 
CDR Robert W. Porter 



Date Assumed Command 
03 J an 1969 
06 Sep 1969 
06 Mar 1970 
03 Sep 1970 
03 Mar 1971 



Aircraft Assignment 



Type of Aircraft 



OV-10A 
YOV-10D 



D a te Type F i rst Recei ved 
03 Jan 1969 
Jun 1971 



Air Wing Assignments 



Air Wing Tail Code 

VS-41 UM 
COMFAIRWESTPAC UM 



Assignment Date 
Sep 1968 
Mar 1969 



Unit Awards Received 



Unit Award 
NUC 

MUC 
RVNGC 



Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 

01 Jun 1964 01 Jun 1968 

01 Apr 1971 31 Oct 1971 

26 Mar 1969 03 Sep 1969 

21 Nov 1968 21 Nov 1970 



Unit Awards Received for VAL-4 Detachment B 




UnitAward Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 

NUC 14 Jun 1969 12 Aug 1969 

PUC 24 Jun 1969 28 Feb 1970 




A squadron OV-10A Bronco in flight, 1969. 



Three squadron OV-10A Broncos on a combat mission over the 
Mekong Delta, circa 1971. Note the squadron's Black Ponies insignia 
on the tail. 



CHAPTER 6 



Heavy Photographic Squadron Histories (VAP) 

VAP-61 to VAP-62 



VAP-61 

Lineage 

Established as Patrol Squadron SIXTY ONE (VP-61) 
on 20 January 1951. 

Redesignated Photographic Squadron SIXTY ONE 
(VJ-61) on 5 March 1952. 

Redesignated Heavy Photographic Squadron SIXTY 
ONE (VAP-61) in April 1956. 

Redesignated Composite Photographic Reconnais- 
sance Squadron SIXTY ONE (VCP-61) on 1 July 1959. 

Redesignated Heavy Photographic Squadron SIXTY 
ONE (VAP-61) on 1 July 1961. 

Disestablished on 1 July 1971. The first squadron to 
be assigned the VAP-61 designation. 




The squadron's second insignia 
was approved for use by the 
unitwhen it was designated 
VCP-61. The acronym in the 
scroll wasfor Photo Composite 
Squadron (VCP) 61. 



When VCP-61 was redesignated 
VAP-61, for the second time, it 
retained thestylized aircraftand 
globe design and just changed 
the scroll designation from PHO- 
TOCOMPRON-61 to VAP-61. 



Squadron Insignia and Nickname 

The squadron's first insignia was approved by CNO 
on 2 October 1951. This insignia had been used by 




Thisinsignia wasused by a 
different squadron prior to 
its approval for use by VP- 
61. It continued in use fol- 
lowing VP-61's redesigna- 
tion to VJ-61, VAP-61 and 
then VCP-61. 



VC-61 before being approved for use by VP-61. Colors 
for the insignia were: a blue background; a gray and 
white goose with a pink foot, green eyes, yellow bill, 
and a red tongue; the pilot and gunner's uniforms 
were olive green with yellow life jackets, pink faces, 
brown gloves, boots were olive green and brown, red 
nose and green eyes; black and white pilot's helmet 
and red gunner's helmet; black gun with white high- 
lights and a brown stock; gray camera with white 
sides, a black and white lens with a blue and white 
sight; the globe had blue water, yellow and white land 
areas and black longitude and latitude lines. 

A new insignia was approved by CNO on 11 
January 1961. Colors for this insignia were: a light sil- 



ver-blue background outlined in a medium blue; light 
silver-blue scroll outlined in dark blue with dark blue 
lettering; silver stylized aircraft with silver viewing 
lines; the land masses on the globe were an olive tan, 
a white ocean and dark blue longitude and latitude 
lines. The scroll designatation was changed to VAP-61 
in 1962. 
Nickname: World Recorders. 

Chronology of Significant Events 

20 Jan 1951: The squadron's mission was aerial pho- 
tographic reconnaissance and cartographic mapping. It 
deployed detachments around the world. 

Mar 1951: A squadron detachment was ordered to 
photograph the Mississippi Delta area and adjacent 
coastline. 

May 1951: A squadron detachment was ordered to 
Alaska in connection with mapping Alaska for the U.S. 
Army Map Service. 

ljul 1959: The squadron's mission was to provide 
aerial photographic intelligence for naval operations 
and cartographic mapping in the Pacific, providing 
detachments for deployment aboard carriers, as well 
as land facilities. 

May 1964: Squadron detachments began flying pho- 
tographic reconnaissance missions over Laos and 
South Vietnam as part of Yankee Team Operations. 
Missions were flown from carriers operating in the 
South China Sea. 



309 



310 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 




A squadron PB4Y-1P in 1951 (Courtesy Robert Lawson Collection). 



31 Jan 1970: The squadron's participation in 
Yankee Team Operations came to an end after 68 
months of providing day and night reconnaissance 
flights over hostile areas in Southeast Asia. Yankee 
Team missions were flown from carriers operating in 
the South China Sea as well as shore facilities in 
Southeast Asia. 

1 Jul 1971: The squadron was disestablished. During 
its period of service the squadron conducted mapping 
and special photographic projects in the 
Mediterranean area, Alaska, Hawaii and numerous 
other Pacific Islands, Korea, Japan, Okinawa, 
Philippines, North and South Vietnam, Laos, Thailand, 
New Guinea, New Britain, Australia and numerous 
places in the continental United States. 



A squadron F8U-1P 
Crusader in flight, circa 
1960 (Courtesy Robert 
Lawson Collection). 



2-5 Aug 1964: Squadron detachments aboard carri- 
ers operating in the South China Sea provided photo 
reconnaissance support during the Tonkin Gulf 
Crisisinvolving North Vietnamese patrol boat attacks 
on American destroyers. 

1965: Squadron detachments continued to operate 
from carriers in the South China Sea; providing photo 
reconnaissane support for Yankee Team Operations; 
as well as flying missions over North Vietnam, part of 
the Rolling Thunder Operations; and assisting in 
Market Time Operations, coastal and shipping surveil- 
lance along the coast of South Vietnam. 

7 Aug 1966: The squadron flew its first night combat 
infrared reconnaissance mission over North Vietnam. 
This began the use of infrared devices on squadron 
aircraft for interdicting truck convoys at night. 



• SS 




DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 311 



Home Port Assignments 

Assignment Date 
20 Jan 1951 
Jun 1956 



Commanding Officers— Continued 



Location 

NAAS Miramar/NAS Miramar* 
NAS Agana 



* NAAS Miramar was redesignated NAS Miramar on 1 April 1952. 



Commanding Officers 



CDR Jesse L. Pennell 
CDR John S. Harris 
CDR Herbert L. Salyer 
CDR David L. Soper 
CDR Gilbert B. Jansen, Jr. 
CDR Sy E. Mendenhall 



Date Assumed Command 
20 Jan 1951 
19 Jul 1952 
Jun 1953 
May 1954 
Jun 1955 
Nov 1956 



CDR Jerry F. McDaniel 
CDR Ralph W. Spuhler 
CDR Jonathan J. Crowder 
CDR Donald B. Brady 
CDR Robert E. Morris 
CDR Hal B. Stewart 
CDR D. A. Woodard 
CDR George H. Lee 
CDR Horace B. Chambers 
CDR Archibald S. Thompson 
CDR Arthur R. Day 
CDR William E. Pippin 
CDR Robert L. Skillen 



Date Assumed Command 
Sep 1958 
Dec 1959 
16 Sep 1960 

09 Nov 1961 
07 Nov 1962 
24 Oct 1963 
06 Nov 1964 
16 Nov 1965 
19 Nov 1966 
14 Nov 1967 
01 Nov 1968 

10 Nov 1969 
30 Nov 1970 




A couple of squadron AJ-2P Savages in flight, March 1953. 



312 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



Aircraft Assignment 



Aircraft Assignment-Continued 



Type of Aircraft 



PB4Y-1P/P4Y-1P* 



AI-2P 



F8U-1P 



A3D-2P/RA-3Bt 



D a te Type F i rst Recei ved 
Jan 1951 
14 Sep 1952 
Aug 1959 
Sep 1959 



Type of Aircraft 



KA-3B 



D a te Type F i rst Recei ved 
26 Dec 1963 



* PB4Y-1PS were redesignated P4Y-1PS in 1951. 

tThe A3D-2P designation was changed to RA-3B in 1962. 




A squadron AJ-2P Savage 
over NASAgana, Guam, 
April 1958. 



Air Wing Assignments 



Air Wing Tail Code 

FAW-14 EF/PB* 
CO MFAIRSAN DIEGO PB 
COMHATWING-2 PB/SSt 
COMFAIRPHILIPPINES SS 
COMFAIRSOWESTPAC SS 



Assignment Date 
20 J an 1951 
1955 
Jul 1956 
01 Jan 



Air Wing Assignments-Continued 



Air Wing 

COMFAIRWESTPAC 



Tail Code 
SS 



Assignment Date 
15 Jan 1964 



* It is believed the squadron's tail code was changed from EF to PB 
in 1953. 



1959 t T ^ e ta '' coc ' e was c * lan 9 ec ' f rorn PB t0 SS in 1957. The effective 
date for this change was most likely the beginning of FY 58 (1 July 
1960 1957). 




A squadron RA-3B 
Skywarrior at NAS 
Agana, Guam, sur- 
rounded by a display of 
aerial cameras used for 
cartographic and recon- 
naissance photography 
taken by the squadron, 
circa 1965 or 1966. 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 313 



Unit Awards Received 

UnitAward Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 

MUC 02 J un 1968 28 Feb 1970 

NUC 01Junl964 01 Jun 1968 

02 Aug 1964 05 Aug 1964 



Unit Awards Received— Continued 

UnitAward Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 

AFEM 22 May 1961 04 Jun 1961 

13 Apr 1969 15 Jun 1969 




A camouflaged squadron RA-3B Skywarrior on the flight line at Da Nang, Republic of Vietnam, 1969. 



314 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



VAP-62 

Lineage 

Established as Photographic Squadron SIXTY TWO 
(VJ-62) on 10 April 1952. 

Redesignated Heavy Photographic Squadron SIXTY 
TWO (VAP-62) on 2 July 1956. 

Disestablished on 15 October 1969. The first 
squadron to be assigned the VAP-62 designation. 



Squadron Insignia and 
Nickname 

The squadron's 
insignia was approved 
by CNO on 3 August 
1953. Colors for the 
insignia were: a red 
background outlined in 
yellow; the film strip 
had gray frames with 
white borders; yellow 
wings; blue eye with a 
white iris and a white 
beam emanating from 
the eye. 

The squadron's 
request for a new 
insignia was disap- 
proved by CNO on 20 
October 1960. The tiger 
insignia was disap- 
proved because cartoon 
portrayals were no 
longer acceptable under 
the insignia guidelines. 

Nickname: Tigers, 
1960-1969. 




Thiswastheonly insignia officially 
approved for use by the squadron. 




CNO disapproved the use of the 
cartoon tiger insignia asthe offi- 
cial squadron logo. 



Chronology of Significant Events 

Apr 1952: The squadron's mission was aerial photo- 
graphic intelligence for naval operations, deploying 
detachments in the Atlantic Ocean, Mediterranean Sea 
and other areas as required. 

1 Sep-19 Dec 1952: A squadron detachment was 
deployed to Dhahran Air Force Base in Saudi Arabia. 

29Jul 1960: During a landing aboard Saratoga (CVA 
60), the squadron's commanding officer, Commander 
C. T. Frohne, and two other squadron crewmembers, 
were lost when the tailhook of their A3D-2P 
Skywarrior separated and the aircraft plunged off the 
deck into the sea. 

Oct 1966: The squadron transferred a detachment of 
aircraft and personnel to VAP-61 to augment that 
squadron's operations in Vietnam. 



15 Oct 1969: The squadron was disestablished. 
During its period of service the squadron conducted 
mapping and special photographic projects in Saudi 
Arabia, Turkey, Italy, Spain, various countries in north- 
ern Europe, Greenland, Iceland, Labrador, various 
Central American and Caribbean countries, Morocco, 
the Mediterranean and Atlantic Ocean areas and 
numerous places in the United States. 




A formation of squadron PB4Y-lPs(P4Y-lP), 1953 (Courtesy Robert 
Lawson Collection). 



Home Port Assignments 



Location 

NAS Jacksonville 
NAAS Sanford 
NAS Norfolk 
NAS Jacksonville 



Assignment Date 
10 Apr 1952 
20 Oct 1952 
Jul 1955 
15 Aug 1957 




A formation of squadron AJ-2P Savages over Sanford, Florida, in 1953. 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 315 



Commanding Officers Commanding Officers— Continued 

DateAssumed Command DateAssumed Command 

LCDR D. C. McNeil (acting) 10 Apr 1952 CDR John E. Cousins 09 Sep 1960 

CDR J. Kennedy, Jr. 30 Apr 1952 CDR Charles H . Boldt, Jr. 06 Oct 1961 

CDRH.S. Klenk Jun 1953 CDR Robert F. Roemer 04 Sep 1962 

CDRJ. A. Goodwin Jul 1954 CDR John D. Stuffiebeem Jul 1963 

CDRE. B.johnsonjr. Jan 1956 £DR John F. Cullen 08 Aug 1964 



CDR Henry W. Drum 12 Jul 1957 

CDR Charles W. Hollinshead 10 Nov 1958 



CDR William E. Nowers 05 Jul 1965 

CDR Harry F. Bryant 22 Apr 1966 



CDR Frank S. Coleman 16 Jun 1967 

CDR Charles T. Frohne 10 Nov 1959 C DR Burke E. Eakie Jul 1968 

CDRW. L. Berkey (acting) Jul 1960 CDR James E. Service 18 Jul 1969 




A squadron A3D-2P Skywarrior on the deck of Independence (CVA 62) after a successful landing, 1961. 



Aircraft Assignment 



Air Wing Assignments 



Type of Aircraft 



P4Y-1P 



A]-2P 



F7F-4N 



A3D-1P 

A3D-2P/RA-3B* 



D a te Type F i rst Recei ved 

May 1952 
Sep 1952 
May 1953 
14 Oct 1957 
19 Oct 1959 



'The A3D-2P designation was changed to RA-3B in 1962. 



AirWing Tail Code Assignment Date 
COMFAIRJACKSON- 

VILLE TP 10 Apr 1952 

COMFAIRNORFOLK TP Jul 1955 
COMFAIRJACKSON- 

VILLE TP/GB* 15 Aug 1957 

* The tail code was changed from TP to GB in 1957. The effective 

date for this change was most likely the beginning of FY 58 (1 July 
1957). 



316 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 




A squadron A3D-2P in flight, 1961. 

Unit Awards Received 



UnitAward Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 

NUC 18 J an 1960 25 Oct 1962 

AFEM 06Junl964 13 Jul 1964 




A squadron A3D-2P Skywarrior on display at NS Mayport, Florida, in May 1961. 



CHAPTER 7 

Strike Fighter Squadron Histories (VFA) 

VFA-15 to VFA-305 



VFA-15 

Lineage 

Established as Attack Squadron SIXTY SEVEN (VA- 
67) on 1 August 1968. 

Redesignated Attack Squadron FIFTEEN (VA-15) on 
2 June 1969. 

Redesignated Strike Fighter Squadron FIFTEEN 
(VFA-15) on 1 October 1986. The first squadron to be 
assigned the VA-67 designation, the second to be 
assigned the VA-15 designation and the first to be 
assigned the VFA-15 designation. 

Squadron Insignia and Nickname 

The squadron does not have a CNO approval date 
for the use of the lion and missile insignia. This 




The squadron adopted the 
lion insignia used by the first 
VA-15. The designation in the 
scroll was changed to VFA-15 
in 1986. 



insignia was approved by the CNO for use by the first 
squadron to be assigned the VA-15 designation. When 
VA-67 was redesignated VA-15 on 2 June 1969, it adopt- 
ed the insignia that had been used by the first VA-15, 
which had been disestablished on 1 June 1969. Colors 
for the lion insignia are: background with red upper 
half and blue-green lower half, the insignia and scroll 
are outlined in white; blue scroll with white lettering; 
white waves; white rocket with black markings and yel- 
low streaks emanating from the tail; yellow lion with 
black markings. 

Nickname: Valions, 1969-present. 

Chronology of Significant Events 

1 Aug 1968: The squadron began training under VA- 
174 in preparation for operating the A-7 Corsair II. 



19 Oct 1973: The squadron provided maintenance 
personnel for Operation Nickle Grass, the transatlantic 
flight of A-4 Skyhawks to Israel using Franklin D. 
Roosevelt (CVA 42) as an intermediate air field. 

Oct-Nov 1973: The squadron, embarked in 
Roosevelt, operated in the vicinity of Crete in response 
to the Arab-Israeli war. 

Jutl-Jul 1976: Following the assassination of the 
American Ambassador to Lebanon on 13 June, America 
(CV 66), with VA-15 embarked, operated in the vicinity 
of Lebanon and flew support missions during the evac- 
uation of non-combatants from that country. 

May 1981: Independence (CV 62), with VA-15 
embarked, transited the Suez Canal and maintained 
station in the eastern Mediterranean due to the crisis 
between Israel and Syria following Israeli raids against 
Syrian surface-to-air missile sites in Lebanon. 

25 Oct-1 Nov 1983: In response to continued politi- 
cal strife and the need to protect and evacuate 
Americans from the island country of Grenada, VA-15 
aircraft flew combat close air support and reconnais- 
sance sorties in support of operation Urgent Fury, the 
landing of U.S. Marines and Army rangers on the 
island. 

4 Dec 1983: In response to hostile fire against U.S. 
reconnaissance aircraft from Syrian positions in 
Lebanon, VA-15 aircraft participated in coordinated 
strikes against Syrian radar, communications and 
artillery positions overlooking the Multi-National 
Peacekeeping Forces. One of the squadron's A-7E 
Corsair lis, flown by the Air Wing Commander, 
Command Edward Andrews, was lost when it was hit 
by a Syrian surface-to-air missile. Commander 
Andrews ejected, was rescued and returned to 
Independence. 

Dec 1985-Jun 1986: The squadron returned from a 
six-month deployment to MCAS Iwakuni in the western 
Pacific. It was assigned to MAG-12, 1st Marine Air Wing 
during the deployment. This deployment was designed 
to test the enhanced interoperability between Marine 
and Naval Air Forces, with emphasis on close air sup- 
port for Marine ground operations and the sharing of 
other techniques used by both communities. 



317 



3 1 8 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



Home Port Assignments 



Commanding Officers— Continued 



Location 

NAS Cecil Field 



Assignment Date 

01 Aug 1968 



Commanding Officers 







Date Assumed Command 


CDR 


Lawrence C. Chambers 


06 Nov 1968 


CDR 


Robert B. Bristol 


12 Feb 1970 


CDR 


Donald D. Brown 


30 Mar 1971 


CDR 


Forrest A. Lees, Jr. 


30 Mar 1972 


CDR 


Richard C. McClary 


21 Mar 1973 


CDR 


Harry P. Kober, Jr. 


24 May 1974 


CDR 


Gordon E. Evans 


30 Jul 1975 


CDR 


Kelvin W. Huehn 


02 Oct 1976 


CDR 


Robert S. Smith 


17 Dec 1977 


CDR 


John J. Mazach 


19 Apr 1979 





Date Assumed Command 


CDR John J. Coonan 


26 Jun 


1980 


CDR Michael B. Nordeen 


24 Sep 


1981 


CDR Byron L. Duff 


01 Nov 


1982 


CDR Leslie G. Kappel 


01 Jun 


1984 


CDR Philip Craig Landon 


08 Oct 


1985 


CDR John W. Curtin 


08 Jan 


1987 


CDR Milton W. Smith 


13 May 


1988 


CDR Brian M. Calhoun 


29 Nov 


1989 



Aircraft Assignment 



Type of Aircraft 



A-7B 
A-7E 



F/A-18A 



Date Type First Received 

10 Mar 1969 
Aug 1975 
06 Jan 1987 




A squadron A- IE Corsair II taking off from the deck of Independence (CV 62) in 1982. 



Major Overseas Deployments 



Date of 


Date of 


Air 




Type of 


Area of 


Departure 


Return 


Wing 


Carrier 


Aircraft 


Operation 


02 Jan 1970 


27 Jul 1970 


CVW-6 


CVA 42 


A-7B 


Med 


29 Jan 1971 


23 Jul 1971 


CVW-6 


CVA 42 


A-7B 


Med 


15 Feb 1972 


08 Dec 1972 


CVW-6 


CVA 42 


A-7B 


Med 


14 Sep 1973 


17 Mar 1974 


CVW-6 


CVA 42 


A-7B 


Med 


03 Jan 1975 


16 Jul 1975 


CVW-6 


CV 42 


A-7B 


Med 


15 Apr 1976 


25 Oct 1976 


CVW-6 


CV 66 


A-7E 


Med 


10 Jun 1977 


19 Jul 1977 


CVW-6 


CV 66 


A-7E 


SoLant 


29 Sep 1977 


25 Apr 1978 


CVW-6 


CV 66 


A-7E 


Med 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 319 



Major Overseas Deployments 



Fiatp nf 


Date of 






Tvtyp of 


Area of 


Departure 


Return 


Wing 


Carrier 


Aircraft 


Operation 


28Jun 1979 


14 Dec 1979 


CVW-6 


CV 62 


A-7E 


Med 


19 Nov 1980 


10 Jun 1981 


cvw-6 


CV 62 


A-7E 


SoLant/IO/Med 


07 Jun 1982 


22 Dec 1982 


CVW-6 


CV 62 


A-7E 


Med 


18 Oct 1983 


11 Apr 1984 


cvw-6 


CV 62 


A-7E 


Carib/Med/NorLant 


16 Oct 1984 


19 Feb 1985 


cvw-6 


CV 62 


A-7E 


Med/IO 


01 Dec 1985 


13 Jun 1986 


MAG-12 


* 


A-7E 


WestPac 


25 Aug 1988 


11 Oct 1988 


CVW-8 


CVN 71 


F/A-18A 


NorLant 


30 Dec 1988 


30 Jun 1989 


CVW-8 


CVN 71 


F/A-18A 


Med 


28 Dec 1990 


28 Jun 1991 


CVW-8 


CVN 71 


F/A-18A 


Med/Red Sea/ 
Persian Gulf 



* The squadron forward deployed to MCAS Iwakuni, Japan, to provide close air support for Marine forces in WestPac. While deployed to 
WestPac the squadron also operated at NAF Kadena, Okinawa; NAS Cubi Point, Philippines and stations in Korea. 



Air Wing Assignments Unit Awards Received— Continued 



Air Wing 


Tail Code 


Assignment Date 


Unit Award 


Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 


COMFAIRJACKSON- 








01 Jul 1976 


31 Dec 1980 


VILLE 




01 Aug 1968 




01 Jan 1987 


31 Dec 1988 


CVW-6 


AE 


11 Mar 1969 


NAVE 


01 Oct 1977 


30 Sep 1978 


COMLATWING 1 




Apr 1985 




01 Oct 1979 


30 Sep 1980 


MAG-12, 1st MAW* 


AC* 


Dec 1985 




01 Jan 1983 


31 Dec 1983 


COMLATWING 1 




Jun 1986 




01 Jan 1988 


31 Dec 1988 


CVW-8 


AJ 


01 Sep 1987 


NEM 


07 Dec 1980 


11 May 1981 


* VA-15 was assigned to MAG-12, 1st Marine Air 


Wing during its 




20 Aug 1982 


05 Sep 1982 


shore-based deployment to MCAS Iwakuni, Japan. While deployed 




01 Oct 1982 


06 Dec 1982 


with MAG-12 the squadron used the tail code AC on its aircraft. 


AFEM 


24 Oct 1983 


02 Nov 1983 










16 Nov 1983 


22 Dec 1983 


Unit Awards Received 






28 Dec 1983 


03 Jan 1984 










15 Jan 1984 


03 Feb 1984 


Unit Award 


Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 




09 Feb 1984 


02 Mar 1984 


MUC 09 Mar 1972 


01 Dec 1972 


HSM 


20 Jun 1976 


27 Jul 1976 




A flight of squadron 
F/A-18A Hornets in 
1990. 



320 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



VFA-22 



Lineage 

Established as Fighting Squadron SIXTY THREE (VF- 
63) on 27 July 1948. 

Redesignated Attack Squadron SIXTY THREE (VA- 
63) in March 1956. 

Redesignated Attack Squadron TWENTY TWO (VA- 
22) on 1 July 1959. 

Redesignated Strike Fighter Squadron TWENTY 
TWO (VFA-22) on 4 May 1990. The first squadron to 
be assigned the VA-22, VA-63 and VFA-22 designation. 

Squadron Insignia and Nickname 

The squadron's insignia was approved by CNO on 9 
May 1949- The background is a heraldic bar sinister 

shield and with cumulus 
clouds. Overlaying the 
background is a game- 
cock ready to strike. 
Colors for the insignia 
are as follows: the 
gamecock and bar on 
the shield are red with 
black outlines; the beak 
and feet of the game- 
cock are gold and the 
background of the 
shield and clouds are 
white outlined in black. 
The squadron continued 
to use the insignia fol- 
lowing its ^designa- 
tions to VA-63, VA-22 
and then VFA-22. VA-22 




This insignia has been used by the 
squadron since its CNO approval 
in 1949- The only modification 
was the addition of the scroll and 
the VA-22 designation, which 
changed to VFA-22 in 1990, 



added a scroll at the bottom of the shield. The scroll 
has a white background outlined in black with red let- 
tering. On 14 September 1990, CNO approved a modifi- 
cation to the insignia, changing the designation in the 
scroll to VFA-22. 

Nickname: Fighting Redcocks, 1949-present. 

Chronology of Significant Events 

16 Sep 1950: The squadron participated in its first 
combat action, providing close air support for the 
amphibious landings at Inchon, Korea. 

23 Jun 1952: VF-63, along with other units from 
Boxer (CV 21), Princeton (CV 37), Philippine Sea (CV 
47), Bon Homme Richard (CV 3D, U.S. Air Force and 
Marine Corps squadrons, conducted a major offensive 
against hydro-electric targets in North Korea. 

6 Aug 1952: While launching combat sorties a 
severe fire broke out on the hangar deck of Boxer fol- 
lowing the explosion of an aircraft gasoline tank. Eight 
people were killed and one was missing, with several 
seriously injured. VF-63 did not suffer any casualties, 
however, three of the squadron's personnel were 
awarded Bronze Stars for their heroic and courageous 
action during the fire. 

Feb 1955: The squadron, while deployed aboard 
Essex (CVA 9), provided air support during the evacua- 
tion of Chinese Nationalist from the Tachen Islands 
after the bombardment of the islands by the People's 
Republic of China. 

9 May 1958: The squadron became the first fleet 
unit to receive the FJ-4B Buddy Tanker package and 
successfully demonstrated its refueling capability. 

Mar-Apr 1961: The squadron, while deployed 
aboard Midway (CVA 41), operated in the South China 
Sea due to the crisis in Laos. 

6 Mar 1963: The squadron formed Detachment 
Romeo consisting of four A-4B Skyhawks, six pilots 



Squadron personnel on the deck of Valley Forge (CV 45) in February 1951. A squadron F4U-4 Corsair is in the background. 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 321 



and forty-eight enlisted personnel. Its mission was to 
deploy aboard ASW carriers and provide them with a 
limited amount of air defense. 

19 Apr-3 Dec 1963: VA-22 Detachment Romeo was 
deployed to the western Pacific aboard Kearsarge 
(CVS 33) and part of CVSG-53. During the deployment 
it participated in the recovery of space capsule Faith 7 
and astronaut Major L. Gordon Cooper, USAF, follow- 
ing his 22 successful orbits around the earth. 

18 Dec 1963: VA-22 Detachment Romeo was dises- 
tablished. 

Apr 1965: The squadron participated in its first com- 
bat operations since the Korean War and on 20 April 
suffered its first aircraft loss. Lieutenant Phillip N. Butler's 
A-4C was hit by enemy antiaircraft fire while on a night 
armed reconnaissance mission over North Vietnam. He 
successfully ejected and became a prisoner of war. 

3 Jun 1965: Lieutenant Raymond P. Ilg (later Vice 
Admiral) was shot down in his A-4C while on an 
armed road reconnaissance mission over northern 
Laos. He successfully ejected and, following three days 
of evading capture deep inside enemy territory, was 
rescued by a helicopter. 

22 Nov 1966: Commander Henry D. Arnold, com- 
manding officer of VA-22, received the Silver Star 
Medal for his actions during a strike against a 
Haiphong surface-to-air missile support facility. 

26 Jan 1968: The Ranger (CVA 62), with VA-22 
aboard, while operating on Yankee Station was 
ordered to the Sea of Japan following the capture of 
Pueblo (ACER 2) by the North Koreans on 23 January 
1968. Ranger and VA-22 operated in the area until 
relieved on 5 March 1968. 

9 May 1972: Operation Pocket Money, the mining of 
Haiphong harbor, was launched. Aircraft from VA-22, as 
well as the other attack squadrons deployed aboard 
Coral Sea (CVA 43), planned and executed the mining. 

Apr-Jul 1973: The squadron flew missions in sup- 



port of Operation End Sweep, the clearing of mines 
from North Vietnam's coastal waters. 

29 Apr 1975: VA-22's aircraft provided air cover for 
Operation Frequent Wind, the evacuation of American 
citizens from Saigon. The last American helicopter to 
lift off the roof of the United States Embassy was 
escorted by an A-7E from the squadron. 

15 May 1975: VA-22 aircraft, along with other ele- 
ments from CVW-15 aboard Coral Sea, launched air 
strikes against the Cambodian mainland after the cap- 
ture of the SS Mayaguez by Cambodian gunboats on 
12 May. Squadron aircraft flew ten combat sorties and 
struck targets at Ream Airfield. 

27 Oct 1979: Following the assassination of Park 
Chung Hee, President of the Republic of Korea, Kitty 
Hawk (CV 63) was ordered to operate off the coast of 
Korea. 

21 Nov 1979: Kitty Hawk, along with VA-22 and the 
rest of CVW-15, departed Subic Bay, Philippines, 
enroute to the Arabian Sea as a response to the 4 
November Iranian seizure of the American Embassy in 
Tehran and the taking of over 60 American hostages. 

6 Dec 1985: A squadron aircraft fired an AGM-88 
Harm missile while operating out of NWC China Lake. 
This was the first AGM-88 Harm missile fired by a 
West Coast Fleet squadron. 

Apr-Jul 1986: In late April Enterprise (CVN 65), with 
VA-22 onboard, transited the Suez Canal from the 
Indian Ocean to the Mediterranean Sea to augment car- 
rier forces there. Earlier in the month American strikes 
were flown against Libyan military targets as a response 
to Libya's continuing support of terrorist activity. 

18 Apr 1988: VA-22 participated in retaliatory strikes 
against Iranian oil platforms, gunboats and other naval 
ships after Samuel B. Roberts (FFG 58) struck an 
Iranian mine on 14 April in international waters. 

Dec 1989: The squadron participated in Operation 
Classic Resolve, providing support for the Philippine 
government during a coup d'etat attempt. 




A formation of squadron F4U-4 Corsairs, 
May 1952 (Courtesy Robert Lawson 
Collection). 



322 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 




DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 323 



Commanding Officers 



Aircraft Assignment 





Date Assumed Command 


LCDR Malcolm W. Cagle 


27 Jul 


1948 


LCDR Thomas J. Ball 


13 Feb 


1950 


LT L. W. S. Cummins (acting) 


17 Aug 


1951 


LCDR Ward S. Miller 


20 Aug 


1951 


LCDR Elmon A. Miller, Jr. 


31 Oct 


1952 


CDR Robert H. Benson 


Apr 


1953 


CDR Howard B. Eddy 


Jul 


1955 


LCDR William C. Chapman 


07 Jun 


1957 


CDR John H. Lobdell 


20 Mar 


1959 


CDR Jack D. Kendall 


31 Mar 


I960 


CDR W. T. Laws 


10 Oct 


1961 


CDR E. W. Abbott 


29 Oct 


1962 


CDR R. S. Smith 


12 Sep 


1963 


CDR C. E. Dechow 


02 Oct 


1964 


CDR E. H. Schorz (acting) 


06 Oct 


1964 


CDR D. M. Wyand 


20 Oct 


1964 


CDR E. H. Schorz 




1965 


CDR Henry D. Arnold 


20 Oct 


1966 


CDR Jack K. Ashmore 


07 Oct 


1967 


CDR Richard T. Gaskill 


18 Oct 


1968 


CDR Henry C. Holt IV 


16 Oct 


1969 


CDR James C. Thompson 


22 Oct 


1970 


CDR Robert G. Ehrman 




1971 


CDR Leonard E. Giuliani 


31 Aug 


1972 


CDR Gary A. Scoffield 


28 Jul 


1973 


CDR John F. Calvert 


08 Nov 


1974 


CDR Alan M. Dundon 


27 Feb 


1976 


CDR Lee B. Cargill 


22 Apr 


1977 


CDR John D. Grice 


06 Jul 


1978 


CDR Jerry D. Palmer 


25 Sep 


1979 


CDR John E Vomastic 


09 May 


1981 


CDR Russell C. York 


Feb 


1983 


CDR Raymond A. Kellett 


26 Jul 


1984 


CDR Richard J. Burns 


01 Feb 


1986 


CDR William H. Roberson III 


31 Jul 


1987 


CDR Dale M. Doorly 


20 Jan 


1989 


CDR G. Robert Darwin 


09 Aug 


1990 



Type of Aircraft 



F8F-2 



F4U-4 



F9F-2* 
F9F-5* 
F9F-6 
F9F-8 



FT-4B 



A4D-2/A-4Bf 

A4D-2N/A-4Q 

A-4F 

TA-4Fj: 



A-7E 



F/A-18C 



Date Type First Received 

Jul 1948 
Jan 1950 
14 Sep 1951 
Dec 1952 
Apr 1954 
Aug 1955 
30 Jul 1957 
24 May I960 
06 Oct 1961 
Jun 1968 
Jun 1968 
04 Feb 1971 
06 Jul 1990 



* The squadron was scheduled to transition to the F9F-2 aircraft and 
received eight of the aircraft in September 1951, however, due to 
the severe lag in production of the aircraft and lack of critical spare 
parts, the squadron returned to flying the F4U-4 Corsair in the latter 
part of September 1951. It continued to fly the F4U-4 until 
November 1952 when it transitioned to jets. Initially it received F9F- 
2 aircraft in November 1952 and then switched to F9F-5 Panthers. 

t In 1962 the Navy's aircraft designation system was changed and 
A4D-2 was redesignated A-4B and A4D-2N became A-4C. 

$ The TA-4Fs were tandem seat Skyhawks used for instrument training. 




A squadron FJ-4B Fury, circa 1958 ( Courtesy Robert Lawson Collection). 




A formation of 
squadron F9F-8 
Cougars, 1957 
(Courtesy Robert 
Lawson Collection) 



324 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



Major Overseas Deployments 



Date of 


Date of 


Air 




Type of 


Area of 


Departure 


Return 


Wing 


Carrier 


Aircraft 


Operation 


27 Oct 1949 


22 Nov 1949 


CVG-6 


CVB 42 


F8F-2 


NorLant 


24 Aug 1950 


11 Nov 1950 


CVG-2 


CV 21 


F4U-4 


WestPac/Korea 


06 Dec 1950 


* 


CVG-2 


CV45 


F4U-4 


WestPac/Korea 


* 


09Jun 1951 


CVG-2 


CV47 


F4U-4 


WestPac/Korea 


07 Feb 1952 


25 Sep 1952 


CVG-2 


CV 21 


F4U-4 


WestPac/Korea 


03 Aug 1953 


03 Mar 1954 


CVG-2 


CVA 10 


F9F-5 


WestPac 


03 Nov 1954 


21 Jun 1955 


CVG-2 


CVA 9 


F9F-6 


WestPac 


13 Nov 1956 


20 May 1957 


CVG-2 


CVA 38 


F9F-8 


WestPac 


16 Aug 1958 


12 Mar 1959 


CVG-2 


CVA 41 


FJ-4B 


WestPac 


15 Aug 1959 


25 Mar I960 


CVG-2 


CVA 41 


FJ-4B 


WestPac 


16 Feb 1961 


28 Sep 1961 


CVG-2 


CVA 41 


A4D-2 


WestPac 


06 Apr 1962 


20 Oct 1962 


CVG-2 


CVA 41 


A4D-2N 


WestPac 


08 Nov 1963 


26 May 1964 


CVW-2 


CVA 41 


A-4C 


WestPac 


06 Mar 1965 


23 Nov 1965 


CVW-2 


CVA 41 


A-4C 


WestPac/Vietnam 


29 Jul 1966 


23 Feb 1967 


CVW-2 


CVA 43 


A-4C 


WestPac/Vietnam 


04 Nov 1967 


25 May 1968 


CVW-2 


CVA 61 


A-4C 


WestPac/Vietnam 


18 Mar 1969 


29 Oct 1969 


CVW-5 


CVA 31 


A-4F 


WestPac/Vietnam 


02 Apr 1970 


12 Nov 1970 


CVW-5 


CVA 31 


A-4F 


WestPac/Vietnam 


12 Nov 1971 


17 Jul 1972 


CVW-15 


CVA 43 


A-7E 


WestPac/Vietnam 


09 Mar 1973 


08 Nov 1973 


CVW-15 


CVA 43 


A-7E 


WestPac 


05 Dec 1974 


02 Jul 1975 


CVW-15 


CVA 43 


A-7E 


WestPac 


15 Feb 1977 


05 Oct 1977 


CVW-15 


CV43 


A-7E 


WestPac 


30 May 1979 


25 Feb 1980 


CVW-15 


CV 63 


A-7E 


WestPac/IO 


01 Apr 1981 


23 Nov 1981 


CVW-15 


CV-63 


A-7E 


WestPac/IO 


Ul aep 


Zo _r\pi I70J 


v w -1 1 




A IV 




30 May 1984 


20 Dec 1984 


CVW-11 


CVN 65 


A-7E 


WestPac/IO/NorPac 


12 Jan 1986 


13 Aug 1986 


CVW-11 


CVN 65 


A-7E 


WestPac/IO/ 












Med/SoLant 


25 Oct 1987 


24 Nov 1987 


CVW-11 


CVN 65 


A-7E 


NorPac 


05 Jan 1988 


03 Jul 1988 


CVW-11 


CVN 65 


A-7E 


WestPac/IO/NorPac 


17 Sep 1989 


16 Mar 1990 


CVW-11 


CVN 65 


A-7E 


World Cruise 


* On 29 March 1951 VF-63 and CVG-2 transferred from Valley Forge (CV 45) to Philippine 


Sea (CV 47) while inport Yokosuka, Japan. 




Air Wing Assignment 




Unit Awards Received 


Air Wing 


Tail Code 


Assignment Date 


Unit Award 


Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 


CVG-6 


C 


27 Jul 1948 


NAVE 


Nov 1962 


Feb 1964 


CVG-2/CVW-2t 


M/NE* 


31 Jul 1950 




01 Jan 1979 


30 Jun 1980 


CVW-19 


NM 


01 Oct 1968 




01 Jul 1980 


31 Dec 1981 


CVW-5 


NF 


01 Nov 1968 


AFEM 


06 Sep 1958 


10 Sep 1958 


COMFAIRLEMOORE 


08 Jan 1971 




12 Sep 1958 


29 Sep 1958 


CVW-15 


NL 


02 Jun 1971 




12 Oct 1958 


30 Oct 1958 


CVW-11 


NH 


15 Jan 1982 




11 Nov 1958 


15 Nov 1958 










30 Nov 1958 


12 Dec 1958 


* CVG-2's tail code 


was changed from M to NE in 1957. The effec- 




24 Mar 1961 


25 Mar 1961 


tive date was most likely the beginning of FY 58 (1 July 1957). 




28 Mar 1961 


07 Apr 1961 


t Carrier Air Groups were redesignated Carrier Air Wings and CVG-2 




09 Apr 1965 


11 May 1965 


became CVW-2 on 


20 December 1963. 






20 May 1965 


28 Jun 1965 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 325 




A composite photograph of the different types of aircraft flown by the squadron between 1948 and 1965. 



326 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 




A squadron A-4C Skyhawk preparing for a launch from Midway (CVA 41) in June 1963. 





Unit Awards Received— 


Continued 


Unit Awards Received— 


Continued 


Unit Award 


Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 


Unit Award Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 




23 Jan 1968 


22 Mar 1968 


15 May 1975 






29 Jim 1969 




01 May 1979 


23 Nov 1981 




07 Jul 1969 


13 Jul 1969 


RVNGC 05 Oct 1965 






24 Jul 1969 




09 Oct 1965 






03 Sep 1969 




30 Mar 1972 


01 Jul 1972 




13 Sep 1969 


14 Sep 1969 


VNSM 22 Jul 1965 


26 Aug 1965 




29 Apr 1975 


30 Apr 1975 


11 Sep 1965 


09 Oct 1965 




15 May 1975 




18 Oct 1965 


04 Nov 1965 




Mar 1988 




12 Sep 1966 


19 Oct 1966 




17 Jan 1990 


31 Jan 1990 


30 Oct 1966 


04 Dec 1966 


HSM 


29 Apr 1975 


30 Apr 1975 


26 Dec 1966 


01 Feb 1967 




17 May 1981 




03 Dec 1967 


29 Dec 1967 




02 Oct 1981 




06 Jan 1968 


28 Jan 1968 




23 Oct 1982 




18 Mar 1968 


12 Apr 1968 


MUC 


03 Dec 1967 


09 May 1968 


21 Apr 1968 


09 May 1968 




15 Feb 1988 


21 May 1988 


17 Apr 1969 


19 May 1969 


NEM 


25 Nov 1979 


28 Jan 1980 


04 Jun 1969 


26 Jun 1969 




25 May 1981 


30 Sep 1981 


31 Jul 1969 


01 Sep 1969 




30 Apr 1986 


27 Jun 1986 


23 Sep 1969 


09 Oct 1969 


NUC 


Apr 1951 


31 May 1951 


02 May 1970 


26 May 1970 




16 Apr 1965 


04 Nov 1965 


01 Jun 1970 


14 Jun 1970 




12 Aug 1966 


01 Feb 1967 


10 Jul 1970 


29 Jul 1970 




18 Apr 1969 


08 Oct 1969 


17 Aug 1970 


03 Sep 1970 




02 May 1970 


30 Oct 1970 


11 Sep 1970 


12 Sep 1970 




15 Dec 1971 


01 Jul 1972 


26 Sep 1970 


21 Oct 1970 




22 Apr 1975 


30 Apr 1975 


14 Dec 1971 





DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 327 



Unit Awards Received— Continued 



Unit Awards Received— Continued 



Unit Award 



KPUC 



Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 

31 Dec 1971 17 Jan 1972 

26 Jan 1972 17 Feb 1972 

01 Apr 1972 11 May 1972 

01 Jim 1972 11 Jim 1972 

21 Jim 1972 30 Jim 1972 

15 Sep 1950 26 Oct 1950 

Dec 1950 20 Mar 1951 



Unit Award 



KSM 



UNSM 



Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 

Apr 1951 31 May 1951 

10 Mar 1952 9 Sep 1952 

14 Sep 1950 26 Oct 1950 
16 Dec 1950 30 Mar 1951 

15 Apr 1951 2Junl951 
10 Mar 1952 9 Sep 1952 
14 Sep 1950 26 Oct 1950 
10 Mar 1952 09 Sep 1952 




328 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



VFA-25 

Lineage 

Established as Torpedo Squadron SEVENTEEN (VT- 
17) on 1 January 1943. 

Redesignated Attack Squadron SIX B (VA-6B) on 15 
November 1946. 

Redesignated Attack Squadron SIXTY FIVE (VA-65) 
on 27 July 1948. 

Redesignated Attack Squadron TWENTY FIVE (VA- 
25) on 1 July 1959. 

Redesignated Strike Fighter Squadron TWENTY 
FIVE (VFA-25) on 1 July 1983. The first squadron to be 
assigned the VFA-25 designation. 




This modification to the insig- This is the current insignia used 

nia was approved by CNO on by the squadron. 

24 January 1974. 



Squadron Insignia and Nickname 

The squadron's first insignia was approved by CNO 
on 28 September 1944. Colors for the four leaf clover, 

horseshoe and flying tor- 
pedo insignia were: a 
blue background with 
white shading; green 
four-leaf clover with 
black markings; white 
horseshoe with black 
markings; the wings and 
nose of the torpedo 
were yellow with black 
markings and the 
remaining part of the 
torpedo was white with 
black markings. 

The clenched fist and 
lightning bolt insignia was 




The squadron's first insignia 
was indicative of its mission as 
a torpedo squadron. 



approved by CNO on 9 
June 1949- Colors for the 
insignia are: a gold back- 
ground with a black bor- 
der; black fist with gold 
markings and a red light- 
ning bolt. On 24 July 1959, 
CNO approved a modifi- 
cation to the insignia. The 
modified insignia added a 
scroll with the designa- 
tion VA-25. The scroll 
was yellow with black 
markings and lettering. 

On 24 January 1974 
CNO approved another 
modification to the 

insignia, adding three black stars. When the squadron 
was designated VFA-25 it continued to use the fist and 
lightning bolt insignia but dropped the three stars. 
Nickname: Fist of the Fleet, 1949-present. 




The clenched fist and lightning 
bolt became the squadron s sec- 
ond insignia and has been in 
use, with some modifications, 
since 1949- 



Chronology of Significant Events 

10 Sep-2 Oct 1943: The squadron was embarked in 
Bunker Hill (CV 17), enroute from Norfolk to Pearl 
Harbor via the Panama Canal and San Diego. 

11 Nov 1943: The squadron flew its first combat sor- 
ties, striking targets in Rabaul. 

Nov 1943-Feb 1944: The squadron flew numerous 
combat missions, striking targets in Kavieng, 
Kwajalein, Eniwetok, Truk and Tinian. 

2 Feb 1944: During operations over Eniwetok, the 
squadron's commanding officer, Lieutenant Commander 
F. M. Whitaker, was lost in a midair collision. 

Feb 1945: The squadron flew numerous combat mis- 
sions against targets in Japan and the Bonin Islands and 
provided ground support for the invasion of Iwo Jima. 

19 Mar 1945: For their actions against the Japanese 
Fleet in the Kure Bay area of the Inland Sea, the fol- 
lowing squadron personnel were awarded the Navy 
Cross: Lieutenant Commander W. M. Romberger; 
Lieutenant H. E. Clark; Lieutenant (jg)s T. J. Coghlan, 
H. W. Foote, H. C. Johnson, A. C. Traxler and Ensign J. 
Behl. Lieutenant J. A. Tew was awarded the Silver Star 
for his actions during this attack. 

Mar 1945: Squadron aircraft struck Japanese ships in 
the East China Sea, Inland Sea and around the Ryukyu 
Islands and land based targets in and around 
Okinawa. 

7 Apr 1945: VT-17, along with other units from the 
task force, attacked a Japanese naval force composed 
of the superbattleship Yamato and her escorts. 
Squadron aircraft scored several torpedo hits on the 
Yamato and sunk one of her destroyer escorts. For 
their actions in this battle the following squadron per- 
sonnel were awarded the Navy Cross: Lieutenants T. 
C. Durkin and S. G. Sullivan; Lieutenant (jg) J. F. 
Monaghan and Ensign W. F. Nickel. Lieutenant H. E. 
Clark, Lieutenant (jg) T. J. Coghlan and Ensign R. S. 
Hanlon were awarded the Silver Star for their actions. 

Apr 1945: Combat missions were flown against tar- 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 329 



gets in and around Okinawa in preparation for the 
invasion of that island. 

May-Jun 1945: VT-17 aircraft struck targets in and 
around Okinawa, Kyushu, Shikoku and ships in the 
East China Sea. 

27 Oct-23 Nov 1949: VA-65, embarked in Franklin 
D. Roosevelt (CVB 42), operated in the Davis Straits 
area conducting cold weather exercises. 

15 Sep 1950: Squadron aircraft participated in com- 
bat strikes against shore defenses in and around 
Inchon, Korea, just before the landings at Inchon. 

1 Oct 1950: Squadron aircraft struck the North 
Korean capital of P'yongyang, hitting the airfield and 
scoring a direct hit on a large electrical power plant. 

23 Jun 1952: Squadron aircraft participated in a 
coordinated four carrier strike on North Korean hydro- 
electric power plants. VA-65 's Skyraiders hit the Suiho 
power plant on the Yalu River. 

6 Aug 1952: Embarked in Boxer, the squadron was 
preparing for routine combat operations when a fire 
broke out on the hangar deck. Squadron personnel 
assisted in removing armed ordnance from planes on 
the flight deck and helped fight the fire on the hangar 
deck. One casualty was suffered by the squadron as a 
result of the fire. 

Feb 1955: While embarked in Essex (CVA 9) and 
operating in the Formosa Straits, the squadron provid- 
ed air support during the evacuation of Nationalist 
Chinese forces from the Tachen Islands which had 
come under bombardment by the People's Republic of 
China. 

25 Aug 1958: Midway (CVA 41), with VA-65 
embarked, was ordered to discontinue its ORI and 
proceed to the vicinity of Taiwan following the 
shelling of the Quemoy Islands on 23 August by the 
Chinese Communists. 

Mar 1961 : The squadron, while embarked in 
Midway, operated in the South China Sea due to the 
crisis in Laos. 

Apr 1965: The squadron engaged in its first combat 
operations in the Vietnam theater. 

20 Jun 1965: Four of the squadron's Skyraiders 
engaged enemy fighters over North Vietnam resulting 
in the shoot down of a MiG-17. Lieutenant Clinton B. 
Johnson and Lieutenant (jg) Charles W. Hartman III 
were awarded Silver Stars for their actions in downing 
the MiG-17. 

14 Sep 1966: While on a combat sortie near Vinh, 
North Vietnam, the squadron's commanding officer, 
Commander C. W. Stoddard, was shot down by a sur- 
face-to-air missile and lost at sea. 

Jan 1968: Squadron aircraft provided close air sup- 
port for U.S. Marines beseiged at Khe Sanh, South 
Vietnam. 

6 Apr 1968: The squadron returned to NAS Lemoore 
from a combat deployment to Vietnam, bringing to a 
close an era for the A-l Skyraider. It was the last 



attack squadron to deploy and operate the A-l. The A- 
l's last combat mission with VA-25 came to an end on 
20 February when the aircraft touched down on the 
deck of Coral Sea (CVA 43). 

Apr 1969: Following the shoot down of a Navy EC- 
121 aircraft by the North Koreans, Ticonderoga (CVA 
14), with VA-25 embarked, was ordered to the Sea of 
Japan. 

21 Nov 1970: Squadron aircraft flew Rescue Combat 
Air Patrol sorties while an Army-Air Force search and 
rescue team landed at the Son Tay POW compound, 
20 miles west of Hanoi, in an attempt to free American 
POWs. Unfortunately the POW compound had already 
been evacuated by the North Vietnamese. 

Dec 1972: The squadron participated in Linebacker 
II Operations, heavy air strikes against targets primari- 
ly around Hanoi and Haiphong. 

15 Jan 1973: The squadron participated with several 
other squadrons in a large laser bombing attack 
against bridge targets in North Vietnam. This coordi- 
nated strike used the A-6's Pave Knife Laser 
Designation System to guide laser-guided bombs 
dropped by A-7 aircraft. 

Jan-Feb 1973: Following the cease fire with North 
Vietnam on 27 January, the squadron concentrated its 
attention on strikes against lines-of-communication tar- 
gets in Laos until an agreement was reached with that 
country. 

Jul 1976: Following the Israeli raid on Entebbe and 
the threatened military operations against Kenya by 
Uganda, the Ranger (CV 6l), with VA-25 embarked, 
was ordered to transit from the South China Sea to the 
western Indian Ocean and operate off the coast of 
Kenya. 

21 Feb 1985: VFA-25 and 113, embarked in 
Constellation (CV 64), were the first to deploy with the 
F/A-18 Hornet. During the deployment the Hornets 
operated in the western Pacific and Indian Ocean. 

Jul 1987: Due to the increased attacks on merchant 
and tanker shipping in the Persian Gulf during the 
Iran/Iraqi War, the United States began to escort 
reflagged Kuwaiti oil tankers. During operation 
Earnest Will, VFA-25 provided air cover for reflagged 
tankers transiting the Straits of Hormuz. 

Aug 1990: Due to the invasion of Kuwait by Iraq, 
Independence (CV 62), with VFA-25 embarked, was 
ordered to operate in the Gulf of Oman. 

Aug-Nov 1990: VFA-25 flew sorties from 
Independence in support of Operation Desert Shield, 
the build-up of American and Allied forces to counter 
a threatened invasion of Saudi Arabia by Iraq and as 
part of an economic blockade of Iraq to force its with- 
drawal from Kuwait. On 2 October Independence 
entered the Persian Gulf and operated in those waters 
for two days before returning to the Northern Arabian 
Sea and being relieved on station by Midway (CV 41). 



330 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 




Home Port Assignments Commanding Officers— Continued 



Location 


Assignment Date 




Date Assumed Comma 


NAS Norfolk 


01 Jan 1943 


LCDR Harry M. Thompson 


Zo UCL 


lyjZ 


NAS Kaneohe 


03 Oct 1943* 


LCDR J . A. Rapp 


iz iviar 


Lyj^i 


NAS Alameda 


10 Mar 1944f 


CDR John R. LSowen 11 


1 ^ Ti 1 1 
13 JUl 


1 QA^ 
LyjJ 


NAS Hilo 


12 Nov 1944* 


CDR William C. Bates 


99 A/To t 7 

zz iviay 


1 G^~7 


NAB Agana 


28 Dec 1944* 


CDR toward V. Izac, Jr. 


19 May 


1 O^Q 

ly90 


NAS Alameda 


08 Jul 1945 


CDR John W. Fairbanks 


Vj Apr 




NAAS Fallon 


Sep 1945 


CDR Warren H. Ireland 


AO A .. 

08 Apr 


1900 


NAS Brunswick 


01 Feb 1946 


LCDR M. E. Mann (acting) 


1 1 May 


1 A/i a 


NAS Norfolk 


15 Aug 1946 


CDR William S. Hertig 


1 /i A /1 ;1 . 7 

id May 


1 AAA 


NAAS Oceana 


05 Mar 1949 


CDR C. R. Bradford 


03 Aug 


1 A/i 1 
19t)l 


NAS Alameda 


15 Aug 1950 


CDR John A. Overn 


11 Aucr 


1962 


NALF Santa Rosa 


11 Jul 1951 


1 Til? T— T<^i*mi^ W7 13 tv^ c c 

rlcllllall W. JTUCoM-Jll 


25 Jun 


1963 


NAS Alameda 


25 Sep 1952 


CDR Ralph F. Smith 


29 May 


1964 


NAS Moffett Field 


28 Sep 1961 


CDR Harry E. Ettinger 


24 May 


1965 


NAS Lemoore 


07 Jan 1963 


CDR C. William Stoddard 


13 Apr 


1966 


* Temporary shore assignment while the squadron conducted train- 


CDR James D. Burden 


14 Sep 


1966 


ing in preparation for combat deployment. 




CDR Clifford E. Church 


01 Oct 


1967 


t During the squadron's reforming and training 


cycle it operated 


CDR Scott L. Smith 


Mar 


1968 


from numerous other shore stations, inlcuding NAAS Monterey, 


CDR Fred J. Orrik 


09 Jun 


1969 


NAAS Vernalis, and NAAS Areata. 




CDR F. M. Humphreys 


26 Jun 


1970 






CDR Juan H. Carcaba 


26 May 


1971 


Commanding Officers 




CDR Edwin A. Greathouse 


19 May 


1972 






CDR Paul M. Moore 


02 Jun 


1973 


Date Assumed Command 


CDR George R. Vezina 


05 May 


1974 


LCDR Frank M. Whitaker 


01 Jan 1943 


CDR Peter W. Ogle 


08 Jul 


1975 


LT Gordon N. Owens 


02 Feb 1944 


CDR James B. Hamilton 


29 Oct 


1976 


LT Jack Martin (acting) 


18 Apr 1944 


CDR Warner L. Butler 


31 Jan 


1978 


LCDR William M. Romberger 


02 May 1944 


CDR Donald J. Wright 


26 Mar 


1979 


LT Arnold C. Traxler (acting) 


18 Aug 1945 


CDR John A. Lockard 


29 Jul 


1980 


LCdr William N. Janes (acting) 


21 Aug 1945 


CDR Robert W. Leone 


07 Oct 


1981 


CDR Rubin H. Konig 


11 Oct 1945 


CDR Steve L. Webb 


25 Apr 


1983 


LCDR Glen B. Butler 


31 Oct 1947 


CDR C. J. Leslie 


16 Nov 


1984 


LCDR Michael J. Hanley 


08 Dec 1948 


CDRJeorme L. Arbiter 


Feb 


1986 


CDR Richard W. Phillips 


01 Feb 1950 


CDR Anthony V. Colantoni, Jr. 


02 Sep 


1987 


CDR Gordon A. Sherwood 


31 Aug 1951 


CDR Daniel W. Gabriel 


23 Nov 


1988 


LCDR Marvin R. Novak (acting) 


22 Oct 1952 


CDR Gregory R. Peairs 


31 May 


1990 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 331 



Aircraft Assignment 



Aircraft Assignment— Continued 



Type of Aircraft 



TBF-1 

TBF-1C 

TBM-1 

TBM-1C 

TBM-3 

TBM-3E 



SB2C-4E 
SB2C-5 




Date Type First Received 

Jan 1943 
Oct 1943 
May 1944 
Oct 1944 
Feb 1945 
Sep 1945 
Mar 1946 
Nov 1946 
23 Sep 1947 
Jul 1948 
02 Dec 1949 
14 Nov 1950 
05 Dec 1950 
05 Dec 1950 



Type of Aircraft 



AD-1/2/3/4 
AD-4NA 
AD-4B 
AD-5 

AD-6/A-lHf 
AD-7/A-lJt 



A-7B 
A^F_ 



F/A-18A 
F/A-18C 



Date Type First Received 
1951* 

03 Dec 1952 
23 Dec 1952 
Jul 1955 
Jul 1955 
Apr 1959 
Oct 1968 
Dec 1969 
11 Nov 1984 
Jun 1989 



* Between July and December 1951 the squadron received and 
transferred numerous models of the AD Skyraider. 

t The AD-6 and AD-7 designations were changed to A-1H and A-1J 
respectively in 1962. 




Photo of squadron officers aboard Philippine Sea (CV 4 7) in 1951 . A squadron AD-2 Skyraider is in the background. 



332 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



Major Overseas Deployments 



Date of 


Date of 


Air 




Type of 


Area of 


Departure 


Return 


Wing 


Carrier 


Aircraft 


Operation 


21 Oct 1943 


04 Mar 1944 


CVG-17 


CV 17 


TBF-1C 


Pacific* 


02 Feb 1945 


08 Jul 1945 


CVG-17 


CV 12 


TBM-1C/3 


Pacificf 


04 Jan 1949 


05 Mar 1949 


CVG-6 


CVB 41 


AD-1 


Med 


24 Aug 1950 

*■ A y ~y 


11 Nov 1950 


CVG-2 


CV 21 


AD-4 


WestPac/Korea 


06 Dec 1950 


09 Tun 1951 


CVG-2 




AD-2 


WestPac/Korea 


08 Feb 1952 


26 Sep 1952 


CVG-2 


CV 21 


AD-4 


WestPac/Korea 


03 Aug 1953 


03 Mar 1954 


CVG-2 


CVA 10 


AD-4B/NA 


WestPac 


03 Nov 1954 


21 Jun 1955 


CVG-2 


CVA 9 


AD-4/4B 


WestPac 


13 Nov 1956 


22 May 1957 


CVG-2 


CVA 38 


AD-6 


WestPac 


16 Aug 1958 


12 Mar 1959 


CVG-2 


CVA 41 


AD-6 


WestPac 


15 Aug 1959 

a. j ^ y y y 


25 Mar I960 


CVG-2 


CVA 41 


AD-7 


WestPac 


16 Feb 1961 


28 Sep 1961 


CVG-2 


CVA 41 


AD-7 


WestPac 


06 Apr 1962 


20 Oct 1962 


CVG-2 


CVA 41 


A-1H/T 


WestPac 


08 Nov 1963 


26 May 1964 


CVW-2 


CVA 41 


A-1H/J 


WestPac 


06 Mar 1965 


23 Nov 1965 


CVW-2 


CVA 41 


A-1H/T 


WestPac/Vietnam 


29 Jul 1966 


23 Feb 1967 


CVW-2 


CVA 43 


A-1H 


WestPac/Vietnam 


26 Jul 1967 


06 Apr 1968 


CVW-15 


CVA 43 


A-1H/T 


WestPac/Vietnam 


01 Feb 1969 


18 Sep 1969 


CVW-16 


CVA 14 


A-7B 


WestPac/Vietnam 


27 Oct 1970 


17 Jun 1971 


CVW-2 


CVA 61 


A-7E 


WestPac/Vietnam 


16 Nov 1972 


23 Jun 1973 


CVW-2 


CVA 61 


A-7E 


WestPac/Vietnam 


07 May 1974 


18 Oct 1974 


CVW-2 


CVA 61 


A-7E 


WestPac 


30 Jan 1976 


07 Sep 1976 


CVW-2 


CV 61 


A-7E 


WestPac/IO 


21 Feb 1979 


22 Sep 1979 


CVW-2 


CV 61 


A-7E 


WestPac 


10 Sep 1980 


05 May 1981 


CVW-2 


CV 61 


A-7E 


WestPac/IO 


07 Apr 1982 


19 Oct 1982 


CVW-2 


CV 61 


A-7E 


WestPac/IO 


21 Feb 1985 


24 Aug 1985 


CVW-14 


CV 64 


F/A-18A 


WestPac/IO 


04 Sep 1986 


20 Oct 1986 


CVW-14 


CV 64 


F/A-18A 


NorPac 


11 Apr 1987 


13 Oct 1987 


CVW-14 


CV 64 


F/A-18A 


WestPac/IO 


01 Dec 1988 


01 Jun 1989 


CVW-14 


CV 64 


F/A-18A 


WestPac/IO 


16 Sep 1989 


19 Oct 1989 


CVW-14 


CV 64 


F/A-18A/C 


NorPac 


23 Jun 1990 


20 Dec 1990 


CVW-14 


CV 62 


F/A-18C 


WestPac/IO/ 



Persian Gulf 



* The combat deployment time frame covers the squadron's departure from Pearl Harbor aboard Bunker Hill (CV 17) and its return to Pearl 
Harbor on 4 March 1944. The squadron detached from Bunker Hill on 4 March and returned to the States on 10 March 1944. 
t The combat deployment time frame covers the squadron's 2 February 1945 embarkation in Hornet (CV 12) at Ulithi atoll and its return to the 
States on 8 July 1945. 

$ VA-65 deployed to Korea embarked in Valley Forge (CV 45). On 29 March 1951 the squadron, along with the rest of CVG-2, transferred to 
Philippine Sea (CV 47) for continued operations in Korea. It returned to the States embarked in Philippine Sea. 




Squadron A-1H Skyraiders on the deck of Coral Sea (CVA 43) in 1966 during their deployment to Vietnam. 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 333 



Air Wing Assignments 



Unit Awards Received 



Air Wing 

CVG-17/CVBG-17/ 
CVBG-5/ CVG-6* 
CVG-2/CVW-2§ 
CVW-15 

COMFAIRALAMEDA 

CVW-16 

CVW-2 

CVW-14 



Tail Code 
Ct 

M/NEt 
NL 

AH 

NE 
NK 



Assignment Date 

01 Jan 1943 

01 Aug 1950 
31 Mar 1967 
1968" 
1968 
1970*** 

Jan 1984 



* CVG-17 was established on 1 January 1943. It was redesignated 
CVBG-17 on 22 January 1946 and then became CVBG-5 on 15 
November 1946. The CVGB-5 designation was changed to CVG-6 on 
27 July 1948. 

t The tail code was assigned to CVBG-5 on 12 December 1946. 

$ The tail code was changed from M to NE in 1957. The effective 
date for this change was most likely the beginning of FY 58 (1 July 
1957). 

§ CVG-2 was redesignated CVW-2 when Carrier Air Groups (CVG) 
were redesignated Carrier Air Wings (CVW) on 20 December 1963. 

** During the squadron's transition to the A-7B Corsair II, its admin- 
istrative superior was Commander Fleet Air Alameda. Once the tran- 
sition was complete it was assigned to CVW-16. 

*** CVW-2 returned from a WestPac deployment on 1 June 1970 and 
VA-25 was assigned to the air wing sometime in the summer or fall 
of 1970. 



Unit Award 
PUC 

NAVE 



KSM 

HSM 
NUC 



AFEM 



Inclusive Dates 

11 Nov 1943 
16 Feb 1945 

01 Jul 1948 

01 Jul 1949 

01 Jul 1964 
01 Jan 1986 
01 Jan 1987 
01 Jan 1990 

14 Sep 1950 
16 Dec 1951 

15 Apr 1951 
10 Mar 1952 
25 May 1976 
20 Mar 1981 
29 Mar 1951 

16 Apr 1965 

12 Aug 1966 

13 Aug 1967 
02 Aug 1990 
01 Nov 1990 
06 Sep 1958 
12 Sep 1958 



Covering Unit Award 
23 Feb 1944 
lOJun 1945 
30 Jun 1949 
30 Jun 1950 

30 Jun 1965 

31 Dec 1986 
31 Dec 1987 
31 Dec 1990 
26 Oct 1950 

30 Mar 1951 
02 Jun 1951 
09 Sep 1952 
01 Jun 1976 

31 May 1951 
04 Nov 1965 
01 Feb 1967 
19 Feb 1968 



10 Sep 1958 
29 Sep 1958 




A squadron A-7E Corsair II at NAS North Island, California, in 1975. 



334 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



Unit Awards Received— Continued 



Unit Awards Received— Continued 



Unit Award 



MUC 



NEM 
RVNGC 



Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 


Unit Award 


Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 


12 Oct 1958 


30 Oct 1958 




02 Apr 1969 


03 Apr 1969 


11 Nov 1958 


15 Nov 1958 




06 Apr 1969 


07 Apr 1969 


30 Nov 1958 


12 Dec 1958 




09 Apr 1969 


15 Apr 1969 


24 Mar 1961 


25 Mar 1961 




10 May 1969 


29 May 1969 


28 Mar 1961 


07 Apr 1961 




31 May 1969 


03 Jun 1969 


09 Apr 1965 


11 May 1965 




28 Jun 1969 


30 Jun 1969 


20 May 1965 


28 Jun 1965 


VNSM 


22 Jul 1965 


26 Aug 1965 


20 Apr 1967 


27 Apr 1967 




10 Sep 1965 


09 Oct 1965 


23 Jan 1968 


22 Mar 1968 




18 Oct 1965 


04 Nov 1965 


20 Apr 1969 


27 Apr 1969 




12 Sep 1966 


19 Oct 1966 


04 Aug 1969 






30 Oct 1966 




16 Aug 1969 


24 Aug 1969 




01 Nov 1966 


04 Dec 1966 


30 Aug 1969 






26 Dec 1966 


01 Feb 1967 


18 Feb 1969 


07 Sep 1969 




26 Aug 1967 


01 Oct 1967 


18 Nov 1970 


02 Jun 1971 




12 Oct 1967 


28 Oct 1967 


01 Jan 1988 


31 Aug 1989 




04 Nov 1967 


05 Nov 1967 


30 Oct 1980 


12 Mar 1981 




11 Nov 1967 


08 Dec 1967 


05 Oct 1965 






16 Dec 1967 


07 Jan 1968 


09 Oct 1965 






15 Jan 1968 


21 Feb 1968 


20 Nov 1966 


21 Nov 1966 




03 Mar 1969 


20 Mar 1969 


29 Dec 1966 






29 Mar 1969 


16 Apr 1969 


23 Nov 1967 






09 May 1969 


04 Jun 1969 


02 Dec 1967 






25 Jun 1969 


01 Aug 1969 


04 Dec 1967 






18 Nov 1970 


18 Dec 1970 


20 Dec 1967 


22 Dec 1967 




27 Dec 1970 


13 Jan 1971 


20 Jan 1968 






02 Feb 1971 


17 Mar 1971 


23 Jan 1968 


27 Jan 1968 




31 Mar 1971 


18 Apr 1971 


29 Jan 1968 


19 Feb 1968 




25 Apr 1971 


18 May 1971 


04 Mar 1969 


08 Mar 1969 




09 Dec 1972 


03 Jan 1973 


10 Mar 1969 






14 Jan 1973 


30 Jan 1973 


12 Mar 1969 


19 Mar 1969 




01 Feb 1973 


06 Feb 1973 


29 Mar 1969 


31 Mar 1969 


SASM 


05 Aug 1990 


04 Nov 1990 




Two squadron F/A-18 Hornets on deck 
preparing to launch, circa 1988 or 1989. 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 335 



VFA-27 

Lineage 

Established as Attack Squadron TWENTY SEVEN 
(VA-27) on 1 September 1967. 

Redesignated Strike Fighter Squadron TWENTY 
SEVEN (VFA-27) on 24 January 1991. The first 
squadron to be assigned the VFA-27 designation. 

Squadron Insignia and Nickname 

The squadron's insignia was approved by the CNO 
on 25 March 1968. Colors for the glove and mace 




The squadron 's Royal Maces 
insignia with the VA-27 (Attack 
Squadron 27) designation in 
the scroll. 



The squadron maintained the 
same insignia design following 
its redesignation to VFA-27. The 
only change was the designa- 
tion in the scroll. 



insignia are as follows: sky blue blackground with a 
white cloud outlined in blue; light blue glove outlined 
in black and with USN in white; orange-red mace han- 
dle with a black mace, outlined in white; white scroll 
outlined in black with black lettering. 
Nickname: Royal Maces, 1968-present. 

Chronology of Significant Events 

28Jun 1968: The squadron flew its first combat sortie, 
striking targets in the panhandle region of North Vietnam. 

4 Feb-7 Mar 1971: VA-27 embarked in Enterprise 
(CVAN 65), conducted training flights during the carri- 
er's transit around Cape Horn to her new home port 
in California. 

Dec 1971 : With the outbreak of war between India 
and Pakistan over East Pakistan (later Bangladesh), 
Enterprise departed Yankee Station and made a quick 
transit to the Indian Ocean to provide support for the 
evacuation of foreign civilians from East Pakistan. 

Oct 1972: Participated in Linebacker I operations, 
heavy air strikes against targets in North Vietnam to 
interdict the flow of supplies in that country and into 
South Vietnam. 

Dec 1972: Participated in Linebacker II operations, 
an intensified version of Linebacker I operations. 

Feb 1975: Enterprise, with CVW-14, provided disas- 



ter support for the island country of Mauritius follow- 
ing a tropical storm. 

Apr 1975: Participated in operation Frequent Wind 
and provided air support for helicopters evacuating 
personnel from Saigon as it fell to the communists. 

Feb 1977: During the crisis in Uganda and threats 
against Americans in that country, Enterprise operated 
off the coast of Kenya for possible support in the 
evacuation of Americans. 

Dec 1979: Coral Sea (CV 43) operated off the coast 
of South Korea following the assassination of South 
Korea's President Park Chung-Hee in late October. 

Apr 1980: The squadron participated in the Iranian 
hostage rescue attempt by providing air cover for the 
forces directly involved in the rescue operation. 

May 1980: Following civil unrest in South Korea, 
Coral Sea operated off the coast of that country. 

Aug 1983: Due to the unsettled conditions in Central 
America, Coral Sea (CV 43) operated off the coast of 
Nicaragua. 

Aug 1986: The squadron participated in the first car- 
rier tactical flight operations in the Bering Sea since 
the end of World War II. 

Home Port Assignments 



Location 


Assignment Date 


NAS Lemoore 


01 Sep 1967 


Commanding Officers 




Date Assumed Command 


CDR George T. Pappas 


01 Sep 1967 


CDR Donald L. Felt 


28 Feb 1969 


CDR Thomas W. Durant 


04 Feb 1970 


CDR Leroy B. Keeley 


22 Jan 1971 


CDR Jerome L. Johnson 


22 Dec 1971 


CDR Leon A. Edney 


15 Dec 1972 


CDR Meredith W. Patrick 


09 Jan 1974 


CDR James A. Kenney 


07 Mar 1975 


CDR Dale A. Iverson 


28 May 1976 


CDR Richard K. Pottratz 


01 Aug 1977 


CDR James "W. Partington 


30 Nov 1978 


CDR James S. Zayicek 


10 May 1980 


CDR Dennis V. McGinn 


24 Sep 1981 


CDR Joseph E. Hart 


16 Dec 1982 


CDR Hugh D. Connell II 


01 May 1984 


CDR Joseph P. Sciabarra 


25 Oct 1985 


CDR Malcolm P. Branch 


29 May 1987 


CDR Richard E. Clayton 


03 Sep 1988 


CDR Stanford H. Hlavka 


29 Mar 1990 



Aircraft Assignment 



Type of Aircraft 



A-7A 
A-7E 



F/A-18A 



Date Type First Received 

Jan 1969 
30 Jun 1970 
20 Feb 1991 



336 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 




Two squadron A-7E Corsair lis fly along a deserted coast line during their deployment to the Indian Ocean, 1986. 



Major Overseas Deployments 



Date of 


Date of 


Air 




Type of 


Area of 


Departure 


Return 


Wing 


Carrier 


Aircraft 


Operation 


28 May 1968 


31 Jan 1969 


CVW-14 


CVA 64 


A-7A 


WestPac/Vietnam 


11 Aug 1969 


08 May 1970 


CVW-14 


CVA 64 


A-7A 


WestPac/Vietnam 


11 Jun 1971 


12 Feb 1972 


CVW-14 


CVAN 65 


A-7E 


WestPac/ 












Vietnam/IO 


12 Sep 1972 


11 Jun 1973 


CVW-14 


CVAN 65 


A-7E 


WestPac/Vietnam 


17 Sep 1974 


20 May 1975 


CVW-14 


CVAN 65 


A-7E 


WestPac AO 


30 Jul 1976 


28 Mar 1977 


CVW-14 


CVN 65 


A-7E 


WestPac/IO 


04 Apr 1978 


30 Oct 1978 


CVW-14 


CVN 65 


A-7E 


WestPac/IO 


13 Nov 1979 


11 Jun 1980 


CVW-14 


CV43 


A-7E 


WestPac/IO 


20 Aug 1981 


23 Mar 1982 


CVW-14 


CV43 


A-7E 


WestPac/IO 


21 Mar 1983 


12 Sep 1983 


CVW-14 


CV43 


A-7E 


World Cruise 


13 Oct 1984 


24 May 1985 


CVW-15 


CVN 70 


A-7E 


WestPac/IO 


12 Aug 1986 


05 Feb 1987 


CVW-15 


CVN 70 


A-7E 


WestPac/IO 


15 Jun 1988 


14 Dec 1988 


CVW-15 


CVN 70 


A-7E 


WestPac/IO 


05 Sep 1989 


09 Nov 1989 


CVW-15 


CVN 70 


A-7E 


NorPac/WestPac 


01 Feb 1990 


29 Jul 1990 


CVW-15 


CVN 70 


A-7E 


WestPac/IO 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 337 



Air Wing Assignments 



Unit Awards Received— Continued 



Air Wing Tail Code 
COMFAIRALAMEDA 

CVW-14 NK 

CVW-15 NL 



Unit Award 
AFEM 

MUC 



NEM 

NUC 
VNSM 



Assignment Date 

01 Sep 1967 
05 Jan 1968 
21 Nov 1983 



Unit Award 



Unit Awards Received 



Inclusive Dates 

16 Oct 1969 
16 Mar 1970 
29 Apr 1975 
14 Jim 1968 
07 Sep 1969 
02 Jul 1971 
22 Apr 1975 

10 Nov 1984 
16 Jan 1987 

01 Feb 1980 

11 Oct 1981 
03 Oct 1972 
27 Jim 1968 

02 Aug 1968 



Covering Unit Award 

24 Oct 1969 
23 Mar 1970 
30 Apr 1975 
23 Jan 1969 
30 Apr 1970 
03 Feb 1972 
30 Apr 1975 
07 May 1985 
02 Feb 1987 
05 May 1980 
20 Oct 1981 
22 Feb 1973 
22 Jul 1968 
28 Aug 1968 



HSM 
NAVE 



Inclusive Dates 
11 Sep 1968 

23 Oct 1968 
09 Dec 1968 

01 Jan 1969 

11 Sep 1969 

01 Nov 1969 
07 Dec 1969 

05 Jan 1970 

12 Feb 1970 
26 Mar 1970 

14 Jul 1971 
15 Aug 1971 
12 Sep 1971 
25 Sep 1971 

02 Oct 1972 
01 Nov 1972 
18 Dec 1972 

24 Jan 1973 
01 Mar 1973 
11 Mar 1973 
29 Apr 1975 

01 Jan 1985 



Covering Unit Award 
09 Oct 1968 

29 Nov 1968 

21 Dec 1968 
07 Jan 1969 
03 Oct 1969 

23 Nov 1969 

22 Dec 1969 

30 Jan 1970 

01 Mar 1970 
17 Apr 1970 

31 Jul 1971 
14 Sep 1971 

26 Sep 1971 

23 Oct 1972 
11 Dec 1972 

13 Jan 1973 
23 Feb 1973 

02 Mar 1973 
28 Mar 1973 

30 Apr 1975 

31 Dec 1985 




A squadron F/A-18A Hornet in flight, 1992. 



338 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 




VFA-37 

Lineage 

Established as Attack Squadron THIRTY SEVEN (VA- 
37) on 1 July 1967. 

Redesignated Strike Fighter Squadron THIRTY 
SEVEN (VFA-37) on 28 November 1990. The first 
squadron to be assigned the VFA-37 designation. 

Squadron Insignia and Nickname 

The squadron's insignia was approved by CNO on 
26 March 1968. A design centering on a Bull was 

selected to symbol- 
ize the spirit, pride 
and mission of the 
unit. The insignia 
colors are as fol- 
lows: a light blue 
circular background 
surrounded by a 
white border out- 
lined in black; red- 
brown bull with a 
black mane, white 
horns tipped with 
red and the nostrils 
emitting clouds of 
white steam; white 
teeth and a red eye; and a dark blue scroll outlined in 
black with lettering in white. 
Nickname: Bulls, 1968-present. 

Chronology of Significant Events 

Jul-Nov 1967: Squadron personnel were trained by 
VA-174 in the operation of the A-7A Corsair II. 

Sep 1970: Fighting erupted between Palestinian 
forces and the Jordanian Army as a result of the 
Palestinian hijacking of several civilian airliners to 
Jordan. Saratoga (CVA 60) with its embarked air wing, 
including VA-37, was directed to operate in the eastern 
Mediterranean in response to this crisis. The conflict 
intensified when Syria invaded Jordan and VA-37 
remained on station until the latter part of September 
when the Jordanian Army had successfully repulsed 
the Syrians and the crisis had abated. 

29 Sep 1970: VA-37 participated in an air power 
demonstration for President Nixon during his two day 
visit to Saratoga while she steamed in the Med. 

Jun-Oct 1971: VA-37 participated in the test and 
evaluation of the new CV concept during the 
Saratoga's deployment to the North Atlantic and the 
Mediterranean Sea. The CV concept involved combin- 
ing the capabilities of the attack and antisubmarine 
carriers (CVA and CVS) into a single ship. 



The squadron has used the Bulls insig- 
nia since March 1968. 



1 Aug 1972: While on a combat mission near the 
island of Hon Nieu, off the coast of North Vietnam, a 
squadron's A-7A Corsair II was used to establish a 
sonobuoy field in an anchorage area. This was the first 
time an A-7 had ever been used to drop sonobuoys. 

Jun 1982: John F. Kennedy, with VA-37 embarked, 
took station off the coast of Lebanon after Israel invad- 
ed that country. 

Jun 1984: The primary mission of the squadron was 
changed to close air support in preparation for its 
deployment to MCAS Iwakuni as part of the Marine 
Corps Unit Deployment Program. VA-37's deployment 
was scheduled as a replacement for a Marine Corps A- 
4M squadron. Two Navy A-7 squadrons had been 
selected for the program because the A-7 Corsair II 
was very similar in size and make-up to a Marine 
Corps A-4 Skyhawk squadron. The deployment of the 
two Navy attack squadrons was designed to test the 
interoperational abilities of the Marine Corps and Navy. 

Dec 1984: VA-37 deployed to MCAS Iwakuni and 
relieved VA-105. VA-105 was the first Navy squadron 
to participate in the Marine Corps Unit Deployment 
Program and it was also the first time a Navy squadron 
came under the operational control of the Marine 
Corps since World War II. 

Mar 1985: While deployed to MCAS Iwakuni, the 
squadron was detached to Yechon, Korea, to partici- 
pate in exercise Team Spirit 85. This was the first time 
a Navy carrier-based squadron had deployed in field 
conditions since World War II. 




A formation of squadron A-7E Corsair lis, 1989- 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 339 



Home Port Assignments 



Location 

NAS Cecil Field 



Assignment Date 
01 Jul 1967 



Commanding Officers 





Date Assumed Command 


CDR James A. Burnett 


01 Jul 


1967 


CDR J. R. Tappan 


08 Nov 


1968 


CDR K. E. Moranville 


Sep 


1969 


CDR C. B. Hawkins, Jr. 


03 Jul 


1970 


CDR Thomas F. Brown III 


28 May 


1971 


CDR Jerome F. Watson 


07 Jan 


1972 


CDR Clarence E. Armstrong 


22 Feb 


1973 


CDR James W. Keathley 


21 Mar 


1974 


CDR George K. Coyne, Jr. 


10 Jul 


1975 


CDR Richard W. Hamon 


15 Oct 


1976 


CDR Robert J. Spane 


12 Jan 


1978 



Commanding Officers— Continued 





Date Assumed Command 


CDR A. Coward IV 


18 Apr 


1979 


CDR W. B. Christie 


03 Jul 


1980 


CDR Leroy A. Farr 


21 Oct 


1981 


CDR Robert L. Ramsay III 


01 Feb 


1983 


CDR Brian L. Lehman 


12 Jul 


1984 


CDR Jeffrey Harrison 


05 Dec 


1985 


CDR James R. O'Hora 


02 Jul 


1987 


CDR L. Scott Jacobsen 


14 Dec 


1988 


CDR Carroll L. White 


22 Jun 


1990 



Aircraft Assignment 



Type of Aircraft 



A-7A 
A-7E 



F/A-18A 



Date Type First Received 

Aug 1967 
23 Apr 1973 
13 Dec 1990 



Major Overseas Deployments 



Date of 


Da te of 


Air 




Type of 


Area of 


Departure 


Return 


Wing 


Carrier 


Aircraft 


Operation 


30 Dec 1968 


04 Sep 1969 


CVW-11 


CVA 63 


A-7A 


WestPac/Vietnam 


17 Jun 1970 


09 Nov 1970 


CVW-3 


CVA 60 


A-7A 


Med 


07 Jun 1971 


28 Oct 1971 


CVW-3 


CVA 60 


A-7A 


NorLant/Med 


11 Apr 1972 


13 Feb 1973 


CVW-3 


CV 60 


A-7A 


SoLant/IO/West 












Pac/Vietnam 


27 Sep 1974 


19 Mar 1975 


CVW-3 


CV 60 


A-7E 


Med 


06 Jan 1976 


28 Jul 1976 


CVW-3 


CV 60 


A-7E 


Med 


11 Jul 1977 


23 Dec 1977 


CVW-3 


CV 60 


A-7E 


Med 


03 Oct 1978 


05 Apr 1979 


CVW-3 


CV 60 


A-7E 


Med 


10 Mar 1980 


27 Aug 1980 


CVW-3 


CV 60 


A-7E 


Med 


04 Jan 1982 


14 Jul 1982 


CVW-3 


CV 67 


A-7E 


Med/IO 


01 Mar 1983 


29 Oct 1983 


CVW-15 


CVN 70 


A-7E 


World Cruise 


01 Dec 1984 


14 Jun 1985 


MAG- 12 


MCAS 


A-7E 


Japan/WestPac 








Iwakuni 






02 Jun 1986 


10 Nov 1986 


CVW-6 


CV 59 


A-7E 


Med 


28 Aug 1987 


09 Oct 1987 


CVW-6 


CV 59 


A-7E 


NorLant 


25 Apr 1988 


07 Oct 1988 


CVW-6 


CV 59 


A-7E 


Med/IO/NorLant 


04 Nov 1989 


12 Apr 1990 


CVW-6 


CV 59 


A-7E 


Med 



Air Wing Assignments 



Air Wing Assignments— Continued 



Air Wing 

COMFAIRJACKSON- 

VILLE 
CVW-11 

COMFAIRJACKSON- 

VILLE 
CVW-3 
CVW-15 



Tail Code 



NH 



AC 
NL 



Assignment Date 

Jul 1967 
Oct 1968 

Sep 1969 
Jan 1970 
01 Oct 1982 



Air Wing 

COMLATWING ONE 
MAG-12, 1st MAW* 
CVW-6 

COMLATWING ONE 



Tail Code 



AE 



Assignment Date 

Oct 1983 
01 Dec 1984 
Aug 1985 
01 Oct 1990 



* VA-37 was assigned to MAG-12, 1st MAW during its shorebased 
deployment to MCAS Iwakuni, Japan. 



340 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



Unit Awards Received 



Unit Awards Received— Continued 



Unit Award 
NAVE 

MUC 



Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 



Unit Award 



Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 



NUC 
VNSM 



01 Jul 1971 
01 Jan 1989 

17 Sep 1970 
04 May 1971 

09 Jan 1973 
01 Oct 1979 
01 Jan 1989 
15 Jan 1969 

18 May 1972 
27 Jan 1969 
12 Mar 1969 
17 Apr 1969 



31 Dec 1972 
31 Dec 1989 

18 Oct 1970 
17 May 1972 
03 May 1977 
15 Nov 1980 
01 Apr 1990 
27 Aug 1969 

08 Jan 1973 
01 Mar 1969 
05 Apr 1969 
10 May 1969 



28 Jun 1969 
27 Jul 1969 

06 May 1972 

17 May 1972 
30 Jun 1972 

27 Jul 1972 

02 Sep 1972 

29 Sep 1972 
25 Oct 1972 

03 Nov 1972 

18 Dec 1972 



15 Jul 1969 
16 Aug 1969 

07 May 1972 

22 Jun 1972 

16 Jul 1972 

23 Aug 1972 
19 Sep 1972 
21 Oct 1972 
26 Oct 1972 

08 Dec 1972 
31 Dec 1972 




Two squadron F/A-18C Hornets in flight over snow-covered mountains; note the hull on the tail of each aircraft, 1992. 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 341 



VFA-81 

Lineage 

Established as Attack Squadron SIXTY SIX (VA-66) 
on 1 July 1955. 

Redesignated Fighter Squadron EIGHTY ONE (VF- 
81) on 1 July 1955, the same day it was established as 
VA-66. 

Redesignated Attack Squadron EIGHTY ONE (VA- 
81) on 1 July 1959. 

Redesignated Strike Fighter Squadron EIGHTY ONE 
(VFA-81) on 4 February 1988. The first squadron to be 
assigned the VA-66, VA-81 and VFA-81 designation. 

Squadron Insignia and Nickname 

The squadron's first insignia was approved by CNO 
on 16 December 1955. Colors for the insignia were: a 
light blue background with an outer ring of alternating 

red and yellow sections, 
outlined in black; white 
cloud with black mark- 
ings; black cougar with 
white markings and red 
eyes, mouth and claws; 
gray knight with black 
markings; red scarf; red 
and yellow helmet 
plume, shield and lance 
outlined in black; red 
scroll outlined in black, 
with yellow lettering. 

A new insignia was 
approved by CNO on 
21 November 1963- Color for this insignia were: a 
black background outlined in international orange; 
international orange mach wave design; orange scroll 
with black lettering. 

A modification to the squadron's insignia was 
approved by CNO on 30 March 1988. Colors for this 
insignia are: a dark blue background outlined in 




The squadron's first insignia, the 
Crusaders, was approved in 1955. 




The squadron 's second 
insignia was a stylized mach 
wave design, approved in 
1963. 



When the squadron was redes- 
ignated VFA a modification to 
its second insignia was 
approved for use in 1988. 



orange; orange scrolls with black lettering; silver stars 
and stylized aircraft; gold aircraft contrails and an 
orange mach wave design. 

Nickname: Crusaders, 1955-1963. 

Sunliners, 1963-present. 

Chronology of Significant Events 

Nov-Dec 1956: Franklin D. Roosevelt (CVA 42), with 
VF-81 embarked, was ordered to deploy and operate off 
the coast of Spain as a result of the Suez Canal crisis. 

Apr-May 1957: VF-81, while deployed to the 
Mediterranean aboard Lake Champlain (CVA 39), 
operated off the coast of Lebanon during a crisis in 
Jordan. 

Oct 1961-Feb 1962: VA-81 Det 45 deployed to the 
North Atlantic embarked in Essex (CVS 9). The detach- 
ment was part of CVSG-56, and with its A4D 
Skyhawks employing Sidewinder missiles, provided air 
cover for antisubmarine units embarked in Essex. The 
detachment was the first jet unit to function as part of 
an antisubmarine killer force. 

Sep 1969: John F. Kennedy (CVA 67), with VA-81 
embarked, were ordered to operate off the coast of 
Libya following a coup that overthrew the Libyan 
monarchy on 1 September 1969- 

2-5 Dec 1972: The squadron's A-7E Corsair II air- 
craft conducted cross-deck operations with the British 
carrier HMS Ark Royal. 

Jul-Aug 1974: The squadron operated from Forrestal 
(CVA 59) in the vicinity of Cyprus following a coup in 
that country and its invasion by Turkish forces. 
Surveillance and cover missions were flown by the 
squadron during the crisis. 

May-Jun 1981: Embarked in Forrestal, VA-81 operat- 
ed in the eastern Mediterranean following Israeli 
reprisal raids against Syrian missile batteries located in 
southern Lebanon. 

Aug 1981: The squadron participated a Freedom of 
Navigation Exercise in the Gulf of Sidra. During this 
exercise two F-14 Tomcats from Nimitz (CVN 68) shot 
down two Libyan SU-22 Fitters on 18 August. Tensions 
escalated and VA-81 flew reconnaissance missions 
over potentially hostile Libyan ships. 

24 Mar 1986: Following a Libyan SA-5 missile firing 
against U.S. naval aircraft operating in the Gulf of 
Sidra during a Freedom of Navigation exercise, VA-81 
aircraft participated in a retaliatory strike against the 
missile site at Suit, Libya. Squadron aircraft acted as 
the decoy group for VA-83's HARM strike against the 
Libyan missile radar site. 

Aug-Dec 1990: The squadron participated in 
Operation Desert Shield, the build-up of American and 
Allied forces to counter a threatened invasion of Saudi 
Arabia by Iraq and as part of an economic blockade of 
Iraq to force its withdrawal from Kuwait. 



342 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



^^^^^ ^^^^^J^^^^^fc^. 


* 





A squadron F9F-8B in flight, 1957 (Courtesy Duane Kasulka Collection). 



Home Port Assignment 



Commanding Officers— Continued 



Location 

NAS Oceana 
NAS Cecil Field 



Assignment Date 

01 Jul 1955 
01 May 1966 



Commanding Officers 





Date Assumed Command 


CDR Merle M. Hershey 


01 Jul 


1955 


LCDR Robert Godman 


30 Jul 


1957 


LCDR J. M. Scarborough 


15 Aug 


1958 


CDR Lawrence Heyworth, Jr. 


17 Oct 


1958 


CDR William P. Kiser 


04 Nov 


1959 


CDR Richard E. Rumble 


09 Nov 


I960 


CDR John N. Longfield 


31 Oct 


1961 


CDR Robert B. Gohr 


01 Dec 


1962 


CDR Grover K. Gregory 


01 Oct 


1963 


CDR Nicholas A. Castruccio 


06 Oct 


1964 


CDR Burton H. Sheperd 


16 Oct 


1965 


CDR Edward A. Grunwald 


20 Sep 


1966 


CDR Melville D. Cunningham 


19 Sep 


1967 


CDR Lloyd M. Westphal 


25 Sep 


1968 


CDR John J. Lahr 


24 Jul 


1969 


CDR Richard J. Damico 


12 Jun 


1970 


CDR Thomas C. Watson, Jr. 


14 Apr 


1971 


CDR Jerry O. Tuttle 


18 Feb 


1972 


CDR Kenneth A. Dickerson 


18 Feb 


1973 


CDR Ralph E. Whitby 


21 Feb 


1974 


CDR Robert V. Sallada 


03 Mar 


1975 





Date Assumed Command 


CDR Richard Birtwistle III 


03 Jun 


1976 


CDR Jerry O. Yarborough 


30 Jun 


1977 


CDR Philip H. Jacobs 


14 Jul 


1978 


CDR James E. Killian 


26 Jul 


1979 


CDR George J. Webb, Jr. 


18 Dec 


1980 


CDR William C. Miller III 


09 Mar 


1982 


CDR William E. Beaty III 


Sep 


1983 


CDR Kenneth C. Cech 


07 Mar 


1985 


CDR Jay M. Munninghoff 


02 Jul 


1986 


CDR William N. Deaver, Jr. 


04 Feb 


1988 


CDR Gerald L. Hoewing 


11 May 


1989 


CDR Michael T. Anderson 


29 Aug 


1990 



Aircraft Assignment 



Type of Aircraft 



F9F-8 
F9F-8B 



A4D-2/A-4B" 
A-4E 



A-7E 



F/A-18C 



Date Type First Received 

Aug 1955 
Apr 1956 
04 Mar 1959 
03 Apr 1963 
Sep 1967 
May 1970 
30 Mar 1988 



* The A4D-2 designation was changed to A-4B in 1962. 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 343 




A squadron A-4C Skyhawk after completing a successful landing aboard John F. Kennedy (CVA 67) in 1969. 



Major Overseas Deployments 



Date of 


Date of 


Air 




Type of 


Area of 


Departure 


Return 


Wing 


Carrier 


Aircraft 


Operation 


21 Jan 1957 


27 Jul 1957 


ATG-182 


CVA 39 


F9F-8/8B 


Med 


09 Jun 1958 


08 Aug 1958 


ATG-181 


CVA 11 


F9F-8 


NorLant 


28 Jan I960 


31 Aug I960 


CVG-8 


CVA 59 


A4D-2 


Med 


09 Feb 1961 


25 Aug 1961 


CVG-8 


CVA 59 


A4D-2 


Med 


03 Aug 1962 


02 Mar 1963 


CVG-8 


CVA 59 


A4D-2 


Med 


10 Jul 1964 


13 Mar 1965 


CVW-8 


CVA 59 


A-4E 


Med 


24 Aug 1965 


07 Apr 1966 


CVW-8 


CVA 59 


A-4E 


Med 


29 Sep 1966 


20 May 1967 


CVW-8 


CVA 38 


A-4E 


Med 


15 Nov 1967 


04 Aug 1968 


CVW-8 


CVA 38 


A-4C 


Med 


05 Apr 1969 


21 Dec 1969 


CVW-1 


CVA 67 


A-4C 


Med 


05 Jan 1971 


02 Jul 1971 


CVW-17 


CVA 59 


A-7E 


Med 


22 Sep 1972 


06 Jul 1973 


CVW-17 


CVA 59 


A-7E 


Med 


11 Mar 1974 


11 Sep 1974 


CVW-17 


CVA 59 


A-7E 


Med 


05 Mar 1975 


22 Sep 1975 


CVW-17 


CV 59 


A-7E 


Med 


04 Apr 1978 


26 Oct 1978 


CVW-17 


CV 59 


A-7E 


Med/NorLant 


27 Nov 1979 


07 May 1980 


CVW-17 


CV 59 


A-7E 


Med 


02 Mar 1981 


15 Sep 1981 


CVW-17 


CV 59 


A-7E 


Med/NorLant 


08 Jun 1982 


16 Nov 1982 


CVW-17 


CV 59 


A-7E 


Med/IO 


02 Apr 1984 


20 Oct 1984 


CVW-17 


CV 60 


A-7E 


Med 


26 Aug 1985 


16 Apr 1986 


CVW-17 


CV 60 


A-7E 


Med/IO 


05 Jun 1987 


17 Nov 1987 


CVW-17 


CV 60 


A-7E 


Med 


07 Aug 1990 


28 Mar 1991 


CVW-17 


CV 60 


F/A-18C 


Med/Red Sea 



344 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 




Air Wing Assignments 



Unit Awards Received 



Air Wing 

ATG-182 

CVG-17 

ATG-182 

ATG-181 

CVG-8/CVW-8t 

CVW-1 

COMFAIRJACKSON- 

VILLE 
COMLATWING 1 
CVW-17 



Tail Code 

o 

R 

O/AN* 
AM 
AJ 
AB 



AA 



Assignment Date 

01 Jul 1955 
Nov 1956 
Dec 1956 
15 Mar 1958 
08 Aug 1958 
25 Aug 1968 

02 Mar 1970 
01 Jun 1970 
01 Aug 1970 



* The tail code was changed from O to AN in 1957. The effective 
date for this change was most likely the beginning of FY 58 (1 July 
1957). 

t CVG-8 was redesignated CVW-8 when Carrier Air Groups (CVG) 
were redesignated Carrier Air Wings (CVW) on 20 December 1963. 



Unit Award 
NAVE 



NUC 



MUC 
NEM 



SASM 



KLM 



Inclusive Dates 

01 Jul 1968 
01 Jan 1973 
01 Jan 1987 
10 Oct 1985 
23 Mar 1986 
17 Jan 1991 
28 Feb 1979 

05 Sep 1982 
13 Oct 1982 
20 Jan 1986 

22 Aug 1990 

23 Oct 1990 

06 Jan 1991 
17 Jan 1991 



Covering Unit Award 

31 Dec 1969 

30 Jun 1974 

31 Dec 1987 
11 Oct 1985 
29 Mar 1986 

28 Feb 1991 
07 May 1980 

10 Sep 1982 
05 Nov 1982 

29 Mar 1986 
21 Sep 1990 
09 Dec 1990 

11 Mar 1991 
28 Feb 1991 




A squadron F/A-18C in flight, 1988. 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 345 



VFA-82 

Lineage 

Established as Attack Squadron EIGHTY TWO (VA- 
82) on 1 May 1967. 

Redesignated Strike Fighter Squadron EIGHTY TWO 
(VFA-82) on 13 July 1987. The first squadron to be 
assigned the VA-82 and VFA-82 designations. 



Squadron Insignia 
and Nickname 

The squadron's in- 
signia was approved 
by CNO on 8 Novem- 
ber 1967. Colors for the 
insignia are: a white 
background outlined 
in blue; blue shield out- 
lined in black; brown 
eagle with white and 
black markings; yel- 
low trident outlined in 
black; and a blue scroll 
with white lettering. 

Nickname: Maraud- 
ers, 1967-present. 




This is the only insignia the 
squadron has used since it was 
established in 196 7. When it was 
redesignated VFA in 1987, the 
squadron changed the ATKRON 82 
acronym in the scroll to STRK- 
FITRON82. 



Chronology of Significant Events 

31 May 1968: The squadron participated in its first 
combat operations, flying sorties over North Vietnam. 

Jul-Oct 1972: The squadron participated in 
Operation Linebacker I, heavy air strikes against tar- 
gets in North Vietnam. 

Dec 1972: The squadron participated in Linebacker 
II operations, a more intensified version of Linebacker 
I operations. 

Jan 1980: After the U.S. Embassy staff was taken 
hostage in Tehran, Iran, VA-82 departed Naples, Italy, 
embarked in Nimitz (CVN 68), enroute to the Indian 
Ocean via the Cape of Good Hope. This was the begin- 
ning of 144 consecutive days at sea for the squadron. 

Oct 1981: Following the assassination of President 
Sadat of Egypt, Nimitz, with VA-82 embarked, was 
ordered to operate off the coast of Egypt. 

Jun 1985: Nimitz, with VA-82 embarked, was 
ordered to operate off the coast of Lebanon due to the 
hijacking of TWA flight 847 by Arab radicals. The carri- 
er and squadron remained on station until the release 
of the hostages in the latter part of July. 

Sep 1989: Squadron aircraft flew support missions 
during the evacuation of the American Embassy in 
Beirut, Lebanon. 

12 Feb-7 Apr 1990: VFA-82 was embarked in 
Constellation (CV 64) during its transit from the west 
coast to the east coast via the Straits of Magellan. 




A squadron A-7 A Corsair II preparing to launch from Coral Sea 
(CVA 43) while deployed to Vietnam in 1969. 



Home Port Assignments 



Location 

NAS Cecil Field 



Assignment Date 
01 May 1967 



Commanding Officers 





Date Assumed Command 


CDRJ. A. Burnett 


20 Jul 1967 


CDRJ. E. Jones 


05 Sep 1967 


CDR D. P. Thomas 


08 Jan 1969 


CDR E. M. Clemens 


01 Dec 1969 


CDR James M. Gleim 


30 Oct 1970 


CDR Thomas P. Scott 


22 Oct 1971 


CDR Donald M. Sumner 


02 Sep 1972 


CDR Jerry C. Breast 


25 Oct 1973 


CDR Peter R. Schoeffel 


13 Aug 1974 


CDR Douglas P. Dunbar, Jr. 


04 Aug 1975 


CDR Thomas A. Mercer 


04 Nov 1976 


CDR Donald B. Hunt 


16 Nov 1977 


CDR David M. Gist 


Jan 1979 


CDR Robert B. Newell, Jr. 


12 Mar 1980 


CDR Dan H. Ryder 


01 May 1981 


CDR David H. Finney 


14 Jul 1982 


CDR Dennis J. Carroll 


23 Feb 1984 


CDR Robert J. Sanderson 


06 Jul 1985 


CDR Gerald A. Pike 


23 Feb 1987 


CDR Richard A. Eason 


02 Sep 1988 


CDR James Ross 


02 Feb 1990 



Aircraft Assignment 



Type of Aircraft 




Date Type First Received 

Jun 1967 

08 Sep 1970 
Apr 1972 
Nov 1974 

09 Nov 1987 



346 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 




Two squadron A-7E Corsair lis in flight, showing the low-visibility paint scheme, 1987. 



Major Overseas Deployments 



Date of 


Date of 


Air 




Type of 


Area of 


Departure 


Return 


Wing 


Carrier 


Aircraft 


Operation 


10 Apr 1968 


16 Dec 1968 


CVW-6 


CVA 66 


A-7A 


WorldCruise/ 
Vietnam 


23 Sep 1969 


01 Jul 1970 


CVW-15 


CVA43 


A-7A 


WestPac/Vietnam 


06 Jul 1971 


16 Dec 1971 


CVW-8 


CVA 66 


A-7E 


Med 


05 Jun 1972 


24 Mar 1973 


CVW-8 


CVA 66 


A-7C 


WestPac/Vietnam 


03 Jan 1974 


03 Aug 1974 


CVW-8 


CVA 66 


A-7C 


Med 


06 Sep 1974 


12 Oct 1974 


CVW-8 


CVA 66 


A-7C 


NorLant 


16 Jul 1975 


24 Sep 1975 


CVW-8 


CVN 68 


A-7E 


Carib/NorLant 


07 Jul 1976 


07 Feb 1977 


CVW-8 


CVN 68 


A-7E 


Med 


01 Dec 1977 


20 Jul 1978 


CVW-8 


CVN 68 


A-7E 


Med/NorLant 


10 Sep 1979 


26 May 1980 


CVW-8 


CVN 68 


A-7E 


Med/SoLant/IO 


29 Aug 1980 


17 Oct 1980 


CVW-8 


CVN 68 


A-7E 


NorLant 


03 Aug 1981 


12 Feb 1982 


CVW-8 


CVN 68 


A-7E 


Med 


10 Nov 1982 


20 May 1983 


CVW-8 


CVN 68 


A-7E 


Carib/Med 


08 Mar 1985 


04 Oct 1985 


CVW-8 


CVN 68 


A-7E 


Carib/Med 


15 Aug 1986 


16 Oct 1986 


CVW-8 


CVN 68 


A-7E 


NorLant 


30 Dec 1986 


26 Jul 1987 


CVW-8 


CVN 68 


A-7E 


Med/SoLant/ 
West Coast 


08 Feb 1989 


03 Apr 1989 


CVW-1 


CV 66 


F/A-18C 


Carib/NorLant 


11 May 1989 


10 Nov 1989 


CVW-1 


CV 66 


F/A-18C 


Med/IO 


28 Dec 1990 


18 Apr 1991 


CVW-1 


CV 66 


F/A-18C 


Med/Red Sea/ 
Persian Gulf 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 347 



Air Wing Assignments 



Unit Awards Received— Continued 



Air Wing 

COMFAIRJACKSON- 

VILLE* 
CVW-6 
CVW-15 

COMFAIRJACKSON- 

VILLE 
CVW-8 

COMLATWING 1 
CVW-1 



Tail Code 



AE 
NL 



AJ 



AB 



Assignment Date 

01 Sep 1967 
01 Dec 1967 
1969 

01 Jul 1970 
Apr 1971 
01 Sep 1987 
1988 



Unit Award 



* Between 1 May and 1 September 1967 the squadron was under 
the administrative control of VA-174 during its training in the A-7 
Corsair II. 



Unit Awards Received 



Unit Award 


Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 




NAVE 


01 Jul 1975 


30 Sep 1976 


AFEM 




01 Jan 1989 


31 Dec 1989 


MUC 


NUC 


12 May 1968 


20 Nov 1968 






23 Jan 1980 


01 May 1980 


NEM 




17 Jan 1991 


07 Feb 1991 




RVNGC 


30 May 1968 


02 Jun 1968 






29 Sep 1968 








10 Oct 1968 


12 Oct 1968 






17 Oct 1968 






VNSM 


29 May 1968 


28 Jun 1968 


SASM 




06 Jul 1968 


03 Aug 1968 


KLM 



Inclusive 
17 Aug 1968 

27 Sep 1968 

26 Oct 1969 
22 Dec 1969 

17 Feb 1970 

19 Mar 1970 

28 Apr 1970 
02 Jul 1972 
11 Jul 1972 

10 Aug 1972 
06 Sep 1972 

11 Oct 1972 

20 Oct 1972 
09 Dec 1972 

09 Jan 1973 

12 Feb 1973 

21 Feb 1973 

10 Dec 1969 

27 Oct 1969 
14 Jul 1972 

14 Jan 1980 
05 Dec 1982 

21 Jan 1983 

18 Feb 1983 

19 Mar 1983 
18 Apr 1983 

15 Jan 1991 
17 Jan 1991 



Dates Covering Unit Award 
12 Sep 1968 

30 Oct 1968 
18 Nov 1969 

19 Jan 1970 
09 Mar 1970 

11 Apr 1970 
01 Jun 1970 

04 Jul 1972 
24 Jul 1972 
28 Aug 1972 
07 Oct 1972 

12 Oct 1972 

01 Dec 1972 

27 Dec 1972 

02 Feb 1973 
16 Feb 1973 
25 Feb 1973 
11 Dec 1969 
01 Jun 1970 

20 Feb 1973 
14 May 1980 

31 Dec 1982 

13 Feb 1983 
24 Feb 1983 

21 Mar 1983 

22 Apr 1983 

03 Apr 1991 

28 Feb 1991 





A squadron F/A-18C Hornet in flight, 1987. 



348 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



VFA-83 

Lineage 

Reserve Fighter Squadron NINE HUNDRED SIXTEEN 
(VF-916) called to active duty on 1 February 1951. 

Redesignated Fighter Squadron EIGHTY THREE 
(VF-83) on 4 February 1953. 

Redesignated Attack Squadron EIGHTY THREE (VA- 
83) on 1 July 1955. 

Redesignated Strike Fighter Squadron EIGHTY 
THREE (VFA-83) on 3 March 1988. The first squadron 
to be assigned the VA-83 and VFA-83 designations. 

Squadron Insignia 
and Nickname 

The squadron's first 
insignia was ap- 
proved by CNO on 
16 May 1950. Colors 
for the insignia were: 
a yellow background; 
black bull with brown 
hair around the horns; 
white horns with light 
blue shading; the 
teeth, eye and smoke 
were white; the nose, 
mouth and ring around the eye were pink. 

A new squadron insignia was approved by CNO on 

12 April 1957. Colors for 
the Rampager insignia 
are: a light blue back- 
ground outlined in gold; 
blue scroll outlined in 
black with black letter- 
ing; white ram's head 
with black markings; 
red eyes; and white 
horns with yellow, 
green and black mark- 
ings. 

Nickname: The Roar- 
ing Bulls, 1950-1953. 

Rampagers, 1957 to 
present. 




The squadron's first insignia, the bull 
with machine guns, was approved in 
1950. 




The squadron adopted the ram 
head insignia in 1957 and has 
used this design for the past four 
decades. 



Chronology of Significant Events 

12 Mar 1956: VA-83, equipped with F7U-3M Cutlass 
aircraft and Sparrow I missiles, departed Norfolk, 
Virginia, embarked in Intrepid (CVA 11), for deploy- 
ment to the Mediterranean Sea. This was the first over- 
seas deployment of a naval missile squadron. 

Dec 1957: The squadron was the first fleet squadron 
to receive the A4D-2 Skyhawk. This version of the 



Skyhawk was the first to be equipped with an inflight 
refueling capability. 

Jul-Aug 1958: Following continued civil violence in 
Lebanon, VA-83 operating from Essex (CVA 9) flew sor- 
ties during the U.S. Marine Corps landings in Lebanon 
to support the Lebanese government and protect 
American lives. During the squadron's more than 500 
sorties, two of its aircraft were hit by hostile small 
arms fire during road reconnaissance missions, no 
casualties were sustained. 

Sep 1958: On 23 August 1958 the People's Republic 
of China began shelling the Quemoy Islands held by 
the Republic of China. Essex, with VA-83 embarked, 
was ordered to transit the Suez Canal and augment the 
7th Fleet forces in the Taiwan Straits. During 
September the squadron conducted flight operations 
while operating in the Taiwan Straits. 

Aug 1962: A squadron A4D-2N Skyhawk cross- 
decked on the British carrier HMS Hermes. 

Sep 1969: John F. Kennedy (CVA 67), with VA-83 
embarked, was ordered to operate off the coast of 
Libya following a coup that overthrew the Libyan 
monarchy on 1 September 1969- 

Jul-Aug 1974: The squadron operated from Forrestal 
(CVA 59) in the vicinity of Cyprus following a coup in 
that country and its invasion by Turkish forces. 

May-Jun 1981: Embarked in Forrestal, VA-83 operat- 
ed in the eastern Mediterranean following Israeli 
reprisal raids against Syrian missile batteries located in 
southern Lebanon. 

Aug 1981: The squadron participated in a Freedom 
of Navigation Exercise in the Gulf of Sidra. During this 
exercise two F-14 Tomcats from Nimitz (CVN 68) shot 
down two Libyan SU-22 Fitters on 18 August. Tensions 
escalated and VA-83 flew reconnaissance missions 
over potentially hostile Libyan ships. 

24 Mar 1986: Following a Libyan SA-5 missile firing 
against U.S. naval aircraft operating in the Gulf of 
Sidra during a Freedom of Navigation exercise, VA-83 
aircraft participated in a retaliatory strike against the 
missile site at Surt, Libya. Squadron aircraft fired 
HARMs against the Libyan missile radar site. This was 
the first use of the AGM-88 HARM missile in combat. 

Aug-Dec 1990: The squadron participated in 
Operation Desert Shield, the build-up of American and 
Allied forces to counter a threatened invasion of Saudi 
Arabia by Iraq and as part of an economic blockade of 
Iraq to force its withdrawal from Kuwait. 



Home Port Assignments 



Location 

NAS Jacksonville 

NAAS Oceana/NAS Oceana* 

NAS Cecil Field 



Assignment Date 

01 Feb 1951 
Sep 1951 
15 Jun 1966 



* NAAS Oceana was redesignated NAS Oceana on 1 April 1952. 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 349 




A squadron F7U-3M Cutlass preparing for 
a launch from Intrepid (CVA 11) in 1956. 



Commanding Officers 



Commanding Officers— Continued 





Date Assumed Command 


LCDR A. J. Fecke 


Apr 


1950 


CDR W. R. Sisley 


16 Dec 


1952 


CDR R. J. Swanson 


Dec 


1953 


CDR H. E. Vita 


28 Jan 


1955 


CDR James L. Holloway III 


12 Sep 


1956 


CDR Albert H. Vito, Jr. 


05 Dec 


1958 


CDR David S. Stear 


15 Jan 


I960 


CDR James W. Nance 


02 Dec 


I960 


CDR James Spargo 


15 Dec 


1961 


CDR A. H. Cummings 


10 Dec 


1962 


CDR R. G. Thomson, Jr. 


20 Dec 


1963 


CDR F. B. Bromley 


19 Dec 


1964 


CDR E. S. Carver 


07 Dec 


1965 


CDR G. F. Brummitt 


08 Dec 


1966 


CDR D. M. Trimble 


Nov 


1967 


CDR F. J. Almberg 


Sep 


1968 


CDR Theodore C. Casimes 


02 Sep 


1969 


CDR William M. Shewchuk 


04 Jan 


1971 


CDR D. B. Gilbert 


12 Jan 


1972 


CDR J. E. Craig, Jr. 


03 Jan 


1973 


CDR G. A. Appelhof 


14 Feb 


1974 


CDR A. H. Henderson 


15 May 


1975 


CDR John M. Waples 


05 Aug 


1976 


CDR Robert J. Naughton 


27 Nov 


1977 


CDR R. E. Wolf 


28 Feb 


1979 


CDR Austin E. Chapman 


29 May 


1980 



CDR Douglas J. Bradt 

CDR W. E. Franson 

CDR S. F. Bloyer 

CDR R. J. Nibe 

CDR Terry A. Miller 

CDR Michael W. Longworth 

CDR Dennis M. Gillespie 



Date Assumed Command 

21 Jan 1982 
28 Apr 1983 
10 Sep 1984 
24 Apr 1986 
28 Sep 1987 

03 Jun 1988 
30 Nov 1989 



Aircraft Assignment 



Type of Aircraft 


Date Type First Received 


F4U-4 


Feb 1951 


F9F-2 


Dec 1951 


F8F-2 


May 1952 


F9F-5 


Sep 1952 


F7U-3 


Aug 1954 


F7U-3M 


Apr 1955 


A4D-1 


Mar 1957 


A4D-2 


15 Dec 1957 


A4D-2N/A-4C* 


14 Sep I960 


A-4E 


May 1963 


A-4C 


Aug 1967 


A-7E 


19 Jun 1970 


F/A-18C 


25 Apr 1988 







: The A4D-2N designation was changed to A-4C in 1962. 



350 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 




A squadron A4D-2N (A-4C) Skyhawk, circa 1960-1962. 



Major Overseas Deployments 



Date of 


Date of 


Air 




Type of 


Area of 


Departure 


Return 


Wing 


Carrier 


Aircraft 


Operation 


26 Apr 1953 


21 Oct 1953 


CVG-8 


CVA43 


F9F-5 


Med 


12 Mar 1956 


05 Sep 1956 


CVG-8 


CVA 11 


F7U-3M 


Med 


02 Feb 1958 


17 Nov 1958 


ATG-201 


CVA 9 


A4D-2 


Med/IO/WestPac 


28 Jan I960 


31 Aug I960 


CVG-8 


CVA 59 


A4D-2 


Med 


09 Feb 1961 


25 Aug 1961 


CVG-8 


CVA 59 


A4D-2N 


Med 


03 Aug 1962 


02 Mar 1963 


CVG-8 


CVA 59 


A-4C 


Med 


10 Jul 1964 


13 Mar 1965 


CVW-8 


CVA 59 


A-4E 


Med 


24 Aug 1965 


07 Apr 1966 


CVW-8 


CVA 59 


A-4E 


Med 


29 Sep 1966 


20 May 1967 


CVW-8 


CVA 38 


A-4E 


Med 


15 Nov 1967 


04 Aug 1968 


CVW-8 


CVA 38 


A-4C 


Med 


05 Apr 1969 


21 Dec 1969 


CVW-1 


CVA 67 


A-4C 


Med 


05 Jan 1971 


02 Jul 1971 


CVW-17 


CVA 59 


A-7E 


Med 


22 Sep 1972 


06 Jul 1973 


CVW-1 7 


CVA 59 


A-7E 


Med 


11 Mar 1974 


11 Sep 1974 


CVW-17 


CVA 59 


A-7E 


Med 


05 Mar 1975 


22 Sep 1975 


CVW-17 


CV 59 


A-7E 


Med 


04 Apr 1978 


26 Oct 1978 


CVW-17 


CV 59 


A-7E 


Med/NorLant 


27 Nov 1979 


07 May 1980 


CVW-17 


CV 59 


A-7E 


Med 


02 Mar 1981 


15 Sep 1981 


CVW-17 


CV 59 


A-7E 


Med/NorLant 


08 Jun 1982 


16 Nov 1982 


CVW-17 


CV 59 


A-7E 


Med/IO 


02 Apr 1984 


20 Oct 1984 


CVW-17 


CV 60 


A-7E 


Med 


26 Aug 1985 


16 Apr 1986 


CVW-17 


CV 60 


A-7E 


Med/IO 


05 Jun 1987 


17 Nov 1987 


CVW-17 


CV 60 


A-7E 


Med 


07 Aug 1990 


28 Mar 1991 


CVW-17 


CV 60 


F/A-18C 


Med/Red Sea 



Air Wing Assignments 



Air Wing Tail Code 

CVG-8 E 

ATG-201 AP 

CVG-8/CVW-8* AJ 

CVW-1 AB 
COMFAIRJACKSON- 
VILLE 



Assignment Date 

Apr 1951 
15 Oct 1957 
18 Nov 1958 
25 Aug 1968 

02 Mar 1970 



Air Wing 

COMLATWING 1 
CVW-17 



Air Wing Assignments— Continued 

Tail Code Assignment Date 

01 Jun 1970 



AA 



01 Aug 1970 



* CVG-8 was redesignated CVW-8 when Carrier Air Groups (CVG) 
were redesignated Carrier Air Wings (CVW) on 20 December 1963. 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 351 




Unit Award 
NAVE 

AFEM 

NEM 



A formation of 
squadron A-7E Corsair 
lis in flight during their 
deployment to the Med 
aboard Forrestal (CV 
59) in 1974. 



Unit Awards Received 



Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 



Unit Awards Received— Continued 



01 Jul I960 
01 Jul 1961 
01 Jan 1990 
16 Jul 1958 
11 Aug 1958 
16 Sep 1958 
05 Sep 1982 
13 Oct 1982 



30 Jun 1961 

30 Jun 1962 

31 Dec 1990 
01 Aug 1958 
20 Aug 1958 
27 Sep 1958 
10 Sep 1982 
05 Nov 1982 



Unit Award 
NUC 

SASM 

KLM 



Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 



20 Jan 1986 
10 Oct 1985 
23 Mar 1986 
17 Jan 1991 

22 Aug 1990 

23 Oct 1990 
06 Jan 1991 
17 Jan 1991 



29 Mar 1986 
11 Oct 1985 
29 Mar 1986 
28 Feb 1991 
21 Sep 1990 
09 Dec 1990 
11 Mar 1991 
28 Feb 1991 




A squadron F/A-18C Hornet over the bombing range in Florida. 



352 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



VFA-86 

Lineage 

Reserve Fighter Squadron NINE HUNDRED TWENTY 
ONE (VF-921) called to active duty on 1 February 1951. 

Redesignated Fighter Squadron EIGHTY FOUR (VF- 
84) on 4 February 1953. 

Redesignated Attack Squadron EIGHTY SIX (VA-86) 
on 1 July 1955. 

Redesignated Strike Fighter Squadron EIGHTY SIX 
(VFA-86) on 15 July 1987. The second squadron to be 
assigned the VA-86 designation and the first squadron 
to be assigned the VFA-86 designation. 

Squadron Insignia and 
Nickname 

The squadron's first 
insignia was approved 
by CNO on 6 August 
1951. Colors for the 
insignia were: a blue 
background; red bird 
with black markings, 
yellow beak and feet 
outlined in black and a 
white eye; yellow avia- 
tor wings and anchor 
with black markings; and a white machine gun and 
missile with black markings. 

A new insignia was approved by CNO on 7 April 
1954. Colors for the top 
hat and snake insignia 
are: a black background 
outlined in white and 
black; gold snake with 
black markings, white 
fangs, red eyes and 
tongue; black top hat 
with white markings; 
and a black cane out- 
lined in white with gold 
markings at the top and 
bottom. 

Nickname: Side- 
winders, 1955-present. 




This was the first insignia approved 
for and used by the squadron. 




The top hat and snake became the 
squadron's second insignia in 
1954 and has become a well- 
known design. 



Chronology of Significant Events 

29 Jun-2 Jul 1953: VF-84 was embarked in Antietam 
(CVA 36) and operated with the British Royal Navy, 
demonstrating flight operations from the carrier's new 
angled deck. 

7 Jan 1961 : The squadron's commanding officer, 
Commander J. W. Shuff, was killed in an aircraft acci- 
dent while the squadron was deployed to the 
Mediterranean. 



Apr 1961 : The squadron operated from 
Independence (CVA 62) in an area south of 
Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, during the Bay of Pigs, the 
unsuccessful invasion of Cuba by American supported 
Cuban exiles. 

Nov 1962: The squadron embarked in Lexington 
(CVS 16) during the Cuban Missile Crisis and operated 
off the coast of Jacksonville, Florida, on call and avail- 
able for operations in the Caribbean. 

Apr-May 1963: The squadron provided detachments 
for operation aboard Randolph (CVS 15), Essex (CVS 
9) and Wasp (CVS 18). The detachment's A-4C 
Skyhawks were equipped with Sidewinder missiles 
and used to provide the ASW carriers with an antiair 
warfare capability. 

I Jul 1965: The squadron conducted its first combat 
mission, flying against targets in South Vietnam. 

II Oct 1967: Squadron aircraft and pilots participat- 
ed in naval gun spotting missions in support of New 
Jerseys (BB 62) shore bombardment role in Vietnam. 

Jul-Oct 1972: Squadron aircraft participated in 
Operation Linebacker I, heavy air strikes against tar- 
gets in North Vietnam. 

Dec 1972: The squadron participated in Linebacker 
II operations, a more intensified version of Linebacker 
I operations. 

Jan 1980: After the U.S. Embassy staff was taken 
hostage in Tehran, Iran, VA-86 departed Naples, Italy, 
embarked in Nimitz (CVN 68), enroute to the Indian 
Ocean via the Cape of Good Hope. This was the 
beginning of 144 consecutive days at sea for the 
squadron. 

Aug 1981: Embarked in Nimitz, the squadron partic- 
ipated in a Freedom of Navigation Exercise in the Gulf 
of Sidra. During this exercise two F-14 Tomcats from 
Nimitz were fired upon by two Libyan SU-22 Fitters 
on 18 August. The F-14's returned fire and shot down 
the two aircraft. Tensions escalated and VA-86 flew 
refueling and reconnaissance missions over potentially 
hostile Libyan ships. 

Oct 1981: Following the assassination of President 
Sadat of Egypt, Nimitz, with VA-86 embarked, was 
ordered to operate off the coast of Egypt. 

Feb 1983: Following hostile threats against Sudan by 
Libya, Nimitz, with VA-86 embarked, operated off the 
coast bordering Libya and Egypt. 

Jun 1985: Nimitz, with VA-86 embarked, was 
ordered to operate off the coast of Lebanon due to the 
hijacking of TWA flight 847 by Arab radicals. The carri- 
er and squadron remained on station until the release 
of the hostages in the latter part of July. 

Jan-Feb 1987: VA-86, embarked in Nimitz, operated 
off the coast of Lebanon after three U.S. citizens were 
taken hostage from the American University in Beirut. 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 353 



A squadron F4U-4 Corsair prepares to launch 
from Tarawa (CV 40), September 1951 
(Courtesy Robert Lawson Collection). 




Home Port Assignments 



Commanding Officers— Continued 



Location 
NAS St. Louis 
NAS Jacksonville 
NAS Oceana 
NAS Cecil Field 



Assignment Date 
* 

28 Mar 1951 
11 Jun 1952 
15 Mar 1966 



* As a reserve squadron, it was assigned to NAS St. Louis prior to a 
recall to active duty in 1951. 

Commanding Officers 





Date Assumed Command 


LT L. H. Pulford 


1947* 


LCDR Harold L. Buell 


Jul 1952 


LCDR Herbert V. Ladley 


Jul 1953 


CDR Chester W. Gates, Jr. 


May 1955 


LCDR Grant Boice 


Sep 1956 


LCDR Jack H. Robcke (acting) 


Sep 1957 


CDR William A. Schroeder, Jr. 


24 Sep 1957 


CDR Rodney F. Schall 


12 Mar 1959 


CDR John W. Shuff, Jr. 


29 Feb I960 


CDR Sam Rorex, Jr. 


07 Jan 1961 


CDR Richard J. McAndrew 


12 Jan 1962 


CDR F. B. Koch 


21 Dec 1962 


CDR Wilbur J. Burgin 


06 Dec 1963 


CDR William F. Sallada 


11 Dec 1964 


CDR William W. Bowers 


15 Nov 1965 


CDR C. R. Long 


16 Nov 1966 


CDR J. E. Russ 


30 Nov 1967 


CDR D. E. Gordon 


10 Jan 1969 


CDR Standley H. Block 


21 Jan 1970 


CDR Grant Augustine III 


15 Jan 1971 


CDR William D. Yonke 


28 Jan 1972 


CDR Benjamin F. Short 


06 Dec 1972 


CDR Duane O. Schumacher 


14 Dec 1973 


CDR Perry W. Gard III 


07 Mar 1975 


CDR Leighton W. Smith, Jr. 


22 Apr 1976 



CDR Herbert W. Taylor 
CDR Bernard J. Smith 
CDR Virgil F. Jackson, Jr. 
CDR John P. Gay 
CDR Charles S. Abbot 
CDR Ralph J. Castor 
CDR John L. Fitzpatrick 
CDR John M. Johnson 
CDR Howard A. Petrea 
CDR Ted J. Venable 
CDR Matthew G. Moffit 



Date Assumed Command 
02 Jun 1977 
02 Jun 1978 
19 Nov 1979 
12 Feb 1981 
23 Jun 1982 
16 Jun 1983 
29 Jan 1985 

05 Jun 1986 
28 Jan 1988 

1989 

06 Nov 1990 



* Lieutenant Pulford was commanding officer of VF-921 during its 
reserve status and continued as its commanding officer when it was 
called to active duty. 




A squadron F9F-5 Panther on the deck of Antietam (CVA 36) during 
her cruise in 1953. 



354 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 




Squadron officers and their F7U-3M Cutlass in the background, November 1955. Bottom row, left to right: Lt. (jg) W. M. Austin, Ens. C. R. Hill, 
Ens. S.J. Kreider, Ens. D. C. Gandee, Ens. W. E. Dennison, Lt. A. L. Kivien, Lt. (jg) J. F. McNerney, Lt. (jg) G. W. Lenox. Top row, left to right: Lt. 
(jg)J. T. Bucy, Cdr. C. W. Gates. Jr., Lcdr. R.J. Burns, Lt. (jg) D. A. Kueth, Lt. (jg) R. C. Barron, Lt. (jg) T. B. Green, Lt. (jg) H. W. Hall, Lt. (jg) R. L. 
Stevenson, and Ens. G. L. Atkinson. 



Aircraft Assignment 



Type of Aircraft 



F4U-4 



F8F-2 



F9F-5 



F7U-3M 



A4D-1 
A4D-2 

A4D-2N/A-4C 



Date Type First Received 

Feb 1951 
18Jun 1952 

Sep 1952 

Jun 1955 
26 May 1957 
24 Dec 1957 

Sep 1962 



Aircraft Assignment— Continued 

Type of Aircraft 




Date Type First Received 

28 Apr 1964 
Feb 1967 

01 Oct 1970 
Apr 1972 

14 Nov 1974 

18 Nov 1987 



* The A4D-2N designation was changed to A-4C in 1962. 

Major Overseas Deployments 



Date of 


Date of 


A it- 




Type of 


Area of 


Departure 


Return 


Wing 


Carrier 


Aircraft 


Operation 


28 Nov 1951 


11 Jun 1952 


CVG-8 


CV 40 


F4U-4 


Med 


11 Jun 1953 


21 Jul 1953 


* 


CV 36 


F9F-5 


NorLant 


28 Sep 1954 


22 Apr 1955 


CVG-8 


CVA 39 


F9F-5 


Med 


02 Sep 1958 


12 Mar 1959 


CVG-7 


CVA 15 


A4D-2 


Med 


04 Aug I960 


03 Mar 1961 


CVG-7 


CVA 62 


A4D-2 


Med 


04 Aug 1961 


19 Dec 1961 


CVG-7 


CVA 62 


A4D-2 


Med 


19 Apr 1962 


27 Aug 1962 


CVG-7 


CVA 62 


A4D-2 


Med 


06 Aug 1963 


04 Mar 1964 


CVG-7 


CVA 62 


A-4C 


Med 


08 Sep 1964 


05 Nov 1964 


CVW-7 


CVA 62 


A-4E 


NorLant/Med 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 355 







Major Overseas Deployments— Continued 




Date of 


Date of 


Air 




Type of 


Area of 


Departure 


Return 


Wing 


Carrier 


Aircraft 


Operation 


10 May 1965 


13 Dec 1965 


CVW-7 


CVA62 


A-4E 


WestPac/Vietnam 


13 Jun 1966 


01 Feb 1967 


CVW-7 


CVA 62 


A-4E 


Med 


10 Apr 1968 


16 Dec 1968 


cvw-6 


CVA 66 


A-7A 


World Cruise/ 












Vietnam 


23 Sep 1969 


01 Jul 1970 


CVW-15 


CVA 43 


A-7A 


WestPac/Vietnam 


06 Jul 1971 


16 Dec 1971 


CVW-8 


CVA 66 


A-7E 


Med 


05 Jun 1972 


24 Mar 1973 


CVW-8 


CVA 66 


A-7C 


WestPac/Vietnam 


03 Jan 1974 


03 Aug 1974 


CVW-8 


CVA 66 


A-7C 


Med 


06 Sep 1974 


12 Oct 1974 


CVW-8 


CVA 66 


A-7C 


NorLant 


16 Jul 1975 


24 Sep 1975 


CVW-8 


CVN 68 


A-7E 


Carib/NorLant 


07 Jul 1976 


07 Feb 1977 


CVW-8 


CVN 68 


A-7E 


Med 


01 Dec 1977 


20 Jul 1978 


CVW-8 


CVN 68 


A-7E 


Med/NorLant 


10 Sep 1979 


26 May 1980 


CVW-8 


CVN 68 


A-7E 


Med/SoLant/IO 


29 Aug 1980 


17 Oct 1980 


CVW-8 


CVN 68 


A-7E 


NorLant 


03 Aug 1981 


12 Feb 1982 


CVW-8 


CVN 68 


A-7E 


Med 


10 Nov 1982 


20 May 1983 


CVW-8 


CVN 68 


A-7E 


Carib/Med 


08 Mar 1985 


04 Oct 1985 


CVW-8 


CVN 68 


A-7E 


Carib/Med 


15 Aug 1986 


16 Oct 1986 


CVW-8 


CVN 68 


A-7E 


NorLant 


30 Dec 1986 


26 Jul 1987 


CVW-8 


CVN 68 


A-7E 


Med/SoLant/West 












Coast 


08 Feb 1989 


03 Apr 1989 


CVW-1 


CV 66 


F/A-18C 


Carib/NorLant 


11 May 1989 


10 Nov 1989 


CVW-1 


CV 66 


F/A-18C 


Med/IO 


28 Dec 1990 


18 Apr 1991 


CVW-1 


CV 66 


F/A-18C 


Med/RedSea/ 



Persian Gulf 



• VF-84, VC-4 and VS-27 deployed aboard Antietam (CVA 36). The carrier did not have an air group embarked. 




Squadron A-4E 
Skyhawks at NAS 
Oceana in 1965. Cdr. 
W. W. Bowers is climbing 
out of the aircraft. Note 
the Tonkin Gulf Yacht 
Club insignia on the for- 
ward part of the fuselage 
and the combat sortie 
mission marks on the 
fuselage just aft of the jet 
intake. 



356 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



Air Wing Assignments 



Air Wing Assignments— Continued 



Air Wing 


Tail Code 


Assignment Date 


CVG-8 


E 


09 Apr 1951 


ATG-181 


I/AM* 


Jul 1955 


CVG-7/CVW-7t 


AG 


15 Jan 1958 


CVW-6 


AE 


16 Oct 1967 


CVW-15 


NL 


1969 


COMFAIRJACKSON- 






VILLE 




01 Jul 1970 



Air Wing 
CVW-8 

COMLATWING 1 
CVW-1 



Tail Code 
AJ 

AB 



Assignment Date 

Jan 1971 
01 Sep 1987 
1988 



* The tail code was changed from I to AM in 1957. The effective 
date for this change was most likely the beginning of FY 58 (1 July 
1957). 

t CVG-7 was redesignated CVW-7 when Carrier Air Groups (CVG) 
were redesignated Carrier Air Wings (CVW) on 20 December 1963. 




A formation of squadron A-7E Corsair lis, circa 1978. 



Unit Award 
NAVE 



AFEM 



Unit Awards Received 



Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 



Unit Awards Received— Continued 



MUC 



01 Jul 1962 
01 Jul 1963 
01 Jan 1982 
01 Jan 1985 
24 Sep 1958 
15Jun 1965 
29 Jun 1965 
10 Dec 1969 
27 Oct 1969 



30 Jun 1963 

30 Jun 1964 

31 Dec 1982 
31 Dec 1985 
26 Sep 1958 

03 Jul 1965 
11 Dec 1969 
01 Jun 1970 



Unit Award 



NEM 



Inclusive Dates 

14 Jul 1972 

04 Aug 1981 
19 Apr 1961 
14 Jan 1980 

05 Dec 1982 
21 Jan 1983 

18 Feb 1983 

19 Mar 1983 
18 Apr 1983 



Covering Unit Award 
20 Feb 1973 

20 May 1983 
29 Apr 1961 
14 May 1980 
31 Dec 1982 
13 Feb 1983 
24 Feb 1983 

21 Mar 1983 

22 Apr 1983 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 357 





Unit Awards Received— 


Continued 




Unit Awards Received— 


Continued 


Unit Award 


Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 


Unit Award 


Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 


NUC 


05 Jun 1965 


21 Nov 1965 




27 Sep 1968 


30 Oct 1968 




12 May 1968 


20 Nov 1968 




26 Oct 1969 


18 Nov 1969 




23 Jan 1980 


01 May 1980 




22 Dec 1969 


19 Jan 1970 




17 Jan 1991 


07 Feb 1991 




17 Feb 1970 


09 Mar 1970 


RVNGC 


21 Oct 1965 






19 Mar 1970 


11 Apr 1970 




23 Oct 1965 






28 Apr 1970 


01 Jun 1970 




25 Oct 1965 


02 Nov 1965 




02 Jul 1972 


04 Jul 1972 




09 Nov 1965 


10 Nov 1965 




11 Jul 1972 


24 Jul 1972 




30 May 1968 


02 Jun 1968 




10 Aug 1972 


28 Aug 1972 




20 Sep 19o8 






Oo Sep 1972 


07 Oct 1972 




10 Oct 1968 


12 Oct 1968 




11 Oct 1972 


12 Oct 1972 




17 Oct 1968 






20 Oct 1972 


01 Dec 1972 


VNSM 


04 Jul 1965 


09 Aug 1965 




09 Dec 1972 


27 Dec 1972 




25 Aug 1965 


21 Sep 1965 




09 Jan 1973 


02 Feb 1973 




14 Oct 1965 


12 Nov 1965 




12 Feb 1973 


16 Feb 1973 




29 May 1968 


28 Jun 1968 




21 Feb 1973 


25 Feb 1973 




06 Jul 1968 


03 Aug 1968 


SASM 


15 Jan 1991 


03 Apr 1991 




17 Aug 1968 


12 Sep 1968 


KLM 


17 Jan 1991 


28 Feb 1991 




A squadron F/A-18C in flight, 1992. 



358 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



VFA-87 

Lineage 

Established as Attack Squadron EIGHTY SEVEN (VA- 
87) on 1 February 1968. 

Redesignated Strike Fighter Squadron EIGHTY 
SEVEN (VFA-87) on 1 May 1986. The first squadron to 
be assigned the VA-87 and VFA-87 designations. 

Squadron Insignia and Nickname 

The squadron's insignia was approved by CNO on 
29 July 1968. Colors for the insignia are: a red back 



The squadron s Golden 
Warrior insignia was 
approved for use in 
1968. When the 
squadron was redesig- 
nated VFA, the designa- 
tion in the scroll was 
changed from ATKRON 
87 to STRKF1TRON 87 
or VFA-87. 




ground outlined in yellow and black; the Indian, war 
bonnet, spear and pony are yellow; and the arrow- 
head is black. 

Nickname: Golden Warriors, 1968-present. 



Chronology of Significant Events 

4 Mar 1969: The squadron flew its first combat mis- 
sions, striking enemy targets in South Vietnam. 

Apr 1969: Following the shoot down of a Navy EC- 
121 aircraft by the North Koreans, Ticonderoga (CVA 
14), with VA-87 embarked, was ordered to the Sea of 
Japan. 

Oct-Nov 1973: VA-87, embarked in Franklin D. 
Roosevelt (CVA 42), operated in the vicinity of Crete in 
response to the Arab-Israeli War. 

Jun-Jul 1976: The American Ambassador to Lebanon 
was assassinated on 13 June and America (CV 66), with 
VA-87 embarked, operated in the vicinity of Lebanon. 
Squadron aircraft flew support missions during the 
evacuation of non-combatants from that country. 

May 1981: Independence (CV 62), with VA-87 
embarked, following its transit of the Suez Canal, 
remained on station in the eastern Mediterranean due 
to the crisis between Israel and Syria following Israeli 
raids against Syrian surface-to-air missile sites in 
Lebanon. 

25 Oct-1 Nov 1983: In response to continued politi- 
cal strife and the need to protect and evacuate 
Americans from the island country of Grenada, VA-87 
aircraft flew combat close air support missions during 
Operation Urgent Fury, the landing of U.S. Marines 
and Army rangers on the island. 

4 Dec 1983: In response to hostile fire against U.S. 
reconnaissance aircraft from Syrian positions in 
Lebanon, VA-87 aircraft participated in a coordinated 
strike against Syrian radar, communications and 
artillery positions overlooking the Multi-National 
Peacekeeping Forces. All squadron aircraft completed 
their mission and returned to the carrier. 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 359 



Home Port Assignments 



Commanding Officers— Continued 



Location 

NAS Cecil Field 



Assignment Date 

01 Feb 1968 



Commanding Officers 



CDR Thomas E. Dunlop 
CDR Walter H. McCall 
CDR Robert W. McKay 
CDR Richard F. Coleman 
CDR John H. Fetterman, Jr. 
CDR Edward J. Rice 
CDR Ronald G. Home 
CDR J. D. Rasmussen 
CDR W. J. Catlett III 
CDR Donald A. Gerrish 
CDR Lewis W. Dunton III 



Date Assumed Command 

01 Feb 1968 

02 May 1969 
31 Mar 1970 

26 Mar 1971 

29 Mar 1972 
20 Mar 1973 

1974 
28 Aug 1975 

30 Nov 1976 
15 Feb 1978 

27 Feb 1979 





Date Assumed Command 


CDR Daniel D. Hill 


23 Jun 


1980 


CDR Hugh C. Bowles 


03 Sep 


1981 


CDR Michael F. O'Brien 


11 Jan 


1983 


CDR Douglas G. Knappe 


13 Jun 


1984 


CDR Raymond A. Dudderar 


07 Nov 


1985 


CDR Timothy J. Keating 


22 May 


1987 


CDR Orren R. Crouch 


23 Jan 


1989 


CDR John C. Stencil 


14 Jun 


1990 



Aircraft Assignment 



Type of Aircraft Date 



A-7B 
A-7E 



F/A-18A 



Type First Received 

09 Jun 1968 
1975* 
24 Oct 1986 



It is believed VA-87 received its first A-7E in October 1975. 



Major Overseas Deployments 



Date of 


Date of 


A ir 




Type of 


Area of 


Departure 


Return 


Wing 


Carrier 


Aircraft 


Operation 


01 Feb 1969 


18 Sep 1969 


CVW-16 


CVA 14 


A-7B 


WestPac/Vietnam 


29 Jan 1971 


23 Jul 1971 


cvw-6 


CVA 42 


A-7B 


Med 


15 Feb 1972 


08 Dec 1972 


cvw-6 


CVA 42 


A-7B 


Med 


14 Sep 1973 


17 Mar 1974 


cvw-6 


CVA 42 


A-7B 


Med 


03 Jan 1975 


16 Jul 1975 


CVW-6 


CV 42 


A-7B 


Med 


15 Apr 1976 


25 Oct 1976 


CVW-6 


CV 66 


A-7E 


Med 


10 Jun 1977 


19 Jul 1977 


CVW-6 


CV 66 


A-7E 


SoLant 


29 Sep 1977 


25 Apr 1978 


CVW-6 


CV 66 


A-7E 


Med 


28 Jun 1979 


14 Dec 1979 


cvw-6 


CV 62 


A-7E 


Med 


19 Nov 1980 


10 Jun 1981 


cvw-6 


CV 62 


A-7E 


SoLant/IO/Med 


07 Jun 1982 


22 Dec 1982 


CVW-6 


CV 62 


A-7E 


Med 


18 Oct 1983 


11 Apr 1984 


CVW-6 


CV 62 


A-7E 


Carib/Med/ 
NorLant 


16 Oct 1984 


19 Feb 1985 


CVW-6 


CV 62 


A-7E 


Med/IO 


25 Aug 1988 


11 Oct 1988 


CVW-8 


CVN 71 


F/A-18A 


NorLant 


30 Dec 1988 


30 Jun 1989 


CVW-8 


CVN 71 


F/A-18A 


Med 


28 Dec 1990 


28 Jun 1991 


CVW-8 


CVN 71 


F/A-18A 


Med/Red 
Sea/Persian Gulf 




A squadron F/A-18C Hornet in flight, 1991- 



360 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



Air Wing Assignments 



Unit Awards Received 



Air Wing 


Tail Code 


A i f j ;- j 1 1 j / j vi t 7~)/~i to 
rXS^l'^l 1 IfIL 1 It LJlAtti 


Urlll /l LI CI 1 Ct 


Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 


COMFAIRJACKSON- 




MUC 


18 Feb 1969 


07 Sep 1969 


VTLLE 




01 Feb 1968 




09 Mar 1972 


01 Dec 1972 


CVW-16 


AH 


1969 


HSM 


on T,, n 1 Q7(< 

J Ull I7/U 


97 Till 107^ 


COMFAIRJACKSON- 




1NHM 


07 Dec 1980 


1 1 Mav 1 981 


VILLE 




Sep 1969 




20 Aue 1982 


05 Sen 1982 


cvw-6 


AE 


01 Aug 1970 




01 Oct 1982 


06 Dec 1982 


COMLATWING-1 


Jul 1985 


NT TP 


20 Oct 1983 


03 Mar 1984 


CVW-8 


AJ 


01 Sep 1987 


I\ V IN U\j 


04 Mar 1969 


08 Mar 1969 

\jyy 1'iui -L y kj y 










10 Mar 1969 

_L \J ivxcll _L y\J y 






Unit Awards Received 






1 2 Mar 10(i0 


10 Mar 1060 

_L y iviiai ± y\j y 










20 Mar 10(i0 

£u y IVldl _L y\J y 


31 Mar 1060 

J _L ivitii _L y\J y 


Unit Award 


Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 




02 Anr 1969 


03 Anr 1060 


AFEM 


20 Apr 1969 


27 Apr 1969 




06 Apr 1969 


07 Apr 1969 




04 Aug 1969 






09 Apr 1969 


15 Apr 1969 




16 Aug 1969 


24 Aug 1969 




10 May 1969 


29 May 1969 




30 Aug 1969 






31 May 1969 


03 Jun 1969 




24 Oct 1983 


02 Nov 1983 




28 Jun 1969 


30 Jun 1969 




16 Nov 1983 


22 Dec 1983 


VNSM 


03 Mar 1969 


20 Mar 1969 




28 Dec 1983 


03 Jan 1984 




29 Mar 1969 


16 Apr 1969 




15 Jan 1984 


03 Feb 1984 




09 May 1969 


04 Jun 1969 




09 Feb 1984 


02 Mar 1984 




25 Jun 1969 


01 Aug 1969 





A squadron A-7E Corsair II with a low-vivibility paint scheme, 1984. 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 361 



VFA-94 

Lineage 

Established as Fighter Squadron NINETY FOUR (VF- 
94) on 26 March 1952. 

Redesignated Attack Squadron NINETY FOUR (VA- 
94) on 1 August 1958. 

Redesignated Strike Fighter Squadron NINETY 
FOUR (VFA-94) on 28 June 1990. The second 
squadron to be assigned the VA-94 designation and 
the first to be assigned the VFA-94 designation. 

Squadron Insignia and Nickname 

When the squadron deployed aboard Hornet (CVA 
12) during its world cruise in 1954 it was using a car- 
toon cat insignia. There 
is no record of this 
insignia being officially 
approved for use by the 
squadron. 

The squadron's first 
official insignia was 
approved by CNO on 21 
November 1955. Colors 
for the tiger paw 
insignia were: a blue 
background outlined in 
yellow; the tiger paw 
was yellow, orange and 
black with the under 
part of the paw white 
with black marks, the claws were black outlined in 
yellow; the lightning bolts were yellow; and the bomb 
blast was white with an orange-red center; the scroll 
was blue with a black outline and lettering. 

A new insignia was approved by CNO on 21 April 
1959. Colors for this insignia were: a light blue back- 
ground; dark blue stylized aircraft with an orange con- 
trail; dark blue crescent; red atom symbol with dark blue 
electrons; and an orange scroll with dark blue lettering. 
A modification to the insignia was approved by 




This cartoon cat insignia was used 
by the squadron prior to 1955 but 
was never officially approved. 






A modification to the second 
insignia was approved in 1967. 
The atom symbol was replaced 
with a stylized bird design. In 
1990, CNO approved another 
modification to this design, 
replacing the Attack Squadron 94 
designation in the scroll to Strike 
Fighter Squadron 94. 



CNO on 16 May 1967. 
The atom symbol was 
replaced by a stylized 
bird design. The stylized 
bird was orange and the 
other colors from the 
previous design stayed 
the same. 

On 14 September 
1990 CNO approved a 
modification to the 
insignia which changed 
the designation in the 
scroll to Strike Fighter 
Squadron 94. 

Nickname: Shrikes or 
Mighty Shrikes, 1959- 
present. 



The tiger paw design was the 
first insignia approved for use 
by the squadron, 1955. 



The squadron 's second insignia 
used the atom symbol with elec- 
trons and a stylized aircraft, 1959- 



Chronology of Significant Events 

May 1963: Following the military losses of Laotian 
neutralists to the Pathet Lao in the Plaine de Jarres, 
Laos, Ranger (CVA 6l) with VA-94 embarked, transited 
to the South China Sea to support possible operations 
in Laos. 

I Dec 1964: The squadron flew its first sorties in 
support of Yankee Team Operations, armed escort for 
photoreconnaissance missions over Laos. 

7 Feb 1965: Following a Viet Cong attack against the 
American advisors compound at Pleiku, South 
Vietnam, the President ordered a reprisal strike against 
North Vietnam, named Flaming Dart I. The squadron's 
target, Vit Thu Lu barracks, was concealed by heavy 
weather and the mission was aborted due to the bad 
weather. 

II Feb 1965: The squadron participated in Flaming 
Dart II, retaliatory strikes against the Chanh Hoa mili- 
tary barracks near Dong Hoi, North Vietnam. 

Mar 1965: The squadron participated in Rolling 
Thunder strikes against the Phu Qui ammunition 
depot in North Vietnam. 

9 May 1972: The squadron participated in Operation 
Pocket Money, the mining of Haiphong harbor. 
Aircraft from VA-94, as well as the other attack 
squadrons deployed aboard Coral Sea (CVA 43), 
planned and executed the mining of the harbor. 

May-Jun 1972: VA-94 participated in operation 
Linebacker I, heavy air strikes against targets in North 
Vietnam. 

29 Apr 1975: Squadron aircraft provided air cover 
for Operation Frequent Wind, the evacuation of 
American citizens from Saigon. 

15 May 1975: VA-94 aircraft, along with other ele- 
ments from CVW-15 embarked in Coral Sea, launched 
air strikes against the Cambodian mainland after the 
capture of the SS Mayaguez by Cambodian gunboats 



362 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 





A squadron F4U-4 Corsair on the deck of Philippine Sea (CVA 47) 
during her deployment to Korea, 1952-1953- 



Two squadron A-7E Corsair lis in flight, 1971. 

on 12 May. Combat sorties were flown against targets 
at Ream Naval Facility, Kompong Som Naval Facility 
and a Cambodian patrol boat. 

27 Oct 1979: Following the assassination of Park 
Chung Hee, President of the Republic of Korea, Kitty 
Hawk (CV 63), with VA-94 embarked, was ordered to 
operate off the coast of Korea. 

21 Nov 1979: Kitty Hawk, along with VA-94 and the 
rest of CVW-15, departed Subic Bay, Philippines, 
enroute to the Arabian Sea in response to the 4 
November Iranian seizure of the American Embassay 
in Tehran and the taking of over 60 American 
hostages. 

14 Jun 1982: While the squadron was deployed to 
NAS Fallon for weapons training, its commanding offi- 
cer, Commander M. A. Gary, was killed in a landing 
accident. 

Apr-Jul 1986: In late April Enterprise (CVN 65), with 
VA-94 embarked, transited the Suez Canal from the 
Indian Ocean to the Mediterranean Sea to augment the 
carrier forces in the Med. Earlier in the month, 
American strikes were flown against Libyan military 
targets as a response to Libya's continuing support of 
terrorist activity. 

Feb-May 1988: The squadron flew air support for 
Operation Earnest Will, escorting reflagged Kuwaiti oil 
tankers in the Persian Gulf. 

18 Apr 1988: VA-94 participated in Operation 
Praying Mantis, retaliatory strikes against Iranian oil 
platforms, gunboats and other naval ships after 
Sameul B. Roberts (FFG 58) struck an Iranian mine in 
international waters on 14 April. Squadron aircraft 
delivered direct hits on the Iranian frigate Sahand. 

Dec 1989: The squadron participated in Operation 
Classic Resolve, providing support for the Philippine 
government during a coup attempt. 



Home Port Assignments 



Location 

NAS Alameda 
NAS Moffett Field 
NAS Alameda 
NAS Lemoore 



Assignment Date 

26 Mar 1952 
Jan 1955 
20 Aug 1958 
08 Mar 1962 




A squadron F9F-5 Panther on the deck of Hornet (CVA 12) during 
her world cruise in 1954. 



Commanding Officers 



CDR Armind T. Holderman 
LCDR R. A. Singleton (acting) 
CDR Armind T. Holderman 
CDR William T. Harding 
CDR C. H. Gates 
CDR Robert M. Soule 
CDR Francis X. Brady 
CDR Richard D. Lazenby 
CDR D. G. Patterson 
CDR G. M. Hart 
CDR J. A. Endacott 
CDR Donald Loranger 
CDR Malcolm E. Vail 



Date Assumed Command 

09 Apr 1952 
Mar 1953 

01 Jul 1953 
Sep 1953 
Jun 1955 
1956 
Sep 1956 
28 Jul 1958 
24 Jul 1959 
02 Sep I960 
20 Dec 1961 
Dec 1962 

10 Dec 1963 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 363 



Commanding Officers— Continued 



Commanding Officers— Continued 



CDR Paul A. Peck 

CDR Otto E. Krueger 

CDR J. H. Wynn III 

CDR Joseph B. Wilkinson, Jr. 

CDR John E. Wasson 

CDR Zygmont J. Kowalskey, Jr. 

CDR Robert B. Browning 

CDR David L. Moss 

CDR W. A. Lacey 

CDR Ted W. Reynolds 

CDR Harvey A. Eikel 

CDR S. R. Briggs 



Date Assumed Command 

05 Nov 1964 
23 Oct 1965 

28 Oct 1966 
09 Nov 1967 
08 Nov 1968 
26 Nov 1969 

22 Oct 1970 

29 Oct 1971 
13 Oct 1972 
26 Sep 1973 
21 Jan 1975 
15 Apr 1976 



CDR John A. Moriarty 

CDR Paul E. Otto 

CDR Paul A. Cassiman 

CDR James I. Maslowski 

CDR M. A. Gary 

CDR J. J. Zerr 

CDR E. L. Tetrick 

CDR Terrence L. Hightower 

CDR Larry S. Doyle 

CDR Carl W. Chamberlain 

CDR John A. Roe 

CDR Lewis G. Mason 



Date Assumed Command 

01 Jul 1977 
20 Oct 1978 

20 Jan 1980 
23 Mar 1981 
04 Jun 1982 
28 Jun 1982 
14 Feb 1983 
Jun 1984 
17 Oct 1985 
27 Feb 1987 
01 Sep 1988 
26 Apr 1990 




A squadron F9F-8B 
Cougar atNAS Moffett 
Field, California, June 
1957 (Courtesy Robert 
Lawson Collection). 



Type of Aircraft 



FG-1D 
F4U-4 



F9F-5 



FT-3 



F9F-8 
F9F-8B 



FJ-3 
FJ-3M 



Aircraft Assignment 



Date Type First Received 

Apr 1952 
Aug 1952 
Sep 1953 
Feb 1955 
Nov 1955 
Apr 1956 
Jun 1957 
01 Jul 1957 



Aircraft Assignment— Continued 



Type of Aircraft 



FJ-3M 
Fb_4 



A4D-2 
A4D-2N/A-4C" 
A-4E 



A-7E 



F/A-18C 



Date Type First Received 

01 Jul 1957 
25 Aug 1958 

11 Jan 1959 
07 Sep I960 
23 Oct 1967 
Jan 1971 
05 May 1990 



: The A4D-2N designation was changed to A-4C in 1962. 



A squadron FJ-3M Fury, 
circa 1958 (Courtesy 
Robert Lawson Collection). 




364 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



Major Overseas Deployments 



Date of 


of 


Air 




Type of 


Area of 


Departure 


Return 


Wing 


Carrier 


Aircraft 


Operation 


1 S Vipc 1 CK? 

1 J IjICV. 17 J Z 


14 Ano 1QS3 


Vj V V I 7 


rvA 47 


F4T T-4 


Wf/i^ctT^Q r /TCoff^o 


1 1 A/Tav/ 1 0^4 


1 ? D(=>r 1 QS4 
iz ijicv. iyj?T 


rvr, 0 

Vj V v T 7 


fVA 1 ? 

Vj \I\ 1 z 


ryr-j 




1 0 Mar 1 OSl. 

1/ iviai lyju 


1 3 Sf=n 1 QS(i 
1.7 oep iyj>u 


ATPt-4 

rVl Vjr T: 


rvA 1 0 

Vj \r\ 1VI 


it yr oil 




0(i Tan 1 0^,8 

UU Jail I7JO 


30 Tim 1QS8 
D\J J Ull Ly JO 


rvi vjr t: 


rvA 1 ? 

Vj VTj. 1 z 


FT-3M 
rj-DivL 




0<i Fph 1Q(if) 

uu rcu 17UU 


an Ano 10f,0 
ju rvu£^ lyviu 


CMCr-Q 
Vj V V.I 7 


rvA <ii 

V , VjT\. u 1 


A4D-? 


Wr-^tP^r 

VVCciLJ!^ tiL. 


1 1 Ana 1061 
11 /vn^ lyvii 


08 Mar 106? 


V , v v.i y 


rvA 61 

V , \_t\ VI 1 


A4D-9N 

.'ill 7 Z1N 


wcc>L_r tiL 


00 Nov 1 06? 


14 Tun IQfi^ 


V , v v.T y 


rvA 61 

V , \_t\ VI 1 


A-4r 


WCC5LJ7 dL 


OS Alio 10f,4 
V7_7 rVU^ 17U1 


Oft M^v 10<^S 


rvw-0 

Vj v W y 


rvA iii 

Vj VjTV VI 1 


A-4r 


Wf/i^CtT^Q r P>1"t"l d m 
VVCMl tiL./ V lCLIld.111 


ZV1 L/Ll l7/VJj> 


71 Tun 1Q<^ 

J Ull 1 7UU 


rvw-0 

Vj V w y 


rvAiv (it 

Vj vrvi^ \J J 


A-4r 


Wife* ctP 'i r f^tn ^ in 


OS Tan 1 067 

U_7 J all 1 /U / 




Vj V V\ J 


rvA io 

Vj vrv 1 y 


A-4r 


XY/^ctP'i r f^tn ci m 
WCMrdL/ VlCLIlalll 


Z/ Jail lyvio 


1 0 Ort 1 0(^8 


Vj V W 7 


rvA ^1 

Vj VjTV 9 1 


A-4F 


XY/i^ctT^Q r /\7a f^tn in 

VVCciLJ^ dL/ V lCLIlcllll 


18 Mar 1060 
10 iviai 1 j\jy 


?0 Ort 1 Qi^Q 


rvw-s 

v., V W 


rvA 31 

Vj V J 1 


A-4F 
\ -tij 


XY/i^QtP'-i r /Vif^tn ci tti 

WCC5LJ7 tlL/ V lCLIla.111 


0? Anr 1070 

VIZ rVL.ll ly/VI 


1 ? Nov 1 070 

IsL 1NUV 1 y / \J 


rw? S 

Vj V W J 


rvA 31 

Vj V/\ ^)1 


A-4F 


XY/^ctPn r f^tn a m 
WCMrdL/ VlCLIlalll 


1 7 Nnv 1 071 

1 Z 1NUV I7/I 


17 T11I 107? 
_L / JUi ly/z. 


rvw-1 s 

Vj V W 1 J 


rvA 43 

Vj VrV 


A-7F 


XY/i^ctT^Q r f^tn ci m 

WCc>L_r tiL./ VlCLIlalll 


no Mar 1073 
\jy iviai 17 / j) 


DM Nov 1 073 


rvw-1 1 

Vj V W 1 J 


rvA 43 


A-7F 

rv / 1 . 


WCC5LJ7 aC 


OS I)pr 1 074 
Uj L/CL I7/4 


0? Tnl 107^ 


CVW 1 S 

Vj V W-lj 


PVA 43 

Vj V/\ ^0 


A 7F 

A / LL 


\Y/^>ctPar 
vVChLr/clC 


1 S Fr-l -v 1 077 

1 j rcU Ly / / 


0^ Ort 1 077 
UD vJCL 1;// / 


rvw 1 s 

Vj V W 1 7 


fV 43 

Vj V ^0 


A 7F 

/\ / LZ 


W/i^ctPar 
WCiiLrdL 


30 Mau 1 070 
3)U Ivlay Ly ly 


l. j raj ±yovj 


rvw-1 s 

Vj V W Ly 


rv <i3 

Vj V VI|J 


A-7F 

rv / lj 


Wr-^tP^r/TO 


f)1 Anr 1081 
VI 1 rVLJl 1701 


?3 Nov 1 081 


rvw 1 s 

Vj V w 1^1 


rv 63 

Vj V VO 


A-7F 

rv / lj 


W^^tPr^r/TO 


D1 Spn 108? 


?M Anr 1QM3 


rvw-1 1 

v., V w 11 


rvN 6s 

Vj V 1M Vljl 


A-7F 
rv / 1 . 


NorP^r/ 












Wr'^tP^ir/TO 


30 Mav 1984 


20 Dec 1984 


CVW-11 


CVN 65 


A-7E 


WestPac/IO/ 












NorPac 


12 Jan 1986 


13 Aug 1986 


cvw-11 


CVN 65 


A-7E 


WestPac/IO/ 












Med/SoLant 


25 Oct 1987 


24 Nov 1987 


CVW-11 


CVN 65 


A-7E 


NorPac 


05 Jan 1988 


03 Jul 1988 


cvw-11 


CVN 65 


A-7E 


WestPac/IO/ 












NorPac 


17 Sep 1989 


16 Mar 1990 


cvw-11 


CVN 65 


A-7E 


World Cruise 




DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 365 



Air Wing Assignments 



Air Wing 

CVG-9 
ATG-4 

CVG-9/CVW-9I 
CVW-5 

COMFAIRLEMOORE 

CVW-15 

CVW-11 



Tail Code 
N 

Z/ND* 

NG 

NF 

NL 
NH 



Assignment Date 

26 Mar 1952 
1955 
01 Aug 1958 

01 Jul 1966 
Nov 1970 

02 Jan 1971 
18 Jan 1982 



* The tail code was changed from Z to ND in 1957. The effective 
date for this change was most likely the beginning of FY 58 (1 July 
1957). 

t CVG-9 was redesignated CVW-9 when Carrier Air Groups (CVG) 
were redesignated Carrier Air Wings (CVW) on 20 December 1963. 




A squadron A-7E Corsair II, in a low-visibility paint scheme, prepar- 
ing to trap aboard Enterprise (CVN 65) in 1989. 



Unit Awards Received Unit Awards Received— Continued 



Unit Award 


Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 


Unit Award 


Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 


KPUC 


31 Jan 1953 


27 Jul 1953 


NEM 


25 Nov 1979 


28 Jan 1980 


KSM 


25 Jan 1953 


01 Aug 1953 




25 May 1981 


30 Sep 1981 


NUC 


31 Jan 1953 


27 Jul 1953 




30 Apr 1986 


27 Jun 1986 




21 Feb 1968 


13 Sep 1968 


RVNGC 


02 Dec 1965 






15 Dec 1971 


01 Jul 1972 




11 Dec 1965 




NAVE 


01 Jul 1973 


30 Jun 1974 




21 Dec 1965 






01 Jul 1983 


31 Dec 1984 




24 Dec 1965 






01 Jan 1989 


31 Dec 1989 




26 Dec 1965 


30 Dec 1965 


AFEM 


24 Jun I960 


25 Jun I960 




01 Jan 1966 


02 Jan 1966 




01 May 1963 


05 May 1963 




04 Jan 1966 


14 Jan 1966 




18 Sep 1964 


20 Sep 1964 




04 Feb 1966 






01 Oct 1964 


09 Oct 1964 




19 Feb 1966 






28 Nov 1964 


01 Jan 1965 




23 Feb 1966 






16 Jan 1965 


17 Mar 1965 




27 Mar 1966 


28 Mar 1966 




04 Apr 1965 


14 Apr 1965 




30 Mar 1966 


31 Mar 1966 




04 May 1968 


07 May 1968 




02 Apr 1966 






29 Jun 1969 






11 Apr 1966 






07 Jul 1969 


13 Jul 1969 




29 Apr 1966 






24 Jul 1969 






20 Feb 1967 






03 Sep 1969 






23 Feb 1967 






13 Sep 1969 


14 Sep 1969 




16 Mar 1967 






29 Apr 1975 


30 Apr 1975 




24 Mar 1967 


25 Mar 1967 




15 May 1975 






07 May 1967 






15 Feb 1988 


09 Mar 1988 




09 May 1967 






17 Jan 1990 


31 Jan 1990 




12 May 1967 




HSM 


29 Apr 1975 


30 Apr 1975 




15 May 1967 


21 May 1967 




17 May 1981 






29 May 1967 


30 May 1967 




02 Oct 1981 






03 Jun 1967 






23 Oct 1982 






16 Jun 1967 




MUC 


20 Jan 1967 


14 Jul 1967 




21 Feb 1968 


25 Feb 1968 




18 Apr 1969 


08 Oct 1969 




27 Feb 1968 


07 Mar 1968 




02 May 1970 


20 Oct 1970 




12 Mar 1968 


18 Mar 1968 




22 Apr 1975 


30 Apr 1975 




22 Mar 1968 


23 Mar 1968 




15 May 1975 






25 Mar 1968 






13 Nov 1979 


08 Feb 1980 




06 Apr 1968 


11 Apr 1968 




01 Oct 1983 


31 Mar 1985 




13 Apr 1968 


14 Apr 1968 




15 Feb 1988 


09 Mar 1988 




17 Apr 1968 


20 Apr 1968 



366 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



Unit Awards Received— Continued 



Unit Awards Received— Continued 



Unit Award 



VNSM 



Inclusive 

13 May 1968 

26 May 1968 
04 Jul 1968 

02 Aug 1968 

27 Aug 1968 
18 Apr 1969 
01 Jun 1969 
04 Jun 1969 
11 Jun 1969 

26 Jun 1969 
02 Dec 1965 
04 Feb 1966 
16 Mar 1966 

22 Apr 1966 

23 May 1966 
04 Feb 1967 
15 Mar 1967 

27 Apr 1967 
11 Jun 1967 
20 Feb 1968 
06 Apr 1968 



Dates Covering Unit Award 
14 May 1968 
27 May 1968 

18 Aug 1968 
14 Sep 1968 
17 May 1969 

09 Jun 1969 

24 Jun 1969 

14 Jan 1966 
23 Feb 1966 
12 Apr 1966 
14 May 1966 
06 Jun 1966 
26 Feb 1967 
12 Apr 1967 
05 Jun 1967 
28 Jun 1967 

25 Mar 1968 
20 Apr 1968 



Unit Award 



Inclusive 

09 May 1968 
04 Jun 1968 

13 Jun 1968 
21 Jul 1968 

27 Aug 1968 
17 Apr 1969 
03 Jun 1969 
30 Jul 1969 
23 Sep 1969 

02 May 1970 
01 Jun 1970 
01 Jul 1970 

17 Aug 1970 
11 Sep 1970 
26 Sep 1970 

14 Dec 1971 
31 Dec 1971 

26 Jan 1972 
01 Apr 1972 
01 Jun 1972 
21 Jun 1972 



Dates Covering Unit Award 

30 May 1968 
05 Jun 1968 

07 Jul 1968 
18 Aug 1968 
14 Sep 1968 
18 May 1969 
26 Jun 1969 

31 Aug 1969 
08 Oct 1969 
26 May 1970 

14 Jun 1970 
29 Jul 1970 
03 Sep 1970 
12 Sep 1970 
21 Oct 1970 

17 Jan 1972 
17 Feb 1972 
11 May 1972 
11 Jun 1972 
02 Jul 1972 




A squadron F/A-18C Hornet flies over the burning oil fields of Kuwait, 1991. 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 367 



VFA-97 

Lineage 

Established as Attack Squadron NINETY SEVEN (VA- 
97) on 1 June 1967. 

Redesignated Strike Fighter Squadron NINETY 
SEVEN (VFA-97) on 24 January 1991. The first 
squadron to be assigned the VA-97 and VFA-97 desig- 
nation. 

Squadron Insignia and Nickname 

The squadron's insignia was approved by the CNO 
on 6 March 1968. Colors for the hawk and shield 
insignia are as follows: background light blue outlined 

in black; gold scroll out- 
lined in black with 
black lettering; black 
hawk with gold mark- 
ings, a gold beak, red 
tongue and eye; dark 
blue shield with a gold 
trident, both outlined in 
black; gray knight's hel- 
met with a blue and 
gold crest and black 
markings. 

Nickname: Warhawks, 
1968-present. 




The squadron's hawk and trident 
insignia. 



Chronology of Significant Events 

28Jun 1968: The squadron conducted its first com- 
bat missions. 

4 Feb-7 Mar 1971: The squadron embarked in 
Enterprise (CVAN 65) for the ship's transit around South 
America to her new home port on the west coast. 



Dec 1971: Following the outbreak of war between 
India and Pakistan over East Pakistan (Bangladesh), 
Enterprise (CVAN 65) was ordered to leave Yankee 
Station for operations in the Indian Ocean. The carrier, 
with Air Wing 14 embarked, operated in the Bay of 
Bengal until the cessation of hostilities in the latter 
part of December. 

Oct 1972: Squadron aircraft participated in Line- 
backer I operations, heavy air strikes against targets in 
North Vietnam to interdict the flow of supplies into 
South Vietnam. 

Dec 1972: The squadron participated in Linebacker 
II operations, an intensified version of Linebacker I. 

Feb 1975: Enterprise, with CVW-14, provided disas- 
ter support for the island country of Mauritius follow- 
ing a tropical storm. 

Apr 1975: The squadron participated in Operation 
Frequent Wind and provided air support for the evacua- 
tion of personnel from Saigon as it fell to the communists. 

Feb 1977: During the crisis in Uganda and threats 
against Americans in that country, Enterprise operated 
off the coast of Kenya ready to evacuate Americans. 

Dec 1979: Coral Sea (CV 43) operated off the coast 
of South Korea following the assassination of South 
Korea's President Park Chung-Hee in late October. 

Apr 1980: Coral Sea was part of the task force 
involved in supporting the Iranian hostage rescue 
attempt. 

May 1980: Following civil unrest in South Korea, 
Coral Sea operated off the coast of that country. 

Aug 1983: Due to the unsettled conditions in Central 
America, Coral Sea operated off the coast of Nicaragua 
and also participated in surveillance for illegal drug traffic. 

Aug 1986: The squadron participated in carrier tacti- 
cal flight operations in the Bering Sea. 

Jul 1988: During the Olympics in Seoul, Korea, Carl 
Vinson (CVN 70), with VA-97 embarked, operated off 
the coast of Korea. 




368 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



Home Port Assignments 



Commanding Officers— Continued 



Location 

NAS Lemoore 



Assignment Date 

01 Jun 1967 



Commanding Officers 



CDR Richard P. Vaillancourt 
CDR Leroy M. Kraft 
CDR James E. Doolittle 
CDR Robert B. Arnold 
CDR Hugh F. Lynch 
CDR Robert C. Coffey 
CDR Bert D. Terry 
CDR Robert P. Nicolls 
CDR John F. Murray 
CDR Rex R. Arnett, Jr. 
CDR John M. McGrath 



Date Assumed Command 

28 Jul 1967 
27 Feb 1969 
19 Dec 1969 

16 Dec 1970 
27 Dec 1971 
15 Dec 1972 
29 Mar 1974 
26 Jun 1975 

17 Sep 1976 
22 Nov 1977 

11 Jan 1979 




CDR David L. Carroll 
CDR Michael L. Bowman 
CDR Thomas L. McClelland 
CDR Norman L. Westerbuhr 
CDR Joseph W. Parker, Jr. 
CDR T. Barry McFarland 
CDR Michael F. Winkler 
CDR James T. Noland, Jr. 



Date Assumed Command 

29 Mar 1980 
06 Jun 1981 
21 Sep 1982 
03 Feb 1984 
20 Sep 1985 
27 Mar 1987 
31 Jul 1988 
11 Jan 1990 



Aircraft Assignment 



Type of Aircraft 



A-7A 
A-7E 



F/A-18A 



Date Type First Received 

Oct 1967 
Jul 1970 
22 Feb 1991 



■I 





% 

Mr 




A squadron A-7E Corsair II in flight with its low-visibility paint scheme, 1984. 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 369 



Major Overseas Deployments 



Date of 


Date of 


Air 




Type of 


Area of 


Departure 


Return 


Wing 


Carrier 


Aircraft 


Operation 


29 Mav 19f>8 

i-i y iy\.<Xy _l_y VO 


31 Tan 19fi9 


CVW-14 


CVA 64 


A-7A 


\Y/et:rPa rVVietna m 

WCilU tlW VlLTLllcllll 


11 Aim 19fi9 


08 Mav 1 970 


CVW-14 


CVA 64 


A-7A 


YX7e t:tP a /Vi etna m 

WCi)U dW VlCLlltllll 


1 1 Tun 1 071 

J. J. JkJ.11 ± y 1 ± 


1 2 Feb 1 972 


CVW-14 


CVAN fiS 


A-7E 


WestPac/ 












Vietnam /TO 

V ICLllcllll/ IKy 


1 2 Sen 1 97? 


1 2 Tun 1973 


CVW-14 


CVAN fis 


A-7E 


Wp *itPa p /Vi pfn a tn 

Wv.ijL1 Cl V V 1L-- LI Icllll 


17 Sen 1974 


20 Mav 1 97S 


CVW-14 


CVAN fis 


A-7E 


WestPac/TO 


3D Till 1976 


?R Mar 1077 


rvW-1 4 


fVN 


A-7F 


Wp<itP?ir/TO 

WCi>li dw IVy 


04 Anr 1978 


30 Oct 1978 


CVW-14 


CVN 65 


A-7E 


WestPac/TO 

VV V- O L-L 1 4. V / 1_ 


1 3 Nnv 1 979 


11 Tun 1 080 


rvw-1 4 


TV 43 


A-7F 


WpstPar/TO 

WCiMl dw Ivy 


20 Alio 1981 


?3 Mar 108? 


rvw-1 4 


rv 43 


A-7F 


Wp^tPar/TO 
wcsLr dw ivy 


91 Mar 1983 


1 ? Spd 1 083 


CVW-14 


rv 43 


A-7E 


XY/orl H f~Vi i i qp 

WW11L1 VjI UlOC 


13 Oct 1984 


24 Mav 1985 


CVW-15 


CVN 70 


A-7E 


NorPac/ 












WestPac/IO 


12 Aug 1986 


05 Feb 1987 


CVW-15 


CVN 70 


A-7E 


NorPac/ 












WestPac/IO 


15Jun 1988 


14 Dec 1988 


CVW-15 


CVN 70 


A-7E 


NorPac/ 












WestPac/IO 


05 Sep 1989 


09 Nov 1989 


CVW-15 


CVN 70 


A-7E 


NorPac/WestPac 


01 Feb 1990 


31 Jul 1990 


CVW-15 


CVN 70 


A-7E 


WestPac/IO 





Air Wing Assignments 






Tail Code 


Assignment Date 


CVW-14 


NK 


15 Dec 1967* 


CVW-15 


NL 


01 Nov 1983 


* Before being 


assigned to CVW-14 the squadron was under the 


operational and administrative control of VA-122 during its training 


in the A-7A Corsair II. 






Unit Awards Received 




Unit Award 


Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 


NAVE 


01 Jul 1968 


31 Dec 1969 




01 Jul 1974 


31 Dec 1975 




01 Jan 1988 


31 Dec 1988 


MUC 


07 Sep 1969 


30 Apr 1970 




02 Jul 1971 


03 Feb 1972 




22 Apr 1975 


30 Apr 1975 




07 Mar 1978 


01 May 1980 




10 Nov 1984 


07 May 1985 




16 Jan 1987 


02 Feb 1987 


NUC 


03 Oct 1972 


22 Feb 1973 


AFEM 


16 Oct 1969 


24 Oct 1969 




16 Mar 1970 


23 Mar 1970 




29 Apr 1975 


30 Apr 1975 


HSM 


29 Apr 1975 


30 Apr 1975 


VNSM 


27 Jun 1968 


22 Jul 1968 




02 Aug 1968 


28 Aug 1968 




11 Sep 1968 


09 Oct 1968 




28 Nov 1968 


29 Nov 1968 




09 Dec 1968 


21 Dec 1968 




01 Jan 1969 


07 Jan 1969 




11 Sep 1969 


03 Oct 1969 



Unit Awards Received— Continued 

Unit Award Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 



01 Nov 1969 


23 Nov 


1969 


07 Dec 1969 


22 Dec 


1969 


05 Jan 1970 


30 Jan 


1970 


12 Feb 1970 


01 Mar 


1970 


26 Mar 1970 


17 Apr 


1970 


14 Jul 1971 


31 Jul 


1971 


15 Aug 1971 


04 Sep 


1971 


12 Sep 1971 






25 Sep 1971 


26 Sep 


1971 


02 Oct 1972 


23 Oct 


1972 


01 Nov 1972 


11 Dec 


1972 


18 Dec 1972 


13 Jan 


1973 


24 Jan 1973 


23 Feb 


1973 


01 Mar 1973 


02 Mar 


1973 


11 Mar 1973 


28 Mar 


1973 




A squadron F/A-18A Hornet at NAS lemoore, California, 1991- 



370 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 




VFA-105 

Lineage 

Established as Attack Squadron ONE HUNDRED 
FIVE (VA-105) on 1 November 1967. 

Redesignated Strike Fighter Squadron ONE HUN- 
DRED FIVE (VFA-105) on 17 December 1990. The sec- 
ond squadron to be assigned the designation VA-105 
and the first to be designated VFA-105. 



Squadron Insignia and 
Nickname 

The squadron's in-sig- 
nia was approved by the 
CNO on 20 September 
1968. Colors for the 
knight and holster 
insignia are as follows: a 
white background with a 
kelly green border; silver 
45 caliber revolver with 
a black handle; black 
holster and gold knight; 
black ammunition belt 
with silver trim and gold 
bullets; kelly green scroll 
with white lettering. 

On 31 December 1984 
the CNO approved a 
modfication to the 
squadron insignia. The 
modification included 
adding an upper scroll 
with the nickname Gun- 
slingers and changes to 
the colors. The back- 
ground color and letter- 
ing in the scrolls were 
changed to silver and 
the insignia was out- 
lined in black. 

Nickname: Gun- 
slingers, 1968-present. 



The squadron's insignia as it was 
first approved in 1968. 




In 1984, a modification was ap- 
proved for the squadron 's insignia 
that added an upper scroll with 
the nickname Gunslingers. When 
the squadron was redesignated 
VFA, the designation in the lower 
scroll changed from ATKRON 105 
to STRKFITRON 105. 



Chronology of Significant Events 

4 Mar 1968: The squadron completed its training 
under VA-174 on the A-7A and became an operational 
unit of the Atlantic Fleet. 

May and Jun 1969: Following the shootdown of a 
Navy EC-121 by the North Koreans in April, Kitty 
Hawk (CVA 63) was part of a continuing American 
presence being maintained off the coast of Korea. 

Sep and Oct 1970: Following the hijacking of several 
airliners by Palestinians, the outbreak of serious fight- 



ing in Jordan and the invasion of Jordan by Syria, 
Saratoga (CVA 60) with VA-105 embarked, operated in 
the eastern Mediterranean, prepared to support an 
evacuation of Americans from Jordan and to show 
support for the Jordanian government. 

Jun-Oct 1971: As part of CVW-3, embarked in 
Saratoga, the squadron participated in the CV Concept 
Evaluation while deployed to the North Atlantic and 
Mediterranean Sea. The concept added antisubmarine 
warfare to the missions of the attack carriers. ASW air- 
craft were added to the carrier air wings and the carri- 
ers were redesignated from CVA to CV. 

Jun-Oct 1972: The squadron participated in 
Linebacker I operations, heavy air strikes against tar- 
gets in North Vietnam to interdict the flow of supplies 
into South Vietnam. 

18-29 Dec 1972: Squadron aircraft participated in 
Linebacker II operations against North Vietnam, an 
intensified version of Linebacker I. 

Jan 1975: Following violent demonstrations in 
Cyprus, Saratoga operated off the coast of that island 
country, prepared to provide support for the possible 
evacuation of Americans. 

Apr 1976: The squadron operated off the coast of 
Lebanon and participated in Operation Fluid Drive, 
preparations to support a possible evacuation of 
Americans from that country. 

Jun 1982: Following the invasion of Lebanon by 
Israel on 6 June, John F. Kennedy (CV 67) operated off 
the coast of Lebanon, available to support an evacua- 
tion of Americans from that country. 

Jul-Dec 1984: The squadron returned from a six- 
month deployment to MCAS Iwakuni in the western 
Pacific. It was assigned to MAG-12, 1st MAW. This was 
the first time a Navy squadron participated in the 
Marine Corps Unit Deployment Program and the first 
Navy squadron since World War II to come under the 
command of a Marine Corps officer. While deployed 
with the Marines the squadron's major mission was 
close air support. 




A squadron A-7E Corsair II in 19 78. 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 371 



Home Port Assignments 




Commanding Officers- 


-Continued 


Location 


Assignment Date 






Date Assumed Command 


NAS Cecil Field 


01 Nov 1967 


CDR R. G. Pearson 
CDR D. V. Raebel 


06 Nov 1980 
17 Feb 1981 


Commanding Officers 


CDR R. G. Brodsky 
CDR D. A. Weiss 


10 May 1982 

1 7 Nn\; 1 




Date Assumed Command 


CDR G. 


G. Johnson 


1 f, Mav 1 QSS 
iu iviciy Lyoj 


CDR R. C. Bos 
CDR R. K. Halverson 
CDR C. R. Bowling 
CDR J. C. Perkins 


01 Nov 1967 
21 Jan 1969 

30 Dec 1969 
05 Oct 1970 


CDR L. E. Osborn 
CDR K. T. Lewis 
CDR K. A. Richardson 
CDR Gene A. Smith 


06 Oct 1986 
25 Mar 1988 
27 Jul 1989 
28 Mar 1991 


CDR H. B. Chase 


16 Jul 1971 








CDR W. R. Zipperer 


07 May 1972 




Aircraft Assignment 


CDR P. N. Puerling 


23 May 1973 








CDR R. F. Moreau 


20 Jul 1974 


Type of Aircraft 


Date Type First Received 


CDR J. E. Carpenter 


17 Nov 1975 


A-7A 




04 Mar 1968 


CDR F. H. Saunders 


07 Jan 1977 


A-7E 




07 May 1973 


CDR B. M. Bennitt 


27 Apr 1978 


F/A-18A 




27 Dec 1990 


CDR R. M. Nutwell 


03 Jul 1979 


F/A-18C 




11 Mar 1991 



Major Overseas Deployments 



Date of 


Date of 


Air 




Type of 


Area of 


Departure 


Return 


Wing 


Carrier 


Aircraft 


Operation 


30 Dec 1968 


04 Sep 1969 


CVW-11 


CVA 63 


A-7A 


WestPac/Vietnam 


17 Jun 1970 


09 Nov 1970 


CVW-3 


CVA 60 


A-7A 


Med 


07 Jun 1971 


28 Oct 1971 


CVW-3 


CVA 60 


A-7A 


NorLant/Med 


11 Apr 1972 


13 Feb 1973 


CVW-3 


CV 60 


A-7A 


WestPac/Vietnam 


27 Sep 1974 


19 Mar 1975 


CVW-3 


CV 60 


A-7E 


Med 


06 Jan 1976 


28 Jul 1976 


CVW-3 


CV 60 


A-7E 


Med 


11 Jul 1977 


23 Dec 1977 


CVW-3 


CV 60 


A-7E 


Med 


03 Oct 1978 


05 Apr 1979 


CVW-3 


CV 60 


A-7E 


Med 


10 Mar 1980 


27 Aug 1980 


CVW-3 


CV 60 


A-7E 


Med 


04 Jan 1982 


14 Jul 1982 


CVW-3 


CV 67 


A-7E 


Med/IO 


01 Mar 1983 


29 Oct 1983 


CVW-15 


CVN 70 


A-7E 


World Cruise 


02 Jun 1984 


17 Dec 1984 


MAG- 12 


* 


A-7E 


WestPac 


02 Jun 1986 


10 Nov 1986 


CVW-6 


CV 59 


A-7E 


Med 


28 Aug 1987 


09 Oct 1987 


CVW-6 


CV 59 


A-7E 


NorLant 


25 Apr 1988 


07 Oct 1988 


CVW-6 


CV 59 


A-7E 


Med/IO/NorLant 


04 Nov 1989 


12 Apr 1990 


CVW-6 


CV 59 


A-7E 


Med 



* The squadron deployed to MCAS Iwakuni, Japan, as part of Marine Aircraft Group 12. While deployed to WestPac the squadron also operated 
from NAF Kadena, Okinawa; NAS Cubi Point, Philippines and stations in Korea. 



A squadron A-7E Corsair II in flight 
with low-visibility paint scheme, 1984. 



372 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



Air Wing Assignments 



Unit Awards Received 



Air Wing Tail Code 

VA-174* 

COMFAIRJACKSON- 
VILLE 

CVW-11 NH 
COMFAIRJACKSON- 
VILLE 

CVW-3 AC 
CVW-15 NL 
COMLATWING ONE 
MAG-12, 1st MAW§ AC 
COMLATWING ONE 
CVW-6 AE 
COMLATWING ONE 
CVW-3 AC 



Assignment Date 
01 NOV 1967 

01 Mar 1968 
1968f 

Sep 

1970* 
01 Oct 1982 

Oct 1983 
08 Jun 1984 

Dec 1984 
01 Apr 1985 
01 Oct 1990 
01 Sep 1991 



• The squadron was assigned to VA-174 during training in the new 
A-7A Corsair II. 

t The squadron was assigned to CVW-11 sometime after June 1968 
and prior to its deployment in December 1968. Squadron and air 
wing records do not indicate the day or month. 

% The squadron was assigned to CVW-3 sometime in the early part 
of 1970. 

§ VA-105 was assigned to MAG-12, 1st MAW during its shorebased 
deployment to MCAS Iwakuni, Japan. While deployed with MAG-12 
the squadron used the tail code AC on its aircraft. 



Unit Award Inclusive 

NAVE 01 Jul 1968 

01 Jul 1974 
01 Oct 1976 
01 Jan 1984 

MUC 17 Sep 1970 

01 Oct 1979 

AFEM 1969 15 May 1969 
25 May 1969 
05 Jun 1969 
07 Jun 1969 
25 Jul 1969 

NUC 15 Jan 1969 

18 May 1972 

01 Mar 1984 
VNSM 27 Jan 1969 

12 Mar 1969 
17 Apr 1969 

28 Jun 1969 
27 Jul 1969 

06 May 1972 

17 May 1972 
30 Jun 1972 

27 Jul 1972 

02 Sep 1972 

29 Sep 1972 
25 Oct 1972 

03 Nov 1972 

18 Dec 1972 



Dates Covering Unit Award 

31 Dec 1969 
30 Jun 1975 

30 Sep 1977 

31 Dec 1984 

18 Oct 1970 
15 Nov 1980 

27 May 1969 

15 Jun 1969 

27 Aug 1969 
08 Jan 1973 
14 Dec 1984 
01 Mar 1969 
05 Apr 1969 
11 May 1969 

15 Jul 1969 
17 Aug 1969 

07 May 1972 

22 Jun 1972 

16 Jul 1972 

23 Aug 1972 

19 Sep 1972 
21 Oct 1972 
26 Oct 1972 

08 Dec 1972 
31 Dec 1972 




A squadron F/A-18C Hornet at NAS Fallon, Nevada, March 1992 (Courtesy Robert Lawson Collection). 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 373 



VFA-106 

Lineage 

Established as Strike Fighter Squadron ONE HUN- 
DRED SIX (VFA-106) on 27 April 1984. The first 
squadron to be assigned the VFA-106 designation. 

Squadron Insignia and Nickname 

The squadron's insignia was approved by CNO on 26 
May 1982. The insignia approved for VFA-106 had been 

used by VA-106 prior to 
its disestablishment on 7 
November 1969- Colors 
for the VFA-106 insignia 
are: a gold background 
f\ . TjB outlined in red; a blue 

^^^fi ftf shield with white 

T^t/ifWm arrow and Roman hel- 

• met ' l ' lc u PP er P art °f 

"^V^ ^ me helmet is red; a gold 

yff; tf9*m^mf&%W^ stylized wing is on the 

^M&H*** upper right hand cornor 

of the shield; white air- 
craft with blue markings; 
and blue scrolls with 
white lettering. 
Nickname: Gladiators, 1984-present. 




The Gladiators insignia used by 
the squadron. 



Chronology of Significant Events 

27 Apr 1984: The squadron's mission is the training 
of F/A-18 replacement pilots and maintenance person- 
nel for east coast F/A-18 fleet squadrons. 

7 Oct 1985: The first Replacement Pilot Class arrives 
at VFA-106 to begin training on the F/A-18 Hornet. 



Home Port Assignments 



Location 

NAS Cecil Field 



Assignment Date 

27 Apr 1984 



Commanding Officers 



CDR D. J. L'Herault 
CDRJ. W. Peterson 
CDR L. G. Kappel 
CDR W. O. King, Jr. 
CDR W. N. Deaver, Jr. 
CDRJ. Barry Waddell 



Date Assumed Command 

27 Apr 1984 
13 Dec 1985 
13 Feb 1987 
03 Jun 1988 
12 Jun 1989 
19 Mar 1991 



Aircraft Assignment 



Type of Aircr aft 



F/A-18A 

TF/A-18A 

F/A-18B 

F/A-18C 

F/A-18D 



Date Type First Received 

09 Feb 1985 
22 Mar 1985 
May 1986 
Oct 1987 
Dec 1987 




A squadron F/A-18A Hornet in flight, May 1987 (Courtesy Robert Lawson Collection). 



374 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



Air Wing 

COMLATWING 
ONE 



Air Wing Assignments 

Tail Code Assignment Date 



AD 



27 Apr 1984 



Unit Awards Received 

Unit Award Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 

NUC 01 May 1985 30 Apr 1986 

MUC 01 May 1986 31 Oct 1987 

01 Nov 1987 31 Dec 1989 





A squadron TF/A-18A Hornet at NAS Fallon, Nevada, March 1986 ( Courtesy Robert Lawson Collection). 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 375 




VFA-113 

Lineage 

Established as Fighter Squadron ONE HUNDRED 
THIRTEEN (VF-113) on 15 July 1948. 

Redesignated Attack Squadron ONE HUNDRED 
THIRTEEN (VA-113) in March 1956. 

Redesignated Strike Fighter Squadron ONE HUN- 
DRED THIRTEEN (VFA-113) on 25 March 1983. The 
first squadron to be assigned the VA-113 and VFA-113 
designation. 



Squadron Insignia and 
Nickname 

The squadron's in- 
signia was approved by 
CNO on 15 April 1949. 
Colors for the insignia 
are: red beehive with 
white markings and 
outlined in yellow, 
with yellow lettering; 
black and yellow bum- 
ble bee with red legs 
and white wings with 
black markings. 

CNO approved a mod- 
ification to the insignia 
on 4 February 1985. The 
beehive insignia was 
placed inside a circle 
with a blue background 
outlined in yellow; the 
scroll is red, outlined in 
black and yellow, with 
yellow lettering; the 
other colors of the 
insignia remained the 
same. 

Nickname: Stingers, 
1949 to present. 



This beehive and hornet insignia 
was adopted by the squadron in 
1949. 




When the squadron was redesig- 
nated VFA, the insignia was mod- 
ified by adding a scroll with the 
squadron designation; it was 
approved by CNO in 1983. 



Chronology of Significant Events 

5 Aug 1950: The squadron flew its first combat mis- 
sion, striking land and sea targets southeast of Kunsan, 
Korea, and Mokpo harbor. 

12-14 Sep 1950: Squadron aircraft flew combat sor- 
ties in and around Inchon, Korea, in preparation for 
the landings at Wolmi Island. 

15 Sep 1950: The squadron participated in offensive 
sorties during the landings at Inchon, striking targets 
on the roads between Inchon and Seoul. 

2 & 5 Nov 1950: Squadron aircraft participated in 
Operation Pinwheel, the docking and departing of the 



carrier from the pier using aircraft engine power to 
move the ship. 

9-10 & 12 Nov 1950: During strikes by the 
squadron's F4U-4Bs on bridges crossing the Yalu River 
between Sinuiju and Antung, they were attacked by 
MiG-15s. No damage was inflicted on the squadron's 
aircraft and no apparent damage was done to the 
MiG-15s. 

22-23 Dec 1950: Two squadron aircraft flew spot- 
ting missions for Saint Paul (CA 73) on 22 December 
and for Missouri (BB 63) on 23 December during 
shore bombardment against villages and troop con- 
centrations near the front line. 

23 Jun 1952: Squadron aircraft, along with planes 
from 3 other air groups and the 5th Air Force, participat- 
ed in the first coordinated strikes against North Korean 
hydroelectric power plants. This was the first time that 
enemy power plants had been so heavily targeted. It 
also marked the first time that four carriers were on line 
off the coast of Korea since the fall of 1950. 

8- 13 Feb 1955: Squadron aircraft were on station 
and available for air support during the evacuation of 
personnel from the Tachen Islands due to the bom- 
bardment of the islands by the People's Republic of 
China. 

Aug-Sep 1958: The squadron was part of a task 
force that provided support to the Republic of China 
during the shelling of the Quemoy Island group by the 
Chinese Communists. 

11 Aug-1 Nov 1961: The squadron was embarked in 
Kitty Hawk (CVA 63) for her transit, via Cape Horn, 
from Norfolk to her new home port at San Diego. 

Jun 1964: Squadron aircraft participated in Yankee 
Team operations, including inflight refueling for RF-8A 
and RF-101 aircraft and search and rescue missions 
over South Vietnam and Laos. 

Nov 1964-Oct 1965: The squadron provided a 
detachment of personnel and aircraft for use as fighter 




A squadron F4U-4 Corsair catching the wire aboard Philippine Sea 
(CV 47) during their 1951-1952 combat deployment to Korea. 



376 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



protection for the Antisubmarine Carrier Air Group 
embarked in Bennington (CVS 20). 

Dec 1965: During the squadron's first line-period on 
Yankee Station, it participated in three major strikes 
against important North Vietnamese targets, including 
the Hai Phong Bridge, Uong Bi Thermal Power Plant 
and the Hai Duong Bridge. 

Jan- Feb 1968: While embarked in Enterprise (CVAN 
65) and enroute to Yankee Station, the carrier was 
ordered to the Sea of Japan for operations following 
the seizure of the Pueblo (AGER 2) by the North 
Koreans. 

Dec 1972: The squadron participated in Linebacker 
II Operations, heavy air strikes against targets primari- 
ly around Hanoi and Haiphong. 

Jul 1976: Following the Israeli raid on Entebbe and 
the threatened military operations against Kenya by 
Uganda, the Ranger (CV 6l), with VA-113 embarked, 
was ordered to transit from the South China Sea to the 
western Indian Ocean and operate off the coast of 
Kenya. 

15 Oct 1980-22 Mar 1981: Under the Swing Wing 
Concept to reduce the deck multiple on Ranger, VA- 
113 was off loaded at NAS Cubi Point and operated as 
a CVW-2 Detachment from the air station. While tem- 
porarily shore based the squadron participated in 
numerous joint and interservice exercises. 

Mar-Oct 1983: The squadron underwent transition 
training with VFA-125, becoming the first Navy fleet 
operational squadron assigned the F/A-18 Hornet. 

Feb-Aug 1985: VFA-113, along with VFA-25, made 
the first deployment with the new F/A-18 Hornet. The 
squadrons deployed aboard Constellation (CV 64) and 
operated in the western Pacific and Indian Ocean. 

Jul 1987: Squadron aircraft, along with other units of 
CVW-14, conducted surveillance in the strategic Strait 
of Hormuz and provided air cover for the first five 
Earnest Will operations, the escort of reflagged 
Kuwaiti oil tankers through the Gulf of Oman and 
Persian Gulf. 

2 Aug 1990: Independence (CV 62), with VFA-113 
embarked, was ordered to the Gulf of Oman following 
the Iraqi invasion of Kuwait. 

Aug 1990: The squadron's F/A-18s flew mixed com- 
bat air patrol missions with F-l4s in the Persian Gulf 
up to 28 degrees north latitude in support of 
Operation Desert Shield, the build up of American and 
Allied forces to counter a threatened invasion of Saudi 
Arabia by Iraq and as part of an economic blockade of 
Iraq to force its withdrawal from Kuwait. 

3-4 Oct 1990: VFA-113 conducted flight operations 
from Independence while she operated in the Persian 
Gulf. This was the first time a carrier had operated in 
the Persian Gulf since 1974. 




Squadron F9F-5 Panthers over Kearsarge (CVA 33) during their 


1953-1954 deployment to Korea and WestPac. 




Home Port Assignments 




Location 


Assignment Date 


NAS San Diego 


15 Jul 1948 


NAS Miramar 


15 Sep 1952 


NAS Lemoore 


12 Dec 1961 


Commanding Officers 




Date Assumed Command 


LCDR Robert S. Merritt 


15 Jul 1948 


LCDR Roy M. Voris 


09 Jun 1949 


LCDR John T. O'Neill 


20 Jan 1950 


CDR Harold P. Ady, Jr. 


30 Jun 1951 


LCDR John R. Strane 


24 Oct 1951 


LCDR J. H. Tripp 


29 Sep 1952 


CDR Charles C. Sanders 


Aug 1954 


CDR Harold W. Davis 


Apr 1955 


CDR Richard L. Cormier 


Dec 1956 


CDR H. S. Matthews, Jr. 


26 Nov 1958 


CDR Robert E. Gallatin 


16 Oct 1959 


CDR L. A. Tomkins 


17 Feb 1961 


CDR G. A. White, Jr. 


30 Mar 1962 


CDR H. A. Borgerding 


01 Mar 1963 


CDR G. G. Zimmerman 


21 Feb 1964 


CDR Henry M. Dibble 


02 Apr 1965 


CDR J. Abbott (acting) 


11 Apr 1966 


CDR J. A. Burnett (acting) 


04 May 1966 


CDR R. E. Bennett 


30 May 1966 


CDR R. J. Thomas 


16 Jul 1967 


CDR E. J. Jacobs 


23 Jul 1968 


CDR J. E. Newton 


03 Sep 1969 


CDR J. Brent Streit 


17 Jul 1970 


CDR Weston H. Byng 


26 Mar 1971 


CDR Richard L. Grant 


28 Apr 1972 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 377 



Commanding Officers— Continued 





Date Assumed Command 


CDR D. Bruce Cargill 


16 Apr 1973 


CDR Judson H. Springer 


10 Dec 1973 


CDR M. D. Munsinger 


28 Mar 1975 


CDR H. D. Lesesne 


17 May 1976 


CDR Michael J. Webber 


26 Aug 1977 


CDR John P. Park 


22 Nov 1978 


CDR T. D. Hill, Jr. 


21 Feb 1980 


CDR W. C. Trafton 


10 Jun 1981 


CDR William W. Pickavance, Jr. 


01 Aug 1982 


CDR C. A. Langbehn 


29 Feb 1984 


CDR Robert G. Sprigg 


05 Sep 1985 


CDR David V. Park 


24 Jan 1987 


CDR John V. Chenevey 


28 Feb 1988 


CDR Gary L. Roger 


07 Jul 1989 


CDR Danny L. Clarkson 


24 Jan 1991 



Aircraft Assignment 



Type of Aircraft 


Date Type First Received 


F8F-1 


15 Jul 1948 


F8F-2 


28 Mar 1949 


F4U-4B 


09 Mar 1950 


F9F-5 


Oct 1952 


F9F-2 


Feb 1954 


F9F-8 


May 1955 


F9F-8B 


Apr 1956 


A4D-1 


29 Apr 1957 


A4D-2 


08 Sep 1958 


A4D-2N/A-4C" 


29 Mar 1961 


A-4F 


Oct 1967 


A-7B 


10 Dec 1968 


A-7E 


Apr 1970 


F/A-18A 


24 Aug 1983 


F/A-18C 


09 Jun 1989 



* The A4D-2N designation was changed to A-4C in 1962. 




A squadron A4D-1 (A-4) Skyhawk on Hancock's (CVA 19) flight deck, November 1957. 



378 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



Major Overseas Deployments 



Date of 


Date of 


Air 




Type of 


Area of 


Departure 


Return 


Wing 


Carrier 


Aircraft 


Operation 


OS Tul 1 QSO 


07 Anr 1 0=11 


CMC 1 1 


CM Al/AV 

UV T / / T:J 


F4T T 4R 




31 Vter 1QS1 
Jl lyec lyyL 


08 Auo 1QS9 


V., V V.T T. T_ 


rv 47 

U V T / 


F4T T-4 




01 Tul 1QS3 


1 8 Tan 1 QS4 
-IO Jail l/Ji 


rvr,-i 1 

Vj V V.T 1 1 


rVA 33 

v.- Vrt. JJ 


ryr-j 


WCMldL/ J\UlCd 


07 Ort 1QS4 

U/ VJLL 


1 9 Mav 1 OSS 
1Z1 iviay Ly j j 


Vj V V I 1 1 


rVA 33 


F0F-9 

it yr z 




1 6 Till 1 QS6 


96 Tan 1 QS7 
zU Jail I77 / 


rvr, 1 1 

V^j V V.l 1 1 


fVA 0 


FQF 8R 

T7T OD 




HQ Mar 1 QS8 

Uu iviai 17JO 


91 w nv 1 q=;q 

z± l\uv J_yyo 


rvr,-i 1 

V.- V V.T 1 1 


rVA 38 

Vj VTT JO 


A4D-1 




00 Mar 10S0 
uy iviai _l y y y 


03 Ort 1 0SQ 

uj ±y jy 


rvCr-1 1 

V , V V.l T. T. 


rVA 38 


A4D-9 

\ t 1 ' Zi 




1 6 Till 1 060 

1U J Ul -1 /UU 


1 8 Mar 1 061 
10 iviai 17U1 


rvr,-i 1 

V.. V V.T T. T. 


rvA 1 o 

V , V.TV J. y 


A4D-9 


\Y/^ctpor 


1 3 Sr-rv 1 069 


0? Anr 1 063 
rvpi ±yuj 


rvr,-i 1 

Vj V V I L L 


rvA 63 

Vj VTT UJ 


A4D-91V 
Zl^ 


WCMr at 


17 Ort 1063 


90 T11I 1 064 
zu j ui -i yu4 


Vj V W 1 1 


rvA 63 

Vj VTT UJ 


A-4r 




1Q Ort 106S 

J.y VJt^L ryu J 


1 3 Tun 1 066 

J.J JUll lyuu 


CVW-11 


rvA 63 


A-4C 


vvcoir v ic Li id in 


1 Q Nov 1 066 
1/ i\uv i yuu 


06 Till 1067 
uu j ui -i yu / 


rvw o 

Vj v w y 


rvAiv 6 s 

Vj vr\.l^ u J 


A-4r 


W/i^ ctP n c /\Ja ^>1"r~i <i n*i 
VVCMrdt/ VlCLllalll 


03 Tan 1068 
uj jan iyuo 


18 Till 1068 
10 JUl 17U0 


rvw-0 

Vj v w y 


rvAN 6s 

V , V.Ti.lN UJ 


A-4F 


c fP a l\J\ f^tf\ o m 
WCi)Ll dL/ V ICLlltilll 


0Q Till 1 060 

Uy J Ul -1 yuy 


99 Tan 1070 
zz j an 17/u 


V , V \V - J 


rvA 6o 

V , V.TV uu 


A 7R 


1V1CL1 


97 Ort 1 070 


1 7 Tun 1 071 

-1/ juu 17 / 1 


rvw 9 

Vj v w z 


rvA 61 

Vj VTT U .1 


A-7F 


XY/i^ctPQ f^tn a m 
WC^tLrtlL/ VlCLllalll 


1 6 Nov 1 07? 
1U liUV ±y/z 


93 Tun 1 073 
zj JUIl ly / j 


rVW-9 
Vj V w z 


rvA 61 

Vj VTT U 1 


A-7F 


XY/^ctPci c l\J\ f^tn in 

WCMl dL/ VlCLllalll 


07 Mav 1 074 
u / ivia y j. y / *± 


1 8 Ort 1 074 

10 UU 1//1 


rVW-9 
VjV w z 


rvA 61 

V.. Vrt. Ul 


A 7F 


WCMr aC 


30 Tan 1 076 
ju Jail ty / u 


07 Sr-rv 1 076 

u/ jcu 17/u 


rvw 9 

v , v vv -z 


rv 61 

Vj V Ul 


A-7F 


W^tP^r/TO 

WOLr aL/ Iw 


91 Fr-h 1070 
z ± ircu 1/ / y 


99 Sr-n 1070 
zz 1 j 17 / y 


rVW-9 
Vj V w z 


rv 61 

Vj V U 1 


A-7F 


WCMr aC 


10 Sep 1980 


05 May 1981 


CVW-2 


CV 61 


A-7E 


WestPac/IO 


U/ Apr lyoz 


iy yjCv lyoz 


r^ r\VT o 


uV 01 


A-/I1 


westrac/ivj 


21 Feb 1985 


24 Aug 1985 


CVW-14 


CV 64 


F/A-18A 


WestPac/IO 


04 Sep 1986 


20 Oct 1986 


CVW-14 


CV 64 


F/A-18A 


NorPac 


11 Apr 1987 


13 Oct 1987 


CVW-14 


CV 64 


F/A-18A 


WestPac/IO 


01 Dec 1988 


01 Jun 1989 


CVW-14 


CV 64 


F/A-18A 


WestPac/IO 


16 Sep 1989 


19 Oct 1989 


CVW-14 


CV 64 


F/A-18A/C 


NorPac 


23 Jun 1990 


20 Dec 1990 


CVW-14 


CV 62 


F/A-18C 


WestPac/IO/ 
Persian Gulf 



* CVG-11 deployed to Korea embarked in Philippine Sea (CV 47) and on 29 March 1951 transferred to Valley Forge (CV 45) and returned to the 
States embarked in Valley Forge. 




A formation of 
squadron A-7E 
Corsair lis in 1971. 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 379 



Air Wing Assignments 



Air Wing 


Tail Code 


Assignment Date 


CVAG-ll/CVG-11/- 




CVW-11* 


V/NHf 


1 S Tul 1 04R 

± J J ui 1740 


CVW-9 


NG 


1966 


COMFAIRALAMEDA 


Aug 1968 


CVW-3 


AC 


1969 


CVW-2 


NE 


01 Jun 1970 


COMLATWING- 






PAC/VFA-125 




1983 


CVW-14 


NK 


Feb 1984 


" CVAG-ll was redesignated CVG-11 on 1 September 1948. CVG-11 


was redesignated CVW-11 when Carrier Air Group (CVG) designa- 


tions were redesignated Carrier Air Wings (CVW) 


on 20 December 


1963. 






t The tail code was changed from V to NH in 1957. The effective 


date for this change was most likely the beginning of FY 58 (1 July 


195 1). 








Unit Awards Received 




Unit Award 


Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 


NUC 


04 Aug 1950 


29 Mar 1951 




26 Dec 1965 


14 May 1966 




18 Dec 1966 


20 Jun 1967 




22 Feb 1968 


26 Jun 1968 




02 Aug 1990 


01 Nov 1990 


KSM 


01 Aug 1950 


29 Mar 1951 




20 Jan 1952 


12 Jul 1952 


KPUC 


01 Aug 1950 


29 Mar 1951 




20 Jan 1952 


12 Jul 1952 


NAVE 


01 Jul 1957 


30 Jun 1958 




01 Jul 1967 


30 Jun 1968 




01 Jan 1985 


30 Jun 1986 


MUC 


18 Nov 1970 


10 Jun 1971 




27 Mar 1983 


27 Aug 1985 




01 Jan 1984 


24 Aug 1985 


AFEM 


30 Aug 1958 


01 Sep 1958 




03 Sep 1958 


27 Sep 1958 




15 Oct 1958 


16 Oct 1958 




21 Oct 1958 


29 Oct 1958 




15 Nov 1962 


16 Nov 1962 




20 Dec 1962 






19 May 1964 


10 Jun 1964 




23 Jan 1968 


22 Mar 1968 


SASM 


05 Aug 1990 


04 Nov 1990 


VNSM 


25 Nov 1965 


23 Dec 1965 




15 Jan 1966 


04 Feb 1966 




18 Feb 1966 


14 Mar 1966 




01 Apr 1966 


29 Apr 1966 




08 May 1966 


23 May 1966 




17 Dec 1966 


17 Jan 1967 




31 Jan 1967 


03 Mar 1967 




20 Mar 1967 


18 Apr 1967 




28 Apr 1967 


28 May 1967 




04 Jun 1967 


21 Jun 1967 




A squadron F/A-18A Hornet launching a Sparrow missile, 1984. 



Unit Awards Received— Continued 



Unit Award 



RVNGC 



Inclusive 

21 Feb 1968 

26 Mar 1968 
30 Apr 1968 

30 May 1968 
18 Nov 1970 

27 Dec 1970 
02 Feb 1971 

31 Mar 1971 
25 Apr 1971 
09 Dec 1972 

14 Jan 1973 
01 Feb 1973 

22 Dec 1966 

04 Jan 1967 
07 Jan 1967 
12 Jan 1967 
16 Jan 1967 

20 Feb 1967 

21 Feb 1967 

23 Feb 1967 

25 Feb 1967 
01 Mar 1967 
23 Mar 1967 
27 Mar 1967 
14 Apr 1967 
29 Apr 1967 
10 Jun 1967 

22 Feb 1968 

26 Feb 1968 

05 Mar 1968 
12 Mar 1968 
14 Mar 1968 
16 Mar 1968 
29 Mar 1968 



Dates Covering Unit Award 

17 Mar 1968 
24 Apr 1968 
21 May 1968 

27 Jun 1968 

18 Dec 1970 
13 Jan 1971 

17 Mar 1971 

18 Apr 1971 
18 May 1971 

03 Jan 1973 
30 Jan 1973 
06 Feb 1973 



09 Jan 1967 
13 Jan 1967 



15 Apr 1967 



24 Feb 1968 
03 Mar 1968 
08 Mar 1968 



30 Mar 1968 



380 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



Unit Awards Received— Continued Unit Awards Received— Continued 

Unit Award Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award Unit Award Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 



01 Apr 1968 


05 Apr 1968 




15 Jun 1968 




07 Apr 1968 


10 Apr 1968 


HSM 


25 May 1976 


01 Jun 1976 


12 Apr 1968 






20 Mar 1981 




14 Apr 1968 




NEM 


30 Oct 1980 


12 Mar 1981 


16 Apr 1968 


20 Apr 1968 




27 Jun 1987 


23 Jul 1987 


22 Apr 1968 


23 Apr 1968 


VA-113 DetQ 






02 May 1968 




AFEM 


19 May 1965 


20 May 1965 


13 May 1968 






25 May 1965 


26 May 1965 


01 Jun 1968 


02 Jun 1968 


VNSM 


26 Jul 1965 


17 Aug 1965 


04 Jun 1968 






27 Aug 1965 


10 Sep 1965 





A squadron F/A-18C Hornet in flight, circa 1990. 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 381 




VFA-125 

Lineage 

Established as Fighter Attack Squadron ONE HUN- 
DRED TWENTY FIVE (VFA-125) on 13 November 
1980. 

The Fighter Attack designation was changed to 
Strike Fighter on 25 March 1983- However, the VFA 
acronym remained the same. It is the first squadron to 
be assigned the VFA-125 designation. 



Squadron Insignia and 
Nickname 

The squadron's insig- 
nia was approved by 
CNO on 3 October 1980. 
The squadron adopted 
the insignia that had 
been used by VA-125. 
Colors for the torch 
insignia are: a black 
background outlined in 
gray; yellow scroll with 
black lettering and a 
gray outline; white torch 
with gray outlines; yel- 
low flame outlined in 
gray followed by red, 
outlined in gray; gray 
electron rings. 

CNO approved a 
modification to the 
squadron's insignia on 
29 January 1991. The 
gray colors were 
changed to a light blue 
and a red and dark blue 
horizontal strip was 
added to the lower part 
of the insignia. 

Nickname: Rough 
Raiders, 1980-present. 



The squadron's first insignia was 
approved in 1980 using the old 
design from VA-125. 




A modification to the squadron 's 
insignia was approved in 1991, 
adding two horizontal lines and 
changing the designation in the 
scroll. 



squadron to begin transition training in the F/A-18. 

Sep 1982: The squadron's first carrier qualification 
detachment began operations aboard Constellation 
(CV 64). 

Mar 1983: Training began for the first Navy 
squadron to transition to the F/A-18. 




Squadron F/A-18 Hornets on the flight line at NAS Lemoore, California. 



Home Port Assignments 



Location 

NAS Lemoore 



Assignment Date 

13 Nov 1980 



Commanding Officers 



CDR James W. Partington 
CDR Jerry D. Palmer 
CDR John A. Lockard 
CDR Dennis V. McGinn 
CDR W. W. Pickavance, Jr. 
CDR John C. Leslie, Jr. 
CDR Joseph W. Parker, Jr. 
CDR Alan R. Gorthy, Jr. 
CDR David C. Kendall 



Date Assumed Command 

13 Nov 1980 
24 Jun 1982 

14 Oct 1983 

14 Dec 1984 
13 Mar 1986 

15 Jun 1987 
02 Sep 1988 
01 Dec 1989 
08 Mar 1991 



Chronology of Significant Events 

13 Nov 1980: The squadron was established with a 
mission of training fighter and attack pilots to fly the 
F/A-18 Hornet. It was also tasked with training Navy 
and Marine Corps maintenance personnel. The com- 
manding officer was a naval officer and the executive 
officer a Marine Corps officer. 

Jun 1981: Squadron's officers, along with the F/A- 
18, participated in the Paris Air Show. 

Aug 1982: The squadron achieved a "Ready for 
Training" status and VMFA-314 became the first 



Aircraft Assignment 



Type of Aim 


■aft Date Type First Received 


F/A-18A 


19 Feb 1981 


TF/A-18A 


10 Mar 1981 


A-7E 


12 Mar 1981 


0-2A 


Apr 1986 


F/A-18B 


May 1986 


F/A-18D 


Jul 1988 


F/A-18C 


1988 


T-34C 


1990 



382 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



Air Wing Assignments Unit Awards Received 

Air Wing Tail Code Assignment Date Unit Award Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 

COMLATWINGPAC NJ 13 Nov 1980 MUC 13 Nov 1980 28 Mar 1983 




A formation of squadron F/A-18 Hornets, including the two-seat versions (Courtesy Duane Kasulka Collection). 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 383 



VFA-127 

Lineage 

Established as Attack Squadron ONE HUNDRED 
TWENTY SEVEN (VA-127) on 15 June 1962. 

Redesignated Strike Fighter Squadron ONE HUN- 
DRED TWENTY SEVEN (VFA-127) on 1 March 1987. 
The first squadron to be assigned the VA-127 and VFA- 
127 designations. 

Squadron Insignia and Nickname 

The squadron's first insignia was approved by CNO 
on 4 February 1963- Colors for the bat and torch 

insignia were: white and 
black background out- 
lined in red; black and 
white bat; white torch 
outlined in black with a 
yellow and red flame, 
also outlined in black; 
white scroll outlined in 
black with black letter- 
ing. 

A new insignia was 
approved by CNO on 4 
June 1975. Colors for 
the globe and serpent 
design were: a light 
blue background outlined in dark blue; blue and 
green globe with black latitude and longitude lines; 
yellow lightning bolts outlined in black and red; 
black and yellow serpent with red tongue and fangs; 
the open book was white with yellow and black 
markings; black and white aircraft carrier; black 
plane with dark blue contrail; red and black interna- 
tional date line; light blue scroll outlined in dark blue 

with black lettering. 

On 17 December 
1975 CNO approved the 
squadron's request to 
return to its original bat 
and torch insignia. 




The bat and torch design was the 
first insignia approved for use by 
the squadron. 




In June 1975, CNO approved 
the use of the globe and serpent 
insignia for the squadron. 
However, this design was used 
only for the remainder of 1975 
and then the squadron request- 
ed approval to revert back to its 
first design, the bat and torch. 
This request was approved by 
CNO in December 1975. 





In 1984, a modification was made 
to the red star insignia adding an 
upper scroll and wording that iden- 
tified the mission of the squadron. 
When the squadron was redesig- 
nated VFA in 1987, the Attack 
Squadron 127 designation in the 
lower scroll changed to Strike 
Fighter Squadron 127. 



The next insignia approved and 
used by the squadron was the 
red star design. 



A new insignia was 
approved by CNO on 
10 August 1980. 
Colors for the red star 
insignia were: a gray 
background outlined 
in black, red and 
black lines; a red star 
outlined in white and 
red; gray aircraft with 
a black canopy; yel- 
low compass mark- 
ings; gray scroll out- 
lined in black with 
black lettering. 

A modification to the 
red star insignia was 
approved by CNO on 
25 October 1984. This 
modification added an upper scroll with Pacific Fleet 
Adversary in black lettering. 

Nickname: Royal Blues, 1960s-1980. 
Cylons, 1981-present. 

Chronology of Significant Events 

24 Jul 1961-15 Jun 1962: Prior to being established 
as VA-127, the unit operated as VA-126 Det Alfa with a 
mission to provide basic and refresher all-weather jet 
instrument and transition training for pilots on the 
west coast. 

15 Jun 1962; The squadron's primary mission was to 
provide advanced all-weather jet instrument training 
for fleet replacement pilots and refresher training for 
light jet attack pilots. A secondary mission included jet 
transition and refresher training. 

1 Jun 1970: The squadron's mission was modified 
when it was designated as the only A-4 Replacement 
Air Wing squadron in the Navy. The primary mission 
included fleet replacement pilot training, basic and 
refresher all weather jet instrument training and 
replacement enlisted training in both the TA-4 and A-4 
model aircraft, plus the ancillary mission of providing 
jet transition training. The flight syllabus included 
weapons delivery (conventional and nuclear), airborne 
electronic countermeasures, field mirror landing prac- 
tice, low level navigation, inflight aerial refueling, 
defensive tactics and carrier qualifications (day and 
night). 

Apr 1971: The squadron expanded its training on 
the A-4 to include personnel from the Argentine Navy, 
previously only U.S. naval aviators had been trained 
by the squadron. 

1973: The squadron continued its program of pro- 



384 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



viding training on the A-4 to foreign pilots. Beginning 
in 1973 pilot training for the Singapore Air Defense 
Command was conducted by VA-127. 

Jul 1975: The squadron's primary mission was 
changed. Fleet Replacement Pilot training and the 
Fleet Replacement Aviation Maintenance Program 
were discontinued. The squadron's new missions 
included basic refresher all weather jet instrument 
training, air combat maneuvering adversary training, 
foreign pilot training and jet transition/refresher train- 
ing. In November 1975 CNO officially designated VA- 
127 with the mission of air combat maneuvering 
(ACM) adversary training. 

1 Oct 1983: The squadron's instrument training mis- 
sion was dropped and the primary mission became 
the Adversary Role (Dissimilar Air Combat 
Maneuvering). 




A squadron F9F-8T (TF-9J) Cougar at N AS Lemoore, California, July 
1963 (Courtesy Robert Lawson Collection). 



Home Port Assignments 

Location Assignment Date 

NAS Lemoore 15 Jun 1962 

NAS Fallon 01 Oct 1987 



Commanding Officers 





Date Assumed Command 


CDR Emory G. Tiffany 


15 Jun 1962 


CDR Simpson Evans, Jr. 


19 Oct 1962 


CDR William F. McCullough 


13 Sep 1963 


CDR J. R. Harper 


25 Sep 1964 


CDR W. S. Brown 


17 Sep 1965 


CDR J. C. Duck 


02 Sep 1966 


CDR Edward W. V. Webster 


05 May 1967 


CDR Timothy J. Perry 


12 Jul 1968 


CDR Loren M. Dierdorff 


13 Jun 1969 


CDR Lawrence A. Sharpe 


05 Jun 1970 


CDR George E. Sheldon, Jr. 


14 May 1971 


CDR Thomas W. Poore 


12 May 1972 


CDR Cecil Richard Tulley 


31 May 1973 


CDR Ronald M. Shields 


Aug 1974 


CDR Arvin R. Chauncey 


10 Oct 1975 


CDR Ronald L. Waters 


21 Dec 1976 


CDR Gary L. Beck 


08 Mar 1978 


CDR John A. McAuley, Jr. 


03 Aug 1979 


CDR Donald L. Dill 


26 Nov 1980 


CDR Wiley P. DeCarli 


26 Feb 1982 


CDR Paul J. Valovich 


26 May 1983 


CDR Michael J. Sullivan 


30 Nov 1984 


CDR David R. Olson 


30 May 1986 


CDR Ridgeway W. Corbin II 


20 Nov 1987 


CDR Alan R. Gorthy, Jr. 


05 Dec 1988 


CDR Gary A. Barrett 


20 Oct 1989 


CDR Vance L. Toalson 


11 Jan 1991 



Two squadron TA-4F 
Skyhawks in flight, 1967. 




DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 385 



Aircraft Assignment 



Aircraft Assignment — Continued 



Type of Aircraft 




Date Type First Received 

15 Jun 1962 
03 Aug 1966 
Mar 1970 
Apr 1970 

15 Apr 1971 
Sep 1987 



Type of Aircraft 




Date Type First Received 

Sep 1987 
Sep 1987 
Sep 1987 
Mar 1992 



* The F9F-8T designation was changed to TF-9J in 1962. 





A squadron F-5E Tiger II at NAS Fallon, Nevada, July 1989 (Courtesy Robert Lawson Collection). 



386 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



Air Wing Assignments 

Air Wing Tail Code Assignment Date 

RCVG-12/RCVW-12* NJt 15Junl962 
COMFAIRLEMOORE/ 01 Jun 1970 

COMLATWINGPAC/ 
COMSTRKFIGHT- 
WINGPACt- 



* Replacement Air Groups were redesignated Combat Readiness Air 
Groups on 1 April 1963- They were popularly known by the short 
titles RAG and CRAG in the respective periods, but the designation 
throughout was RCVG. On 20 December 1963, when Carrier Air 
Group (CVG) designations were changed to Carrier Air Wings 
(CVW) the RCVG designation was changed to RCVW. 
t RCVW-12 was disestablished on 1 June 1970. However, VA-127, 
and the other squadrons assigned to RCVW-12, continued to use the 
NJ tail code. 

i COMFAIRLEMOORE was redesignated COMLATWINGPAC on 30 
June 1973 and in 1991 redesignated COMSTRKFIGHTWINGPAC. 





A squadron F/A-18A Hornet at NAS Fallon, Nevada, 1992 (Courtesy Robert Lawson Collection). 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 387 



VFA-131 

Lineage 

Established as Strike Fighter Squadron ONE HUN- 
DRED THIRTY ONE (VFA-131) on 3 October 1983. 

The first squadron to be assigned the VFA-131 des- 
ignation. 

Squadron Insignia and Nickname 

The squadron's insignia was approved by CNO on 26 

January 1984. Colors for 
the insignia are: a blue 
background outlined in 
white and blue; white 
stars and aircraft; red, 
white and blue contrail 
outlined in white; white 
wildcat head with black 
markings, black nose, 
red eye and mouth; 
blue scroll with white 
lettering. 

Nickname: Wildcats, 
1984-present. 




The squadron's Wildcat insignia. 



Chronology of Significant Events 

Mar 1986: During Freedom of Navigation exercises 
in the Gulf of Sidra, the squadron's aircraft flew 
Combat Air Patrols in support of the exercise, includ- 
ing the period of 24 and 25 March following a Libyan 
firing of an SA-5 missile on 24 March against an 
American aircraft operating in international waters. 

14-15 Apr 1986: Squadron aircraft, along with other 
units of CVW-13 and A-7s from CVW-1, provided air- 
to-surface Shrike and Harm missile strikes against 
Libyan surface-to-air missile sites at Banghazi. This 
was the first use of the F/A-18 in combat. 



15 Aug-8 Oct 1988: Squadron was embarked in 
Independence (CV 62) during the carrier's transit, via 
Cape Horn, from Norfolk to its new home port at San 
Diego. 

Aug 1990: Embarked in Eisenhower (CVN 69), the 
squadron's F/A-18s flew missions in the Red Sea in sup- 
port of Operation Desert Shield, the build-up of 
American and Allied forces to counter a threatened inva- 
sion of Saudi Arabia by Iraq and as part of an economic 
blockade of Iraq to force its withdrawal from Kuwait. 
The Eisenhower task force was the first U.S. force in 
position to deter Iraqi incursion into Saudi Arabia. 



Home Port Assignments 



Location 



NAS Lemoore 
NAS Cecil Field 



Assignment Date 

03 Oct 1983 
15 Apr 1985* 



"This is the official transfer date, however, the squadron had aircraft 
and personnel onboard the air station in February 1985. 



Commanding Officers 



CDR James O. Ellis, Jr. 
CDR Charles W. Moore, Jr. 
CDR Dean L. Steele 
CDR Jerry B. Singleton 
CDR Robert C. Rubel 
CDR R. E. Hoppock 



Date Assumed Command 

03 Oct 1983 
02 Dec 1985 
05 Jun 1987 
01 Dec 1988 
20 Jun 1990 
18 Sep 1991 



Aircraft Assignment 



Type of Aircraft 



F/A-18A 
F/A-18C 



Date Type First Received 

May 1984 
05 Nov 1990 



A squadron F/A-18C Hornet 
on the deck of George 
Washington (CVN 73), 
September 1993- 



388 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 







Major Overseas Deployments 






Date of 


Date of 


Air 




Type of 


Area of 


Departure 


Return 


Wing 


Carrier 


Aircraft 


Operation 


02 Oct 1985 


19 May 1986 


CVW-13 


CV 43 


F/A-18A 


Med 


29 Sep 1987 


28 Mar 1988 


CVW-13 


CV 43 


F/A-18A 


Med 


08 Mar 1990 


12 Sep 1990 


CVW-7 


CVJN t>9 


F/A-18A 


Med/Red Sea 




Air Wing Assignments 




Unit Awards Received 








Unit Award 


Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 


Air Wing 


Tail Code 


Assignment Date 


NEM 


20 Jan 1986 


05 May 1986 








NAVE 


01 Jan 1986 


31 Dec 1986 


COMLATWINGPAC 


03 Oct 1983 


NUC 


02 Oct 1985 


19 May 1986 


CVW-13 


AK 


01 Mar 1984 




23 Mar 1986 


17 Apr 1986 


CVW-17 


AA 


05 May 1988 


MUC 


08 Mar 1990 


12 Sep 1990 


AFEM 


12 Apr 1986 


17 Apr 1986 


CVW-7 


AG 


17 Oct 1988 


SASM 


08 Aug 1990 


24 Aug 1990 




A formation of squadron F/A-18A Hornets, 1986. 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 389 



VFA-132 

Lineage 

Established as Strike Fighter Squadron ONE HUN- 
DRED THIRTY TWO (VFA-132) on 3 January 1984. 

Disestablished on 1 June 1992. The first squadron to 
be assigned the VFA-132 designation. 

Squadron Insignia and Nickname 

The squadron's insignia was approved by CNO on 2 
May 1985. Colors for the privateer insignia were: a 

light blue background 
outlined in yellow; the 
privateer's coat was red 
with yellow trim; black 
boots; black hat with 
yellow trim; white 
trousers; the man's face 
and hands were white 
and his mustache and 
eye patch were black; 
white rockets and green 
bombs, both outlined in 
black; yellow contrails 
from the rockets and 
bombs; white cutlass 
outlined in black with a yellow handle; dark blue 
scrolls with yellow lettering. 

Nickname: Privateers, 1984-1992. 

Chronology of Significant Events 

Mar 1986: During Freedom of Navigation exercises 
in the Gulf of Sidra, the squadron's aircraft flew 
Combat Air Patrols in support of the exercise, includ- 
ing the period of 24 and 25 March following a 24 
March Libyan firing of an SA-5 missile against an 
American aircraft operating in international waters. 

14-15 Apr 1986: Squadron aircraft, along with other 




The squadron '$ one and only in 
signia. 



units of CVW-13 and A-7s from CVW-1, provided air- 
to-surface Shrike and Harm missile strikes against 
Libyan surface-to-air missile sites at Banghazi. This 
was the first use of the F/A-18 in combat. 

Oct 1987-Apr 1988: The squadron deployed to 
MCAS Iwakuni, Japan, and was assigned to Marine Air 
Group 15. While deployed to Japan, the squadron 
operated detachments at NAS Cubi Point, Tsuiki AB, 
Clark AB, Yechon AB, Misawa AB and Kadena AB. 

Aug-Sep 1989: Coral Sea (CV 43), with VFA-132 
embarked, operated off the coast of Lebanon follow- 
ing the Israeli capture of Sheik Obeid and the reported 
killing of Lieutenant Colonel William R. Higgins, 
USMC. In early September the squadron provided air 
cover for the CH-53 helos used to evacuate personnel 
from the U.S. embassy in Beirut. 

Jun-Sep 1991: CVW-6 squadrons participated in 
Operation Provide Comfort, flying missions over 
northern Iraq in support of the Kurdish relief effort. 

Home Port Assignments 

Location Assignment Date 

NAS Lemoore 03 Jan 1984 

NAS Cecil Field Feb 1985 

Commanding Officers 



CDR Robert E. Lakari 
CDRJohn B. Nathman 
CDR Scott C. Ronnie 
CDR John T. Morris 
CDR Robert C. Stephens 
CDR J. L. Fleming 



Date Assumed Command 

10 Jan 1984 
22 Apr 1985 
1986 
01 Oct 1987 
05 May 1989 
13 Sep 1990 



Aircraft Assignment 



Type of Aircraft 



F/A-18A 



Date Type First Received 

21 Jun 1984 




Two squadron F/A- 
18A Hornets 
preparing to launch 
from Coral Sea (CV 
43), January 1986. 



390 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



Major Overseas Deployments 



Date of 
Departure 

02 Oct 1985 

05 Oct 1987 

31 May 1989 
30 May 1991 



Date of 
Return 

19 May 1986 
28 Apr 1988 

30 Sep 1989 
22 Dec 1991 



Air 
Wing 

CVW-13 
MAG-15 

CVW-13 
CVW-6 



Carrier 
CV43 

MCAS 
Iwakuni 
CV43 
CV 59 



Type of 
Aircraft 

F/A-18A 
F/A-18A 

F/A-18A 
F/A-18A 



Area of 
Operation 

Med 

Japan/WestPac 

Med 
Med 



Air Wing Assignments 



Unit Awards Received 



Air Wing 
CVW-13 

MAG-15 
CVW-13 
CVW-6 



Tail Code 
AK 

AK 
AE 



Assignment Date 

01 Mar 1984 
Oct 1987 
May 1988 
01 Oct 1990 



Unit Award Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 

NEM 20 Jan 1986 05 May 1986 

NUC 02 Oct 1985 19 May 1986 

23 Mar 1986 17 Apr 1986 

MUC 30 Mar 1988 30 Sep 1989 

AFEM 12 Apr 1986 17 Apr 1986 

JMUA Jun 1991 Sep 1991 




A close-up of a squadron F/A-18A in flight. 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 391 



VFA-136 



Home Port Assignments 



4 



Lineage 

Established as Strike Fighter Squadron ONE HUN- 
DRED THIRTY SIX (VFA-136) on 1 July 1985. 

The first squadron to be assigned the VFA-136 des- 
ignation. 



Squadron Insignia and Nickname 

The squadron's insig- 
nia was approved by 
CNO on 23 May 1985. 
Colors for the Knight- 
hawk insignia are: a light 
blue background outlined 
in dark blue; black shield 
outlined in red; blue- 
white hawk with black 
markings; yellow feet and 
beak; red tongue; black 
eye; light blue scrolls out- 
lined in dark blue with 
black lettering. 

Nickname: Knight- 
hawks, 1985-present. 



The squadron s Knighthawks 
insignia. 



Chronology of Significant Events 

Aug 1990: Embarked in Eisenhower (CVN 69), the 
squadron's F/A-18s flew missions in the Red Sea in sup- 
port of Operation Desert Shield, the build-up of 
American and Allied forces to counter a threatened inva- 
sion of Saudi Arabia by Iraq and as part of an economic 
blockade of Iraq to force its withdrawal from Kuwait. 
The Eisenhower task force was the first U.S. force in 
position to deter Iraqi incursions into Saudi Arabia. 



Location 

NAS Lemoore 
NAS Cecil Field 



Assignment Date 

01 Jul 1985 
28 Mar 1986 



Commanding Officers 



CDR G. A. Gurick 
CDR M. D. Malone 
CDR John B. Sandknop 
CDR Jeffrey R. Nelson 
CDR D. R. Miller 



Date Assumed Command 

01 Jul 1985 
24 Aug 1987 
11 Mar 1989 
20 Sep 1990 
14 Dec 1991 



Aircraft Assignment 



Type of Aircraft 



F/A-18A 
F/A-18C 



Date Type First Received 

07 Jan 1986 
13 Nov 1990 




A squadron F/A-18A Hornet about to be launched from Eisenhower 
(CVN 69). 




A squadron F/A-18A Hornet 
inflight, circa 1986 or 
1987. 



392 DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 



Major Overseas Deployments 



Date of 
Departure 

29 Sep 1987 
08 Mar 1990 
26 Sep 1991 



Date of 
Return 

28 Mar 1988 
12 Sep 1990 
02 Apr 1992 



Air 
Wing 

CVW-13 

CVW-7 

CVW-7 



Carrier 
CV43 

CVN 69 
CVN 69 



Type of 
Aircraft 

F/A-18A 
F/A-18A 
F/A-18C 



Area of 
Operation 

Med 

Med/Red Sea 
Med/IO/NorLant 



Air Wing 
CVW-13 

CVW-7 



Air Wing Assignments 



Tail Code 
AK 
AG 



Unit Awards Received 

Assignment Date Unit Award Inclusive Dates Covering Unit Award 

10Junl986 MUC 08 Mar 1990 12 Sep 1990 

01 Oct 1988 SASM 08 Aug 1990 24 Aug 1990 




A squadron F/A-18A Hornet in flight armed with a Sidewinder missile on its wing tip, February 1989. 



DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL AVIATION SQUADRONS— Volume I 393 



VFA-137 

Lineage 

Established as Strike Fighter Squadron ONE HUN- 
DRED THIRTY SEVEN (VFA-137) on 1 July 1985. 

The first squadron to be assigned the VFA-137 
designation. 

Squadron Insignia and Nickname 

The squadron's insignia was approved by CNO on 1 

April 1985. Colors for 
the stylized hawk 
design are: a black 
background outlined 
in orange; the upper 
part of the hawk 
design is white and the 
lower part is reddish- 
brown; gray beak out- 
lined in black; yellow 
eye with a black pupil; 
grayish-blue contrails; 
orange stylized aircraft; 
black scrolls outlined 
in orange and the let- 
tering is orange. 

Nickname: Kestrels, 
1985-present. 




The squadron 's stylized hawk 
design was approved by CNO in 
April 1985. 



Chronology of Significant Events 

Aug-Sep 1989: Coral Sea (CV 43), with VFA-137 
embarked, operated off the coast of Lebanon follow- 
ing the Israeli capture of Sheik Obeid and the reported 
killing of Lieutenant Colonel